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The English Language Teaching (ELT) MA degree provides professional development for teachers working in a variety of educational settings. Read more
The English Language Teaching (ELT) MA degree provides professional development for teachers working in a variety of educational settings.

While balancing theory and practice you will develop skills in language description and analysis, and learn how to tailor teaching methods and learning materials to suit institutional requirements, local circumstances, and learners’ wants and needs.

- You will have access to some of the most recent and relevant English language research
- Observe English language classes and undertake teaching practice
- In the final stages of the course you may have the opportunity to complete a (salaried) ten-month overseas teaching placement

Why Study English Langauge Teaching MA Degree?
* You will have access to some of the most recent and relevant English language research
* Observe English language classes and undertake teaching practice
* In the final stages of the course you may have the opportunity to complete a (salaried) ten-month overseas teaching placement
* You will be taught by a team consisting of international experts on corpus linguistics, computer assisted language learning, Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL), discourse and varieties of English (including business English) and second language acquisition
* The final stage can be completed off campus, and participants may elect to submit a reflective portfolio of their own professional practice instead of a dissertation
* The flexibility of the course enables applicants with recognised ELT qualifications to qualify for some accreditation of prior learning (APL)


The course can enhance your career prospects in teaching and management posts in schools and colleges, as well as government/civil service posts in relation to staff support and development, curriculum and materials design.

Course Content:
Students on the English Language Teaching MA will:

* Consider the theory and practice of English language learning and teaching, and the relevance of major language learning and language acquisition theories
* Develop skills in the evaluation and design of teaching and learning materials for a variety of settings
* Explore the role played by new technologies for learning, teaching and communicating
* Develop skills in the analysis of English as it is spoken and written in the UK and in the rest of the world
* Have opportunities to practise teaching and observe experienced teachers in a variety of face-to-face and blended-learning settings

Structure

The programme runs over three terms. Students normally take four 15-credit modules in term 1, four 15-credit modules in term 2 and complete a Dissertation or a Professional Practice Portfolio in term 3.

The delivery of the Research Methods module is distributed over the first two terms. Term 3 does not require attendance and students can elect to complete their dissertation/portfolio off-campus. If they do so, they will be supervised online in distance learning mode for this stage of their programme.

Assessment is normally completed at or soon after the end of the ten weeks of teaching for all 15-credit modules.

Module Information

Mandatory Modules

* Theories & Methods of Language Learning & Teaching
* Materials Design & Evaluation
* Analysing Written & Spoken Discourse
* The Social Context - Culture & Interaction
* The English Language: Structure
* The Phonology & The Semantics of the English Language
* Research Methods in Applied Linguistics

Options (Students must choose 3, one of which must be either Dissertation or Professional Practice Portfolio)

* Teaching English in Higher Education
* Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL): Past, Present & Future
* Teaching English for Business
* Language Testing & Assessment
* Professional Practice Portfolio
* Dissertation in Applied Linguistics

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Underpinned by high-quality training in social science research methodologies and work-related learning, this new programme provides you with in-depth knowledge and expertise in public policy analysis within an international and comparative context. Read more
Underpinned by high-quality training in social science research methodologies and work-related learning, this new programme provides you with in-depth knowledge and expertise in public policy analysis within an international and comparative context.

About the programme

You will investigate the ways in which a variety of state and non-state actors come together to address global problems (such as climate change, human rights issues, health inequalities, terrorism and migration).

The programme also involves understanding the roles of international organisations and networks and how these operate in the context of multilevel governance. The dissertation gives you the opportunity to specialise in an area of public policy and governance that interests you, under academic supervision.

The programme would be of equal interest and relevance to students coming though undergraduate social science programmes and to executive students seeking to undertake careers in policy analysis, public administration and management, and evaluation.

Your learning

Indicative module options include:
• The Politics of Public Policy
• The Politics and Management of Risk and Crises
• Comparative Governance and Public Administration
• Comparative Global Social Policy
• Policy and Practice
• Power, Politics and Civil Society
• Theories of State and Civil Society
• Research Methods
• Social Science Research Methods
• MSc Dissertation

Students who successfully complete three core modules (60 credits), and who elect not to proceed, are eligible to exit with the Postgraduate Certificate. Students who successfully complete the six core modules in trimesters 1 and 2 and who elect not to proceed to the dissertation, are eligible to exit with the Postgraduate Diploma.

Our Careers Adviser says

Upon graduating you will have developed a wide range of skills that include project management, evaluation, research methods and policy analysis. These skills will be of major advantage to students seeking to take up employment in government, state agencies, and civil society organisations (including, but not limited to, non-governmental organisations), or you may opt to follow a research pathway and consider PhD research.

Note: This programme is subject to validation

Research excellence

Research carried out by our staff underpins all of our teaching activity, which means you’ll directly benefit from our extensive expertise in a variety of fascinating, relevant areas. Our research outputs span academic publications and a range of contributions to official reports. Our research work is coordinated through a set of interdisciplinary research groups in Applied Psychology, Civil Society and Governance, Health Behaviours and Policy, and Social Work.

We would be interested to hear from anyone who might be interested in pursuing postgraduate studies linked to any aspect of our research work. In addition, we offer a range of research-based modules and short courses for continuing professional development. Our portfolio of research-led taught postgraduate programmes is now expanding across the full range of subject areas.

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Computer Science Departmental degree requirements for the master’s degree, which are in addition to those established by the College of Engineering and the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/), are as follows for Plan I and Plan II students. Read more
Computer Science Departmental degree requirements for the master’s degree, which are in addition to those established by the College of Engineering and the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/), are as follows for Plan I and Plan II students.

- Master of Science–Thesis Option (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#thesis)
- Master of Science–Non-Thesis Option (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#nonthesis)
- Timetable for the Submission of Graduate School Forms for an MS Degree (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#timetable)

Visit the website http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

MASTER OF SCIENCE–THESIS OPTION (PLAN I):

30 CREDIT HOURS
Each candidate must earn a minimum of 24 semester hours of credit for coursework, plus a 6-hour thesis under the direction of a faculty member. Unlike the general College of Engineering requirements, graduate credit may not be obtained for courses at the 400-level.

Degree Requirements Effective Fall 2011

Credit Hours
The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- 24 hours of CS graduate-level course work

- 6 hours of CS 599 Master’s Thesis Research: Thesis Research.

- Completion of at least one 500-level or 600-level course in each of the four core areas (applications, software, systems and theory). These courses must be taken within the department and selected from the following:
Applications: CS 528, CS 535, CS 557, CS 560, CS 609, CS 615
Software: CS 503, CS 507, CS 515, CS 516, CS 534, CS 600, CS 603, CS 607, CS 614, CS 630
Systems: CS 526, CS 538, CS 567, CS 606, CS 613, CS 618
Theory: CS 500, CS 570, CS 575, CS 601, CS 602, CS 612

- No more than 12 hours from CS 511, CS 512, CS 591, CS 592, CS 691, CS 692 and non-CS courses may be counted towards the coursework requirements for the master’s degree. Courses taken outside of CS are subject to the approval of the student’s advisor.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will select a thesis advisor and a thesis committee. The committee must contain at least four members, including the thesis advisor. At least two members are faculty of the Computer Science department, and at least one member must be from outside the Department of Computer Science.

- The student will develop a written research proposal. This should contain an introduction to the research area, a review of relevant literature in the area, a description of problems to be investigated, an identification of basic goals and objectives of the research, a methodology and timetable for approaching the research, and an extensive bibliography.

- The student will deliver an oral presentation of the research proposal, which is followed by a question-and-answer session that is open to all faculty members and which covers topics related directly or indirectly to the research area. The student’s committee will determine whether the proposal is acceptable based upon both the written and oral presentations.

- The student will develop a written thesis that demonstrates that the student has performed original research that makes a definite contribution to current knowledge. Its format and content must be acceptable to both the student’s committee and the Graduate School.

- The student will defend the written thesis. The defense includes an oral presentation of the thesis research, followed by a question-and-answer session. The student’s committee will determine whether the defense is acceptable.

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/) and by the College of Engineering.

Degree Requirements Prior to Fall 2011

Credit hours

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- 6 hours of CS 599 Master’s Thesis Research

- 24 hours of CS graduate-level course work with a grade of A or B, including the following courses completed at The University of Alabama:
At least 3 hours of theory courses (CS 500 Discrete math, CS 601 Algorithms, CS 602 Formal languages, CS 612 Data structures)

At least 3 hours of software courses (CS 600 Software engineering, CS 603 Programming languages, CS 607 Human-computer interaction, CS 614 Compilers, CS630 Empirical Software Engineering)

At least 3 hours of systems courses (CS 567 Computer architecture, CS 606 Operating systems, CS 613 Networks, CS 618 Wireless networks)

At least 3 hours of applications courses (CS 535 Graphics, CS 560 or 591 Robotics, CS 591 Security, CS 609 Databases)

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will select a thesis advisor and a thesis committee. The committee must contain at least four members, including the thesis advisor. At least two members are faculty of the Computer Science department, and at least one member must be from outside the Department of Computer Science.

- The student will develop a written research proposal. This should contain an introduction to the research area, a review of relevant literature in the area, a description of problems to be investigated, an identification of basic goals and objectives of the research, a methodology and timetable for approaching the research, and an extensive bibliography.

- The student will deliver an oral presentation of the research proposal, which is followed by a question-and-answer session that is open to all faculty members and which covers topics related directly or indirectly to the research area. The student’s committee will determine whether the proposal is acceptable based upon both the written and oral presentations.

- The student will develop a written thesis that demonstrates that the student has performed original research that makes a definite contribution to current knowledge. Its format and content must be acceptable to both the student’s committee and the Graduate School.

- The student will defend the written thesis. The defense includes an oral presentation of the thesis research, followed by a question-and-answer session. The student’s committee will determine whether the defense is acceptable.

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/) and by the College of Engineering.

MASTER OF SCIENCE–NON-THESIS OPTION (PLAN II):

30 CREDIT HOURS
Each candidate must earn a minimum of 30 semester hours of credit for coursework, which may include a 3-hour non-thesis project under the direction of a faculty member. Unlike the general College of Engineering requirements, graduate credit may not be obtained for courses at the 400-level.

Degree Requirements Effective Fall 2011

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- Completion of at least one 500-level or 600-level course in each of the four core areas (applications, software, systems and theory).
Applications: CS 528, CS 535, CS 557, CS 560, CS 609, CS 615
Software: CS 503, CS 507, CS 515, CS 516, CS 534, CS 600, CS 603, CS 607, CS 614, CS 630
Systems: CS 526, CS 538, CS 567, CS 606, CS 613, CS 618
Theory: CS 500, CS 570, CS 575, CS 601, CS 602, CS 612

- No more than 12 hours from CS 511, CS 512, CS 591, CS 592, CS 691, CS 692 and non-CS courses may be counted towards the coursework requirements for the master’s degree. Courses taken outside of CS are subject to the approval of the student’s advisor.

- The student may elect to replace 3 hours of course work with 3 hours of CS 598 Research Not Related to Thesis: Non-thesis Project. This course should be proposed in writing in advance, approved by the instructor, and a copy placed in the student’s file. The proposal should specify both the course content and the specific deliverables that will be evaluated to determine the course grade.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School and by the College of Engineering.

Degree Requirements Prior to Fall 2011

Credit hours

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours of CS graduate-level course work with a grade of A or B, as follows:

- The following courses will be completed at The University of Alabama:
At least 3 hours of theory courses (CS 500 Discrete math, CS 601 Algorithms, CS 602 Formal languages, CS 612 Data structures)

At least 3 hours of software courses (CS 600 Software engineering, CS 603 Programming languages, CS 607 Human-computer interaction, CS 614 Compilers, CS630 Empirical Software Engineering)

At least 3 hours of systems courses (CS 567 Computer architecture, CS 606 Operating systems, CS 613 Networks, CS 618 Wireless networks)

At least 3 hours of applications courses (CS 535 Graphics, CS 560 or 591 Robotics, CS 591 Security, CS 609 Databases)

- The student may elect to replace 3 hours of course work with 3 hours of CS 598 Research Not Related to Thesis: Non-thesis Project. This course should be proposed in writing in advance, approved by the instructor, and a copy placed in the student’s file. The proposal should specify both the course content and the specific deliverables that will be evaluated to determine the course grade.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School and by the College of Engineering.

TIMETABLE FOR THE SUBMISSION OF GRADUATE SCHOOL FORMS FOR AN MS DEGREE
This document identifies a timetable for the submission of all Graduate School paperwork associated with the completion of an M.S. degree

- For students in Plan I students only (thesis option) after a successful thesis proposal defense, you should submit the Appointment/Change of a Masters Thesis Committee form

- The semester before, or no later than the first week in the semester in which you plan to graduate, you should “Apply for Graduation” online in myBama.

- In the semester in which you apply for graduation, the Graduate Program Director will contact you about the Comprehensive Exam.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is a thriving center of intellectual excellence that encompasses 14 academic departments and 80 degree programs. Read more
The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is a thriving center of intellectual excellence that encompasses 14 academic departments and 80 degree programs. Its more than 2,500 students are engaged in a wide variety of challenging courses and hands-on learning experiences that extend across all areas of the humanities and sciences – from the great philosophers and classic literature to the world economy and environmental sustainability.

At the core of each department are faculty members who have garnered national acclaim for their best-selling books, ground-breaking research and creative endeavors. Together, students and their professors explore globally significant subjects and work towards the goal of improving every aspect of the way in which human beings live. To learn more about a specific area of study, click on the left-hand navigation bar for a full listing of academic departments.

Interdisciplinary Studies

The Interdisciplinary Studies program (IDS) is designed for those students whose career or educational goals are not reflected in one of LIU Post’s established graduate programs. An individual course of study, subject to the approval of the IDS Faculty Committee, will be developed by the student with the assistance of appropriate graduate advisors and the program coordinator. Students may incorporate courses from any of the five LIU Post colleges and schools. The student’s plan of study must be approved before full matriculation is granted.

In addition to designing a unique interdisciplinary degree, students can also elect to follow several other interdisciplinary concentrations: American Studies, Environmental Studies, Liberal Arts, Literacy Studies, Museum Studies, Public History/Archives and Records Management, Public History/Non-Profit Management, Social Studies, among others.

M.A. in Interdisciplinary Studies

LIU Post offers both the Master of Arts and Master of Science in Interdisciplinary Studies. The Interdisciplinary Studies program (IDS) is designed for those students whose career or educational goals are not reflected in one of LIU Post’s established graduate programs. An individual course of study, subject to the approval of the IDS Faculty Committee, will be developed by the student with the assistance of appropriate graduate advisors and the program coordinator. Students may incorporate courses from any of the five LIU Post colleges and schools. The student’s plan of study must be approved before full matriculation is granted.

In addition to designing a unique interdisciplinary degree, students can also elect to follow several other interdisciplinary concentrations: American Studies, Environmental Studies, Liberal Arts, Literacy Studies, Museum Studies, Public History/Archives and Records Management, Public History/Non-profit Management and Social Studies among others.

A total of 36 credits is required for the degree, of which 6 credits are in thesis work.

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The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is a thriving center of intellectual excellence that encompasses 14 academic departments and 80 degree programs. Read more
The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is a thriving center of intellectual excellence that encompasses 14 academic departments and 80 degree programs. Its more than 2,500 students are engaged in a wide variety of challenging courses and hands-on learning experiences that extend across all areas of the humanities and sciences – from the great philosophers and classic literature to the world economy and environmental sustainability.

At the core of each department are faculty members who have garnered national acclaim for their best-selling books, ground-breaking research and creative endeavors. Together, students and their professors explore globally significant subjects and work towards the goal of improving every aspect of the way in which human beings live. To learn more about a specific area of study, click on the left-hand navigation bar for a full listing of academic departments.

Interdisciplinary Studies

The Interdisciplinary Studies program (IDS) is designed for those students whose career or educational goals are not reflected in one of LIU Post’s established graduate programs. An individual course of study, subject to the approval of the IDS Faculty Committee, will be developed by the student with the assistance of appropriate graduate advisors and the program coordinator. Students may incorporate courses from any of the five LIU Post colleges and schools. The student’s plan of study must be approved before full matriculation is granted.

In addition to designing a unique interdisciplinary degree, students can also elect to follow several other interdisciplinary concentrations: American Studies, Environmental Studies, Liberal Arts, Literacy Studies, Museum Studies, Public History/Archives and Records Management, Public History/Non-Profit Management, Social Studies, among others.

M.S. in Interdisciplinary Studies

LIU Post offers both the Master of Arts and Master of Science in Interdisciplinary Studies. The Interdisciplinary Studies program (IDS) is designed for those students whose career or educational goals are not reflected in one of LIU Post’s established graduate programs. An individual course of study, subject to the approval of the IDS Faculty Committee, will be developed by the student with the assistance of appropriate graduate advisors and the program coordinator. Students may incorporate courses from any of the five LIU Post colleges and schools. The student’s plan of study must be approved before full matriculation is granted.

In addition to designing a unique interdisciplinary degree, students can also elect to follow several other interdisciplinary concentrations: American Studies, Environmental Studies, Liberal Arts, Literacy Studies, Museum Studies, Public History/Archives and Records Management, Public History/Non-profit Management and Social Studies among others.

A total of 36 credits is required for the degree, of which 6 credits are in thesis work

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Biomedical scientists are key contributors to modern healthcare, including disease diagnosis, monitoring of therapy and research into disease mechanisms. Read more
Biomedical scientists are key contributors to modern healthcare, including disease diagnosis, monitoring of therapy and research into disease mechanisms. This course offers postgraduate training in a selected biomedical science discipline, either Haematology and Blood Transfusion Science, Clinical Biochemistry and Immunology or Infection Science, together with opportunities to advance skills and knowledge in laboratory management and accreditation, plus modern developments such as genomics and stem cell technology. The MSc course is accredited by the IBMS; individual modules may also be studied for CPD accreditation.

The MSc Biomedical Science with Professional Experience is an extended full-time Masters programme with a substantive professional experience component. Within the professional experience modules, students have the option of undertaking an internship with a host organisation or, alternatively, campus-based professional experience. Internships are subject to a competitive application and selection process and the host organisation may include the University.

Internships may be paid or unpaid, and this will depend on what is being offered and agreed with the host organisation. Students who do not wish to undertake an internship or are not successful in securing an internship will undertake campus-based professional experience, which will deliver similar learning outcomes through supervised projects and activities designed to offer students the opportunity to integrate theory with an understanding of professional practice.

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

This IBMS accredited course allows students who have studied biomedical sciences at undergraduate level both at home and overseas to develop their skills and knowledge, whether they are considering future employment within biomedical science laboratories or research routes. It will also benefit practitioners already in HCPC registered posts to aid career progression. The course can be studied on either a full time or part time basis, and individual modules can be taken for CPD.

The course offers the opportunity to specialise in a key area of biomedical science, extend practical laboratory experience and develop transferable and research skills to enhance future employability.

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

Students will study Professional and Laboratory Skills in Biomedical Science, Research Skills plus they elect to study one of the following modules:
-Haematology and Blood Transfusion Sciences
-Infection Science
-Clinical Biochemistry and Immunology

And two of the following modules:
-Genomics and Regenerative Medicine
-Independent Study in Biomedical Science
-Evidence Based practice in Biomedical Science
-Quality Management and ISO standards
-Laboratory Management, Leadership and Training (suitable for current HCPC practitioners in management roles)
-Introduction to Laboratory Leadership, Management and Training (suitable for students who are not currently in management roles)

Additionally, the understanding gained from these modules will be demonstrated and applied in either the University-based project (12 months full-time or 24 months part-time, on course HLST132), or the professional experience modules giving students the option of undertaking an internship with a host organisation or, alternatively, campus-based professional experience.

HOW WILL THIS COURSE ENHANCE MY CAREER PROSPECTS?

MSc Biomedical Science graduates will be well placed to consider employment in several different areas of life sciences including the NHS, for example as a Trainee Biomedical Scientist in a pathology discipline or entry to the Scientist Training Programme.

Employment in commercial diagnostic laboratories, research organisations and sales and marketing are also options graduates may wish to consider. Opportunities are available both in the UK and overseas.

Examples of possible career routes include:
-NHS laboratories and similar private laboratories, PHE laboratories, the Blood Transfusion service
-University research laboratories
-Bioscience/Life Sciences private companies
-Laboratory Quality Assurance and Management

WORK PLACEMENTS

If you elect for the Extended Masters programme MSc Biomedical Science with Professional Experience (HLST139) you may apply for an internship lasting 2 semesters.

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This CIPD approved course develops the key people management and development skills associated with Human Resources. Read more

Course Description

This CIPD approved course develops the key people management and development skills associated with Human Resources.
The Postgraduate Diploma in HRM is approved by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD) as meeting the knowledge requirements that are pre-requisite for Chartered Membership or Chartered Fellowship of the CIPD.

See the website http://www.ntu.ac.uk/apps/pss/course_finder/60702-1/1/pgdip_human_resource_management.aspx?utm_campaign=FAM-BLSS-Nov-15&utm_medium=Profile&utm_source=Findamasters&utm_term=BLSS

This course will:
- provide you with an opportunity for professional development and for enhanced career development at a time when postgraduate professional qualifications are becoming increasingly recognised by employers.

- develop your knowledge and understanding of the major elements of managerial, personnel and development principles and practice.

- enable you to demonstrate a critical understanding of contemporary issues and current thinking about organisations and their management in relation to external and internal contexts.

- provide you with knowledge and a critical understanding of conceptual frameworks, perspectives and issues associated with the management of human resources, and enable you to apply this to practical, organisational situations.

Course content

You will complete five core modules:
- HRM in its Business Context
- People Resourcing and Talent Management
- Learning and Talent Development
- Research Methods and Professional Skills
- Applied Management Research Report.

A specialist elective module allows you to develops skills and knowledge in an area of your own particular interest. In your second year, whilst completing your applied management research report, you will elect one module. The specialist options we offer may include:
- Managing Employee Relations and Engagement
- Performance Management
- Reward Management
- Employment Law
- eHR
- CSR and Diversity in HRM.

Study and support

Attendance in both years is mostly on a weekly basis and teaching normally takes place in the afternoons and evenings. The induction will take place over two full days and there will be a residential during HRM in its Business Context.

Teaching and learning

We recognise that many of you are experienced, mature professionals and that undertaking a professional qualification indicates a tendency towards self-motivated learning. We aim to develop your skills by:
- utilising your individual work and life experiences
- applying theory to relevant organisational contexts, both real and simulated
- focusing on group as well as individual activities
- incorporating a wide range of teaching and learning methods.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out internally through Nottingham Business School. The modules are designed so that the required knowledge and skills are appropriately assessed.

This is primarily carried out through:
- Organisationally based Assignments
- Examinations that incorporate case studies and issue-based questions

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Ranked number one in Wales for student satisfaction (Complete University Guide 2017), Education at Wrexham Glyndwr University is one of the institution's most successful courses, working closely with organisations in a wide group of sectors, notably FE, health and training. Read more
Ranked number one in Wales for student satisfaction (Complete University Guide 2017), Education at Wrexham Glyndwr University is one of the institution's most successful courses, working closely with organisations in a wide group of sectors, notably FE, health and training.

The department has had a successful period which included strong performances in the Sunday Times and Guardian league tables.

Our MA Education has been designed to provide content and context that relates directly to the work of educational professionals in their settings including schools, colleges, universities and public sector organisations. All content and assignments are work-related, enabling you to consider the latest theoretical underpinning for the subject area selected relating to your work.

You can select from the following named routes:
-MA Education (Learning & Teaching)
-MA Education (Leadership)
-MA Education (Additional Learning Needs)
-MA Education (Youth and Community Work)
-MA Education (Counselling Skills for Education)
-or make their own selection of modules to achieve the generic MA Education award.

The MA Education (Additional Learning Needs) has two pathways. There are generic SEN/ALN modules or, candidates may elect to study the specific British Dyslexia Association accredited modules to achieve the Approved Teacher Status (ATS) and then the Associate Member of the British Dyslexia Association (AMBDA) awards.

The MA Education has been designed to meet the requirements of the Welsh Government’s priorities for education and caters for a wide range of professionals who are involved in delivering education in a variety of organisations and related settings. Partners involved in the design of this programme included: local authorities; FE colleges; voluntary and community organisations, nurse educators; headteachers; teachers and current students.

Whatever setting you come from, you will be challenged to extend your thinking about the subjects you select, deepen your understanding of the content and theoretical foundations of the area and, be encouraged to reflect critically upon how this will impact on your practice. All assignments will be context related to enable you to implement many of the ideas discussed and to evaluate their success.

Key Course Features

-The course is designed in partnership with LEAs, local further and higher education and training providers, professional agencies and leading consultants.
-The MA provides Continuing Professional Development for professionals working in schools, further education and training, higher education and community and voluntary sectors.
-The course provides progression opportunities from undergraduate level by offering a number of exit points: single module, postgraduate certificate, postgraduate diploma and MA Education.
-The programme is accredited by the British Dyslexia Association (BDA).

What Will You Study?

The programme is structured to develop your skills and concepts incrementally through the following stages:
-Postgraduate Certificate stage: 1 core module: Mastering Professional Learning, and 1 option module.
-Postgraduate Diploma stage: 1 core module: Research Methodology and Enquiry in Education, and 1 option module.
-MA Education stage: A dissertation on an aspect of interest that you wish to explore.

A selection of the option modules available include (subject to numbers):
-Overview of behaviour management
-Supporting mathematical learning: pupils with specific learning difficulties
-Supporting pupils with literacy difficulties and dyslexia
-Inclusion
-Poverty, Attainment and Education
-Learning from Teaching
-Promoting Positive Behaviour
-Recognising, Respecting and Developing Individuality
-Curriculum Design and Development
-Learning and Assessment
-Language and Literacy in Learning and Teaching
-Effective Professional Learning Communities (60 credits)
-Teaching Critical Thinking, Reasoning and Argument Skills
-Teaching and Learning with Technology
-Mentoring to Develop and Improve Professional Practice
-Negotiated Learning
-Leadership and Management in Education
-Leading and Managing Professionals
-Accountability, Evaluation and School Improvement
-Strategic and Developmental Planning for School Improvement
-Impact of Developmental Ages and Stages on the Counselling Relationship
-Using Creative Resources in Counselling
-Relationships in Schools: How to Use Counselling Skills to Support Pupils’ Well-being and Achievement
-Therapeutic Play Skills

The information listed in this section is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal academic framework review, so may be subject to change.

Assessment and Teaching

Assessments will reflect the professional context in which you work and reflect an enquiry-led approach to learning that comprises portfolios, presentations, reports, research projects, reports to seminar groups and essays.

Career Prospects

The Careers & Zone at Wrexham Glyndŵr University is there to help you make decisions and plan the next steps towards a bright future. From finding work or further study to working out your interests, skills and aspirations, they can provide you with the expert information, advice and guidance you need.

This course provides a career-enhancing, internationally-recognised award that is valued by many professions.

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The MA Ceramics Programme’s aim is to enable each student to identify their true interests and concerns as artists, designers or makers and to develop appropriate methods to explore their ideas and articulate or express them effectively in imaginative or innovative ways, through the medium of ceramics. Read more

Course Overview

The MA Ceramics Programme’s aim is to enable each student to identify their true interests and concerns as artists, designers or makers and to develop appropriate methods to explore their ideas and articulate or express them effectively in imaginative or innovative ways, through the medium of ceramics.

It also engages students with the key theories and contemporary debates, thus fostering their understandings of the ways in which these influence the development, expression and communication of their ideas, which will impact upon the success of their future practice as artists, makers or academics

Ceramics is a medium in which the practitioner occupies very different positions and frequently has opposing priorities and values drawn from previous personal experiences, technical competence and tacit knowledge.

The MA Ceramics programme is for individuals seeking to extend and develop their practice as well as deepen their knowledge and understandings of the subject, as future practitioners, researchers or academics.

The MA programme allows each student to:
- Develop their authorship of advanced studio work
- Be analytically rigorous
- Develop a greater capacity for reflection

Students are encouraged to challenge norms and question conventions through fusing materiality and concept. This approach is underpinned by a critical and historical approach discourse – a critical language for both fine and applied art and design.

See the website https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/artanddesign/courses/Pages/maceramics.aspx

Course Content

The MA programme is offered as One Year Full Time, or Two Years Part Time.

Students undertake a sequentially designed course to lead seamlessly from one module to the next and finally into the Major study (equivalent to Dissertation of a more theory based MA). There are no options or electives or alternatives to the scheme. The development of these skills have been embedded into specific modules.

The following Modules will be undertaken by MA Ceramics students:
- MAA7001 Research Methods (20 Credits)
- MAC7004 Studio Project 1 (40 Credits)
- MAC 7006 Studio Project 2 (40 Credits)
- MAC7008 Dissertation (20 Credits)
- MAC7007 Major Project (60 Credits)

Exit points/Awards
- On completing 120 credits in total students will be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma.
- On completing 180 credits in total students will be awarded a Master’s Degree (MA Ceramics).

Learning & Teaching

The MA is taught through lecture and seminar with individualised supervisory meetings to develop a learning contract (part of the early Personal Development Planning process [PDP]) and an individualised programme of learning and individualised supervision towards a creative research outcome, defined and monitored by developing PDP.

Our approach to learning and teaching is based on negotiation and dialogue, encouraging students to develop their own, self-directed project to a professional standard within a rigorous yet supportive academic environment. To support this, each student is allocated a Personal Tutor and an additional subject-specialist member of staff (academic tutor) from within the design expertise in a respective design department.

Together, they form the Supervisory Team. The CSAD web application form includes a personal statement, and an outline of the professional or research project that the student wishes to pursue at Masters level. This informs the allocation of personal tutor and subject-specialist member of academic staff (academic tutor) with whom the learning contract is established, which in turn forms the basis for the student’s personal plan, reflected on in the continuing PDP process.

There are opportunities for all MA students to come together in common teaching and presentations, to engage in peer learning groups and peer review of work, and to reflect on the outcomes of these peer reviews in PDP. At several key stages in the MA programme we stress the importance of self-directed and negotiated learning. This is in part a response to what we perceive to be a growing demand for programmes of study that allow students to integrate work, study, career, personal aspirations and other commitments.

All course documentation, including Cardiff Metropolitan University’s Research Studies Manual, CSAD’s Research Study Guide, the MA Ceramics Handbook with module descriptors, assessment guidelines and criteria, will be available as hard copy and electronically. In addition, lecture PowerPoint presentations and workshop-generated material, for example, paragraphs and textual or visual analyses composed during workshops, will be available on the Cardiff Metropolitan University Virtual Learning Environment (VLE).

Remote or electronic contact with staff will be available by email and/or VLE. The supervisory team will deliver, manage and monitor each student's progress through a number of individual and team meetings. Students will also be encouraged to form and maintain peer-learning groups, either face-to-face or online. Learning will be supported through the use of the VLE, electronic communications, and other relevant methods. Any students requiring learning support are advised to contact Learning Support in Student Services. Throughout the programme, students are expected to maintain their own Personal Development Plan/Portfolio (PDP), intended to provide evidence of their knowledge and understanding in relation to the learning outcomes of each module.

Each 20 credits is equivalent to 240 learning hours (80 typically are taught and 160 are directed study or independent study).

Assessment

For each module, assessment is in the form of:
- MAA7001 Research Methods (20credits) Written 3000 word paper
- MAC7004 Studio Project1. (40 credits) Constructing a Discourse’ Presentation of Practical Work Power Point Presentation with 1,000-1500 word transcript
- MAC 7006 Studio Project 2. (40 credits)Presentation of Practical Work Power Point Presentation, with 1,000-1500 word transcript Viva Voce.
- MAC7008 (20 credits) ‘Developing a Theoretical Context for Student’s Studio-Based Practice’. Written 5000 word paper
- MAC7007 Major Project. (60 credits) Presentation of Practical Work Power Point Presentation with 1,000-1500 word transcript Viva Voce.

Support will be available through weekly individual tutorials, group seminars, workshops where practical demonstrations, involving student participation. This may include, for example (Theory), communal writing (via computer and data projector) or group discourse analysis.

Students are encouraged to instigate discussion within and outside of the formal delivery Programme Face book pages and blogs further contribute and facilitate this shared learning experience.

Employability & Careers

The MA Ceramics programme enables students to enhance their careers as, or to become, established artist, designers, makers leading towards a career, or towards a PhD or to a Professional Doctorate in either art or design. Cardiff School of Art and Design offers Professional Doctoral programs in both Art and Design.

The MA Ceramics programme is designed to enable students to achieve the attributes of greater flexibility, adaptability, and individual responsibility and autonomy as professional artists, makers and designers or researchers. It is Internationally recognised that the MA Ceramics programme develops individuality , creativity, self-reliance, initiative, and the ability to perform in rapidly changing environments as well as increasing competence with research skills and methods which will make graduates highly employable as academics and or researchers or enable them to develop an active and sustained practice as artists makers or designers.

The MA Ceramics programme particularly characteristic is that it enable graduates, mid- career and professional practitioners from within and outside of the discipline of Ceramics to negotiate and examine strategies of Practice through the medium of Ceramics and yet being able to create their own hybrids of material based practice that can further enhance the territory that Ceramics can occupy.

All students receive individual Semester based PDP tutorials to support employability and life-long learning. Learning Journal blogs, and continuous visual documentation /text that integrates opportunities for self-reflection in programmes in order to help them develop as effective and confident learners are expected to be maintained throughout the programme of study.

At the conclusion of the programme, a very high percentage of MA graduates establish or continue their professional practice, enabled by the links they have made with galleries or organisations associated with the visual arts. Some elect to continue with ceramics at CSAD by undertaking a PhD.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

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This Master’s degree in history will provide you with the advanced conceptual, theoretical and practical skills necessary for undertaking historical research, whether at PhD level, professionally or independently. Read more
This Master’s degree in history will provide you with the advanced conceptual, theoretical and practical skills necessary for undertaking historical research, whether at PhD level, professionally or independently. It will give you the intellectual foundations, practical techniques and confidence to pursue your own research in the historical subject or period that most interests you.

The core modules provide fundamental training in approaching and carrying out research at a postgraduate level, including locating, retrieving and managing historical evidence, contextualising and analysing textual, visual and material sources, and using qualitative and quantitative methods, including specialist software, to assess and analyse historical data. We will critically examine problems of historical theory and practice, with an emphasis on debates around key topics such as historical narrative, objectivity and relativism, causation, the relationship of history to other disciplines, the rise and impact of social and cultural histories, and new directions in historical research and writing. We will consider some of the key methodological and theoretical approaches to history of the past 100 years, including the Annales School, Marxist historiography and postmodernism.

As well as being able to choose option modules from the extensive range offered by the Department of History, Classics and Archaeology, you will also be able to elect to undertake option modules offered by other departments. The culmination of the programme is the writing of an independently researched dissertation under the guidance and supervision of one of our research-active academics.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.
This Master's degree in historical research is specifically aimed at providing intellectual and skills training for students considering future research at PhD level, professionally or independently.
Our Department of History, Classics and Archaeology is one of the leading research and teaching departments for history in the UK. It is ranked 6th in the UK for the percentage of our research deemed world-leading or internationally excellent.
Our academic staff are international authorities in their fields, delivering stimulating, research-led teaching.
Our department is home to thriving student societies and a number of affiliated research centres that actively run seminars, conferences and other events where some of the world's best scholars present their latest research. These include the Pears Institute for the Study of Antisemitism, the Raphael Samuel History Centre and the Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities.
We are located 5 minutes' walk from the British Museum and the British Library, while the Museum of London is easily reachable. The Institute of Historical Research is located in Bloomsbury, near the main Birkbeck campus, and has an internationally renowned library collection and seminars that you can attend.
Birkbeck Library has an extensive history collection, including the major specialist journals, and access to online materials.
Find out more about why you should study with us.

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Advanced Practice is a part-time study for experienced healthcare practitioners in hospital and community settings. Builds on existing skills and experience to enable you to lead and support the development and delivery of evidence-based practice. Read more
Advanced Practice is a part-time study for experienced healthcare practitioners in hospital and community settings. Builds on existing skills and experience to enable you to lead and support the development and delivery of evidence-based practice. Module outcomes mapped against the Knowledge and Skills Framework so NHS employees can identify learning to support career progression.

Key benefits

- Central location allows access to world leading clinical and academic resources
- Access to extracurricular seminars and lectures given by leaders in healthcare from around the world
- A multi-faculty environment drawing on clinical and academic expertise from a number of world leading schools and hospitals providing an unparalleled inter-professional learning experience.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/advanced-practice-msc-pg-dip-pg-cert.aspx

Course detail

- Description

This programme is suitable for practitioners, educators and managers from many healthcare disciplines who are developing autonomous practice, supporting educational and practice development or exercising clinical leadership. Practitioners may choose to follow generic pathway or choose from a number of clinical specialities. Applicants are generally expected to be working within the chosen specialist field.

Relevant for qualified healthcare practitioners in the following areas: Cancer Nursing, Cardiac Care, Child Healthcare, Critical Care, Dermatology, Diabetes Care, District Nursing, Leadership, Midwifery, Palliative Care, Primary Care Nurse Practitioner/Community Matron/Case Manager, Women's Health Care.

- Course Purpose

This programme is intended for experienced healthcare practitioners who are seeking to advance their practice, enhance their knowledge of research and evidence-based healthcare, and develop their roles.

- Course format and assessment

This programme is part-time with taught sessions comprising a mixture of one day per week attendance and study blocks. Students select from modules rated at 15 or 30 credits. Students may elect to undertake one or more practice portfolios where practice accounts are used to demonstrate specialist or advanced practice.

Students are assessed through a combination of coursework and examinations. This can include written assignments such as essays, portfolios and dissertations. In addition, some modules will require students to undertake a presentation as part of the module assessment. A small number of modules are assessed by an exam, such as an unseen written examination or a computer-based assessment.

All students will also have to complete a clinical-based competency assessment as part of the MSc/PGDip/PGCert Advanced Practice pathway. This assessment is a clinical hurdle with 0 credits and is undertaken in the student’s workplace with an assessor.

- Required modules:

- Evidence-based Decision Making In Healthcare
- Measurement and Evaluation For Healthcare Practice

Prior learning

Students who have already studied clinically-focused modules at undergraduate or graduate level at King's may be able to incorporate this study into the programme, subject to certain limits, provided that the credits have not already contributed to an award. Modules studied elsewhere may be incorporated through accreditation of prior certificated learning (subject to a successful accreditation claim).

Career prospects

Possible options after taking this programme include advanced practice roles such as nurse consultant, specialist practice roles, education, research and audit.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

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This course has been designed with industry to meet the challenge of interdependence between sophisticated engineered systems of all kinds. Read more
This course has been designed with industry to meet the challenge of interdependence between sophisticated engineered systems of all kinds. It is often taken in its part-time format.

It is aimed at engineers who have specialised in a traditional discipline but are now expected to understand, operate in, develop and integrate entire systems that are not only increasingly complex but rapidly changing.

The block taught format of the programme and the option to elect assessment by coursework rather than exam makes it a popular part time course and a CPD option.

Core study areas include systems thinking, systems architecture, systems design, verification and validation, and an individual project.

Optional study areas include enterprise systems management, holistic engineering (industry-led module), sensors and actuators for control, imagineering technologies, engineering and management of capability and understanding complexity.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/eese/systems-engineering/

Programme modules

Compulsory Modules:
• Systems Thinking
• Systems Architecture
• Systems Design
• Validation & Verification
• Individual Project

Optional Modules (choose four):
• Enterprise Systems Engineering
• Holistic Engineering (industry-led module)
• Sensors and Actuators for Control
• Imagineering Technologies
• Engineering and Management of Capability
• Understanding Complexity

Block taught, individual modules are also highly suitable as CPD for professional engineers working onsystems engineering projects and challenges.

How you will learn

The curriculum stimulates thinking and extends the capabilities of technical managers and engineers to handle complexity, enabling them to remain effective in the workplace by providing:
- an integrated systems engineering view of inter-related technologies, processes, tools, techniques and their effective use;

- essential systems skills such as model-based systems architecture and design, against a background of the need for traceability in managing complex projects;

- knowledge and technical expertise in a range of systems technologies;

- experience of the importance to ultimate success of effective, integrated, multi-skilled project teams working in extended enterprises beyond the confines of any particular organisation;

- increased depth of technical and management knowledge through elective modules; and

- the ability to transfer systems skills and knowledge into the workplace through the individual master’s project.

Teaching staff comprise a varied skill set of international expertise to give the broadest perspectives and modules frequently feature master classes from industry practitioners.

- Assessment
There is the option to complete without written examinations as all compulsory modules are assessed by coursework. Where examinations are taken these are in January and May.

Facilities

We employ advanced modelling, simulation and interactive visualisation tools and techniques to enable you to gain greater understanding of the performance, behaviour and emergent properties of advanced technology and complex systems.

Many of these facilities are part of the Advanced VR Research Centre ( AVRRC) http://www.lboro.ac.uk/research/avrrc/facilities/

Careers and further study

Graduates of this course gain capabilities that are in global demand across a range of sectors and which can be applied to the challenges and issues posed by any complex system design and operation.

Promotion within their company for sponsored students is common since the course enables them to match higher job expectations and demands. Employed students often bring a work-relevant topic to their individual project giving the opportunity to display newly acquired skills.

Why choose electronic, electrical and systems engineering at Loughborough?

We develop and nurture the world’s top engineering talent to meet the challenges of an increasingly complex world. All of our Masters programmes are accredited by one or more of the following professional bodies: the IET, IMechE, InstMC, Royal Aeronautical Society and the Energy Institute.

We carefully integrate our research and education programmes in order to support the technical and commercial needs of society and to extend the boundaries of current knowledge.

Consequently, our graduates are highly sought after by industry and commerce worldwide, and our programmes are consistently ranked as excellent in student surveys, including the National Student Survey, and independent assessments.

- Facilities
Our facilities are flexible and serve to enable our research and teaching as well as modest preproduction testing for industry.
Our extensive laboratories allow you the opportunity to gain crucial practical skills and experience in some of the latest electrical and electronic experimental facilities and using industry standard software.

- Research
We are passionate about our research and continually strive to strengthen and stimulate our portfolio. We have traditionally built our expertise around the themes of communications, energy and systems, critical areas where technology and engineering impact on modern life.

- Career prospects
90% of our graduates were in employment and/or further study six months after graduating. They go on to work with companies such as Accenture, BAE Systems, E.ON, ESB International, Hewlett Packard, Mitsubishi, Renewable Energy Systems Ltd, Rolls Royce and Siemens AG.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/eese/systems-engineering/

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The web-based MA Modern English Language offers you the opportunity to follow a wide range of modules from across the expertise of the language section of the School of English. Read more
The web-based MA Modern English Language offers you the opportunity to follow a wide range of modules from across the expertise of the language section of the School of English.

Therefore, this course is ideal if you do not want to specialise in your language study or if you want the flexibility of building your own programme.

The MA has intakes in September and February.

Key facts

The MA courses by web-based distance learning build on the international reputation of the School of English at Nottingham as one of the foremost centres for English Language research in the world.
We are ranked 7th for English in The Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2015, in the world top 50 for English Literature, Language and Linguistics (QS World University Rankings 2014) and 9th in the UK for 'research power' (REF 2014)..
The course is taught using a course tool software called Moodle. It is also supported by extensive online resources, course materials and teaching.
The programme offers an excellent route towards pursuing a PhD.
The MA Modern English Language is also available as a taught full- or part-time course within the University.
As well as completing this course at a pace that suits you and your other commitments, you have the flexibility to study towards a Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits), Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits) or an MA (180 credits, including dissertation). Please note that if you wish to study for a Postgraduate Certificate or Postgraduate Diploma you still need to apply for the full MA; you would then elect to leave the course with the alternative award once studying.

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The School of English at Nottingham has long been at the forefront of research and teaching in the area of applied linguistics. This web-based MA provides an exciting opportunity to work with several leading world figures and to investigate English language in applied contexts. Read more
The School of English at Nottingham has long been at the forefront of research and teaching in the area of applied linguistics.

This web-based MA provides an exciting opportunity to work with several leading world figures and to investigate English language in applied contexts.

You will be introduced to the key ideas and concepts in applied linguistics and provided with thorough training in relevant research methods. This MA is particularly suitable if you wish to pursue a PhD programme after completion of the MA.

The principle of language study that we have established at Nottingham combines theoretical and ideological dimensions with practical applications; we aim to be rigorous and principled while offering an approach to language study that is fundamentally humane.

The MA has intakes in September and February.

Key facts

- The MA courses by web-based distance learning build on the international reputation of the School of English at Nottingham as one of the foremost centres for English Language research in the world.

- We are ranked 7th for English in The Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2015, in the world top 50 for English Literature, Language and Linguistics (QS World University Rankings 2014) and 9th in the UK for 'research power' (REF 2014).

- The course is taught using a course tool software called Moodle. It is also supported by extensive online resources, course materials and teaching.

- The programme offers an excellent route towards pursuing a PhD.

- This MA is convened in the Centre for Research in Applied Linguistics and is among the most popular postgraduate courses of its kind in the UK.

- As well as completing this course at a pace that suits you and your other commitments, you have the flexibility to study towards a Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits), Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits) or an MA (180 credits, including dissertation). Please note that if you wish to study for a Postgraduate Certificate or Postgraduate Diploma you still need to apply for the full MA; you would then elect to leave the course with the alternative award (in Modern English Language) once studying.

- The MA Applied Linguistics is also available as an on-site taught full- or part-time course within the University.

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This course has been running for more than forty years and is recognised as providing a good grounding for students interested in the management, engineering and planning of transport infrastructure. Read more
This course has been running for more than forty years and is recognised as providing a good grounding for students interested in the management, engineering and planning of transport infrastructure. It takes students from a wide range of relevant backgrounds.

The emphasis of the course is on current methodology and practice to improve your employability with engineering and planning departments of local and central governments, passenger transport executives, and transport consultants.

This degree is accredited as meeting the requirements for Further Learning for a Chartered Engineer (CEng) for candidates who have already acquired an Accredited CEng (Partial) BEng(Hons) or an Accredited IEng (Full) BEng/BSc (Hons) undergraduate first degree.

Key benefits:

• Member of the national Universities Transport Partnership
(http://www.utp.org.uk)
• Emphasis on methodology and practice, guided by the needs of employers
• Meets requirements for Further Learning for a Chartered Engineer (CEng)

Visit the website: http://www.salford.ac.uk/pgt-courses/transport-engineering-and-planning

Suitable for

Graduates come from a wide variety of backgrounds including civil engineering, geography, economics, mathematics, physics, business studies and social studies wishing to specialise in the field of transport engineering and planning. Students will need a reasonable aptitude for mathematics/statistics.

Programme details

Transport engineering modules relate to traffic engineering and transport systems design. Transport planning modules consider policy (such as reducing car dependency), travel demand forecasting and appraisal. If you have a civil engineering background you can elect to take an optional module in transport infrastructure design as an alternative to the extended modelling and appraisal work.

The course is supported by field surveys, seminars and studio work, allowing students to experience a range of relevant computer packages and methodological approaches.

You are also required to produce a dissertation with the close supervision of an expert academic member of staff.

This course may be taken on a full-time or part-time basis. The part-time course enables candidates who would not normally be able to obtain a year’s release from employment to also study in depth and is used by some employers as part of their formal graduate training programme.

Format

The course combines formal lectures and seminars with extensive coursework including transport planning studio work, traffic survey projects, appraisal assignments and statistics tutorials. The teaching panel includes visiting specialists with expert knowledge of specific topics.

You will be exposed to a range of relevant transport software.

Part-time students study the taught modules over two years on a day-release basis (currently Thursdays)

Module titles

• Transport Planning: Policy and Principles
• Transport Engineering: Principles and Methodologies
• Transport Engineering: Analysis and Road Safety
• Transport Planning: Forecasting and Appraisal (option)
• Transport Infrastructure Design and Analysis (option)
• MSc Dissertation

Assessment

Assessment is by a combination of formal examinations, tutorial and seminar work, course assignment portfolio and a dissertation. The overall breakdown is:

• Examination: 50%
• Coursework: 50%

Career potential

Graduates come from a wide variety of backgrounds including civil engineering, geography, economics, mathematics, physics, business studies and social studies wishing to specialise in the field of transport engineering and planning. Students will need a reasonable aptitude for mathematics/statistics.

How to apply: http://www.salford.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/applying

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