• Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine Featured Masters Courses
  • Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • Durham University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Cambridge Featured Masters Courses
  • Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
  • Anglia Ruskin University Featured Masters Courses
De Montfort University Featured Masters Courses
Leeds Beckett University Featured Masters Courses
Queen’s University Belfast Featured Masters Courses
University of Hertfordshire Featured Masters Courses
Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
"electroacoustics"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Electroacoustics)

We have 8 Masters Degrees (Electroacoustics)

  • "electroacoustics" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 8 of 8
Order by 
The International Master in Electro acoustics offers students the opportunity to learn the fundamentals in electro acoustics and in relating fields. Read more
The International Master in Electro acoustics offers students the opportunity to learn the fundamentals in electro acoustics and in relating fields. The program offers a specialized education in:
• Electro acoustics
• Mechanics and materials
• Transducers (loudspeakers, microphones)
• Acoustic loads and acoustic radiation
• Real time signal processing
The program covers the entire range of the whole electro acoustic chain. All courses are given in English on an advanced scientific and technical level. The teaching is based on cutting-edge research in electro acoustics.

The master’s programme prepares students for careers dealing with different aspects of electroacoustics which require strong analytical and research skills, whether in the public or private sectors and for PhD studies or research activities.

General description and ECTS credits:
- Level Refresh (semester 1) - 8 ECTS: Mathematics, digital electronics, signal processing, measurement, acoustics and vibration, theoretical mechanics.
- General skills - 38 ECTS: Mathematics, programming methods, signal processing, acoustics, vibrations, vibro acoustics, acoustic waveguides, analytical modelling of transducers, radiation of transducer systems, advanced modelling of transducers (non linearities, viscothermal effects ...).
- Professional courses - 47 ECTS: Real time signal processing, audio signal processing, optical measurement methods, measurement method of transducers, 3D mechanical modelling, 3D sound, micro technologies, physics of magnets, materials for transducers, numerical modelling of transducers, application project.
- Master’s Thesis– 25 ECTS: Thesis on an electro acoustics engineering-related theme
- Elective courses – 2 ECTS: Fluid mechanics, mechanics of deformable bodies, musical acoustics, room acoustics.

Read less
Study areas currently offered. Composition; Electroacoustic Composition; Composing Film Music. The course (Special Track) allows students to specialise in any one of area of composition, including Electro-acoustic Composition, Sonic Art and Composing for Film. Read more
Study areas currently offered:

Composition; Electroacoustic Composition; Composing Film Music
The course (Special Track) allows students to specialise in any one of area of composition, including Electro-acoustic Composition, Sonic Art and Composing for Film.

All the training will be centred on the student’s main area, aided by a broader look at compositional techniques and approaches as a whole (through the core module in Composition).

The programme is divided into two parts: two semesters of taught study (Part 1, 120 credits) and a substantial independent piece of work in the main area, produced over the summer (Part 2, 60 credits).

Part 1 is centred on the Principal Subject module (WMM4045, 60 credits) in a chosen area of composition. Another aspect of the same area or a different approach to composition will be explored in the Independent Special Study (WMP4049, 20 credits).

WMP4052 Preparing for the Part 2 project (10 credits) acts as a bridge between Parts 1 and 2.

Additionally students will attend a core module in composition (WMP4042 Contexts and Concepts in Composition, 30 credits). During these modules students will became familiar with up-to-date research and creative techniques and methodologies in the selected disciplines.

Subject-specific teaching is provided through a combination of individual tuition and seminar session in small groups. Within each of the chosen subject areas, students can identify their own projects, for which they will receive expert supervision.

Course Structure
Part 1 (Diploma):

Focuses on studies in composition and/or electroacoustic composition and/or sonic art.

(Total of 120 credits)

Part 2 (MMus):

Consists of a portfolio comprising at least one substantial composition (with or without electroacoustics) or work of sonic art.

(Total of 60 credits)

Compulsory modules:

Principal Subject Module: either Composition, Electroacoustic Composition / Sonic Arts or Composing for Film (60 credits)
Compulsory Core Module: Concepts of Composition (30 credits)
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits)
(Total 120 credits)

Optional modules:

Independent Special Study in either Composition, Composing for Film or Electroacoustic Composition / Sonic Arts (20 credits)

Read less
Music as a creative art form in the 21st century can combine both tradition and innovation, bringing together instruments (some new, some with centuries of history) and the latest in high technology. Read more
Music as a creative art form in the 21st century can combine both tradition and innovation, bringing together instruments (some new, some with centuries of history) and the latest in high technology.

As a composer today all of these resources are available to you, and our research degrees in composition aim to foster your skills as you navigate this exciting new world.

On this programme you can create works which use electroacoustics and computer technology, traditional (and not so traditional) instrumental and vocal composition, or which combine these aspects. Works for interactive systems, multimedia, and sound installations are also welcome, and you are encouraged to find your own individual path.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

Read less
There is increasing pressure to make life quieter and to gain a better understanding of how noise and vibration affect people. Read more

Summary

There is increasing pressure to make life quieter and to gain a better understanding of how noise and vibration affect people. The Institute of Sound and Vibration Research (ISVR) at the University of Southampton is renowned for its contributions to reducing noise and vibration in engineering applications and also for fundamental work on understanding how humans hear sounds and process this information. No prior knowledge of acoustics is required to take this programme, and you will cover aspects of engineering acoustics, structural dynamics, applied digital signal processing and human effects of sound and vibration. You have the possibility to specialise in one of the three pathways: Applied Digital Signal Processing; Engineering Acoustics; Structural Dynamics.

Modules

You have the possibility to specialise in one of the three pathways: Applied Digital Signal Processing; Engineering Acoustics; Structural Dynamics.
Compulsory module: Research Methods
Core module: MSc Research Project
Typical Optional Modules: Signal Processing; Fundamentals of Acoustics; Fundamentals of Vibration; Musical Instrument Acoustics; Noise Control Engineering; Underwater Acoustics; Electroacoustics; Aeroacoustics; Architectural and Building Acoustics; Audio Engineering; Human Responses to Sound and Vibration; Advanced Vibration; Biomedical Application of Signal and Image Processing; Active Control; Applied Digital Signal Processing; Numerical Methods for Acoustics

Visit our website for further information...



Read less
The Sensory Systems, Technologies & Therapies (SenSyT) MRes programme was devised in consultation with industry partners developing treatments for sensory disorders. Read more
The Sensory Systems, Technologies & Therapies (SenSyT) MRes programme was devised in consultation with industry partners developing treatments for sensory disorders. It is an innovative biomedical and translational sciences programme intended for students aiming to pursue a career in academia or to work in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industrial sectors.

Degree information

Through a major year-long research project and supplemental coursework, students will learn to conduct cutting-edge research aimed at understanding fundamental principles of sensory systems function and/or developing novel technologies and therapies for sensory disorders, such as deafness and blindness.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (45 credits), one optional module (15 credits) and a research project with dissertation/report (120 credits).

Core modules
-Introduction to Sensory Systems, Technologies & Therapies
-Research in Practice
-Translating Science into the Clinic

Optional modules - one optional module can be chosen from a group of appropriate modules currently offered at the UCL Ear Institute or at the UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, to provide more in-depth knowledge and understanding of particular issues in sensory systems research. Examples include:
-Anatomy and Physiology of the Audiovestibular System
-Auditory Biophysics and Electroacoustics
-Ocular Cell Biology, Genetics and Epidemiology of Ocular Disease
-Ocular Development in Health and Disease
-Visual Neuroscience

Students may choose an alternative optional module from across UCL with prior approval of the Programme Director, provided that it aligns with the topic of the extended research project.

Dissertation/report
All students undertake a year-long independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, tutorials, practicals, seminars, workshops, journal clubs, and an extended research project. Assessment is through coursework, oral presentations, essays, practicals, unseen written examinations, and research dissertation.

Careers

The Sensory Systems, Technologies and Therapies MRes was devised in consultation not only with academic scientists pursuing cutting-edge research in sensory systems and therapies, but also with representatives from industries interested in developing new treatments for sensory disorders. The programme has therefore been designed with the intention of ensuring that successful graduates will be attractive candidates either for further PhD research or for jobs in the commercial sector (for example, in companies developing or marketing novel treatments for visual impairment or hearing loss).

Employability
Students will graduate with interdisciplinary training in sensory systems science; a good understanding of the clinical and commercial context for development of sensory systems technologies and therapies; and substantive experience with a cutting-edge research project.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL is among the world's top universities for biomedical research, with particular strength in neuroscience, sensory systems research, and translational studies. Students taking the Sensory Systems, Technologies and Therapies MRes will be based at the UCL Ear Institute, an internationally recognised centre for auditory research, and will also take core modules at the UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, one of the world's major centres for vision research.

MRes students will have access to potential research supervisors from across all UCL, and will benefit from interaction with students on the Sensory Systems, Technologies and Therapies MPhil/PhD introduced in 2014. The Sensory Systems, Technologies and Therapies MRes will therefore provide students with outstanding opportunities to learn from and network with scientists, engineers, clinicians and students throughout the UCL community.

Read less
Our MA in Music Production gives you time, facilities and authoritative guidance from academics and industry professionals to develop both practical studio craft along with a firm theoretical and critical understanding of modern technique and practice. Read more
Our MA in Music Production gives you time, facilities and authoritative guidance from academics and industry professionals to develop both practical studio craft along with a firm theoretical and critical understanding of modern technique and practice.

Course summary

This new programme (which replaces the Production pathway of the Music MA) provides practical, theoretical and analytical study of the creation, perception and reception of audio productions. An interdisciplinary approach is adopted which examines how creative studio practice is informed by perspectives provided by science and engineering (acoustics, psychoacoustics, electroacoustics, signal processing) as well as composition, performance and musicology. Professional competences in various aspects of sound recording practice are developed and assessed, along with the underlying transferable knowledge. This is in addition to a cultural and historical perspective which encourages the understanding of production, with its own notions of style and genre, as an evolving and integral part of music making.

Aims

The MA in Music Production degree is aimed at students wishing to explore the practice and theory of Music Production. This combines a very broad view of the techniques and applications of production for audio media with the subsequent development of more tightly focussed individual skills and scholarship. Music Production might involve anything ranging from the creation of entirely synthetic material using computer-based techniques to the successful capture of acoustic performances, as well as the restoration and reconstruction of existing audio heritage. There are also important philosophies and technologies underlying this discipline that are constantly evolving.

Whether you are an electronic/computer-based composer or an early music specialist who wants to make the very best recordings, this course will provide you with the intellectual and practical skills to realise your goals. This is not a training course in specific pieces of software or hardware. It is a year-long exposure to thinking about and working in Music Production in its many forms. It is an opportunity to develop your own ideas, styles and career in this exciting discipline.

Structure and Ethos

The use of technology for the creation and capture of music is a core part of the Department of Music’s activities. The Department is home to the Music Research Centre: one of the finest facilities for listening to and recording sound in the UK. There is a large-scale neutral listening and performing space built to extremely low noise specifications (PNC15), a linked studio suite containing a dedicated performance space with configurable acoustics and two mix down/control rooms. The department’s main concert hall has a dedicated studio control room along with a suite of editing and programming rooms. This remarkable set of facilities is populated with a wide range of microphones and recording hardware/software. There are extensive computing facilities for practical work and research. Surround sound work is very well supported by multiple sets of 5.1 and full periphonic (i.e. with height) ambisonic reproduction systems.

Throughout the course MA Music Production students are expected to use these facilities to make recordings and other audio artefacts. Running alongside this practical activity are taught modules which provide an understanding and fluency in audio signals and systems and the production chain, listening and analytical skills. In the final six months students produce a self-directed portfolio as well as undertaking a large research project.

Industry and Employment Relevance

The role of producer is widely recognised within the music industry, across all styles and in many different areas of activity. This course will provide you with a versatile skill-set which will be of value for entrepreneurs or for candidates seeking professional appointments, be it with a small independent production house or a broadcaster with global reach. The department is home to professional sound recordists, producers, performers, composers and technology developers and so offers a unique combination of expertise in this field. Rather than a narrow set of competencies which will quickly date, you will graduate with a set of robust skills which will transfer to many different scenarios along with a breadth and depth of understanding of Music Production which will allow you to create meaningful and significant audio content, as well as critically analyse the work of other producers. A significant proportion of our graduates go on to do further research at PhD level.

Read less
Our PGCert in Music Production gives you time, facilities and authoritative guidance from academics and industry professionals to develop both practical studio craft along with a firm theoretical and critical understanding of modern technique and practice. Read more
Our PGCert in Music Production gives you time, facilities and authoritative guidance from academics and industry professionals to develop both practical studio craft along with a firm theoretical and critical understanding of modern technique and practice.

Course summary

This new programme (which replaces the Production pathway of the Music MA) provides practical, theoretical and analytical study of the creation, perception and reception of audio productions. An interdisciplinary approach is adopted which examines how creative studio practice is informed by perspectives provided by science and engineering (acoustics, psychoacoustics, electroacoustics, signal processing) as well as composition, performance and musicology. Professional competences in various aspects of sound recording practice are developed and assessed, along with the underlying transferable knowledge. This is in addition to a cultural and historical perspective which encourages the understanding of production, with its own notions of style and genre, as an evolving and integral part of music making.

Aims

The PGCert in Music Production degree is aimed at students wishing to explore the practice and theory of Music Production. This combines a very broad view of the techniques and applications of production for audio media with the subsequent development of more tightly focussed individual skills and scholarship. Music Production might involve anything ranging from the creation of entirely synthetic material using computer-based techniques to the successful capture of acoustic performances, as well as the restoration and reconstruction of existing audio heritage. There are also important philosophies and technologies underlying this discipline that are constantly evolving.

Whether you are an electronic/computer-based composer or an early music specialist who wants to make the very best recordings, this course will provide you with the intellectual and practical skills to realise your goals. This is not a training course in specific pieces of software or hardware. It is a year-long exposure to thinking about and working in Music Production in its many forms. It is an opportunity to develop your own ideas, styles and career in this exciting discipline.

Structure and Ethos

The use of technology for the creation and capture of music is a core part of the Department of Music’s activities. The Department is home to the Music Research Centre: one of the finest facilities for listening to and recording sound in the UK. There is a large-scale neutral listening and performing space built to extremely low noise specifications (PNC15), a linked studio suite containing a dedicated performance space with configurable acoustics and two mix down/control rooms. The department’s main concert hall has a dedicated studio control room along with a suite of editing and programming rooms. This remarkable set of facilities is populated with a wide range of microphones and recording hardware/software. There are extensive computing facilities for practical work and research. Surround sound work is very well supported by multiple sets of 5.1 and full periphonic (i.e. with height) ambisonic reproduction systems.

Throughout the course Music Production students are expected to use these facilities to make recordings and other audio artefacts. Running alongside this practical activity are taught modules which provide an understanding and fluency in audio signals and systems and the production chain, listening and analytical skills. In the final six months students produce a self-directed portfolio as well as undertaking a large research project.

Industry and Employment Relevance

The role of producer is widely recognised within the music industry, across all styles and in many different areas of activity. This course will provide you with a versatile skill-set which will be of value for entrepreneurs or for candidates seeking professional appointments, be it with a small independent production house or a broadcaster with global reach. The department is home to professional sound recordists, producers, performers, composers and technology developers and so offers a unique combination of expertise in this field. Rather than a narrow set of competencies which will quickly date, you will graduate with a set of robust skills which will transfer to many different scenarios along with a breadth and depth of understanding of Music Production which will allow you to create meaningful and significant audio content, as well as critically analyse the work of other producers. A significant proportion of our graduates go on to do further research at PhD level.

Read less
Our Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) in Music Production gives you time, facilities and authoritative guidance from academics and industry professionals to develop both practical studio craft along with a firm theoretical and critical understanding of modern technique and practice. Read more
Our Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) in Music Production gives you time, facilities and authoritative guidance from academics and industry professionals to develop both practical studio craft along with a firm theoretical and critical understanding of modern technique and practice.

Course summary

This new programme provides practical, theoretical and analytical study of the creation, perception and reception of audio productions. An interdisciplinary approach is adopted which examines how creative studio practice is informed by perspectives provided by science and engineering (acoustics, psychoacoustics, electroacoustics, signal processing) as well as composition, performance and musicology. Professional competences in various aspects of sound recording practice are developed and assessed, along with the underlying transferable knowledge. This is in addition to a cultural and historical perspective which encourages the understanding of production, with its own notions of style and genre, as an evolving and integral part of music making.

Aims

The PGDip in Music Production degree is aimed at students wishing to explore the practice and theory of Music Production. This combines a very broad view of the techniques and applications of production for audio media with the subsequent development of more tightly focussed individual skills and scholarship. Music Production might involve anything ranging from the creation of entirely synthetic material using computer-based techniques to the successful capture of acoustic performances, as well as the restoration and reconstruction of existing audio heritage. There are also important philosophies and technologies underlying this discipline that are constantly evolving.

Whether you are an electronic/computer-based composer or an early music specialist who wants to make the very best recordings, this course will provide you with the intellectual and practical skills to realise your goals. This is not a training course in specific pieces of software or hardware. It is a year-long exposure to thinking about and working in Music Production in its many forms. It is an opportunity to develop your own ideas, styles and career in this exciting discipline.

Structure and Ethos

The use of technology for the creation and capture of music is a core part of the Department of Music’s activities. The Department is home to the Music Research Centre: one of the finest facilities for listening to and recording sound in the UK. There is a large-scale neutral listening and performing space built to extremely low noise specifications (PNC15), a linked studio suite containing a dedicated performance space with configurable acoustics and two mix down/control rooms. The department’s main concert hall has a dedicated studio control room along with a suite of editing and programming rooms. This remarkable set of facilities is populated with a wide range of microphones and recording hardware/software. There are extensive computing facilities for practical work and research. Surround sound work is very well supported by multiple sets of 5.1 and full periphonic (i.e. with height) ambisonic reproduction systems.

Throughout the course Music Production students are expected to use these facilities to make recordings and other audio artefacts. Running alongside this practical activity are taught modules which provide an understanding and fluency in audio signals and systems and the production chain, listening and analytical skills. In the final six months students produce a self-directed portfolio as well as undertaking a large research project.

Industry and Employment Relevance

The role of producer is widely recognised within the music industry, across all styles and in many different areas of activity. This course will provide you with a versatile skill-set which will be of value for entrepreneurs or for candidates seeking professional appointments, be it with a small independent production house or a broadcaster with global reach. The department is home to professional sound recordists, producers, performers, composers and technology developers and so offers a unique combination of expertise in this field. Rather than a narrow set of competencies which will quickly date, you will graduate with a set of robust skills which will transfer to many different scenarios along with a breadth and depth of understanding of Music Production which will allow you to create meaningful and significant audio content, as well as critically analyse the work of other producers. A significant proportion of our graduates go on to do further research at PhD level.

Read less

  • 1
Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X