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Masters Degrees (Electroacoustics)

We have 8 Masters Degrees (Electroacoustics)

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The International Master's Degree in Electro acoustics (IMDEA) offers students the opportunity to learn the fundamentals in electro acoustics and in relating fields. Read more

The International Master's Degree in Electro acoustics (IMDEA) offers students the opportunity to learn the fundamentals in electro acoustics and in relating fields. The program offers a specialized education in:

• Electro acoustics

• Mechanics and materials

• Transducers (loudspeakers, microphones)

• Acoustic loads and acoustic radiation

• Real time signal processing

The program covers the entire range of the whole electro acoustic chain. All courses are given in English on an advanced scientific and technical level. The teaching is based on cutting-edge research in electro acoustics.

The master’s program prepares students for careers dealing with different aspects of electroacoustics which require strong analytical and research skills, whether in the public or private sectors and for PhD studies or research activities.

-Refresher courses - 7 ECTS: mathematics, digital electronics, signal analysis, measurement, acoustics and vibrations, Matlab, electronics

-Electroacoustics - 32 ECTS

-Acoustics & mechanics - 25.5 ECTS

-Mathematics - 3 ECTS

-Communication - 8 ECTS

-Electronics, signal processing - 18.5 ECTS

-Master’s Thesis– 26 ECTS: Thesis on an electro acoustics engineering-related theme



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Study areas currently offered. Composition; Electroacoustic Composition; Composing Film Music. The course (Special Track) allows students to specialise in any one of area of composition, including Electro-acoustic Composition, Sonic Art and Composing for Film. Read more
Study areas currently offered:

Composition; Electroacoustic Composition; Composing Film Music
The course (Special Track) allows students to specialise in any one of area of composition, including Electro-acoustic Composition, Sonic Art and Composing for Film.

All the training will be centred on the student’s main area, aided by a broader look at compositional techniques and approaches as a whole (through the core module in Composition).

The programme is divided into two parts: two semesters of taught study (Part 1, 120 credits) and a substantial independent piece of work in the main area, produced over the summer (Part 2, 60 credits).

Part 1 is centred on the Principal Subject module (WMM4045, 60 credits) in a chosen area of composition. Another aspect of the same area or a different approach to composition will be explored in the Independent Special Study (WMP4049, 20 credits).

WMP4052 Preparing for the Part 2 project (10 credits) acts as a bridge between Parts 1 and 2.

Additionally students will attend a core module in composition (WMP4042 Contexts and Concepts in Composition, 30 credits). During these modules students will became familiar with up-to-date research and creative techniques and methodologies in the selected disciplines.

Subject-specific teaching is provided through a combination of individual tuition and seminar session in small groups. Within each of the chosen subject areas, students can identify their own projects, for which they will receive expert supervision.

Course Structure
Part 1 (Diploma):

Focuses on studies in composition and/or electroacoustic composition and/or sonic art.

(Total of 120 credits)

Part 2 (MMus):

Consists of a portfolio comprising at least one substantial composition (with or without electroacoustics) or work of sonic art.

(Total of 60 credits)

Compulsory modules:

Principal Subject Module: either Composition, Electroacoustic Composition / Sonic Arts or Composing for Film (60 credits)
Compulsory Core Module: Concepts of Composition (30 credits)
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits)
(Total 120 credits)

Optional modules:

Independent Special Study in either Composition, Composing for Film or Electroacoustic Composition / Sonic Arts (20 credits)

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Fascinated by the science of sound? Southampton Solent University’s applied acoustics masters programme can provide you with the skills and knowledge required to work in a range of acoustics fields. Read more

Fascinated by the science of sound? Southampton Solent University’s applied acoustics masters programme can provide you with the skills and knowledge required to work in a range of acoustics fields. Suitable graduate destinations include consultancy, engineering, environmental health, built environment work or further study at PhD level.

Taught by experts with strong research and industry backgrounds, MSc Applied Acoustics offers students the chance to gain hands-on experience with the latest measurement, simulation and modelling technology. Students also study relevant scientific principles such as how humans respond to sound, acoustic physics, and how sound interacts with our environment. 

We have excellent links with the Institute of Acoustics (IoA) and the Association of Noise Consultants, as well as a number of commercial companies across the sector. These include KP Acoustics, with whom we have a formal partnership for work placement and mentoring. The course has also been designed to meet the requirements for professional IoA registration. 

The University also offers access to specialist facilities for the testing and demonstration of acoustic and electro-acoustic principles, including a hemi-anechoic chamber, audio isolation booths for sound recording and audiometric testing, and the University’s own digital 3D cinema.

What does this course lead to?

Acoustics offers an intellectual and practical challenge across a wide range of sectors, from manufacturing or construction to architecture, telecommunications or various engineering industries.

Acousticians could be involved in designing and planning exciting new infrastructure projects such as airports, motorways and sports arenas, or could be responsible for making airplanes and cars quieter, or improving the sound quality of a television or computer. Acousticians are also involved in the design of new buildings – from flats and houses, to skyscrapers and concert halls.

Who is this course for?

This course is ideal for students with an engineering or technology-related undergraduate degree, or who have chartered environmental health practitioner status or equivalent.

Students who are looking to gain hands-on practical experience using the latest acoustics technology will be well-suited to the course.

What you will study

Year one

Core taught units:

  • Principles of Acoustics
  • Noise, Vibration and Health
  • Computer-Aided Simulation
  • Research Methods
  • Field and Laboratory Testing

Core project units:

  • Pilot Project
  • Research Project

Three options from:

  • Environmental Acoustics
  • Acoustics in the Built Environment
  • Noise and Vibration Control
  • Electroacoustics
  • Acoustic Materials
  • Professional Skills and Practice Practice
  • Standards and Legislation 

Please note: Not all optional units are guaranteed to run each year.

Facilities

To aid study and help perfect techniques, students have full access to the University’s laboratory and studio facilities. Students will be able to undertake acoustic measurement and laboratory projects using a wide range of test equipment such as sound level meters, a 16-channel data acquisition system, head and torso simulators, a laser vibrometer and ambisonic microphones. Students will also have access to cutting-edge simulation and modelling software, including MATLAB, NI Labview, CadnaA, CATT Acoustic, and EASE.

Your future

Solent has a 10-year history of successful graduate employment in the acoustic industries. Solent graduates have gone on to work in acoustics roles for Apple (acoustic engineer), Accon UK, Samsung (audio engineer), Cole Jarman Associates, Hilson Moran, Mott Macdonald, KP Acoustics, Hann Tucker Associates, Hoare Lea, Vangardia Consulting and Clarke Saunders Associates, among others.

Industry links

We have excellent links with the Institute of Acoustics (IoA) and the Association of Noise Consultants, as well as a number of commercial companies across the sector. As a result of the course team’s strong industry connections, students have access to guest speakers from a range of relevant organisations. Previous speakers have included Mark Murphy and Jim Griffiths (Vanguardia Consulting), Nicholas Jones (Hilson Moran) and Phil McIlwain (Westminster City Council).

Placements

The Professional Skills and Practice unit involves organising your own work placement with an external company, supported by staff and making use of the course team’s industry contacts.

There are a number of opportunities for work experience with professional partners and contacts, as well as through the University’s own Solent Acoustics consultancy.

Past students have worked on a range of projects, including for TruckFest, Isle of Wight Festival, Westminster City Council and KP Acoustics.



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The Sensory Systems, Technologies & Therapies (SenSyT) MRes programme was devised in consultation with industry partners developing treatments for sensory disorders. Read more

The Sensory Systems, Technologies & Therapies (SenSyT) MRes programme was devised in consultation with industry partners developing treatments for sensory disorders. It is an innovative biomedical and translational sciences programme intended for students pursuing a career in academia or in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industrial sectors.

About this degree

Through a major year-long research project and supplemental coursework, students will learn to conduct cutting-edge research aimed at understanding fundamental principles of sensory systems function and/or developing novel technologies and therapies for sensory disorders, such as deafness and blindness.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (45 credits), one optional module (15 credits) and a research project with dissertation/report (120 credits).

Core modules

  • Introduction to Sensory Systems, Technologies & Therapies
  • Research in Practice
  • Translating Science into the Clinic

Optional modules

One optional module can be chosen from a group of appropriate modules currently offered at the UCL Ear Institute or at the UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, to provide more in-depth knowledge and understanding of particular issues in sensory systems research. Examples include:

  • Anatomy and Physiology of the Audiovestibular System
  • Auditory Biophysics and Electroacoustics
  • Ocular Cell Biology, Genetics and Epidemiology of Ocular Disease
  • Ocular Development in Health and Disease
  • Visual Neuroscience

Students may choose an alternative optional module from across UCL with prior approval of the Programme Director, provided that it aligns with the topic of the extended research project.

Dissertation/report

All students undertake a year-long independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, tutorials, practicals, seminars, workshops, journal clubs, and an extended research project. Assessment is through coursework, oral presentations, essays, practicals, unseen written examinations, and research dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Sensory Systems, Technologies and Therapies MRes

Funding

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

The Sensory Systems, Technologies and Therapies MRes was devised in consultation not only with academic scientists pursuing cutting-edge research in sensory systems and therapies, but also with representatives from industries interested in developing new treatments for sensory disorders. The programme has therefore been designed with the intention of ensuring that successful graduates will be attractive candidates either for further PhD research or for jobs in the commercial sector (for example, in companies developing or marketing novel treatments for visual impairment or hearing loss).

Employability

Students will graduate with interdisciplinary training in sensory systems science; a good understanding of the clinical and commercial context for development of sensory systems technologies and therapies; and substantive experience with a cutting-edge research project.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL is among the world's top universities for biomedical research, with particular strength in neuroscience, sensory systems research, and translational studies. Students taking the Sensory Systems, Technologies and Therapies MRes will be based at the UCL Ear Institute, an internationally recognised centre for auditory research, and will also take core modules at the UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, one of the world's major centres for vision research.

MRes students will have access to potential research supervisors from across all UCL, and will benefit from interaction with students on the Sensory Systems, Technologies and Therapies MPhil/PhD. The Sensory Systems, Technologies and Therapies MRes will therefore provide students with outstanding opportunities to learn from and network with scientists, engineers, clinicians and students throughout the UCL community.



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Our MA in Music Production gives you time, facilities and authoritative guidance from academics and industry professionals to develop both practical studio craft along with a firm theoretical and critical understanding of modern technique and practice. Read more
Our MA in Music Production gives you time, facilities and authoritative guidance from academics and industry professionals to develop both practical studio craft along with a firm theoretical and critical understanding of modern technique and practice.

Course summary

This new programme (which replaces the Production pathway of the Music MA) provides practical, theoretical and analytical study of the creation, perception and reception of audio productions. An interdisciplinary approach is adopted which examines how creative studio practice is informed by perspectives provided by science and engineering (acoustics, psychoacoustics, electroacoustics, signal processing) as well as composition, performance and musicology. Professional competences in various aspects of sound recording practice are developed and assessed, along with the underlying transferable knowledge. This is in addition to a cultural and historical perspective which encourages the understanding of production, with its own notions of style and genre, as an evolving and integral part of music making.

Aims

The MA in Music Production degree is aimed at students wishing to explore the practice and theory of Music Production. This combines a very broad view of the techniques and applications of production for audio media with the subsequent development of more tightly focussed individual skills and scholarship. Music Production might involve anything ranging from the creation of entirely synthetic material using computer-based techniques to the successful capture of acoustic performances, as well as the restoration and reconstruction of existing audio heritage. There are also important philosophies and technologies underlying this discipline that are constantly evolving.

Whether you are an electronic/computer-based composer or an early music specialist who wants to make the very best recordings, this course will provide you with the intellectual and practical skills to realise your goals. This is not a training course in specific pieces of software or hardware. It is a year-long exposure to thinking about and working in Music Production in its many forms. It is an opportunity to develop your own ideas, styles and career in this exciting discipline.

Structure and Ethos

The use of technology for the creation and capture of music is a core part of the Department of Music’s activities. The Department is home to the Music Research Centre: one of the finest facilities for listening to and recording sound in the UK. There is a large-scale neutral listening and performing space built to extremely low noise specifications (PNC15), a linked studio suite containing a dedicated performance space with configurable acoustics and two mix down/control rooms. The department’s main concert hall has a dedicated studio control room along with a suite of editing and programming rooms. This remarkable set of facilities is populated with a wide range of microphones and recording hardware/software. There are extensive computing facilities for practical work and research. Surround sound work is very well supported by multiple sets of 5.1 and full periphonic (i.e. with height) ambisonic reproduction systems.

Throughout the course MA Music Production students are expected to use these facilities to make recordings and other audio artefacts. Running alongside this practical activity are taught modules which provide an understanding and fluency in audio signals and systems and the production chain, listening and analytical skills. In the final six months students produce a self-directed portfolio as well as undertaking a large research project.

Industry and Employment Relevance

The role of producer is widely recognised within the music industry, across all styles and in many different areas of activity. This course will provide you with a versatile skill-set which will be of value for entrepreneurs or for candidates seeking professional appointments, be it with a small independent production house or a broadcaster with global reach. The department is home to professional sound recordists, producers, performers, composers and technology developers and so offers a unique combination of expertise in this field. Rather than a narrow set of competencies which will quickly date, you will graduate with a set of robust skills which will transfer to many different scenarios along with a breadth and depth of understanding of Music Production which will allow you to create meaningful and significant audio content, as well as critically analyse the work of other producers. A significant proportion of our graduates go on to do further research at PhD level.

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Our PGCert in Music Production gives you time, facilities and authoritative guidance from academics and industry professionals to develop both practical studio craft along with a firm theoretical and critical understanding of modern technique and practice. Read more
Our PGCert in Music Production gives you time, facilities and authoritative guidance from academics and industry professionals to develop both practical studio craft along with a firm theoretical and critical understanding of modern technique and practice.

Course summary

This new programme (which replaces the Production pathway of the Music MA) provides practical, theoretical and analytical study of the creation, perception and reception of audio productions. An interdisciplinary approach is adopted which examines how creative studio practice is informed by perspectives provided by science and engineering (acoustics, psychoacoustics, electroacoustics, signal processing) as well as composition, performance and musicology. Professional competences in various aspects of sound recording practice are developed and assessed, along with the underlying transferable knowledge. This is in addition to a cultural and historical perspective which encourages the understanding of production, with its own notions of style and genre, as an evolving and integral part of music making.

Aims

The PGCert in Music Production degree is aimed at students wishing to explore the practice and theory of Music Production. This combines a very broad view of the techniques and applications of production for audio media with the subsequent development of more tightly focussed individual skills and scholarship. Music Production might involve anything ranging from the creation of entirely synthetic material using computer-based techniques to the successful capture of acoustic performances, as well as the restoration and reconstruction of existing audio heritage. There are also important philosophies and technologies underlying this discipline that are constantly evolving.

Whether you are an electronic/computer-based composer or an early music specialist who wants to make the very best recordings, this course will provide you with the intellectual and practical skills to realise your goals. This is not a training course in specific pieces of software or hardware. It is a year-long exposure to thinking about and working in Music Production in its many forms. It is an opportunity to develop your own ideas, styles and career in this exciting discipline.

Structure and Ethos

The use of technology for the creation and capture of music is a core part of the Department of Music’s activities. The Department is home to the Music Research Centre: one of the finest facilities for listening to and recording sound in the UK. There is a large-scale neutral listening and performing space built to extremely low noise specifications (PNC15), a linked studio suite containing a dedicated performance space with configurable acoustics and two mix down/control rooms. The department’s main concert hall has a dedicated studio control room along with a suite of editing and programming rooms. This remarkable set of facilities is populated with a wide range of microphones and recording hardware/software. There are extensive computing facilities for practical work and research. Surround sound work is very well supported by multiple sets of 5.1 and full periphonic (i.e. with height) ambisonic reproduction systems.

Throughout the course Music Production students are expected to use these facilities to make recordings and other audio artefacts. Running alongside this practical activity are taught modules which provide an understanding and fluency in audio signals and systems and the production chain, listening and analytical skills. In the final six months students produce a self-directed portfolio as well as undertaking a large research project.

Industry and Employment Relevance

The role of producer is widely recognised within the music industry, across all styles and in many different areas of activity. This course will provide you with a versatile skill-set which will be of value for entrepreneurs or for candidates seeking professional appointments, be it with a small independent production house or a broadcaster with global reach. The department is home to professional sound recordists, producers, performers, composers and technology developers and so offers a unique combination of expertise in this field. Rather than a narrow set of competencies which will quickly date, you will graduate with a set of robust skills which will transfer to many different scenarios along with a breadth and depth of understanding of Music Production which will allow you to create meaningful and significant audio content, as well as critically analyse the work of other producers. A significant proportion of our graduates go on to do further research at PhD level.

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Our Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) in Music Production gives you time, facilities and authoritative guidance from academics and industry professionals to develop both practical studio craft along with a firm theoretical and critical understanding of modern technique and practice. Read more
Our Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) in Music Production gives you time, facilities and authoritative guidance from academics and industry professionals to develop both practical studio craft along with a firm theoretical and critical understanding of modern technique and practice.

Course summary

This new programme provides practical, theoretical and analytical study of the creation, perception and reception of audio productions. An interdisciplinary approach is adopted which examines how creative studio practice is informed by perspectives provided by science and engineering (acoustics, psychoacoustics, electroacoustics, signal processing) as well as composition, performance and musicology. Professional competences in various aspects of sound recording practice are developed and assessed, along with the underlying transferable knowledge. This is in addition to a cultural and historical perspective which encourages the understanding of production, with its own notions of style and genre, as an evolving and integral part of music making.

Aims

The PGDip in Music Production degree is aimed at students wishing to explore the practice and theory of Music Production. This combines a very broad view of the techniques and applications of production for audio media with the subsequent development of more tightly focussed individual skills and scholarship. Music Production might involve anything ranging from the creation of entirely synthetic material using computer-based techniques to the successful capture of acoustic performances, as well as the restoration and reconstruction of existing audio heritage. There are also important philosophies and technologies underlying this discipline that are constantly evolving.

Whether you are an electronic/computer-based composer or an early music specialist who wants to make the very best recordings, this course will provide you with the intellectual and practical skills to realise your goals. This is not a training course in specific pieces of software or hardware. It is a year-long exposure to thinking about and working in Music Production in its many forms. It is an opportunity to develop your own ideas, styles and career in this exciting discipline.

Structure and Ethos

The use of technology for the creation and capture of music is a core part of the Department of Music’s activities. The Department is home to the Music Research Centre: one of the finest facilities for listening to and recording sound in the UK. There is a large-scale neutral listening and performing space built to extremely low noise specifications (PNC15), a linked studio suite containing a dedicated performance space with configurable acoustics and two mix down/control rooms. The department’s main concert hall has a dedicated studio control room along with a suite of editing and programming rooms. This remarkable set of facilities is populated with a wide range of microphones and recording hardware/software. There are extensive computing facilities for practical work and research. Surround sound work is very well supported by multiple sets of 5.1 and full periphonic (i.e. with height) ambisonic reproduction systems.

Throughout the course Music Production students are expected to use these facilities to make recordings and other audio artefacts. Running alongside this practical activity are taught modules which provide an understanding and fluency in audio signals and systems and the production chain, listening and analytical skills. In the final six months students produce a self-directed portfolio as well as undertaking a large research project.

Industry and Employment Relevance

The role of producer is widely recognised within the music industry, across all styles and in many different areas of activity. This course will provide you with a versatile skill-set which will be of value for entrepreneurs or for candidates seeking professional appointments, be it with a small independent production house or a broadcaster with global reach. The department is home to professional sound recordists, producers, performers, composers and technology developers and so offers a unique combination of expertise in this field. Rather than a narrow set of competencies which will quickly date, you will graduate with a set of robust skills which will transfer to many different scenarios along with a breadth and depth of understanding of Music Production which will allow you to create meaningful and significant audio content, as well as critically analyse the work of other producers. A significant proportion of our graduates go on to do further research at PhD level.

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Music as a creative art form in the 21st century can combine both tradition and innovation, bringing together instruments (some new, some with centuries of history) and the latest in high technology. Read more

Music as a creative art form in the 21st century can combine both tradition and innovation, bringing together instruments (some new, some with centuries of history) and the latest in high technology.

As a composer today, all of these resources are available to you, and the Mixed Composition pathway aims to foster your skills as you navigate this exciting new world. By studying this pathway you can create works which combine electroacoustics and computer technology with more traditional instrumental and vocal composition, or explore each of those elements separately. Works for interactive systems, multimedia, and sound installations are also welcome.

Course details

You will study one core module:

  • Composition Tutorials

You will also choose three optional modules. This must include at least one of:

  • Advanced Studies in Electroacoustic Composition
  • Advanced Studies in Instrumental/Vocal Composition

Your remaining optional module(s) will be chosen from a range which typically includes:

  • Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art
  • Contemporary Music Studies
  • Laptop Ensemble
  • Music, Place and Identity
  • Sound in Society
  • Special Study in Music

Full descriptions are available below.

Assessment

Modules are assessed by a combination of practical and written assignments. You will also produce a composition portfolio of new musical works.

Learning and teaching

Your learning will be enhanced by our extensive facilities, including the Bramall Music Buildingand the Electroacoustic Music Studios and Birmingham ElectroAcoustic Sound Theatre (BEAST).

Support with academic writing

As a postgraduate student in the College of Arts and Law, you have access to the Academic Writing Advisory Service (AWAS) which aims to help your transition from undergraduate to taught Masters level, or back into academia after time away. The service offers guidance on writing assignments and dissertations for your MA/MSc programme with individual support from an academic writing advisor via tutorials, email and the provision of online materials.

International students can access support for English Language development and skills through the Birmingham International Academy (BIA).

Employability

Your degree will provide excellent preparation for employment and this will be further enhanced by a range of employability support services offered by the University.

The University's Careers Network provides advice and information specifically for postgraduates that will help you to develop an effective career and skills development strategy, and to make the most of your time with us at the University. The College of Arts and Law also has a dedicated careers and employability team to deliver tailored programmes of careers events and local support.

You will have opportunities to: meet employers face-to-face at on-campus recruitment fairs; attend employer presentations and skills workshops; receive individual guidance on your job applications, writing your CV and improving your interview technique; and access to comprehensive listings of hundreds of graduate jobs and work experience opportunities.

You will also be able to access our full range of careers support for up to two years after graduation.

Postgraduate employability: Music

Birmingham's Music postgraduates work in a wide range of careers within and beyond the music world. A postgraduate degree in Music develops a broad base of skills including general skills such as communication, problem solving and research, and also specific skills developed by practice and performance such as self-management, team work and presentation.

Over the past four years, 91% of Music postgraduates were in work and/or further study six months after graduation. Whilst some graduates pursue music-related careers, or go on to teaching and lecturing roles, others choose to use their transferable skills to follow career paths in fields including finance and the public sector.



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