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The MA pathway in Eighteenth-Century Studies is an interdisciplinary programme for the study of eighteenth-century British culture which draws on modules in literature and history, and has contributions from all subject-areas in the Faculty of Humanities. Read more

The MA pathway in Eighteenth-Century Studies is an interdisciplinary programme for the study of eighteenth-century British culture which draws on modules in literature and history, and has contributions from all subject-areas in the Faculty of Humanities.

Introducing your degree

The MA pathway in Eighteenth-Century Studies will give you the opportunity to specialise in the culture and history of the long eighteenth century. It is taught by world-leading experts in the period who are as passionate about the subject as you are, and is linked to Chawton House Library, a unique collection of women’s writing. It will empower you to conduct advanced-level research and independent critical thinking; to make effective use of archives, manuscripts, and research libraries; and examine how eighteenth- century literature and culture shaped our understanding of education, class, sexuality, nature, economics, and more. Not only will you emerge with an internationally-recognised masters degree from a top Russell Group university, you will also acquire the critical thinking and writing skills that will give you the competitive edge, either as a future scholar or as a professional in areas such as secondary school teaching, librarianship, publishing and roles in the heritage industry.

Overview

The Eighteenth Century pathway allows you to specialise in the literary culture and history of the long eighteenth century. It is taught by world-leading experts in the field and has a unique link to Chawton House Library .

Our MA English Literary Studies (Eighteenth Century) will enable you to work independently in the field; to explore how genres, authors, and texts participate in wider public discourses concerning gender, sexuality, and class; and to evaluate unique archival resources specific to eighteenth-century studies. It will develop your knowledge and understanding of critical and research methods appropriate to the period; raise your awareness of the historical and critical reception of literature in the long eighteenth century; and empower you to explore the nuances of literary meaning in the contested cultural field of eighteenth-century public culture.

View the programme specification document for this course

Career Opportunities

An MA in English Literary Studies is excellent preparation for a career in teaching, publishing and arts administration. Graduates of our programme go onto professional careers in writing (from journalism to fiction), education, international PhD programmes, teaching, broadcasting, and varied work in the creative industries. Former graduates and alumni return to give talks throughout the year, and you will help you make the most of the opportunities here.

A number of our graduates have gone on to careers in teaching, journalism, media and found the year-long course invaluable in shaping and developing their voice.



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This MA offers an intellectually dynamic introduction to one of the most exciting eras in literary history. Read more
This MA offers an intellectually dynamic introduction to one of the most exciting eras in literary history.

Grounded in and administered from the Centre for Studies in the Long Eighteenth Century, this is an interdisciplinary MA programme that builds upon the expertise and common research interests of 18th-century researchers and teachers across the Faculty of Humanities. The Centre provides an excellent research context for the MA programme and any further postgraduate work that will arise from it.

Among the teachers involved in this MA are Jennie Batchelor (English), Jonathan Friday (History and Philosophy of Art), Donna Landry (English), Paddy Bullard (English) and Ben Thomas (History & Philosophy of Art).

The Eighteenth-Century Studies MA is also available at Canterbury and Paris (https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/221/eighteenth-century-studies-paris). After spending your first term at our Canterbury campus, you relocate to our Paris centre for the spring term to study in the heart of historic Montparnasse.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/220/eighteenth-century-studies

About the School of English

The School of English has a strong international reputation and global perspective, apparent both in the background of its staff and in the diversity of our teaching and research interests.

Our expertise ranges from the medieval to the postmodern, including British, American and Irish literature, postcolonial writing, 18th-century studies, Shakespeare, early modern literature and culture, Victorian studies, modern poetry, critical theory and cultural history. The international standing of the School ensures that we have a lively, confident research culture, sustained by a vibrant, ambitious intellectual community. We also count a number of distinguished creative writers among our staff, and we actively explore crossovers between critical and creative writing in all our areas of teaching and research.

The Research Excellence Framework 2014 has produced very strong results for the School of English at Kent. With 74% of our work graded as world-leading or internationally excellent, the School is ranked 10th out of 89 English departments in terms of Research Intensity (Times Higher Education). The School also received an outstanding assessment of the quality of its research environment and public impact work.

Course structure

You take two modules in the autumn term and two in the spring term; two core modules and two optional modules. You are also expected to attend the Faculty and School Research Methods Programmes.

You then write a dissertation or an editorial project between the start of the Summer Term and the end of August.

Modules

In the 2014/15 academic year the following two core specialist modules were available: EN832 - Hacks, Dunces and Scribblers: Authorship and the Marketplace in the Eighteenth Century and EN895 - Jane Austen and Material Culture. These should be considered indicative of the types of modules available, which may vary from year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.

EN832 - Hacks, Dunces and Scribblers: Authorship and the Marketplace in the Eig (30 credits)
HI826 - Literary Undergrounds and Anarchists in the Basement (12 credits)
HI874 - Religion and Society in Seventeenth-Century England (30 credits)
MT864 - Reading the Medieval Town: Canterbury, an International City (30 credits)
MT865 - Encountering the Holy: Devotion and the Medieval Church (30 credits)
EN834 - Imagining India (30 credits)
EN835 - Dickens, The Victorians and the Body (30 credits)
EN836 - Dickens and the Material Culture of the Victorian Novel (30 credits)
EN842 - Reading the Contemporary (30 credits)
EN850 - Centres and Edges: Modernist and PostcolonialQuest Literature (30 credits)
EN852 - Colonial and Postcolonial Discourses (30 credits)
EN857 - Body and Place in the Postcolonial Text (30 credits)
EN862 - Contemporary Arab Novel (30 credits)
EN865 - Post-45: American Literature and Culture in the Cold War Era (30 credits)
EN866 - The Awkward Age: Transatlantic Culture and Literature in Transition, 18 (30 credits)
EN872 - Provocations and Invitations (30 credits)
EN876 - Dickens and the Condition of England (30 credits)
EN888 - Extremes of Feeling: Literature and Empire in the Eighteenth Century (30 credits)
EN889 - Literary Theory (30 credits)
EN897 - Advanced Critical Reading (30 credits)
EN818 - American Modernism 1900-1930 (Teaching Period I) (30 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by a 5-6,000-word essay for each module and a 12-15,000-word dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- extend and deepen through coursework and research your understanding of eighteenth-century literary, visual and material culture and its political and cultural contexts

- develop your understanding of, and engagement with, the critical and methodological paradigms that inform the field of eighteenth-century studies today

- develop your independent critical thinking and judgement.

- introduce you to the research methods that facilitate advanced study in the field

- provide a basis in knowledge and skills for those intending to teach eighteenth-century studies, especially in higher education

- provide an interdisciplinary context for the study of eighteenth-century literary, visual and material culture.

- develop your ability to argue a point of view with clarity and cogency, both orally and in written form

- provide teaching which is informed by current research and scholarship and which requires you to engage with aspects of work at the frontiers of knowledge

- develop your research skills to the point where you are ready to undertake a research degree.

Careers

Many career paths can benefit from the writing and analytical skills that you develop as a postgraduate student in the School of English. Our students have gone on to work in academia, journalism, broadcasting and media, publishing, writing and teaching; as well as more general areas such as banking, marketing analysis and project management.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Find out more about this programme at our Postgraduate Open Day on Wednesday 22 March 2017. To register, visit. www.liverpool.ac.uk/pg/openday. Read more
Find out more about this programme at our Postgraduate Open Day on Wednesday 22 March 2017. To register, visit: http://www.liverpool.ac.uk/pg/openday

The Eighteenth-Century Worlds pathw will take you on an investigative journey through the history, literature and visual and material culture of Europe and its interactions with the wider world, from the Atlantic to Asia.

This highly original interdisciplinary postgraduate course gives you the opportunity to study in one of Britain’s leading Atlantic ports; a city rich in eighteenth-century history, architecture and culture.

Researching the subject is a real pleasure in Liverpool. The city is home to more national museums and galleries than any other English city outside of London.

The expertise of our research-active tutors and the combination of modules makes this a unique course, following the trajectory to a global world during the eighteenth century.

ERASMUS Exchange with Paris Diderot

There is an opportunity for students to spend semester 2 studying at the University of Paris-Diderot, taking modules there while preparing their feasibility study. Further details will be available in due course. For students who do not choose to go abroad, the course is enhanced by the presence of a visiting lecturer from Paris in each academic year.

Eighteenth-Century Worlds Research Centre

All MA students are encouraged to take part in the activities of the Centre. These include research seminars with invited speakers and workshops and conferences, some designed specifically for postgraduates. Watch this space!

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

The MA programme has as its core one interdisciplinary module in each semester . These modules are team-taught by staff with expertise in British and Continental European literary, cultural and historical studies (including colonial and postcolonial studies) and in Classics. They are designed to introduce postgraduates to the range of disciplines covered by the MA, while raising awareness of methodological and theoretical concerns and some of the key themes in eighteenth-century studies. The other compulsory elements are a module on research methods, the Feasibility Study and the Dissertation. The choice of dissertation topic is up to the student, and the Feasibility Study and Dissertation can be supervised by staff from any of the participating Departments (History; English; Cultures, Languages and Area Studies; Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology).

All studies are co-ordinated by the Eighteenth-Century Worlds Centre at the University of Liverpool. The two core modules are worth 30 credits each, while the research methods module and Feasibility Study are both worth 15 credits. I. In addition to the compulsory modules, students select one 15-credit option in each semester from modules in English literature and the reception of classical antiquity. Over the summer students complete the 15,000-word dissertation which constitutes the final 60 credits of the MA programme.

Why History?

Breadth of expertise

The interests of our staff and PhD students are extremely diverse and span the medieval, early modern and modern periods.

Their work encompasses political, social, cultural, economic, military and diplomatic history, across Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia and the Americas.

Active seminar programmes, linked to our research centres and MA programmes, enable staff and postgraduates to present their work and listen to eminent visiting speakers.

These are our on-going seminar series:

Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Eighteenth-Century Worlds
Contemporary Cultural and Social
History
International Slavery
Contemporary History and Policy
New Research (run by our postgraduate students)
Recent conferences and workshops have addressed ‘Religion in the Spanish Baroque’, ‘Text and Place in Medieval and Early Modern Europe’, ‘Re-thinking Post- Slavery’ and ‘British Nuclear Culture’.

Taught programmes that prepare you for future research

By pursuing our programmes you’ll gain the skills and knowledge you need to carry out further research towards a PhD.

Our MA programmes are taught by research-active experts who bring their knowledge of, and passion for, their subjects into the seminar room.

Teaching takes place in small-group seminars or workshops and through one-to-one tutorials, as we believe this leads to the best collaboration between students and staff.

We offer programmes in:-

Cultural History
Eighteenth-Century Worlds
International Slavery Studies
Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Twentieth-Century History
You can also pursue an MRes in History or a vocational Masters in Archives and Records Management.

Support and skills training for PhD students

As a postgraduate research student you’ll receive comprehensive skills from the Graduate School, the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences and History Department.

This will equip you with the research skills you need to successfully complete your PhD.

Our PhD programmes place a strong emphasis on independent research and study, culminating in a 100,000-word dissertation. Two supervisors (normally experts in your chosen field) who will advise and support you through the process.

Our commitment to postgraduate students

We welcome enquiries from all postgraduate students interested in studying here and will give you all the academic, practical and pastoral support we can.

Students have a voice here and are represented on the School Postgraduate Committee. There’s also a dedicated staff – student liaison committee to oversee our MA and PhD programmes.

Postgraduate studentships and bursaries are often available.

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The Renaissance and the eighteenth-century are two of the richest periods in English literature, as well as areas in which some of the most exciting new critical and textual scholarship has been concentrated. Read more
The Renaissance and the eighteenth-century are two of the richest periods in English literature, as well as areas in which some of the most exciting new critical and textual scholarship has been concentrated. The relations between these periods are made especially close by the conflicts as well as the continuities that can be traced between them.

All the major writers of the eighteenth-century were passionate readers of Shakespeare, Jonson Milton and Spenser, with some publishing major editions of their works. Yet Pope and Swift, Dryden and Johnson saw themselves not just as the inheritors of their literary forebears, but as their masters, correcting and improving the literature of the Tudor and Stuart eras before them, as the products of a golden but unrefined age. What is at stake in the mighty contests that arise from the great works and the cultural shifts of the Renaissance and the eighteenth-century is the development of ‘English Literature’ itself.

Conversation with other students and researchers through departmental talks, seminars, conferences, and associated research centres such as the Liverpool Medieval and Renaissance Research Centre and the Eighteenth-Century Worlds Centre will help you situate that reading within a thriving academic context.

Why English?

Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), we ranked 10th out of 89 in the UK for 4* (world-leading) and 3* (internationally excellent) research.

Strong postgraduate community

With over 150 taught and research students from all over the world, you will be part of a genuine international community. You will be able to participate in our lively research culture through attending regular seminars and lectures by guest speakers as well as our own staff and students. A legacy from former tutor Miriam Allott has allowed the department to host a creative writing fellow (currently the poet Sean Borodale), and a vibrant series of international poetry readings. Recent conferences include ‘On Liberties’ at St Deiniol’s Library, and ‘Renaissance Old Worlds’ in collaboration with the British Library. As a doctoral student you can participate in the optional English Graduate Teaching Programme, which allows doctoral students to get the best of the teaching opportunities available without making significant demands on their time.

Career prospects

The independence of study, clarity of expression and management of time demanded by all our taught programmes equip the successful graduate with the skills and knowledge base required for further academic study and research in English and other areas.

However, many graduates choose to enter careers such as teaching, publishing and journalism, or to work in the business sector, often in human resources, administration, marketing or sales.

Successful alumni have gone on to teach English at elementary, secondary and tertiary levels in schools around the globe. A significant number of MA graduates have also continued their studies to PhD level.

Successful alumni have gone on to teach English at elementary, secondary and tertiary levels in schools around the globe. A significant number of MA graduates have also continued their studies at PhD level.

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Our Eighteenth Century Studies course is co- taught with the British Museum in London and by lecturers from eight different departments across Arts & Humanities, making it a truly multi-faceted degree, looking at all aspects of the eighteenth century. . Read more

Our Eighteenth Century Studies course is co- taught with the British Museum in London and by lecturers from eight different departments across Arts & Humanities, making it a truly multi-faceted degree, looking at all aspects of the eighteenth century. 

You can explore the Enlightenment through race, gender, class, intellectual networks and material culture; analyse ideas, objects, texts and arts and have access to unique, diverse and rich collections in central London, all close to King’s, including the National Portrait Gallery, the Royal Society, the Foundling Museum, and Sir John Soane’s Museum.

Key benefits

  • Joint degree with the British Museum
  • Unrivalled access to British Museum expertise
  • Unrivalled location for access to London's cultural collections
  • Located in the heart of London

Description

Our Eighteenth Century Studies MA is offered jointly by King’s and the British Museum. This collaboration means that we can draw on the expertise of scholars from eight Departments in the School of Humanities at King’s, and senior staff at the British Museum to offer exciting opportunities to explore 18th century textual, material and visual cultures. This MA consists of a required module, adissertation and (normally) four modules chosen from a wide range of options, including modules taught by the Departments of English, History, Comparative Literature, French, German, Music and Philosophy. The required module is taught in part by experts from the British Museum, with special reference to the Enlightenment Gallery and its history.

The required module Representing the Eighteenth Century explores constructions of Enlightenment, then and now, through frameworks such as race, gender, class, the body and intellectual networks. You will learn about the ideas of the Enlightenment and how it has been regarded subsequently. We will teach you how to analyse ideas, objects, texts and arts of the 18th century and, thanks to our unique collaboration with the British Museum, you will have the opportunity to research a wealth of 18th century materials under the guidance of world-leading curators and experts.

Course purpose

Provides teaching and research training in a wide variety of disciplines relating to the study of the 18th century. As the course will be offered jointly with the British Museum special emphasis will be placed on relevant collections held by that institution. Includes opportunities for training in any of the basic technical skills necessary for those who wish to go on to study for a PhD in 18th century subjects.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

If you are a full-time student, we will provide you with six to eight hours of teaching through lectures and seminars each week. We expect you to undertake an additional 34 hours of self-study each week.

If you are a part-time student, we will provide you with four hours of teaching through lectures and seminars each week in your first year, and two to four hours per week in your second year. We will expect you to undertake 23 hours of independent study each week in your first year and 11 hours in your second.

Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

Assessment

We assess our modules entirely through coursework, normally in the form of a 4,000-word essays. Your dissertation will consist of a 15,000-word essay.

Regulating body

King’s College London is regulated by the Higher Education Funding Council for England



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This MA offers an intellectually dynamic introduction to one of the most exciting eras in literary history. Read more
This MA offers an intellectually dynamic introduction to one of the most exciting eras in literary history.

Grounded in and administered from the Centre for Studies in the Long Eighteenth Century, this is an interdisciplinary MA programme that builds upon the expertise and common research interests of 18th-century researchers and teachers across the Faculty of Humanities. The Centre provides an excellent research context for the MA programme and any further postgraduate work that will arise from it.

This programme allows you to spend your first term at our Canterbury campus with full access to its excellent academic and recreational facilities, before relocating to our Paris centre for the spring term.

During your studies in Paris, you are based at Columbia Global Center (known as Reid Hall) in a historic corner of Montparnasse. You participate in the Paris-focused modules, taught in English. In the final term, you complete your MA by writing a 12-15,000-word dissertation on a research topic defined in collaboration with your academic supervisors.

You take two modules in each of the first two terms (three of these four modules are core) and a dissertation in the third.

Modules

In 2015 the following three core specialist modules were available: EN832 - Hacks, Dunces and Scribblers: Authorship and the Marketplace in the Eighteenth Century, CP812 - Enlightenment and Counter-Enlightenment in the Long Eighteenth Century and FR803 – Paris and the European Enlightenment. These should be considered indicative of the types of modules available, which may vary from year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.

Teaching and Assessment

Assessment is by a 5-6,000-word essay for each module and a 12,000 word dissertation.

This programme is also available at Canterbury only or full-time at Paris.
https://www.kent.ac.uk/english/postgraduate/index.html?tab=taught-masters

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Our MA in English Studies invites you to choose from a number of distinctive pathways through the programme. Our Eighteenth-Century Literature and Romanticism pathway takes a truly interdisciplinary approach, and explores the history of genres, philosophy, politics, history, and visual culture, amongst other topics. Read more
Our MA in English Studies invites you to choose from a number of distinctive pathways through the programme.

Our Eighteenth-Century Literature and Romanticism pathway takes a truly interdisciplinary approach, and explores the history of genres, philosophy, politics, history, and visual culture, amongst other topics.

In your first semester you might explore the popular culture of coffee house and tavern, the political world on the street and in parliament, the vocations of women poets and polemicists, polite society and its interest in the management of emotions and arts, and the metropolitan life of London.

In the second semester, you can examine Romantic poetics and manifestos, the theoretical and political growth of philosophical and cultural enlightenment, Orientalism, travel, and the French Revolution and its aftershocks.

This pathway aims to prepare students to formulate a research topic, identify research materials, and present an argument in written and oral form that is formed by alternative interpretations. Students who complete the pathway will be aware of the interdisciplinary debates concerning the literature and history of this period, and will have engaged with a variety of materials: theoretical, visual, historical, and literary. You will also be able to deploy a range of appropriate skills in research, bibliography, and IT.

You will be taught in small seminar groups, and will be introduced to a number of key research resources in London through a module in research skills.

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This is a fully interdisciplinary programme, involving the Departments of English, History, History of Art, and Archaeology. Read more
This is a fully interdisciplinary programme, involving the Departments of English, History, History of Art, and Archaeology. It offers the opportunity for you to study the culture and cultural history of the eighteenth century from new perspectives, as well as to lay foundations for higher degrees within the various disciplines involved in the programme.

We do not assume that you have any prior knowledge of more than one discipline, or that you wish to abandon whatever discipline you pursued in your earlier studies. Our aim is to encourage you to develop a kind of intellectual curiosity that is open to different methods of inquiry, and interested in exploring many different aspects of the period.

The MA can be taken full-time over one year, or part-time over two years.

Structure

In addition to their core module, students follow one optional module in the first term, and two optional modules in the second term. A range of module courses taught by staff from the English, History, Philosophy and History of Art Departments are available each year.

All courses are taught by weekly two-hour seminars. Assessment is by four term papers and a 14,000-16,000-word dissertation written over the summer term and vacation. Part-time students are encouraged to use the first summer term of their two years to begin working on their dissertation topic.

Students will also take classes in research training.

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Do you want to define your own path in literary and cultural studies? Take the opportunity to further your understanding of Modernity or eighteenth-century studies, or pursue your own interests and passions, with our MA English and Culture. Read more
Do you want to define your own path in literary and cultural studies? Take the opportunity to further your understanding of Modernity or eighteenth-century studies, or pursue your own interests and passions, with our MA English and Culture. On this diverse and challenging degree you’ll gain advanced research skills, which you’ll apply throughout your studies and beyond. Learn more about an existing area of interest, or discover something new on our highly adaptable and varied MA.

Key features

-Develop your research interests in the eighteenth century or Modernity studies, or carve your own path with a general MA spanning different periods.
-Define your own programme with modules which rotate yearly, giving you a fresh choice each year.
-Benefit from small tutorial groups across all modules, providing you with invaluable face-to-face contact with your tutors.
-Choose from modules closely integrated with staff research interests, whilst being able to pursue your own ideas.
-Hone your skills with a compulsory initial module which shows you how to carry out postgraduate research.
-Benefit from adaptable study routes, allowing you to find a means of studying which fits around your other commitments.
-Access resources at any time with the University library, open 24 hours, 365 days a year, offering a vast range of electronic and print materials, including a rare books collection.
-Engage closely with unique local resources such as the nationally designated eighteenth-century Cottonian Collection, or the University’s own rare books collection stocked with 19th century and 20th century periodicals.
-Build on your experience - some of our students have been involved in curating exhibitions and organising conferences.
-Make the most of a rich cultural environment with Plymouth University’s Peninsula Arts programme and the University’s links with local arts organisations, like the Theatre Royal.

Course details

In your first term you’ll take our compulsory research methods module. In addition, you’ll take a further three modules from those listed below – the combination depends on the award you wish to achieve at the end of the MA. The spring term and summer period will see you take the dissertation module in a subject of your choice, involving one-on-one supervision and support. This will be a chance to work independently on a project which interests and excites you. On a part-time route, you can complete the programme over either two or three years. After completing research methods in the first term, you’ll usually study one module per term for two years (although other arrangements are possible). This works out at three contact hours per week, plus independent reading and study of around 20 hours per week. You’ll then do your dissertation in the spring and summer of the second year, finishing the MA in two years, or defer the dissertation to the following year and complete in three years.

Core modules
-MAEL708 Poetry and the Modern Self
-MALT712 Fictions of femininity in eighteenth-century England
-MAEL700 Research Methods and Debates in Literary and Cultural Studies
-ENMA706 The Legacy of War: Fiction of the 1920's and 1930's

Optional modules
-MALT760 MA English and Culture Dissertation (Art, Architecture and Literature in the Eighteenth Century)
-MAEL740 MA English and Culture Dissertation
-ENMA720 MA English and Culture Dissertation (Literature and Modernity, 1860 - 1960)

Every postgraduate taught course has a detailed programme specification document describing the programme aims, the programme structure, the teaching and learning methods, the learning outcomes and the rules of assessment.

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Explore diverse forms of contemporary theatre with this practical course. You’ll study areas including devised performance and live art, community and applied theatres, new playwriting, classic texts on the contemporary stage, and documentary and verbatim theatre. Read more

About the course

Explore diverse forms of contemporary theatre with this practical course. You’ll study areas including devised performance and live art, community and applied theatres, new playwriting, classic texts on the contemporary stage, and documentary and verbatim theatre. Our teaching team has strong links with many major venues, theatre companies and practitioners, with Sheffield recently named best theatre city outside London.

Improve both your research and performance skills by working with practising theatre-makers and arts organisations. We have a fully equipped theatre workshop and studio spaces, a publicly licensed drama studio, and excellent editing and recording facilities.

Your career

You’ll examine early modern texts, language and culture. Staff expertise includes palaeography, rhetoric, news writing, the sermon, drama, and issues of political, sectarian and national identity between 1400 and 1700. Modules (including modules from History) can be tailored to suit your interests. You’ll complete one core module, optional modules and a dissertation.

Cultural life

Study eighteenth-century literature to develop a broad range of advanced skills. The focus is on the interface between historical and literary approaches, and you’ll be introduced to current academic debates and research methods in the field. Spanning eighteenth century prose and poetry, Romantic poetry, prose, and drama, and Gothic literature, there’s an incredible range to choose between.

First-rate facilities

We’re based in a brand new building at the heart of the campus. There are computer workstations especially for postgraduates and a DVD library with viewing facilities. Our theatre workshop is a fully equipped teaching/performance area with excellent film-viewing facilities and audio suites.

Specialist resources

The University Library subscribes to the major periodicals and full-text electronic archives, including Early English Books Online and Eighteenth-Century Collections Online. Special collections include an outstanding collection of Restoration drama, the Hope Collection of eighteenth-century periodicals, the Jack Rosenthal scripts collection, and papers of contemporary writers such as Anita Brookner, Marina Warner, Fay Weldon and Peter Redgrove.

Funding

There are a number of studentships and fee bursaries available, funded by the University. Deadlines for funding applications are usually in winter/early spring. For details, see our website.

Research training for PhD

If you intend to progress to a PhD, your course can be tailored to include essential research training. The same applies to students on the online course.

Part-time study

Part-time students usually take one taught module in each semester. In the second year, you’ll also take a dissertation module. For most courses, you’ll need to come in for one half-day per week. The MA Creative Writing is taught in the evening. Some modules, such as Theatre and Performance, may require greater time commitment. We try to be as flexible as possible to accommodate the different needs of our students.

Core modules

Text, Politics and Performance; Issues in Contemporary Performance; Theatre Practice 1: practical research projects; Theatre Practice 2: independent practice; Dissertation of 15,000 or 9,000 words plus integrated practice component.

Teaching and assessment

You’ll be taught through practical workshops, productions and seminars. You’ll be assessed on performance practice, written coursework and a dissertation.

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This unique MA in French and British Decorative Arts and Interiors focuses on the development of interiors and decorative arts in England and France in the “long” eighteenth century (c.1660-c.1830) and their subsequent rediscovery and reinterpretation in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Read more

Course outline

This unique MA in French and British Decorative Arts and Interiors focuses on the development of interiors and decorative arts in England and France in the “long” eighteenth century (c.1660-c.1830) and their subsequent rediscovery and reinterpretation in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

A key element of the course is the emphasis on the first-hand study of furniture, silver and ceramics, where possible in the context of historic interiors. Based in central London at the European School of Economics, it draws upon the outstanding collections of the nearby Wallace Collection and the Victoria and Albert Museum.

The MA is designed to appeal to those wishing to pursue careers in heritage organisations, antique-dealing and auctioneering, museums, conservation, interior design or university teaching and research. However, those with a strong personal interest in studying the subject for its own sake are also very welcome.

With its focus on first-hand study of decorative arts within historic interiors, the programme provides a vocational and academic training which has enabled students to pursue careers in museums, interior design, antique dealing, and auctioneering. Some of our past students now work at the Royal Collection, the National Trust and English Heritage (see What our students and alumni say).

The MA also provides an excellent spring-board for students wanting to do a PhD in art history or related disciplines.

Find out more about our School of Humanities on http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities.

Teaching

Teaching is carried out through a combination of lectures supported by seminars and tutorials. A key feature of the Buckingham teaching method is the use of small tutorial groups which provide the most effective means of ensuring that the students benefit from the academic expertise at their disposal. It is also the philosophy of Buckingham’s faculty to be available to students outside the scheduled tutorial times and to encourage good working relationships between staff and students.

The MA is taught by staff from the University of Buckingham, with the participation of outside experts from the Wallace Collection, the Victoria and Albert Museum, English Heritage, the Royal Institute of British Architects, the Soane Museum. There are also a number of renowned independent scholars who give lectures and lead some of the seminars and class trips.

UK Study Trips

There are frequent trips to collections in and around London, and a study week at Buckingham exploring local country houses such as Woburn Abbey, Waddesdon Manor, Boughton and Blenheim Palace, with their important decorative arts collections.

Paris Study Week

In the second term there is a study week in Paris, where students are granted privileged access to some of the private apartments at Versailles not normally accessible to the public, as well as a number of very important eighteenth-century private houses in Paris, open by special permission.

Professional Practice Projects and Placements in Museums and Galleries

Students also have the opportunity, through the Professional Practice Project to plan an exhibition in a museum, research a project to restore an historic interior, or undertake a part-time museum placement, thereby acquiring useful vocational skills and experience. Some of our students are currently doing placements at English Heritage and Strawberry Hill.

Course Structure

The course starts each September and finishes the following September. During the first term students study the development of the decorative arts and the interior in France and England between c.1660 and the end of the eighteenth century. In the second term students examine revivalism and the practical and historical problems of reinterpreting eighteenth-century interiors and objects. This is combined with a professional practice project designed to equip students with skills and experience applicable to careers in museums and built heritage.

Teaching takes place two days a week (excluding class trips) over two terms, or one day a week for part-time students. During the third term, students research a dissertation under supervision, which is written up over the summer for submission at the end of September. Assessment is by means of coursework and the dissertation.

Subject to the agreement of the Programme Director, there are some options for part-time study, one day a week over two years, or by deferral of the dissertation.

Apply here http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities/ma/decorativearts.

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Develop your knowledge of literature and literary linguistics. You’ll be supported by our expertise in areas including Renaissance and contemporary literatures in English. Read more

About the course

Develop your knowledge of literature and literary linguistics. You’ll be supported by our expertise in areas including Renaissance and contemporary literatures in English.

This course is taught completely online, so you can study while working, wherever you live. Most class texts can be accessed electronically through the University libraries. You’ll complete one 30-credit core module, optional modules worth 90 credits and a dissertation worth 60 credits.

Your career

You’ll examine early modern texts, language and culture. Staff expertise includes palaeography, rhetoric, news writing, the sermon, drama, and issues of political, sectarian and national identity between 1400 and 1700. Modules (including modules from History) can be tailored to suit your interests. You’ll complete one core module, optional modules and a dissertation.

Cultural life

Study eighteenth-century literature to develop a broad range of advanced skills. The focus is on the interface between historical and literary approaches, and you’ll be introduced to current academic debates and research methods in the field. Spanning eighteenth century prose and poetry, Romantic poetry, prose, and drama, and Gothic literature, there’s an incredible range to choose between.

First-rate facilities

We’re based in a brand new building at the heart of the campus. There are computer workstations especially for postgraduates and a DVD library with viewing facilities. Our theatre workshop is a fully equipped teaching/performance area with excellent film-viewing facilities and audio suites.

Specialist resources

The University Library subscribes to the major periodicals and full-text electronic archives, including Early English Books Online and Eighteenth-Century Collections Online. Special collections include an outstanding collection of Restoration drama, the Hope Collection of eighteenth-century periodicals, the Jack Rosenthal scripts collection, and papers of contemporary writers such as Anita Brookner, Marina Warner, Fay Weldon and Peter Redgrove.

Funding

There are a number of studentships and fee bursaries available, funded by the University. Deadlines for funding applications are usually in winter/early spring. For details, see our website.

Research training for PhD

If you intend to progress to a PhD, your course can be tailored to include essential research training. The same applies to students on the online course.

Part-time study

Part-time students usually take one taught module in each semester. In the second year, you’ll also take a dissertation module. For most courses, you’ll need to come in for one half-day per week. The MA Creative Writing is taught in the evening. Some modules, such as Theatre and Performance, may require greater time commitment. We try to be as flexible as possible to accommodate the different needs of our students.

Core module

Research Methods in English Studies.

Examples of optional modules

May include: Literature and the Mind; Shakespeare and Early Women Dramatists; Introduction to Literary Linguistics.

NB: All MA students can take optional modules from the online course, with the agreement of their course tutor.

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study History at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study History at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA by Research in History is a research degree pursued over one year full-time or two years part-time. Students on the History research programme undertake research under the supervision of History staff, and produce a thesis that makes an original contribution to knowledge and understanding of some aspect of the past.

Key Features of the MA by Research in History

The expertise of the Department of History and Classics spans from the ancient cultures and languages of ancient Egypt, Greece, and Rome to the history of late twentieth- and early twenty-first-century Europe. The research of our staff and postgraduates is integral to the life of the Department of History and Classics, and it means that Swansea is a dynamic, exciting, and stimulating place to study.

History and Classics is part of the Research Institute for the Arts and Humanities (RIAH: http://www.swansea.ac.uk/riah/), which organises a large number of seminars, conferences, and other research activities. There are also a number of research groups which act as focal points for staff and postgraduates, including: the Richard Burton Centre for the Study of Wales, Centre for Ancient Narrative Literature (KYKNOS), Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Research (MEMO), and the Centre for research into Gender in Culture and Society (GENCAS).

As a student of the History research programme you have access to skills and training programmes offered by the College of Arts and Humanities and the University.

The MA by Research in History is ideal for those who would like to do an initial research degree, either as a stand-alone culmination to their studies or with a view to further, subsequent research, e.g. in form of a PhD. Research proposals are invited on any topic in medieval, early modern, or modern history for which staff can provide supervision.

For informal enquiries regarding the MA by research in History programme please contact: Dr Fritz-Gregor Herrmann ().

Research Interests

Research interests in the Department of History and Classics include:

Medieval History

• The Anglo-Norman ‘Realm’ and the Angevin Empire

• Capetian France, especially the monarchy, aristocracy, and religious orders

• The Cathars and the Albigensian Crusade

• Charters and the documentary records of medieval France and England

• The Mediterranean world, especially the Crusades, later medieval Italian society and politics, and the Italian Renaissance, including art history

• England and Wales in the central and late Middle Ages, including the aristocracy and gentry, the Welsh Marches, urban history, law and crime, women and the law, religious belief and practice, and education and literacy

• Gender and the life cycle in late medieval Europe

• Medieval frontier societies and borderlands, and concepts of frontiers from the late Roman Empire to the present day

Early Modern History

• Most aspects of British history between 1500 and 1800, especially religious, scientific, cultural and gender history

• The history of health and medicine in early modern Britain

• History of Disabilities

• The Portuguese Empire

• The Reformation and Counter-Reformation

• Science, intellectual life, collecting and museums in early modern Europe

• The social history of early modern sex and marriage

• Crime and witchcraft

• The Enlightenment, republicanism and international relations in the eighteenth century

Modern History

• Most aspects of Welsh history, especially industrial society

• The cultural, intellectual and urban history of nineteenth-century and twentieth-century Britain

• Modern international history

• The United States since 1750, in particular slavery, the South and the Civil War

• The economic and imperial history of Britain in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries

• Emigration and urbanisation in the British Isles between the eighteenth and twentieth centuries

• The political history of the UK since 1800

• Military and society in Europe between 1750 and 1815

• Austrian and German history in the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries

• Austrian, German and Central European history, especially in the fields of urban, labour and post-1945 history

• Modern economic history

• Quantitative aspects of British economic growth from the sixteenth to the twenty-first centuries

• Anti-capitalist and socialist political economy

• Policing and police forces in twentieth-century Europe

• Italian fascism

• Allied Occupation of Italy

• Contemporary French and Italian social an d cultural history

• Memory studies and oral history of twentieth-century Europe

• History of protest and activism in the 1960s and 1970s



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You’ll study modern and contemporary fiction and poetry, with a focus on literature since 1900. Modules include. memory studies, contemporary poetry, urban and postmodern literature, the Cold War, life-writing, race, gender and animal studies. Read more

About the course

You’ll study modern and contemporary fiction and poetry, with a focus on literature since 1900. Modules include: memory studies, contemporary poetry, urban and postmodern literature, the Cold War, life-writing, race, gender and animal studies.

Your career

You’ll examine early modern texts, language and culture. Staff expertise includes palaeography, rhetoric, news writing, the sermon, drama, and issues of political, sectarian and national identity between 1400 and 1700. Modules (including modules from History) can be tailored to suit your interests. You’ll complete one core module, optional modules and a dissertation.

Cultural life

Study eighteenth-century literature to develop a broad range of advanced skills. The focus is on the interface between historical and literary approaches, and you’ll be introduced to current academic debates and research methods in the field. Spanning eighteenth century prose and poetry, Romantic poetry, prose, and drama, and Gothic literature, there’s an incredible range to choose between.

First-rate facilities

We’re based in a brand new building at the heart of the campus. There are computer workstations especially for postgraduates and a DVD library with viewing facilities. Our theatre workshop is a fully equipped teaching/performance area with excellent film-viewing facilities and audio suites.

Specialist resources

The University Library subscribes to the major periodicals and full-text electronic archives, including Early English Books Online and Eighteenth-Century Collections Online. Special collections include an outstanding collection of Restoration drama, the Hope Collection of eighteenth-century periodicals, the Jack Rosenthal scripts collection, and papers of contemporary writers such as Anita Brookner, Marina Warner, Fay Weldon and Peter Redgrove.

Funding

There are a number of studentships and fee bursaries available, funded by the University. Deadlines for funding applications are usually in winter/early spring. For details, see our website.

Research training for PhD

If you intend to progress to a PhD, your course can be tailored to include essential research training. The same applies to students on the online course.

Part-time study

Part-time students usually take one taught module in each semester. In the second year, you’ll also take a dissertation module. For most courses, you’ll need to come in for one half-day per week. The MA Creative Writing is taught in the evening. Some modules, such as Theatre and Performance, may require greater time commitment. We try to be as flexible as possible to accommodate the different needs of our students.

Examples of optional modules

You’ll choose four modules from a range which may include: Tales of the City: the living space in contemporary American fiction; Exchanging Letters: art and correspondence in twentieth-century American culture; Memory and Narrative; Rocket State Cosmology; Contemporary Poetry; White Like Me: reading whiteness in American literature; Interpret the Brutes: the animal in postcolonial writing.

Teaching and assessment

Teaching is by seminars. You’ll be assessed on your essays, coursework and a 15,000-word dissertation.

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Our MRes programme provide a personalised and focused introduction to postgraduate research allowing you to develop as an independent researcher with the support of an expert in Modern Languages and Cultures. Read more
Our MRes programme provide a personalised and focused introduction to postgraduate research allowing you to develop as an independent researcher with the support of an expert in Modern Languages and Cultures. It provides a rigorous overview of the current state of scholarship in your selected field, guides you, through a programme of directed, individualised reading, to the selection of a feasible research project, and allows you to complete a substantial piece of research.

Within Modern Language and Cultures, we offer pathways in:

- Latin-American Studies
- Hispanic Studies
- Spanish Studies
- Portuguese Studies, Catalan Studies
- Basque Studies
- French Studies
- German Studies
- Italian Studies
- Film Studies
- Chinese Studies.

As an MRes student you will benefit from your membership of the university research community, both students and academic staff. You will also have access to facilities available to doctoral students e.g. free Interlibrary loans, a print allowance and a research allowance.

Why Department of Modern Languages and Cultures?

We are a smaller department than many, but manage at the same time to maintain a variety of very distinctive areas of strength in research. As a result we are uniquely placed to offer taught programmes which are tailored to the individual in a friendly, supportive atmosphere and, for research students, close contact with your supervisors from the outset.

There is a high degree of interdisciplinary activity, with students and staff from all disciplines interacting through institutional research centres, cross-School reading groups, research groups and seminars.

We offer an MA in Latin American Studies and an MA in Modern Languages (French / German / Hispanic Studies/Italian) and supervision on a wide range of topics for both MPhil and PhD study.

Applications are welcome for both full-time and part-time study. Postgraduate students form an integral part of our research culture, and are encouraged to become involved in conference, workshops and seminar series, in addition, we have postgraduate reading groups and a regular programme of postgraduate workshops involving leading scholars visiting the institution. We have an active and vibrant research community, with staff engaging in research covering eight language areas consisting of French, German, Italian, Spanish, Galician, Catalan, Portuguese and Corsican. Research interests range from medieval manuscripts to contemporary cyber literature, and cover a wide geographical remit, with staff working on American, Latin American, and Caribbean, African and Indian contexts as well as European ones.

We are home to three scholarly journals: Bulletin of Hispanic Studies, Bulletin of Latin American Research, and Migrations and Identities as well as a number of prominent book series.

Research Overview

Our research activities are broadly organised around four research groups in addition to the Research Institute of Latin American Studies. The groups are engaged in interdisciplinary work, taking in literary, visual and historical sources, and collaborating across the language areas.

French Studies

Research interests in French Studies cover all areas of French literature, culture and history, including Medieval studies, sixteenth, seventeenth and eighteenth century studies, French theatre, French cinema, travel literature, francophone postcolonial studies (including French language representations of India),modern and contemporary France, and sociolinguistics. Colleagues are actively involved in interdisciplinary research centres, namely the Research Centre in Eighteenth-Century Studies, the Centre of International Slavery, the Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies and the India in the World Research Centre.

German Studies

Postgraduate teaching and supervision in German Studies covers the full range of modern (post 1750) German literary and cultural studies, including German cinema. It also offers tuition and supervision in many areas of social history, where staff specialisms include gender and women’s history since the eighteenth-century, twentieth-century labour history, Holocaust studies, issues of race and ethnicity (Afro-German and Gypsy studies), the culture and politics of East and West Germany and contemporary Berlin. The University Library’s Special Collections include uniquely rich holdings on German and European Gypsy studies. Research contacts exist with numerous universities and institutes in Germany and the United States.

Hispanic Studies

The University has the oldest chair of Spanish in the country (established 1908). It has a distinguished tradition of excellence within an extensive area of Hispanic Studies teaching and research which includes not only the Peninsula (Spain and Portugal), but also Latin America (Peru, Brazil, Mexico, Argentina, Chile, etc). Among the section’s achievements and publications in research are the Bulletin of Hispanic Studies, a quarterly journal of international influence (published by Liverpool University Press), Hispanic Textual Research and Criticism (TRAC) and a scholarly series of books and editions. Postgraduate supervision and courses are offered in diverse specialist subjects within the broad range of Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan and Latin American Studies. This reflects the varied research interests and publications of members of staff in the section. Postgraduate students have at their disposal in the Sydney Jones Library large holdings in Hispanic books and periodicals, which are among the most comprehensive in the country.

Italian Studies

Postgraduate supervision in Italian is provided in the following areas: sociolinguistics, Italian dialectology, Italian cinema and crime/detective fiction. Postgraduate students benefit from the remarkable digitised collections and resources available in the Sydney Jones Library and the personalised services provided by library staff.

Latin American Studies

Latin American Studies is one of Modern languagesa dn Cultures' major research specialisms. The six permanent members of staff have research interests in the following domains of Latin American Studies: anthropology, cultural studies, history, literature, politics, and sociology and extend to Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Central America, the Caribbean and southern USA. The Sydney Jones Library is an acknowledged centre of excellence for collections in Latin American Studies. Additional facilities for all postgraduates include access to regular seminars and short conferences, language tuition, and use of the University’s networked computer facilities.

Career prospects

Former postgraduates in French, German and Hispanic Studies are currently employed in senior positions at the universities of: Aberdeen, Sussex, Leeds, Sheffield, Kings College London, Loughborough, Salford and Liverpool, as well as in a variety of careers.

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