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Masters Degrees (Electronic And Communication)

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This course has been designed to develop your knowledge and skills to meet the needs of industry and to update or retrain more experienced engineers. Read more
This course has been designed to develop your knowledge and skills to meet the needs of industry and to update or retrain more experienced engineers.

This broad-based course deals with a range of design and development areas relevant to electronic systems and communication projects. You should gain the knowledge and skills required of a professional engineer to design and develop systems for applications such as: wireless communications, mobile-cellular communications, electronics design, broadcasting, remote control, instrumentation, diagnostics, and monitoring.

Hands-on experience is gained through a major individual research project.

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Students in this graduate program have a core set of requirements in theory and method courses, which provide foundations in three research areas. Read more

Program Areas

Students in this graduate program have a core set of requirements in theory and method courses, which provide foundations in three research areas: Communication and Culture, Organizational and Interpersonal Communication, and Rhetoric and Political Discourse. In addition, students complete their plans of study, with elective courses from among any graduate courses in the department (see link below) or outside of the department, with the approval of their academic advisors.

Visit the website https://comstudies.ua.edu/graduate-program/

COMMUNICATION STUDIES (COM)

COM 500 Introduction to Graduate Studies. One hour.
The primary goal is to orient new graduate students to the expectations and procedures of graduate study in the department. Topics covered include developing the plan of study, thesis prospectus, comprehensive examination, and choosing advisors and committees.

COM 501 Introduction to Teaching Public Speaking. No hours.
The primary goal of this course is to facilitate the instruction of COM 123 Public Speaking. Students enrolled in this course will provide lesson plans for their classes and discuss options for improving classroom learning.

COM 513 Communication and Diversity. Three hours.
Study and analysis of issues of diversity as they relate to groups in society and in communication fields. Emphasis is on the media's treatment of various groups in society. Approved as a communication and cultural diversity elective.

COM 515 African American Rhetoric. Three hours.
A historical-critical investigation of African American public discourse from the Revolutionary era to the present, exploring rhetorical strategies for social change and building community.

COM 521 Political Communication. Three hours.
An exploration of rhetorical, media, and cross-disciplinary theories and literature related to political communication as expressed in campaigns and institutional governance.

COM 525 Gender and Political Communication. Three hours.
Study of the impact of gender on political communication activities. Topics include gender differences in political messages and voter orientation, masculine ideals of leadership, women’s roles and advancement in the political sphere, and media representations.

COM 536 Independent Study. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Written permission.
Students who want to count this course toward their Plans of Study must complete the official request form and submit it for the approval of their faculty advisor and the Graduate Program Director.

COM 541 Contemporary Rhetorical Theory. Three hours.
A survey of major contributions to rhetorical theory from the 20th century up to the present.

COM 545 Classical Rhetorical Theory. Three hours.
A systematic inquiry into the development of Greek and Roman rhetorical theory during the classical period (ca. 480 B.C.E.–400 C.E.).

COM 548 Seminar in Rhetorical Criticism. Three hours.
An examination of various methodological perspectives of rhetorical criticism. Specifically, the course aims to familiarize students with both traditional and alternative critical methods and to encourage students to perceive the rhetorical dimensions of all manner of public discourse, ranging from speeches, advertising, film, popular music to discursive forms in new media and the Internet.

COM 560 Group Leadership. Three hours.
An advanced study of small-group behavior, examining in detail theories of leadership as they relate to problem solving in group situations.

COM 550 Qualitative Research Methods. Three hours.
An introduction to qualitative research methods in communication, including data collection and analysis. The goals of the course are to provide exposure to a broad array of qualitative methods, help students learn to use some of these methods, and to help them to understand the role of research in our field. The course is designed to help student actually conduct research, resulting in two conference-worthy papers.

COM 555 Conflict and Negotiation. Three hours.
Negotiation is fundamentally a communicative activity. The main objective of this course is to understand processes of formal conflict management in mixed motive settings. Students will apply negotiation theory and skills to simulated negotiation cases that include buyer-seller transactions, negotiating through an agent or mediator, salary negotiations, deal making, resolution of workplace disputes, multiparty negotiations, international and intercultural negotiations, and ethical decision making and communication in negotiation. The skills and theory introduced in this course will help students manage integrative and distributive aspects of the negotiation process to achieve individual and collective goals.

COM 561 Human Communication Theory. Three hours.
A detailed review of selected theories of speech communication with a focus on the critical examination of the foundation of social scientific theories.

COM 562 Theories of Persuasion. Three hours.
A critical review of social-influence theories in the area of persuasion and human action.

COM 563 Relational Communication. Three hours.
Prerequisite: COM 220 or permission of the instructor.
Focused investigation of to communication in close personal relationships, with primary emphasis on contemporary concepts and theories of romantic relationships and friendships.

COM 565 Intercultural Communication. Three hours.
Survey and analysis of major concepts, theories, and research dealing with communication between people of different cultural backgrounds in multicultural and international settings.

COM 567 Seminar: Public Address. Three hours.
A topical consideration of individual case studies from public discourse, designed to probe problems of the nature of the audience, the ethics of persuasion, and the power of public advocacy in mass society. Topics may vary.

COM 569 Communication and Gender. Three hours.
Explores the role of communication in the construction of gender. Covers feminist theoretical approaches in communication and other disciplines, the intersections of gender with other marginalities, and the role of gender in various communication contexts. Approved as a communication and cultural diversity elective.

COM 571 Seminar in Organizational Communication. Three hours.
An introductory examination of historical and contemporary issues in organizational communication scholarship from a variety of theoretical and methodological perspectives.

COM 572 Organizational Assessment and Intervention. Three hours.
Examines the theoretical issues inherent in the study of organizational communication, the primary factors requiring assessment and intervention, the impact of on-going changes and new information techniques, current challenges facing the organizational consultant, and the practical application of communication processes for improving organizations.

COM 575 Technology, Culture, and Human Communication. Three hours.
Study of the complexity of technologically-mediated communication across cultures. This course combines literature and concepts from intercultural communication with human communication and technology and addresses the challenges of interacting with others via technology, working in global virtual teams and organizations, and participating as a citizen and consumer in the technology age.

COM 590 Internship in Communication Studies. One to three hours.
Prerequisite: Written permission from the graduate program director.
Proposal for supervised field experience in communication studies must be submitted and approved.

COM 595 Special Topics. Three hours. Topics vary by instructor.

COM 598 Professional Project. Three hours.

COM 599 Thesis Research. One to three hours.

Career Options

A Master of Arts degree in Communication Studies can offer many career options. Communication skills — oral, written, electronic — are now recognized as critical aspects in all major professions in the United States. Both in education and in the work force, there is a growing need for those who not only understand how human communication functions in its various forms, but also can analyze and advise others on ways to improve human communication. Graduates typically pursue one of three career paths: teaching public speaking, working in professional communication positions, or continuing with advanced academic study, such as in doctoral or law degree programs.

Find out how to apply here - https://comstudies.ua.edu/graduate-program/admissions/

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Electronic and Electrical Engineering at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Electronic and Electrical Engineering at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

As a student on the Master's course in Electronic and Electrical Engineering, you will develop specialist skills aligned with the College of Engineering’s research interests and reflecting the needs of the electronics industry.

Key Features of MSc in Electronic and Electrical Engineering

The MSc Electronic and Electrical Engineering course covers the ability to apply the knowledge gained in the course creatively and effectively for the benefit of the profession, to plan and execute a programme of work efficiently, and to be able, on your own initiative, to enhance your skills and knowledge as required throughout your career in Electronic and Electrical Engineering.

Students on the Electronic and Electrical Engineering course benefit from the use of industry-standard equipment, such as a scanning tunnelling microscope for atomic scale probing or an hp4124 parameter analyzer for power devices, for simulation, implementation and communication.

During the Electronic and Electrical Engineering course there will be the opportunity to choose and apply suitable prototyping and production methods and components, gain knowledge in constructing and evaluating advanced models of various manufacturing techniques, and be able to differentiate, analyse and discuss various product lifetime management solutions and how they affect different sectors of Electronic and Electrical Engineering industry.

The MSc in Electronic and Electrical Engineering programme is modular in structure. Students must obtain a total of 180 credits to qualify for the degree. This is made up of 120 credits in the taught element (Part One) and a project (Part Two) that is worth 60 credits and culminates in a written dissertation in Electronic and Electrical Engineering. Students on the Electronic and Electrical Engineering course must successfully complete Part One before being allowed to progress to Part Two.

Part-time Delivery mode of MSc in Electronic and Electrical Engineering

The part-time scheme of the MSc in Electronic and Electrical Engineering is a version of the full-time equivalent MSc in Electronic and Electrical Engineering scheme, and as such it means lectures are spread right across each week and you may have lectures across every day. Due to this timetabling format, the College advises that the scheme is likely to suit individuals who are looking to combine this with other commitments (typically family/caring) and who are looking for a less than full-time study option in Electronic and Electrical Engineering.

Those candidates seeking to combine the part-time option with full-time work are unlikely to find the timetable suitable, unless their job is extremely flexible and local to the Bay Campus.

Modules on Electronic and Electrical Engineering

Modules on the MSc Electronic and Electrical Engineering course can vary each year but you could expect to study:

Communication Skills for Research Engineers
Energy and Power Electronics Laboratory
Power Semiconductor Devices
Advanced Power Electronics and Drives
Wide Band-Gap Electronics
Power Generation Systems
Modern Control Systems
Advanced Power Systems
Signals and Systems
Digital Communications
Optical Communications
Probing at the Nanoscale
RF and Microwaves
Wireless Communications

Facilities for Electronic and Electrical Engineering

The new home of the Electronic and Electrical Engineering programme is at the innovative Bay Campus which provides some of the best university facilities in the UK, in an outstanding location.

Engineering at Swansea University has extensive IT facilities and provides extensive software licenses and packages to support teaching. In addition the University provides open access IT resources.

Find out more about the facilities used by Electronic and Electrical students at Swansea University, including the electronics lab on our website.

Links with Industry

At Swansea University, Electronic and Electrical Engineering has an active interface with industry and many of our activities are sponsored by companies such as Agilent, Auto Glass, BT and Siemens.

Electronic and Electrical Engineering has a good track record of working with industry both at research level and in linking industry-related work to our postgraduate courses. We also have an industrial advisory board that ensures our taught courses including the MSc in Electronic and Electrical Engineering maintain relevance.

Our research groups work with many major UK, Japanese, European and American multinational companies and numerous small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) to pioneer research. This activity filters down and influences the project work that is undertaken by all our postgraduate students including those on the MSc in Electronic and Electrical Engineering.

Careers

Electronic and Electrical Engineering graduates find employment in industry, research centres, government or as entrepreneurs in a wide range of careers, from a design and development role for electronic and electrical equipment or as a technological specialist contributing to a multi-disciplinary team in a range of fields, including medicine, travel, business and education.

Research

The Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 ranks Engineering at Swansea as 10th in the UK for the combined score in research quality across the Engineering disciplines.

The REF assesses the quality of research in the UK Higher Education sector, assuring us of the standards we strive for.

World-Leading Research

The REF shows that 94% of research produced by our academic staff is of World-Leading (4*) or Internationally Excellent (3*) quality. This has increased from 73% in the 2008 RAE.

Research pioneered at the College of Engineering harnesses the expertise of academic staff within the department. This ground-breaking multidisciplinary research informs our world-class teaching with several of our staff leaders in their fields.

With recent academic appointments strengthening electronics research at the College, the Electronic Systems Design Centre (ESDC) has been re-launched to support these activities.

The Centre aims to represent all major electronics research within the College and to promote the Electrical and Electronics Engineering degree.

Best known for its research in ground-breaking Power IC technology, the key technology for more energy efficient electronics, the Centre is also a world leader in semiconductor device modelling, FEM and compact modelling.

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At the University of Surrey we leads the way in areas such as nanotechnology, vision and signal processing, mobile and wireless communications, multimedia engineering and space and satellite engineering. Read more
At the University of Surrey we leads the way in areas such as nanotechnology, vision and signal processing, mobile and wireless communications, multimedia engineering and space and satellite engineering.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

Our MSc Euromasters programme is designed for electronic engineering students and professionals with an interest in gaining further qualifications in advanced, cutting-edge techniques and technologies in the selected pathway, with enhanced project, as well as training in transferable skills including business awareness and management.

We offer numerous Electronic Engineering MScs in more specialised fields of study, from space engineering to mobile communications systems, and if you wish to specialise in one of these pathways you can adjust your course accordingly.

The advanced taught technical content is in sub-disciplines of electronic engineering closely aligned with the internationally-leading research conducted in the four research centres of the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied part-time over 48 months. It consists of eight taught modules and a standard project. Each student will undertake one short course, following which they will be provided with distance learning material in order to study for the subsequent assessment. The students may be assessed for either one or two modules from the short course they undertake.

Typically a student would complete two modules and therefore up to two short courses within the space of year, though they are at liberty to study for more modules if they have the time. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Digital Communications
-Digital Signal Processing A
-Object Oriented Design and C++
-RF and Microwave Fundamentals
-IP Networking Protocols and Technologies
-Nanoscience and Nanotechnology
-Space Dynamics and Missions
-Space Systems Design
-Antennas and Propagation
-Image Processing and Vision
-Fundamentals of Mobile Communication
-Principles of Telecommunications and Packet Networks
-Space Robotics and Autonomy
-Speech and Audio Processing and Recognition
-Satellite Communication Fundamentals
-Satellite Remote Sensing
-RF Systems and Circuit Design
-Spacecraft System Design
-Satellite Communications
-Internet of Things
-Space Avionics
-Applied Mathematics for Communication Systems
-Data and Internet Networking
-Digital Design with VDHL
-Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
-Mediacasting
-Semiconductor Devices and Optoelectronics
-AI and AI Programming
-Advanced Signal Processing
-Advanced Guidance, Navigation and Control
-Image and Video Compression
-Launch Vehicles and Propulsion
-Advanced Mobile Communication Systems
-Microwave Engineering
-Nanoelectronics and Devices
-Operating Systems for Mobile Systems Programming
-Advanced Satellite Communication Techniques
-Nanophotonics Principles and Engineering
-Mobile Applications and Web Services
-Spacecraft Structures and Mechanisms
-Space Environment and Protection
-Renewable Energy Technologies
-60-Credit Standard Project

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The taught postgraduate Degree Programmes of the Department are intended both to assist with professional career development within the relevant industry and, for a small number of students, to serve as a precursor to academic research.

Our philosophy is to integrate the acquisition of core engineering and scientific knowledge with the development of key practical skills (where relevant). To fulfil these objectives, the programme aims to:
-Attract well-qualified entrants, with a background in Electronic Engineering, Physical Sciences, Mathematics, Computing & Communications, from the UK, Europe and overseas
-Provide participants with advanced knowledge, practical skills and understanding applicable to the MSc degree
-Develop participants' understanding of the underlying science, engineering, and technology, and enhance their ability to relate this to industrial practice
-Develop participants' critical and analytical powers so that they can effectively plan and execute individual research/design/development projects
-Provide a high level of flexibility in programme pattern and exit point
-Provide students with an extensive choice of taught modules, in subjects for which the Department has an international and UK research reputation

A graduate from this MSc Programme should:
-Know, understand and be able to apply the fundamental mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles that underpin electronic engineering
-Be able to analyse problems within the field of electronic engineering and find solutions
-Be able to use relevant workshop and laboratory tools and equipment, and have experience of using relevant task-specific software packages to perform engineering tasks
-Know, understand and be able to use the basic mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles associated with the topics within electronic engineering
-Be aware of the societal and environmental context of his/her engineering activities
-Be aware of commercial, industrial and employment-related practices and issues likely to affect his/her engineering activities
-Be able to carry out research-and-development investigations
-Be able to design electronic circuits and electronic/software products and systems

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

General transferable skills
-Be able to use computers and basic IT tools effectively
-Be able to retrieve information from written and electronic sources
-Be able to apply critical but constructive thinking to received information
-Be able to study and learn effectively
-Be able to communicate effectively in writing and by oral presentations
-Be able to present quantitative data effectively, using appropriate methods
-Be able to manage own time and resource
-Be able to develop, monitor and update a plan, in the light of changing circumstances
-Be able to reflect on own learning and performance, and plan its development/improvement, as a foundation for life-long learning

Underpinning learning
-Know and understand scientific principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering, to enable appreciation of its scientific and engineering content, and to support their understanding of historical, current and future developments
-Know and understand the mathematical principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering and to enable them to apply mathematical methods, tools and notations proficiently in the analysis and solution of engineering problems
-Be able to apply and integrate knowledge and understanding of other engineering disciplines to support study of electronic and electrical engineering

Engineering problem-solving
-Understand electronic and electrical engineering principles and be able to apply them to analyse key engineering processes
-Be able to identify, classify and describe the performance of systems and components through the use of analytical methods and modelling techniques
-Be able to apply mathematical and computer-based models to solve problems in electronic and electrical engineering, and be able to assess the limitations of particular cases
-Be able to apply quantitative methods relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems
-Understand and be able to apply a systems approach to electronic and electrical engineering problems

Engineering tools
-Have relevant workshop and laboratory skills
-Be able to write simple computer programs, be aware of the nature of microprocessor programming, and be aware of the nature of software design
-Be able to apply computer software packages relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems

Technical expertise
-Know and understand the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of the range of electronic and electrical engineering topics he/she has chosen to study
-Know the characteristics of particular materials, equipment, processes or products
-Have thorough understanding of current practice and limitations, and some appreciation of likely future developments
-Be aware of developing technologies related to electronic and electrical engineering
-Have comprehensive understanding of the scientific principles of electronic engineering and related disciplines
-Have comprehensive knowledge and understanding of mathematical and computer models relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, and an appreciation of their limitations
-Know and understand, at Master's level, the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of a range of engineering topics that he/she has chosen to study
-Have extensive knowledge of a wide range of engineering materials and components
-Understand concepts from a range of areas including some from outside engineering, and be able to apply them effectively in engineering projects

Societal and environmental context
-Understand the requirement for engineering activities to promote sustainable development
-Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk issues
-Understand the need for a high level of professional and ethical conduct in engineering

Employment context
-Know and understand the commercial and economic context of electronic and electrical engineering processes
-Understand the contexts in which engineering knowledge can be applied (e.g. operations and management, technology development, etc.)
-Be aware of the nature of intellectual property
-Understand appropriate codes of practice and industry standards
-Be aware of quality issues
-Be able to apply engineering techniques taking account of a range of commercial and industrial constraints
-Understand the basics of financial accounting procedures relevant to engineering project work
-Be able to make general evaluations of commercial risks through some understanding of the basis of such risks
-Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk) issues

Research and development
-Understand the use of technical literature and other information sources
-Be aware of the need, in appropriate cases, for experimentation during scientific investigations and during engineering development
-Be able to use fundamental knowledge to investigate new and emerging technologies
-Be able to extract data pertinent to an unfamiliar problem, and employ this data in solving the problem, using computer-based engineering tools when appropriate
-Be able to work with technical uncertainty

Design
-Understand the nature of the engineering design process
-Investigate and define a problem and identify constraints, including environmental and sustainability limitations, and health and safety and risk assessment issues
-Understand customer and user needs and the importance of considerations such as aesthetics
-Identify and manage cost drivers
-Use creativity to establish innovative solutions
-Ensure fitness for purpose and all aspects of the problem including production, operation, maintenance and disposal
-Manage the design process and evaluate outcomes
-Have wide knowledge and comprehensive understanding of design processes and methodologies and be able to apply and adapt them in unfamiliar situations
-Be able to generate an innovative design for products, systems, components or processes, to fulfil new needs

Project management
-Be able to work as a member of a team
-Be able to exercise leadership in a team
-Be able to work in a multidisciplinary environment
-Know about management techniques that may be used to achieve engineering objectives within the commercial and economic context of engineering processes
-Have extensive knowledge and understanding of management and business practices, and their limitations, and how these may be applied appropriately

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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This degree mirrors the two-year Masters programme structure that is common in the USA, and is an ideal stepping stone to a PhD or a career in industry. Read more
This degree mirrors the two-year Masters programme structure that is common in the USA, and is an ideal stepping stone to a PhD or a career in industry.

The optional professional placement component gives you the opportunity to gain experience from working in industry, which cannot normally be offered by the standard technically-focused one-year Masters programme.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

The Electronic Engineering Euromasters programme is designed for electronic engineering graduates and professionals with an interest in gaining further qualifications in advanced, cutting-edge techniques and technologies. Current pathways offered include:
-Communications Networks and Software
-RF and Microwave Engineering
-Mobile Communications Systems
-Mobile and Satellite Communications
-Mobile Media Communications
-Computer Vision, Robotics and Machine Learning
-Satellite Communications Engineering
-Electronic Engineering
-Space Engineering
-Nanotechnology and Renewable Energy
-Medical Imaging

Please note that at applicant stage, it is necessary to apply for the Electronic Engineering (Euromasters). If you wish to specialise in one of the other pathways mentioned above, you can adjust your Euromaster programme accordingly on starting the course.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over 24 months and part-time over 60 months. It consists of ten taught modules and an extended project. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Digital Communications
-Digital Signal Processing A
-Object Oriented Design and C++
-RF and Microwave Fundamentals
-Nanoscience and Nanotechnology
-Space Dynamics and Missions
-Space Systems Design
-Antennas and Propagation
-Image Processing and Vision
-Fundamentals of Mobile Communications
-Principles of Telecommunications and Packet Networks
-Space Robotics and Autonomy
-Speech and Audio Processing and Recognition
-Satellite Communication Fundamentals
-Satellite Remote Sensing
-Molecular Electronics
-RF Systems and Circuit Design
-Internet of Things
-Nanofabrication and Characterisation
-Space Avionics
-Applied Mathematics for Communication Systems
-Data and Internet Networking
-Digital Design with VHDL
-Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
-Mediacasting
-Semiconductor Devices and Optoelectronics
-AI and AI Programming
-Advanced Signal Processing
-Advanced Guidance, Navigation and Control
-Image and Video Compression
-Launch Vehicles and Propulsion
-Advanced Mobile Communication Systems
-Microwave Engineering Optional
-Nanoelectronics and Devices
-Network and Service Management and Control
-Operating Systems for Mobile Systems Programming
-Advanced Satellite Communication Techniques
-Nanophotonics Principles and Engineering
-Mobile Applications and Web Services
-Spacecraft Structures and Mechanisms
-Space Environment and Protection
-Renewable Energy Technologies
-Engineering Professional Studies 1 (with industrial Placement)
-Engineering Professional Studies 1
-Engineering Professional Studies 2
-Extended Project

PARTNERS

The MSc Euromasters complies with the structure defined by the Bologna Agreement, and thus it is in harmony with the Masters programme formats adhered to in European universities. Consequently, it facilitates student exchanges with our partner universities in the Erasmus Exchange programme.

A number of bilateral partnerships exist with partner institutions at which students can undertake their project. Current partnerships held by the Department include the following:
-Brno University of Technology, Czech Republic
-University of Prague, Czech Republic
-Universität di Bologna, Italy
-Universität Politècnica de Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain
-Universita' degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Italy

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The taught postgraduate degree programmes of the Department are intended both to assist with professional career development within the relevant industry and, for a small number of students, to serve as a precursor to academic research.

Our philosophy is to integrate the acquisition of core engineering and scientific knowledge with the development of key practical skills (where relevant). To fulfil these objectives, the programme aims to:
-Attract well-qualified entrants, with a background in electronic engineering, physical sciences, mathematics, computing and communications, from the UK, Europe and overseas
-Provide participants with advanced knowledge, practical skills and understanding applicable to the MSc degree
-Develop participants' understanding of the underlying science, engineering, and technology, and enhance their ability to relate this to industrial practice
-Develop participants' critical and analytical powers so that they can effectively plan and execute individual research/design/development projects
-Provide a high level of flexibility in programme pattern and exit point
-Provide students with an extensive choice of taught modules, in subjects for which the Department has an international and UK research reputation

A graduate from this MSc programme should:
-Know, understand and be able to apply the fundamental mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles that underpin electronic engineering
-Be able to analyse problems within the field of electronic engineering and find solutions
-Be able to use relevant workshop and laboratory tools and equipment, and have experience of using relevant task-specific software packages to perform engineering tasks
-Know, understand and be able to use the basic mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles associated with the topics within electronic engineering
-Be aware of the societal and environmental context of his/her engineering activities
-Be aware of commercial, industrial and employment-related practices and issues likely to affect his/her engineering activities
-Be able to carry out research-and-development investigations
-Be able to design electronic circuits and electronic/software products and systems

Enhanced capabilities of MSc (Euromasters) graduates:
-Demonstrate transferable skills such as problem solving, analysis and critical interpretation of data, through the undertaking of the extended 90-credit project
-Know how to take into account constraints such as environmental and sustainability limitations, health and safety and risk assessment
-Have gained comprehensive understanding of design processes
-Understand customer and user needs, including aesthetics, ergonomics and usability
-Have acquired experience in producing an innovative design
-Appreciate the need to identify and manage cost drivers
-Have become familiar with the design process and the methodology of evaluating outcomes
-Have acquired knowledge and understanding of management and business practices
-Have gained the ability to evaluate risks, including commercial risks
-Understand current engineering practice and some appreciation of likely developments
-Have gained extensive understanding of a wide range of engineering materials/components
-Understand appropriate codes of practice and industry standards
-Have become aware of quality issues in the discipline

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

General transferable skills
-Be able to use computers and basic IT tools effectively
-Be able to retrieve information from written and electronic sources
-Be able to apply critical but constructive thinking to received information
-Be able to study and learn effectively
-Be able to communicate effectively in writing and by oral presentations
-Be able to present quantitative data effectively, using appropriate methods
-Be able to manage own time and resources
-Be able to develop, monitor and update a plan, in the light of changing circumstances
-Be able to reflect on own learning and performance, and plan its development/improvement, as a foundation for life-long learning

Underpinning learning
-Know and understand scientific principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering, to enable appreciation of its scientific and engineering content, and to support their understanding of historical, current and future developments
-Know and understand the mathematical principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering and to enable them to apply mathematical methods, tools and notations proficiently in the analysis and solution of engineering problems
-Be able to apply and integrate knowledge and understanding of other engineering disciplines to support study of electronic and electrical engineering

Engineering problem-solving
-Understand electronic and electrical engineering principles and be able to apply them to analyse key engineering processes
-Be able to identify, classify and describe the performance of systems and components through the use of analytical methods and modelling techniques
-Be able to apply mathematical and computer-based models to solve problems in electronic and electrical engineering, and be able to assess the limitations of particular cases
-Use of quantitative methods for problem solving. Be able to apply quantitative methods relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems
-Understand and be able to apply a systems approach to electronic and electrical engineering problems

Engineering tools
-Have relevant workshop and laboratory skills
-Be able to write simple computer programs, be aware of the nature of microprocessor programming, and be aware of the nature of software design
-Be able to apply computer software packages relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems

Technical expertise
-Know and understand the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of the range of electronic and electrical engineering topics he/she has chosen to study
-Know the characteristics of particular materials, equipment, processes or products
-Have thorough understanding of current practice and limitations, and some appreciation of likely future developments
-Be aware of developing technologies related to electronic and electrical engineering
-Have comprehensive understanding of the scientific principles of electronic engineering and related disciplines
-Have comprehensive knowledge and understanding of mathematical and computer models relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, and an appreciation of their limitations
-Know and understand, at Master's level, the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of a range of engineering topics that he/she has chosen to study
-Have extensive knowledge of a wide range of engineering materials and components
-Understand concepts from a range of areas including some from outside engineering, and be able to apply them effectively in engineering projects

Societal and environmental context
-Understand the requirement for engineering activities to promote sustainable development
Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk issues
-Understand the need for a high level of professional and ethical conduct in engineering

Employment context
-Know and understand the commercial and economic context of electronic and electrical engineering processes
-Understand the contexts in which engineering knowledge can be applied (e.g. operations and management, technology development, etc.)
-Be aware of the nature of intellectual property
-Understand appropriate codes of practice and industry standards
-Be aware of quality issues
-Be able to apply engineering techniques taking account of a range of commercial and industrial constraints
-Understand the basics of financial accounting procedures relevant to engineering project work
-Be able to make general evaluations of commercial risks through some understanding of the basis of such risks
-Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk) issues

Research and development
-Understand the use of technical literature and other information sources
-Be aware of the need, in appropriate cases, for experimentation during scientific investigations and during engineering development
-Be able to use fundamental knowledge to investigate new and emerging technologies
-Be able to extract data pertinent to an unfamiliar problem, and employ this data in solving the problem, using computer-based engineering tools when appropriate
-Be able to work with technical uncertainty

Design
-Understand the nature of the engineering design process
-Investigate and define a problem and identify constraints, including environmental and sustainability limitations, and health and safety and risk assessment issues
-Understand customer and user needs and the importance of considerations such as aesthetics
-Identify and manage cost drivers
-Use creativity to establish innovative solutions
-Ensure fitness for purpose and all aspects of the problem including production, operation, maintenance and disposal
-Manage the design process and evaluate outcomes
-Have wide knowledge and comprehensive understanding of design processes and methodologies and be able to apply and adapt them in unfamiliar situations
-Be able to generate an innovative design for products, systems, components or processes, to fulfil new needs

Project management
-Be able to work as a member of a team
-Be able to exercise leadership in a team
-Be able to work in a multidisciplinary environment
-Know about management techniques that may be used to achieve engineering objectives within the commercial and economic context of engineering processes
-Have extensive knowledge and understanding of management and business practices, and their limitations, and how these may be applied appropriately

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Read less
Mankind has always communicated, but the means of communication changes. Over the past century, communication technologies have had a fundamental impact on how we carry out our daily lives. Read more
Mankind has always communicated, but the means of communication changes. Over the past century, communication technologies have had a fundamental impact on how we carry out our daily lives. Besides using the internet and mobile phones for interpersonal communication; businesses, banking, transportation systems, TV and radio broadcasts and smart power grids rely on advanced communication technology.

In a constant and rapidly evolving field, you as a communication engineer will be needed to design and build the systems of the future.

Programme aim

Society today is firmly rooted in electronic communication systems, and it is hard to imagine life without them.

Global systems such as TV, radio, the Internet and wired and mobile telephones have a fundamental impact on the way we live and work.

In the near future, we will see rapid development of e.g.

- sensor network communication,
- algorithms to decrease energy consumption of communication networks,
- tele-presence systems that reduce the need for transportation of people,
- communication as it becomes an increasingly prominent aspect of vehicles and transportation,
- many more areas.

Exactly what the future will bring is unknown, but some things are almost certain: there will still be advanced communication systems - some of them will be different from what the world knows today and communication engineers will be needed to develop and maintain them.

Programme description

Global communication systems have not only changed the world but are also advancing at an exceptional rate. Future communication systems will form the foundation for a sustainable and intelligent society where people and equipment can be connected anywhere, any time – with anything. A high degree of connectivity will be a key enabler for new innovative technologies and applications that can benefit from information sharing.

Evolving technologies are e.g. 5G mobile communications, machine communications, fibre optical links and networks, and sensor network communication, with emerging new applications such as remote and assisted medical diagnosis and treatment, traffic and vehicle safety, environmental monitoring, maximizing efficiency and reliability in smart grid infrastructure, and tele-presence systems that reduce the need for energy consuming transportation of people.

In order to gain insight into communication systems of the future, and to develop such systems, solid analytical skills and an understanding of the fundamental principles of digital information transmissions are essential.

Besides the fundamentals in communication engineering we focus on e.g. random signal analysis, stochastic methods for digital modulation and coding, applications of digital signal processing, optical fibres and lasers and information theory and coding.

The combination of theoretical and applied knowledge in systems that apply on a global scale gives you a toolbox and a degree in Communication Engineering for a lifelong learning process in communication technologies.

Who should apply

You should apply if you find the future outlook for communication engineers interesting, and have the following skills at a bachelor’s level: signals and systems theory (including linear systems and transforms), mathematical analysis (including probability and linear algebra) and basic programming. Basic knowledge in data communications is recommended but not required.

Why apply

In order to gain insight into communication systems of the future, and to develop such systems, solid analytical skills and an understanding of the fundamental principles of digital information transmissions are essential, where mathematics and signal processing are important tools. The combination of theoretical and applied knowledge prepares students with a degree in Communication Engineering for a lifelong learning process in communications.

Educational methods

The pedagogical structure of the programme is targeted towards learning system design processes as practiced in the communication industry. In general, the educational methods are based on what are expected from engineering graduates in an industrial environment, with specific emphasis on building and refining problem-solving skills, team work and presentation skills. Certain emphasis is placed on solving complex tasks by defining subtasks and interfaces, performing these subtasks independently, and assembling the results. All courses in the program are permeated by the principles of sustainable development. You get the opportunity to interact with the industry via guest lectures and study visits. Finally, the Master’s Thesis gives you training in individual research, project planning, documentation and presentation. It can be carried out at the University, industry or another university/research institute.

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Mobile telephony is reaching saturation in the most technologically advanced countries and is rapidly becoming the main telecommunications infrastructure in the rest of the world. Read more
Mobile telephony is reaching saturation in the most technologically advanced countries and is rapidly becoming the main telecommunications infrastructure in the rest of the world.

This programme gives you a thorough understanding of the engineering aspects of this rapidly developing field, as well as new emerging systems for the support of broadband mobile Internet.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

We have a wide range of testbeds available for projects, including wireless networking, wireless sensors, satellite networking, and security testbeds, future internet testbed and cloud infrastructure.

We also have a wide range of software tools for assignments and project work, including OPNET, NS2/3, Matlab, C, C++ and various system simulators. Some projects can offer the opportunity to work with industry.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year, until a total of eight is reached. It consists of eight taught modules and a standard project. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Digital Communications
-Fundamentals of Mobile Communications
-Principles of Telecommunications and Packet Networks
-RF Systems and Circuit Design
-Internet of Things
-Applied Mathematics for Communication Systems
-Data and Internet Networking
-Advanced Signal Processing
-Advanced Mobile Communication Systems C
-Network and Service Management and Control
-Operating Systems for Mobile Systems Programming
-Mobile Applications and Web Services
-Advanced 5G Wireless Technologies
-Standard Project

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The taught postgraduate Degree Programmes of the Department are intended both to assist with professional career development within the relevant industry and, for a small number of students, to serve as a precursor to academic research.

Our philosophy is to integrate the acquisition of core engineering and scientific knowledge with the development of key practical skills (where relevant).

To fulfil these objectives, the programme aims to:
-Attract well-qualified entrants, with a background in Electronic Engineering, Physical Sciences, Mathematics, Computing & -Communications, from the UK, Europe and overseas
-Provide participants with advanced knowledge, practical skills and understanding applicable to the MSc degree
-Develop participants' understanding of the underlying science, engineering, and technology, and enhance their ability to relate this to industrial practice
-Develop participants' critical and analytical powers so that they can effectively plan and execute individual research/design/development projects
-Provide a high level of flexibility in programme pattern and exit point
-Provide students with an extensive choice of taught modules, in subjects for which the Department has an international and UK research reputation

Intended capabilities for MSc graduates:
-Underpinning learning– know, understand and be able to apply the fundamental mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles that underpin mobile and satellite communications
-Engineering problem solving - be able to analyse problems within the field of mobile and satellite communications and more broadly in electronic engineering and find solutions
-Engineering tools - be able to use relevant workshop and laboratory tools and equipment, and have experience of using relevant task-specific software packages to perform engineering tasks
-Technical expertise - know, understand and be able to use the basic mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles associated with the topics within mobile and satellite communications
-Societal and environmental context - be aware of the societal and environmental context of his/her engineering activities
-Employment context - be aware of commercial, industrial and employment-related practices and issues likely to affect his/her engineering activities
-Research & development investigations - be able to carry out research-and- development investigations
-Design - where relevant, be able to design electronic circuits and electronic/software products and systems

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

General transferable skills
-Be able to use computers and basic IT tools effectively
-Be able to retrieve information from written and electronic sources
-Be able to apply critical but constructive thinking to received information
-Be able to study and learn effectively
-Be able to communicate effectively in writing and by oral presentations
-Be able to present quantitative data effectively, using appropriate methods
-Be able to manage own time and resources
-Be able to develop, monitor and update a plan, in the light of changing circumstances
-Be able to reflect on own learning and performance, and plan its development/improvement, as a foundation for life-long learning

Underpinning learning
-Know and understand scientific principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering, to enable appreciation of its scientific and engineering content, and to support their understanding of historical, current and future developments
-Know and understand the mathematical principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering and to enable them to apply mathematical methods, tools and notations proficiently in the analysis and solution of engineering problems
-Be able to apply and integrate knowledge and understanding of other engineering disciplines to support study of electronic and electrical engineering.

Engineering problem-solving
-Understand electronic and electrical engineering principles and be able to apply them to analyse key engineering processes
-Be able to identify, classify and describe the performance of systems and components through the use of analytical methods and modelling techniques
-Be able to apply mathematical and computer-based models to solve problems in electronic and electrical engineering, and be able to assess the limitations of particular cases
-Be able to apply quantitative methods relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems
-Understand and be able to apply a systems approach to electronic and electrical engineering problems

Engineering tools
-Have relevant workshop and laboratory skills
-Be able to write simple computer programs, be aware of the nature of microprocessor programming, and be aware of the nature of software design
-Be able to apply computer software packages relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems

Technical expertise
-Know and understand the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of the range of electronic and electrical engineering topics he/she has chosen to study
-Know the characteristics of particular materials, equipment, processes or products
-Have thorough understanding of current practice and limitations, and some appreciation of likely future developments
-Be aware of developing technologies related to electronic and electrical engineering
-Have comprehensive understanding of the scientific principles of electronic engineering and related disciplines
-Have comprehensive knowledge and understanding of mathematical and computer models relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, and an appreciation of their limitations
-Know and understand, at Master's level, the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of a range of engineering topics that he/she has chosen to study
-Have extensive knowledge of a wide range of engineering materials and components
-Understand concepts from a range of areas including some from outside engineering, and be able to apply them effectively in engineering projects

Societal and environmental context
-Understand the requirement for engineering activities to promote sustainable development
-Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk issues
-Understand the need for a high level of professional and ethical conduct in engineering

Employment context
-Know and understand the commercial and economic context of electronic and electrical engineering processes
-Understand the contexts in which engineering knowledge can be applied (e.g. operations and management, technology development, etc.)
-Be aware of the nature of intellectual property
-Understand appropriate codes of practice and industry standards
-Be aware of quality issues
-Be able to apply engineering techniques taking account of a range of commercial and industrial constraints
-Understand the basics of financial accounting procedures relevant to engineering project work
-Be able to make general evaluations of commercial risks through some understanding of the basis of such risks
-Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk) issues

Research and development
-Understand the use of technical literature and other information sources
-Be aware of the need, in appropriate cases, for experimentation during scientific investigations and during engineering development
-Be able to use fundamental knowledge to investigate new and emerging technologies
-Be able to extract data pertinent to an unfamiliar problem, and employ this data in solving the problem, using computer-based engineering tools when appropriate
-Be able to work with technical uncertainty

Design
-Understand the nature of the engineering design process
-Investigate and define a problem and identify constraints, including environmental and sustainability limitations, and health and safety and risk assessment issues
-Understand customer and user needs and the importance of considerations such as aesthetics
-Identify and manage cost drivers
-Use creativity to establish innovative solutions
-Ensure fitness for purpose and all aspects of the problem including production, operation, maintenance and disposal
-Manage the design process and evaluate outcomes
-Have wide knowledge and comprehensive understanding of design processes and methodologies and be able to apply and adapt them in unfamiliar situations
-Be able to generate an innovative design for products, systems, components or processes, to fulfil new needs

Project management
-Be able to work as a member of a team
-Be able to exercise leadership in a team
-Be able to work in a multidisciplinary environment
-Know about management techniques that may be used to achieve engineering objectives within the commercial and economic context of engineering processes
-Have extensive knowledge and understanding of management and business practices, and their limitations, and how these may be applied appropriately

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Read less
Are you interested in the creative industries? Want to learn more about management and promotional culture?. Read more
Are you interested in the creative industries? Want to learn more about management and promotional culture?

Mass Communication Management at Northumbria offers you an exciting opportunity to study the issues and trends across mass communication platforms such as TV, radio, newspaper, movies, advertising and social media.

You will learn to recognise how these modes of communication are connected and how they relate to ideas and problems in society at both the national and the global level.

You will develop an awareness of the media, communication and cultural industries in the 21st century through research-informed and practical activities as you learn how communication strategies are produced, distributed and consumed.

Applying academic theory to a range of real-world issues, this course also includes training in cultural management, enterprise and leadership, providing you with the skills and confidence to succeed in a range of media and communication industries.

This course is also taught on our London campus. This course can also be started in January - please view this web-page for details: https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/mass-communication-management-dtfmax6/

Learn From The Best

Dr Sarah Ralph is a lecturer in Media and Cultural Studies, and her expertise lies in the realm of empirical methods and approaches to the study of production cultures, media audiences and reception.

Dr Ibrahim Seaga Shaw has a background as a reporter, editor, sub editor and correspondent in Sierra Leone, France and the UK, and brings real-life issues to the classroom.

Dr Gabriel Moreno practiced journalism for 13 years, including as a general and financial news correspondent with Reuters news agency in Mexico City. He was awarded a PhD in Journalism and Mass Communication from Westminster University and is currently involved in research projects involving new media and migration, and social media and environmental communication. He became a fellow of the UK’s Higher Education Academy in December 2015.

Teaching And Assessment

You’ll learn through a mix of theory and practice, including taught sessions, field trips, lectures, seminars and group assignments.

You’ll discover the theories and issues informing real-work examples within a range of media and cultural industries and then put these to use in workshop activities which reinforce the links between theory and practice. You will be encouraged to develop your communication skills by taking an active part in seminars.

The dissertation module provides an opportunity for you to put learning into practice by designing, executing and writing up an original piece of research on a topic negotiated between you and your dissertation supervisor.

You will have the opportunity to go on at least one industry visit and hear from professionals working in a local media organisation. Previous visits have included to sites which represent successful local cultural regeneration such as BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Arts and Sage, Gateshead.

Module Overview
EF0126 - E.S.A.P. in FADSS Level 7 (Optional, 0 Credits)
MP7002 - Advertising and Promotional Cultures (Core, 30 Credits)
MP7003 - Working in Mass Communication Industries (Core, 30 Credits)
MP7004 - Media Dissertation (Core, 60 Credits)
MP7005 - Research Methods (Core, 30 Credits)
VA7006 - Cultural Management, Enterprise & Leadership (Core, 30 Credits)

Learning Environment

Your learning experience is enhanced by new technologies used to deliver and assess your course modules, including online reading lists and electronic submission of assignments. You are also encouraged to use social media to communicate with your peers and students regularly develop module Facebook groups for this purpose.

You will have access to an e-learning portal that provides lecture materials, assessment criteria, handbooks and additional learning materials such as videos, podcasts and news items.

You will have access to state-of-the art facilities such as the university library which has been recognised as being in the top three in the UK (tied with Cambridge University).

As part of the research methods module, you will explore using online forms for survey research, including social media and generic software tools such as Survey Monkey.

If you are an international student, you can develop your literacy and communications skills through English for Specific Academic Purposes.

Research-Rich Learning

Northumbria University is ranked in the UK top 20 for the quality of research outputs in communication, cultural and media studies (REF 2014).

70% of Northumbria’s research in Communication, Cultural and Media Studies is rated as being either world leading or internationally excellent.

The Mass Communication Management course has been designed with the help of industry practitioners so you will be graduating with the latest knowledge and skills required by the creative and media industries.

You will be learning from tutors who are specialists in their disciplines and who are research active at the cutting-edge of their field. Their expertise and industry experience helps to bring theory to life in the classroom.

You will develop your own practical research skills and will be able to demonstrate your own interest in at least one aspect of the wider cultural industry through planning, executing and writing-up an empirically-focused research project.

Give Your Career An Edge

Your course is designed to give you the skills and competencies, theory and practical experience that employers in the media industries are looking for.

You will be encouraged to think like an entrepreneur and to understand the behaviours you need to exhibit in order to succeed in your future career aspirations. Graduates are global citizens who are not afraid to ask the big, challenging questions.

The diverse examples and case studies which are used across the modules provide a good grounding in a range of different media industries, enabling you to be a credible applicant for opportunities in a range of cultural industries.

Taking part in seminar discussions and group activities will encourage you to develop teamwork and a range of other transferable skills including effective communication, relationship-building and personal time management.

Your Future

This course will foster your intellectual curiosity and help you become a reflective and independent thinker, especially on issues, trends, policies, and challenges in mass communication industries in national and global contexts.

You will have the opportunity to develop skills in effectively interrogating ideas to clarify and boost your understanding. This combination of critical knowledge and skills will provide you with an excellent foundation for pursuing your future career.

On graduation, you could progress into a career in advertising, marketing, media or journalism.

Read less
Communication and the technologies for message creation and dissemination are at the center of dramatic economic, social, and cultural changes occurring as a result of technological development and global connectedness. Read more

Program overview

Communication and the technologies for message creation and dissemination are at the center of dramatic economic, social, and cultural changes occurring as a result of technological development and global connectedness. The master of science degree in communication and media technologies is an interdisciplinary advanced program of study combining liberal arts courses in communication with course work in an applied or professional program. Graduates will be adept at the analysis of communication problems, the development of solutions, and the creation of messages as a result of their combined training in the social sciences, humanities, and applied technologies.

Communication courses rooted in the humanities and social sciences provide students with the opportunity to gain a broad, historical understanding of issues in communication, including the ethical, legal, and social dimensions. Additional courses give students advanced guidance in the creation of written and visual message content. Courses in applied technologies or professional programs provide opportunities for implementation and application. The required thesis combines knowledge, practice, original research, and application under the guidance of a graduate advisement committee. Graduates are prepared for careers as communication experts in commerce, industry, education, entertainment, and government, as well as for graduate work toward a doctoral degree.

Plan of study

The degree requires the completion of 36 credit hours of graduate course work. The program consists of five required courses, three communication electives, three applied professional or technical courses, and a thesis or project.

Graduate committee

Full-time students create a graduate advisement committee by the end of their first semester of study. The committee will be comprised of at least one faculty member from the department of communication and one faculty member from outside the department. The outside member should have a terminal degree. The committee advises and guides the student's elective course selection and course sequencing. With the guidance and approval of the graduate advising committee, students design and conduct a thesis or project appropriate to their course of study and their career goals.

Master's thesis/project

A thesis or project is an option for all students in the program. The topic should complement the student's academic graduate interests and scholarly training. Topic selection and methods for implementing the thesis/project occur in consultation with the student's graduate advisement committee.

Comprehensive examinations

Comprehensive examinations may be taken in lieu of a thesis or project. Students are eligible to take these examinations after all coursework has been completed. The Graduate Committee chooses the Exam Committee members from two areas: Theory and Methods. The student selects a specialty area within the communication elective courses with the consent of the faculty member who taught the course and will administer and grade the exam question(s). Specialization areas include the following: Electronic, Visual, International, Electronic, Strategic, and Education. Exams will take place at two times: Intersession and June. If students fail any portion of the exam, they get one rewrite.

Curriculum

Communication and media technologies, MS degree, typical course sequence:
-History of Media Technologies
-Communication Theories
-Communication Electives
-Professional Core
-Research Methods in Communication
-Media Law and Ethics
-Communication thesis/project

View website for more information on the different electives and professional/technical courses available.

Other admission requirements

-Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
-Have a minimum cumulative undergraduate GPA of 3.0.
-Submit three letters of reference from academic advisers, major professors, and/or supervisors or managers.
-Submit a writing portfolio consisting of at least three writing samples, such as academic papers written for class, work-related brochures and pamphlets, or newspaper or magazine articles, and complete a graduate application.
-International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from either the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS). Minimum scores of 570 (paper-based) or 88-89 (Internet-based) are required on the TOEFL. A minimum score of 6.5 is required on the IELTS. This requirement may be waived for students who submit undergraduate transcripts from American colleges and universities.

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Surrey is a world leader in satellite communications, broadcasting, terrestrial mobile networks and the Internet. essential components of communication and information infrastructures. Read more
Surrey is a world leader in satellite communications, broadcasting, terrestrial mobile networks and the Internet: essential components of communication and information infrastructures.

This has allowed us to create a Masters programme in this burgeoning field that is delivered by academics and researchers with extensive theoretical expertise and practical experience.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

Mobile communications provide terrestrial coverage in densely populated areas, while satellite communications enable wireless communication in regions where mobile networking is not cost-effective. The programme gives you an in-depth understanding of the engineering aspects of these important current and future technologies.

Read about the experience of a previous student on this course, Gideon Ewa.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year, until a total of eight is reached. It consists of eight taught modules and a project. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Digital Communications
-Fundamentals of Mobile Communications
-Principles of Telecommunications and Packet Networks
-Satellite Communications Fundamentals
-RF Systems and Circuit Design
-Applied Mathematics for Communication Systems
-Data and Internet Networking
-Advanced Signal Processing
-Advanced Mobile Communication Systems
-Networking and Service Management & Control
-Operating Systems for Mobile Systems Programming
-Advanced Satellite Communication Techniques
-Advanced 5G Wireless Technologies
-60-Credit Standard Project

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The programme aims to:
-Attract well-qualified entrants, with a background in Electronic Engineering, Physical Sciences, Mathematics, Computing & Communications, from the UK, Europe and overseas
-Provide participants with advanced knowledge, practical skills and understanding applicable to the MSc degree
-Develop participants' understanding of the underlying science, engineering, and technology, and enhance their ability to relate this to industrial practice
-Develop participants' critical and analytical powers so that they can effectively plan and execute individual research/design/development projects
-Provide a high level of flexibility in programme pattern and exit point
-Provide students with an extensive choice of taught modules, in subjects for which the Department has an international and UK research reputation

Intended capabilities for MSc graduates:
-Underpinning learning– know, understand and be able to apply the fundamental mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles that underpin mobile and satellite communications
-Engineering problem solving - be able to analyse problems within the field of mobile and satellite communications and more broadly in electronic engineering and find solutions
-Engineering tools - be able to use relevant workshop and laboratory tools and equipment, and have experience of using relevant task-specific software packages to perform engineering tasks
-Technical expertise - know, understand and be able to use the basic mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles associated with the topics within mobile and satellite communications
-Societal and environmental context - be aware of the societal and environmental context of his/her engineering activities
-Employment context - be aware of commercial, industrial and employment-related practices and issues likely to affect his/her engineering activities
-Research & development investigations - be able to carry out research-and- development investigations
-Design - where relevant, be able to design electronic circuits and electronic/software products and systems

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

General transferable skills
-Be able to use computers and basic IT tools effectively
-Be able to retrieve information from written and electronic sources
-Be able to apply critical but constructive thinking to received information
-Be able to study and learn effectively
-Be able to communicate effectively in writing and by oral presentations
-Be able to present quantitative data effectively, using appropriate methods
-Be able to manage own time and resources
-Be able to develop, monitor and update a plan, in the light of changing circumstances
-Be able to reflect on own learning and performance, and plan its development/improvement, as a foundation for life-long learning

Underpinning learning
-Know and understand scientific principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering, to enable appreciation of its scientific and engineering content, and to support their understanding of historical, current and future developments
-Know and understand the mathematical principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering and to enable them to apply mathematical methods, tools and notations proficiently in the analysis and solution of engineering problems
-Be able to apply and integrate knowledge and understanding of other engineering disciplines to support study of electronic and electrical engineering

Engineering problem-solving
-Understand electronic and electrical engineering principles and be able to apply them to analyse key engineering processes
-Be able to identify, classify and describe the performance of systems and components through the use of analytical methods and modelling techniques
-Be able to apply mathematical and computer-based models to solve problems in electronic and electrical engineering, and be able to assess the limitations of particular cases
-Be able to apply quantitative methods relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems
-Understand and be able to apply a systems approach to electronic and electrical engineering problems

Engineering tools
-Have relevant workshop and laboratory skills
-Be able to write simple computer programs, be aware of the nature of microprocessor programming, and be aware of the nature of software design
-Be able to apply computer software packages relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems

Technical expertise
-Know and understand the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of the range of electronic and electrical engineering topics he/she has chosen to study
-Know the characteristics of particular materials, equipment, processes or products
-Have thorough understanding of current practice and limitations, and some appreciation of likely future developments
-Be aware of developing technologies related to electronic and electrical engineering
-Have comprehensive understanding of the scientific principles of electronic engineering and related disciplines
-Have comprehensive knowledge and understanding of mathematical and computer models relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, and an appreciation of their limitations
-Know and understand, at Master's level, the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of a range of engineering topics that he/she has chosen to study
-Have extensive knowledge of a wide range of engineering materials and components
-Understand concepts from a range of areas including some from outside engineering, and be able to apply them effectively in engineering projects

Societal and environmental context
-Understand the requirement for engineering activities to promote sustainable development
-Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk issues
-Understand the need for a high level of professional and ethical conduct in engineering

Employment context
-Know and understand the commercial and economic context of electronic and electrical engineering processes
-Understand the contexts in which engineering knowledge can be applied (e.g. operations and management, technology development, etc.)
-Be aware of the nature of intellectual property
-Understand appropriate codes of practice and industry standards
-Be aware of quality issues
-Be able to apply engineering techniques taking account of a range of commercial and industrial constraints
-Understand the basics of financial accounting procedures relevant to engineering project work
-Be able to make general evaluations of commercial risks through some understanding of the basis of such risks
-Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk) issues

Research and development
-Understand the use of technical literature and other information sources
-Be aware of the need, in appropriate cases, for experimentation during scientific investigations and during engineering development
-Be able to use fundamental knowledge to investigate new and emerging technologies
-Be able to extract data pertinent to an unfamiliar problem, and employ this data in solving the problem, using computer-based engineering tools when appropriate
-Be able to work with technical uncertainty

Design
-Understand the nature of the engineering design process
-Investigate and define a problem and identify constraints, including environmental and sustainability limitations, and health and safety and risk assessment issues
-Understand customer and user needs and the importance of considerations such as aesthetics
-Identify and manage cost drivers
-Use creativity to establish innovative solutions
-Ensure fitness for purpose and all aspects of the problem including production, operation, maintenance and disposal
-Manage the design process and evaluate outcomes
-Have wide knowledge and comprehensive understanding of design processes and methodologies and be able to apply and adapt them in unfamiliar situations
-Be able to generate an innovative design for products, systems, components or processes, to fulfil new needs

Project management
-Be able to work as a member of a team
-Be able to exercise leadership in a team
-Be able to work in a multidisciplinary environment
-Know about management techniques that may be used to achieve engineering objectives within the commercial and economic context of engineering processes
-Have extensive knowledge and understanding of management and business practices, and their limitations, and how these may be applied appropriately

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Read less
The course will provide media and communication professionals with an informed and critical perspective on the future of communications, and future researchers and academics will gain advanced skills in media and communications. Read more
The course will provide media and communication professionals with an informed and critical perspective on the future of communications, and future researchers and academics will gain advanced skills in media and communications.

It draws on the expertise of Strathclyde’s internationally-renowned media and communications academic staff, including experts in strategic communication, media and communication theory, media ethics and mediated populism. 

What you’ll study

You'll take four core classes covering the theory, history and practice in communication and media, a research skills class and two option classes in communications. You'll also write a 15,000-word dissertation.

Work placement

The course includes opportunities to produce assessed work with outside clients.

Facilities

You'll have access to a library with more than 400,000 electronic books and 26,000 e-journals, accessible at any time from any device. Electronic resources include e-books, e-journals and other learning materials, alongside electronic databases such as Nexis® and the Communication and Mass Media Complete database.

Guest lectures

The course will feature a variety of guest lectures, and you'll have the opportunity to attend seminars from prominent scholars and practitioners.

Course content

Semester 1 classes
-Communication & Media Theory in an International Context
-Research Skills in Literature, Culture & Communication
-Media and Communication Option

Semester 2 classes
-From Broadcast to Participation: a History of Mediation
-Strategic Communication

Learning & teaching

You'll experience a variety of learning methods, including supervised production exercises. The core classes are based on a blend of lectures, seminar discussion and student-led teaching. Modes of delivery may vary in the option components of the course according to the classes you select. 

Assessment

The course will assessed by an combination of written assignment, group and individual presentation, case study and media production.

Careers

The MLitt in Media and Communication is designed to enhance employment prospects in media, as well as in communication industries such as public relations and corporate communications.

The strategic communication component of the programme will also increase the employability of graduates within the communication sections of other industry sectors, particularly within companies dealing with English-speaking markets.

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Communication Systems at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Communication Systems at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MRes Communication Systems provides an excellent teaching and research environment with international recognition for the advancement and dissemination of knowledge communication and photonic systems. This provides lasting career skills for students.

Key Features of MRes in Communication Systems

Along with the taught component, this MRes Communication Systems contains a substantial research component that involves independent research.

As a student on the MRes Communication Systems programme, you will have the opportunity to progress a research project linked to an industrially relevant problem under joint supervision of an academic and a participating industrial researcher.

In addition, the MRes Communication Systems project includes a series of lectures that deal with research techniques including research methodologies, philosophy and principles, ethics, experimental design, managing research project progress, data analysis and presentation, and technical and scientific writing.

Combination of taught modules (60 credits) and a research thesis, which presents the outcome of a significant research project (120 credits) over 12 months full-time study. An MRes (Master of Research) provides relevant training to acquire the knowledge, techniques and skills required for a career in industry or for further research.

Modules

Modules on the MRes in Communication Systems typically include:

• Network Protocols and Architectures
• Signals and Systems
• Digital Communications
• Optical Communications
• Software for Smartphone
• Communication Skills for Research Engineers
• MRes Communication Systems Project

Facilities

Our new home at the innovative Bay Campus provides some of the best university facilities in the UK, in an outstanding location.

Engineering at Swansea University has extensive IT facilities and provides extensive software licenses and packages to support teaching. In addition the University provides open access IT resources.

Links with Industry

At Swansea University, Electronic and Electrical Engineering has an active interface with industry and many of our activities are sponsored by companies such as Agilent, Auto Glass, BT and Siemens.

This discipline has a good track record of working with industry both at research level and in linking industry-related work to our postgraduate courses. We also have an industrial advisory board that ensures our taught courses maintain relevance.

Our research groups work with many major UK, Japanese, European and American multinational companies and numerous small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) to pioneer research. This activity filters down and influences the project work that is undertaken by all our postgraduate students.

Careers

Employment in wireless communication systems and network administration, and mobile applications development.

Student Quotes

“I have enjoyed my research with my supervisor and have one patent sorted, published two IEEE letters (a well-cited journal in the area of communications) and one IEE letter (an internally renowned peer-reviewed journal) – my dream has come true!”

Arun Raaza, MRes Communication Systems

Research

The Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 ranks Engineering at Swansea as 10th in the UK for the combined score in research quality across the Engineering disciplines.

World-leading research

The REF shows that 94% of research produced by our academic staff is of World-Leading (4*) or Internationally Excellent (3*) quality. This has increased from 73% in the 2008 RAE.

Research pioneered at the College of Engineering harnesses the expertise of academic staff within the department. This ground-breaking multidisciplinary research informs our world-class teaching with several of our staff leaders in their fields.

Highlights of the Engineering results according to the General Engineering Unit of Assessment:

Research Environment at Swansea ranked 2nd in the UK
Research Impact ranked 10th in the UK
Research Power (3*/4* Equivalent staff) ranked 10th in the UK
With recent academic appointments strengthening electronics research at the College, the Electronic Systems Design Centre (ESDC) has been re-launched to support these activities.

The Centre aims to represent all major electronics research within the College and to promote the Electrical and Electronics Engineering degree.

Best known for its research in ground-breaking Power IC technology, the key technology for more energy efficient electronics, the Centre is also a world leader in semiconductor device modelling, FEM and compact modelling.

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We are placing ever greater demands on the Internet, and traditional telecommunication infrastructures are migrating to Internet-based architectures and protocols. Read more
We are placing ever greater demands on the Internet, and traditional telecommunication infrastructures are migrating to Internet-based architectures and protocols.

This programme benefits from the research that experts in our 5G Innovation Centre are undertaking to lead the world in the race to the next generation of communications networks.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

Our MSc in Communications, Networks and Software covers the key aspects of the changing Internet environment, in particular the convergence of computing and communications underpinned by software-based solutions.

Some of our students undertaking their project are able to work on one of our wide range of testbeds, such as internet technologies, wireless networking, network management and control, and internet-of-things (IoT) applications.

We also have specialist software tools for assignments and project work, including OPNET, NS2/3, and various system simulators.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Object Oriented Design and C++ (+Lab)
-Fundamentals of Mobile Communications
-Principles of Telecommunications and Packet Networks
-Speech and Audio Processing and Recognition
-Internet of Things
-Applied Mathematics for Communication Systems
-Data and Internet Networking Compulsory
-Advanced Signal Processing
-Mobile Communications B
-Network and Service Management and Control
-Operating Systems for Mobile Systems Programming
-Advanced 5G Wireless Technologies
-Standard Project

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The taught postgraduate degree programmes of the Department are intended both to assist with professional career development within the relevant industry and, for a small number of students, to serve as a precursor to academic research.

Our philosophy is to integrate the acquisition of core engineering and scientific knowledge with the development of key practical skills (where relevant).

To fulfil these objectives, the programme aims to:
-Attract well-qualified entrants, with a background in Electronic Engineering, Physical Sciences, Mathematics, Computing and Communications, from the UK, Europe and overseas
-Provide participants with advanced knowledge, practical skills and understanding applicable to the MSc degree
-Develop participants' understanding of the underlying science, engineering, and technology, and enhance their ability to relate this to industrial practice
-Develop participants' critical and analytical powers so that they can effectively plan and execute individual research/design/development projects
-Provide a high level of flexibility in programme pattern and exit point
-Provide students with an extensive choice of taught modules, in subjects for which the Department has an international and UK research reputation

A graduate from this MSc Programme should:
-Know, understand and be able to apply the fundamental mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles that underpin communications, networks and software
-Be able to analyse problems within the field of communications, networks and software and more broadly in electronic engineering and find solutions
-Be able to use relevant workshop and laboratory tools and equipment, and have experience of using relevant task-specific software packages to perform engineering tasks
-Know, understand and be able to use the basic mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles associated with the topics within communications, networks and software
-Be aware of the societal and environmental context of his/her engineering activities
-Be aware of commercial, industrial and employment-related practices and issues likely to affect his/her engineering activities
-Be able to carry out research-and-development investigations
-Be able to design electronic circuits and electronic/software products and systems

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The Department's taught postgraduate programmes are designed to enhance the student's technical knowledge in the topics within electronic and electrical engineering that he/she has chosen to study, and to contribute to the Specific Learning Outcomes set down by the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) (which is the Professional Engineering body for electronic and electrical engineering) and to the General Learning Outcomes applicable to all university graduates.

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

General transferable skills
-Be able to use computers and basic IT tools effectively
-Be able to retrieve information from written and electronic sources
-Be able to apply critical but constructive thinking to received information
-Be able to study and learn effectively
-Be able to communicate effectively in writing and by oral presentations
-Be able to present quantitative data effectively, using appropriate methods
-Be able to manage own time and resources
-Be able to develop, monitor and update a plan, in the light of changing circumstances
-Be able to reflect on own learning and performance, and plan its development/improvement, as a foundation for life-long learning

Underpinning learning
-Know and understand scientific principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering, to enable appreciation of its scientific and engineering content, and to support their understanding of historical, current and future developments
-Know and understand the mathematical principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering and to enable them to apply mathematical methods, tools and notations proficiently in the analysis and solution of engineering problems
-Be able to apply and integrate knowledge and understanding of other engineering disciplines to support study of electronic and electrical engineering

Engineering problem-solving
-Understand electronic and electrical engineering principles and be able to apply them to analyse key engineering processes
-Be able to identify, classify and describe the performance of systems and components through the use of analytical methods and modelling techniques
-Be able to apply mathematical and computer-based models to solve problems in electronic and electrical engineering, and be able to assess the limitations of particular cases
-Be able to apply quantitative methods relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems
-Understand and be able to apply a systems approach to electronic and electrical engineering problems

Engineering tools
-Workshop and laboratory skills. Have relevant workshop and laboratory skills
-Be able to write simple computer programs, be aware of the nature of microprocessor programming, and be aware of the nature of software design
-Be able to apply computer software packages relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems

Technical expertise
-Know and understand the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of the range of electronic and electrical engineering topics he/she has chosen to study
-Know the characteristics of particular materials, equipment, processes or products
-Have thorough understanding of current practice and limitations, and some appreciation of likely future developments
-Be aware of developing technologies related to electronic and electrical engineering
-Have comprehensive understanding of the scientific principles of electronic engineering and related disciplines
-Have comprehensive knowledge and understanding of mathematical and computer models relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, and an appreciation of their limitations
-Know and understand, at Master's level, the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of a range of engineering topics that he/she has chosen to study
-Have extensive knowledge of a wide range of engineering materials and components
-Understand concepts from a range of areas including some from outside engineering, and be able to apply them effectively in engineering projects

Societal and environmental context
-Understand the requirement for engineering activities to promote sustainable development
-Relevant part of: Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk issues
-Understand the need for a high level of professional and ethical conduct in engineering

Employment context
-Know and understand the commercial and economic context of electronic and electrical engineering processes
-Understand the contexts in which engineering knowledge can be applied (e.g. operations and management, technology development, etc.)
-Be aware of the nature of intellectual property
-Understand appropriate codes of practice and industry standards
-Be aware of quality issues
-Be able to apply engineering techniques taking account of a range of commercial and industrial constraints
-Understand the basics of financial accounting procedures relevant to engineering project work
-Be able to make general evaluations of commercial risks through some understanding of the basis of such risks
-Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk) issues

Research and development
-Understand the use of technical literature and other information sources
-Be aware of the need, in appropriate cases, for experimentation during scientific investigations and during engineering development
-Be able to use fundamental knowledge to investigate new and emerging technologies
-Be able to extract data pertinent to an unfamiliar problem, and employ this data in solving the problem, using computer-based engineering tools when appropriate
-Be able to work with technical uncertainty

Design
-Understand the nature of the engineering design process
-Investigate and define a problem and identify constraints, including environmental and sustainability limitations, and health and safety and risk assessment issues
-Understand customer and user needs and the importance of considerations such as aesthetics
-Identify and manage cost drivers
-Use creativity to establish innovative solutions
-Ensure fitness for purpose and all aspects of the problem including production, operation, maintenance and disposal
-Manage the design process and evaluate outcomes
-Have wide knowledge and comprehensive understanding of design processes and methodologies and be able to apply and adapt them in unfamiliar situations
-Be able to generate an innovative design for products, systems, components or processes, to fulfil new needs

Project management
-Be able to work as a member of a team
-Be able to exercise leadership in a team
-Be able to work in a multidisciplinary environment
-Know about management techniques that may be used to achieve engineering objectives within the commercial and economic context of engineering processes
-Have extensive knowledge and understanding of management and business practices, and their limitations, and how these may be applied appropriately

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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The program aims to form Master graduates with a comprehensive and solid scientific and technological background in Electronics Engineering, able to design and to use electronic devices, electronic circuits and electronic systems of any complexity as well as to promote the diffusion of electronic technologies in the fields of human activity where benefits can be envisaged. Read more

Mission and goals

The program aims to form Master graduates with a comprehensive and solid scientific and technological background in Electronics Engineering, able to design and to use electronic devices, electronic circuits and electronic systems of any complexity as well as to promote the diffusion of electronic technologies in the fields of human activity where benefits can be envisaged.
To meet these training needs, the Master of Science in Electronics Engineering bases its roots on a full spectrum of basic courses (mathematics, classical and modern physics, computer science, signal theory, control and communications, basic electronic circuits) that are prerequisites required from the Bachelor, and focuses on the most advanced disciplines in electronic design (analog and digital electronics, solid state physics and devices, microelectronics, optoelectronics, sensors and electronic instrumentation, communications and control systems) to provide a complete and updated preparation. Upon graduating, students will have developed a “design oriented” mindset and acquired a skill to use engineering tools to design solutions to advanced electronic challenges in scientific and technological fields.

See the website http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/electronics-engineering/

Career opportunities

Thanks to the deep and solid scientific and technological knowledge provided, Master of Science graduates in Electronics Engineering will be able to hold positions of great responsibility, both at technical and management level, in a wide variety of productive contexts:
- Scientific and technological research centers, national and international, public or private;
- Industries of semiconductors, integrated circuits and in general of electronic components;
- Industries of electronic systems and instrumentation, such as consumer electronics (audio, video, telephone, computers, etc.), optoelectronics, biomedical, etc.;
- Electromechanical industries with high technological content such as aeronautics, transportation, aerospace, energy, robotics and plant automation, etc.;
- Work as a freelance in the design and fabrication of custom electronic systems.

Presentation

See http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/uploads/media/Electronics_Engineering_01.pdf
The Master of Science in Electronics Engineering aims to form graduates with a comprehensive and solid scientific and technological knowledge in the field of Electronics, able to design and to use electronic devices, electronic circuits and electronic systems of any complexity as well as to promote the diffusion of electronic technologies in the fields of human activity where benefits can be envisaged. The course focuses on the most advanced aspects of Electronics (analog and digital integrated circuits design, solid state devices, microelectronics, optoelectronic devices and sensors, electronic instrumentation, communications and control systems) to provide a complete and updated professional preparation. Upon graduating, students will have developed a “design oriented” mindset enabling them to successfully deal with the complex needs of today’s industrial system. They will have also acquired a skill to use engineering tools to design solutions to advanced electronic challenges in scientific and technological fields as well as a maturity to hold positions of great responsibility both at technical and management level. The programme is taught in English.

Required background from Bachelor studies

The Master of Science in Electronics Engineering bases its roots on a full spectrum of knowledge that students are expected to have successfully acquired in their Bachelor degree, like advanced mathematics, classical and modern physics, computer science, signal and communication theory, electric circuits and feedback control, basic electronic devices and analog & digital circuit analysis.

Subjects

- Analog & Digital Integrated Circuit Design
- MEMS and Microsensors
- Electronic Systems
- Electron Devices and Microelectronic Technologies
- Signal recovery and Feedback Control
- Optoelectronic Systems and Photonics Devices
- RF Circuit Design
- Power Electronics
- Semiconductor Radiation Detectors
- FPGA & Microcontroller System Design
- Biochip and Electronics Design for Biomedical Instrumentation

See the website http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/electronics-engineering/

For contact information see here http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/electronics-engineering/

Find out how to apply here http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/how-to-apply/

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Electronic engineering defines the very fabric of today’s modern technologically advanced society. A myriad of consumer electronic products - televisions, CD and DVD players - are in daily use by practically everyone on the planet. Read more
Electronic engineering defines the very fabric of today’s modern technologically advanced society. A myriad of consumer electronic products - televisions, CD and DVD players - are in daily use by practically everyone on the planet. Mobile phones and computers enable global communications on a scale unimaginable even a few decades ago. Yet electronic engineering continues to develop new capabilities which will shape the lives of future generations.

This programme aims to provide a broad based Electronic Engineering MSc which will enable students to contribute to the future development of electronic products and services. The course reflects the School’s highly regarded research activity at the leading edge of electronic engineering. The MSc will provide relevant, up-to-date skills that enhance the engineering competency of its graduates and allows a broader knowledge of electronic engineering to be acquired by studying important emerging technologies, such as, optoelectronics, bioelectronics, polymer electronics and micromachining. The course is intended for graduates in a related discipline, who wish to enhance and specialise their skills in several emerging technologies.

Course Structure
This course runs from 29 September 2014 to 30 September 2015.

The course structure consists of a core set of taught and laboratory based modules that introduce advanced nanoscale and microscale device fabrication processes and techniques. In addition, device simulation and design is addressed with an emphasis placed on the use of advanced CAD based device and system based modelling. Transferable skills such as project planning and management, as well as, presentational skills are also further developed in the course.

Taught Modules:

Introduction to Nanotechnology & Microsystems*: focuses on the device fabrication techniques at the nano and micro scale, as well as introducing some of the diagnostic tools available to test the quality and characteristics of devices.

Modelling and Design: Focuses on the simulation and design of electronic devices using an advanced software package – COMSOL. This powerful commercial software package is extremely adaptable and can be used to simulate and design a very wide range of physical systems.



Advanced Sensor Systems: Provides students with an understanding of more complex sensor systems and a view of current developments in specific areas of sensor development. Applications of these systems and their main producers and users are also discussed.

Masters Mini Project: focuses on applying the skills and techniques already studied to a mini project, the theme of which will form the basis of the research project later in the year.

RF and Optical MEMs*: Introduces the use and benefits of miniaturisation in RF and optical technologies. The module will investigate improvements in component characteristics, and manufacturing processes. Applications of RF and optical nano and microsystems will be discussed using examples.

Microengineering*: Provides an introduction to the rapidly expanding subject of microengineering. Starting with a discussion of the benefits and market demand for microengineered systems, the module investigates clean room-based lithographic and related methods of microfabrication. Micro manufacturing issues for a range of materials such as silicon, polymers and metals will be discussed along with routes to larger scale manufacture. A range of example devices and applications will be used to illustrate manufacturing parameters.

Further Microengineering*: This module builds on the knowledge of microengineering and microfabrication gained in the Microengineering module. The module examines a broad range of advanced manufacturing process including techniques suitable for larger scale production, particularly of polymer devices. This module also examines specialist fabrication methods using laser systems and their flexibility in fabricating macroscopic and sub micron structures.

Mobile Communication Systems*: This module will provide an in-depth understanding of current and emerging mobile communication systems, with a particular emphasis on the common aspects of all such systems.

Broadband Communication Systems: This module provides students with an in-depth understanding of current and emerging broadband communications techniques employed in local, access and backbone networks. Particular emphasis will be focussed on the following aspects: 1) fundamental concepts, 2) operating principles and practice of widely implemented communications systems; 3) hot research and development topics, and 4) opportunities and challenges for future deployment of broadband communications systems.

Data Networks and Communications*: This module will provide an in-depth understanding of how real communication networks are structured and the protocols that make them work. It will give the students an ability to explain in detail the process followed to provide end to end connections and end-user services at required QoS.

Masters Project Preparation: To place computing and engineering within a business context so that students relate the technical aspects of their work to its commercial and social dimensions and are able to prepare project plans which take into account the constraints and limitations imposed by non-technical factors.

*optional modules

Research Project
After the successful completion of the taught component of the MSc programme, the major individual project will be undertaken within the world-leading optoelectronics or optical communications research groups of the School. Students will then produce an MSc Dissertation.

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