• University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Bristol Featured Masters Courses
  • Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Southampton Featured Masters Courses
  • Aberystwyth University Featured Masters Courses
  • Northumbria University Featured Masters Courses

Postgrad LIVE! Study Fair

Birmingham | Bristol | Sheffield | Liverpool | Edinburgh

Cranfield University Featured Masters Courses
OCAD University Featured Masters Courses
Southampton Solent University Featured Masters Courses
University of Bedfordshire Featured Masters Courses
Newcastle University Featured Masters Courses
"egypt"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Egypt)

We have 79 Masters Degrees (Egypt)

  • "egypt" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 79
Order by 
UCL is a world-leading centre for research and teaching in the archaeology of Egypt and the Near East. The programme is ideally suited to students seeking to combine advanced study of these regions with new technical and interpretative skills, and offers an ideal grounding for doctoral research. Read more
UCL is a world-leading centre for research and teaching in the archaeology of Egypt and the Near East. The programme is ideally suited to students seeking to combine advanced study of these regions with new technical and interpretative skills, and offers an ideal grounding for doctoral research.

Degree information

UCL’s wide range of archaeological expertise provides a unique opportunity to study Egypt and the Near East in a truly comparative context, and for students to develop a programme and research dissertation tailored to individual interests. These may include the application of new skills in archaeological science, exploring new theoretical perspectives, or the significance of archaeology for the wider cultural heritage of these regions.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (45 credits), two or three optional modules (45 credits), and a dissertation.

Core modules - all students must take the following:
-Archaeology of Egypt and the Near East: A Comparative Approach
-Themes, Thought and Theory in World Archaeology: Foundations

Optional modules
-Ancient Cyprus: Colonisations, Copper and City-States (by arrangement with King's College London)
-Archaeologies of Asia
-Aegean Prehistory: major themes and debates
-Beyond Chiefdoms: Archaeologies of African Political Complexity
-Egyptian Archaeology: An Object-Based Theoretical Approached
-Intangible Dimensions of Museum Objects from Egypt
-Introductory Akkadian (by arrangement with SOAS)
-Mediterranean Dynamics
-Mediterranean Prehistory
-Middle Egyptian Language
-Society and Culture in Ancient Egypt
-The Neolithic and Early Bronze Age of the Near East: The emergence of villages and urban societies
-Subject to approval a third module can be taken from the overall options available at the Institute of Archaeology or more widely within UCL and the University of London.

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project, with guidance from an assigned supervisor, which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
Teaching at the Institute of Archaeology is delivered through a combination of lectures and seminars to support student interaction, and examination is primarily through module-based essays and the individual dissertation. Depending on the options taken, teaching may also include object handling, museum work, and laboratory practicals.

Careers

The first cohort of students on the Archaeology of Egypt and the Near East MA is due to graduate in 2018, therefore no specific career destinations are currently available.

Previous UCL graduates in these areas have regularly gone on to undertake doctoral research, or found employment in related areas of the public, museum and heritage sector.

Employability
In addition to receiving advanced training in their chosen subject areas, students will have the opportunity to acquire a strong combination of general research skills, communication skills, skills in teamwork and networking and overall personal effectiveness.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Your instructors on this degree will be world-class scholars whose research is at the cutting-edge of their disciplines. Students will also benefit from the first-class institutions located within walking distance of the Institute of Archaeology, including the Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, the British Museum, and the Egypt Exploration Society, and from the institute’s own collections, including the Petrie Palestinian Collection.

Egyptian and Near Eastern Archaeology at UCL are embedded in the vibrant research environment of the Bloomsbury Campus, in the centre of one of the most exciting cities in the world. Our institute includes over twenty researchers with regional expertise in these areas, including both prehistory and the historical periods.

With its international staff and student body, the Institute of Archaeology (IoA) is well known for its welcoming atmosphere, challenging intellectual climate, and supportive feedback structure. It is regularly rated in first place among UK archaeology departments for student experience.

Read less
This course is studied by students based in Egypt but if successful they will be awarded an MSc in Orthodontics by the University of Dundee. Read more
This course is studied by students based in Egypt but if successful they will be awarded an MSc in Orthodontics by the University of Dundee. The course is aimed at qualified dentists in the Middle East who wish to specialise in this area. The course will assume no prior knowledge of orthodontics prior to enrolling in the programme.

Teaching & Assessment

How you will be taught

Teaching will take place in Cairo, Egypt using the facilities of the ASCDE.
The programme will run concurrently with a complementary 3 year programme in clinical orthodontic skills which will be delivered and assessed by ASCDE.

How you will be assessed

The course will be taught by a combination of classroom based teaching in Cairo (lectures, seminars, tutorials and discussion groups) which will take place throughout the
year. It is planned to deliver intensive face-to-face teaching sessions each month throughout the year. Between these teaching sessions students will complete course work;
this self-directed learning will be reviewed and assessed at the following face-to-face sessions.
One-on-one supervision of the dissertation will be by a single tutor.
Students will learn through preparing and delivering oral and written presentations, peer assessments of oral presentations, problem-solving assignments and feedback.
Additional student support will be available through ASCDE between teaching sessions and students will have access to teaching materials through the University's VLE (online
virtual learning environment)

What you will study

The course is delivered part-time and take 3 years to complete. All modules are compulsory.
The modules are:
Year 1
Module 1: Craniofacial Growth and Development and the Aetiology of Malocclusion (15 credits)
Module 2: Assessment, Diagnosis and Treatment Planning (15 credits)
Module 3: Orthodontic Treatment mechanics (30 credits)

Year 2
Module 4: Tooth movement and biomechanics (15 credits)
Module 5: Orthodontic materials and health & safety (15 credits)
Module 6: Adult and multidisciplinary treatment (30 credits)

Year 3
Module 7: Research methods and dissertation (60 credits)

Employability

The course is designed for qualified dentists who wish to specialise in orthodontics as well as general practice.
The course (taken in conjunction with the ASCDE partner programme in clinical orthodontic skills ) aims to prepare students for success in the Membership in Orthodontics examination of the UK Royal Colleges.

Read less
This MPhil is appropriate for students who are prepared for graduate work and who wish to undertake research in Egyptology, but who need further training in either the language(s) or the archaeology of the region. Read more
This MPhil is appropriate for students who are prepared for graduate work and who wish to undertake research in Egyptology, but who need further training in either the language(s) or the archaeology of the region. The student may choose either an archaeological or a linguistic emphasis. All MPhil students in the Division of Archaeology take a Research Skills module and write a dissertation (maximum 15,000 words). In addition, students taking the MPhil in Egyptology select three taught modules, chosen in consultation with the supervisor.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hsarmpegy

Course detail

Modules on offer include:

- Introduction to Egyptian Language;
- Advanced Egyptian Language;
- Coptic;
- Demotic;
- Landscapes, Built Environment, and Material Culture of Ancient Egypt;
- Historical Archaeology of Ancient Egypt I;
- Historical Archaeology of Ancient Egypt II;
- Topics in Egyptology;

or any other MPhil module offered in the Division of Archaeology (with consent of the module's instructor and the MPhil in Egyptology Coordinator).

Format

The MPhil in Egyptology delivers competence in language and a detailed knowledge of the cultures of ancient Egypt, emphasizing historical archaeology, landscape and the built environment, art, and the language and/or literature of ancient Egypt. All MPhil students in the Division of Archaeology take a Research Skills Module and write a dissertation (15,000 words maximum). The MPhil in Egyptology also includes three taught modules, chosen in consultation with the supervisor according to the student's interests. Students will learn an Ancient Egyptian language at either an introductory or more advanced level depending on previous experience.

Students receive written feedback on all assessed essays and reports from internal markers via the Graduate Administrator. Coursework and exam marks are communicated to students following the first examiners meeting at the end of Easter Term. Feedback on dissertations are available to students on request following the second examiners meeting in September.

Assessment

The dissertation is an extended piece of independent, original research. Students work with their supervisor to formulate a dissertation project, carry out research and write it up. The topic of the dissertation has to be approved by the Faculty Degree Committee; the dissertation is of maximum 15,000 words (excluding bibliography and appendices) and is due at the end of August; it counts as 50% of the student’s final mark.

Students taking the MPhil in Egyptology are usually required to produce between 1 and 4 assessed essays depending on their chosen course of study and the modules they select. The essays are between 3000 and 4000 words and are submitted in Michaelmas, Lent and Easter Terms.

Students taking the MPhil in Egyptology are required to sit written examinations for some modules. Language modules are assessed through a written exam in Easter Term. For language modules, choice of module is subject to the student’s prior experience to make sure that they have the preparation to benefit from the module taken; the course co-ordinator will provide guidance upon this.

Attendance at the relevant Research Skills Workshops is required of all MPhil students in the Division of Archaeology. MPhil students are required to submit a 2000 word research proposal and give a presentation to teaching staff and peers which form the assessed part of the Research Skills module and are worth 5% of the overall MPhil degree.

Continuing

MPhil students wishing to continue to the PhD in Archaeology are required to achieve a High Pass mark of 68 overall and no less than 68 in their dissertation, and to obtain the support of an appropriate supervisor. In some circumstances additional academic conditions may be set to ensure appropriate skills, such as language competence, are in place prior to admittance on the PhD programme.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are many different sources of funding available to support UK/EU and international students at the Division of Archaeology but full scholarships for MPhil students are highly competitive. The Division of Archaeology enters exceptionally strong MPhil candidates for Gates Cambridge, CHESS and AHRC scholarships and scholarship schemes administered by the Cambridge Trust.

The Division of Archaeology also administers several funds which aim to support Archaeological fieldwork, Egyptology and Assyriology at MPhil level and will endeavour to support students in obtaining funding from University and external sources.

For further information about funding opportunities at the Division of Archaeology consult the Division website: http://www.arch.cam.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate-funding or contact the Graduate Administrator: .

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

Read less
Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Ancient Egyptian Culture at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Ancient Egyptian Culture at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in Ancient Egyptian Culture is a distinct programme focussing on ancient Egyptian history, language and material culture offered by specialist international researchers.

Key Features

Egyptology at Swansea University enjoys an invaluable asset in its purpose-built Egypt Centre, which houses about 3,000 objects from Ancient Egypt. This impressive and important collection from Ancient Egypt illustrates more than 4,000 years of human development from the prehistoric to the early Christian era and plays an integral role in our teaching.

The University Library is particularly well stocked with original texts, literary and documentary, with basic works of reference and with secondary material of all kinds. It subscribes to a wide range of general and specialist periodicals.

Online access to external bibliographies and citation indexes is available. Resources include JSTOR Dyabola, TLG, Patrologia Latina and Teubner Latin texts online, and the Gnomon database.

Classics, Ancient History and Egyptology also has a thriving postgraduate seminar, which meets weekly.

Students of the MA Ancient Egyptian Culture can take advantage of the College of Arts and Humanities' Graduate Centre which fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

Modules

Modules on the MA Ancient Egyptian Culture course typically include:

• Understanding Ancient Egyptian Culture

• Reaching the Public: Museums and Object-Handling

• Reading Academic German

• Middle Egyptian I

• Advanced Egyptian language modules

• Private Life in Ancient Egypt

• The Reign of Ramesses III

The full-time Ancient Egyptian Culture course structure is split across the year with three modules offered in each academic semester (a total of six modules in part one) and then a dissertation over the summer (part two). Students study three compulsory modules and three optional modules. The dissertation component is written on a specialist research topic of your choosing.

Part-time students of the Ancient Egyptian Culture course normally take one compulsory and two optional modules in the first and second years and write their dissertation in the third year.

Student Quote

“I completed the Masters program in Ancient Egyptian Culture at Swansea University. During my time in the program, I was taught by experts in the field and I was encouraged to attend many conferences where I met other Egyptologists. I was also given the fantastic opportunity to do research at the British Museum for my Masters dissertation which involved working with a Nubian skeletal collection, thought to be the world’s first evidence of warfare (circa 12,000 BC). As a result of this research, I was offered two internships at the museum and I plan on applying for a PhD in Physical Anthropology in the near future. I have no doubt that I am well equipped to find a position in this field because of the excellent education and opportunities made available to me through the Masters program at Swansea University”.

Casey Kirkpatrick



Read less
Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Ancient History at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Ancient History at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA by Research in Ancient History is a research degree pursued over one year full-time or two years part-time. This MA allows students to study in depth a topic related to the history, culture, or archaeology of the classical world, from Mycenaean Greece to the fall of the Roman Empire.

Key Features of Ancient History MA by Research

The expertise of the Department of History and Classics spans from the ancient cultures and languages of ancient Egypt, Greece, and Rome to the history of late twentieth- and early twenty-first-century Europe. The research of our staff and postgraduates is integral to the life of the department, and it means that Swansea is a dynamic, exciting, and stimulating place to study Ancient History.

History and Classics is part of the Research Institute for the Arts and Humanities (RIAH: http://www.swansea.ac.uk/riah/), which organises a large number of seminars, conferences, and other research activities. There are also a number of research groups which act as focal points for staff and postgraduates, including: the Richard Burton Centre for the Study of Wales, Centre for Ancient Narrative Literature (KYKNOS), Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Research (MEMO) and the Centre for research into Gender in Culture and Society (GENCAS).

Students of the MA by Research in Ancient History are encouraged to develop a methodological awareness and are introduced to key concepts and interpretative techniques that shape the study of the ancient civilisations in the modern world. This programme develops research skills needed for high-level work in any field of Ancient History. Students have access to skills and training programmes offered by the College of Arts and Humanities and the University.

Ancient History Research Interests

Staff research interests cover the core disciplines of culture, religion, language, literature, history, and archaeology. Particular research strengths include:

• Ancient Egyptian Religion

• Ancient Egyptian Kingship Ideology

• Egyptian Temple Texts of the Graeco-Roman Period (‘Ptolemaic’)

• Gender in Ancient Egypt

• Ancient Egyptian Demonology

• Ancient Narrative Literature

• The Ancient Novel

• Ancient Philosophy

• Ancient Technology

• Archaeology of Roman Egypt

• Graeco-Roman Urbanisation

• Greek Social History (Archaic to Hellenistic)

• Historiography

• History and Archaeology of Asia Minor

• History of Late Antiquity

• Imperialism in Egypt and the Near East

• Roman Republican and Imperial History



Read less
Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Egyptology at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Egyptology at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA by Research in Egyptology is a research degree pursued over one year full-time or two years part-time. This MA allows students to study in depth a topic related to the history, archaeology, religion, languages (all stages of the ancient Egyptian language, including Demotic and the hieroglyphic Graeco-Roman temple texts), literature, and culture of ancient Egypt, including the Ptolemaic and Roman periods.

The MA by Research in Egyptology is ideal for those who would like to do an initial research degree, either as a stand-alone culmination to their studies or with a view to further, subsequent research, e.g. in form of a PhD.

Research proposals are invited on any topic for which staff can provide supervision.

For informal enquiries regarding the MA by Research in Egyptology please contact: Dr Fritz-Gregor Herrmann ().

Key Features of MA by Research in Egyptology

Students enrolled on the MA by Research in Egyptology study a topic of their own devising and complete an independent, original research thesis of 40,000 words on an Egyptological topic. Egyptology students are encouraged to develop a methodological awareness and are introduced to key concepts and interpretative techniques that shape the study of ancient Egypt. This Egyptology programme develops research skills needed for high-level work in any field of Egyptology. Students enrolled on the MA by Research in Egyptology will benefit from an invaluable, unique resource is the Egypt Centre located adjacent to the College of Arts and Humanities on the Park Campus (http://www.egypt.swan.ac.uk/).

The research of our staff and postgraduates is integral to the life of the Department of History and Classics, and it means that Swansea is a dynamic, exciting, and stimulating place to study. History and Classics is part of the Research Institute for the Arts and Humanities (RIAH: http://www.swansea.ac.uk/riah/), which organises a large number of seminars, conferences, and other research activities. Students have access to skills and training programmes offered by the College of Arts and Humanities and the University.



Read less
The MA in Ancient History offers students whose interests centre on the study of ancient history the opportunity to take a specialist higher degree tailored to those interests. Read more
The MA in Ancient History offers students whose interests centre on the study of ancient history the opportunity to take a specialist higher degree tailored to those interests.

Course Overview

If you wish to expand your knowledge of the history of Ancient Greek and Roman societies at a postgraduate level, then the MA in Ancient History is for you. The Ancient History scheme allows you to study a wide range of modules covering not only fascinating figures like Alexander the Great and Julius Caesar, but also basic aspects of everyday life, such as warfare and the economy.

The MA Ancient History offers students whose interests centre on the study of ancient history the opportunity to take a specialist higher degree tailored to those interests. Students will take a balance of modules in both Greek and Roman history, and may focus on one or other of the two societies in their dissertation module. The Greek modules cover the archaic, classical and Hellenistic periods while there are three primary foci for the study of Roman history: the Republican period; the Imperial Roman West; and, the Roman East, including Egypt and India.

Modules

-Power and Culture in the Hellenistic East
-Between Narrative and Interpretation: Writing History in the Ancient World
-The Greek Economy in the Archaic and Classical Periods
-Early Rome and Italy
-Life in the Eastern Desert of Egypt

Key Features

Providing our students with a range of learning opportunities and excellent teaching is the primary aim of the School of Classics. We employ innovative methods and approaches that enhance our students’ learning throughout their studies.

All our modules are taught by specialists and active researchers. The influence of our research on our teaching offers our students the opportunity to learn from the best in the subject and follow the latest scholarly trends and discoveries.

Our programme is designed to help learners both on campus and at a distance. Our Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) is a live forum through which students and staff can interact, through which students are better able to revise and explore difficult topics and through which students are better able to access the electronic resources available in the virtual world.

Studying Ancient History with us here at University of Wales Trinity Saint David means research-led teaching and research-active learning in an environment that allows for both full use of the virtual world and the personal approach of expert tuition.

Assessment

An MA degree in Ancient History involves a wide range of assessment methods. In addition to traditional essays, you will be assessed through bibliographic exercises, presentations – oral and PowerPoint based, creation of abstracts, in-house conference papers, article reviews, creation of project plans and, of course, the dissertation. This variety of assessment helps develop skills in presenting material in clear, professional and a lucid manner, whether orally or in writing.

The assessment is on the student’s own subject of choice in relation to each module, always in consultation with the relevant tutor. Most modules are assessed by long essays, but some modules are assessed by alternative means, such as conference-style presentations.

Career Opportunities

The programme provides a broad foundation for postgraduate work, by laying particular emphasis on the methodologies and research tools needed for independent advanced study, thus acting as training for students who intend to undertake an MPhil or PhD.

The course also provides a professional qualification for teachers or others seeking Continuing Professional Development.

Read less
The Mediterranean, the world’s largest inland sea and the interface of Europe, Africa and western Asia, is one of the major crucibles of cultural, economic and political change in world history, a focus of scholarship for all periods between the Palaeolithic and the present, and a place where the past plays a critical role in the present, as well as in the creation of a viable future. Read more
The Mediterranean, the world’s largest inland sea and the interface of Europe, Africa and western Asia, is one of the major crucibles of cultural, economic and political change in world history, a focus of scholarship for all periods between the Palaeolithic and the present, and a place where the past plays a critical role in the present, as well as in the creation of a viable future.

Degree information

Students will develop an understanding of Mediterranean societies from earliest times to the early Medieval period, and of major interpretative paradigms and principal investigative techniques - including fieldwork and archaeological science - applied to the Mediterranean. One or more specific regions will be analysed in depth from a comparative perspective, and Mediterranean societies will be studied holistically.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (45 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and a dissertation/report (90 credits).

Core modules - all students are required to take the following:
-Mediterranean Dynamics
-Themes, Thought and Theory in World Archaeology: Foundations

Optional modules - from an outstanding range of Master's optional modules, students choose options to the value of 60 credits, at least one of which must be choses from the following options;
-Mediterrean Prehistory
-The Mediterranean World in the Iron Age
-The Transformation of the Roman Mediterranean.
-The remaining must be made up from the list below:
-Aegean Prehistory: major themes and current debates
-Ancient Italy in the Mediterranean
-Art: Interpretation and Explanation
-British and European Prehistory: Neolithic to Iron Age
-Egyptian Archaeology: An Object-Based Theoretical Approach
-Intangible Dimensions of Museum Objects from Egypt
-Making and Meaning in Ancient Greek Art
-Making and Meaning in Ancient Roman Art
-Medieval Archaeology: Selected Topics and Current Problems
-Middle Bronze Age to the Iron Age in the Near East: City-states and Empires
-Museum and Site Interpretation
-Society and Culture in Ancient Egypt
-The Neolithic and Early Bronze Age of the Near East: The Emergence of Villages and Urban Societies
-Themes, Thought and Theory in World Archaeology: Current Topics
-Making and Meaning in Ancient Roman Art

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words. Approaches that explore new connections or comparisons are strongly encouraged.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars and assessed through essays and the dissertation.

Careers

Graduates of this programme are expected to pursue further studies at PhD level or embark on a wide range of professional careers both within and beyond archaeology.

Employability
Successful graduates will have been fully prepared to undertake research on ancient Mediterranean societies, from a comparative region/period/theme-specific perspective, and will also possess the expert background knowledge to move on to related professional work in or on the Mediterranean (subject to the particular requirements of the role). They will also have honed their transferable skills in critical analysis, debate and presentation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse department of archaeology in the UK, and provides a stimulating environment for postgraduate study. Its outstanding library is complemented by UCL’s Main Library, University of London Senate House and other specialist libraries.

This programme deploys the institute’s unparalleled research and teaching strengths in Mediterranean archaeology, which must constitute the largest single concentration of expertise anywhere in the UK.

UCL’s own museums and collections form a resource of international importance for academic research and students may work on material from the institute’s collection as part of their assessment.

Read less
The master’s programme in Classics and Ancient Civilizations at Leiden University covers the entire range of present-day research on the civilisations of Greece and Rome, Egypt and the Ancient Near East. Read more

The master’s programme in Classics and Ancient Civilizations at Leiden University covers the entire range of present-day research on the civilisations of Greece and Rome, Egypt and the Ancient Near East.

Choose from four specialisations

This master's programme distinguishes itself from similar programmes by consistently integrating Greek and Roman Antiquity, the world of the Hebrew Bible, ancient Judaism, emerging Christianity, Egypt (ancient, antique and late-antique) and the cuneiform cultures of Ancient Mesopotamia, into their broader context. The number of specialisations on offer at Leiden University is unparalleled.

Use a wide range of research methods

The programme makes creative use of a wide range of research methods, all of them well-represented at Leiden University. Traditional philology with its intimate knowledge of languages and texts, while still indispensable, is enriched by literary studies, cultural history, and the analysis of material culture.

Close, individual tuition

At Leiden, our master’s students are considered valued members of a close-knit academic community. Small classes, regular individual mentoring, and an informal, open-door policy create an environment that is ideal for the exchange of ideas and the development of your knowledge and intellectual abilities.

Critical-thinking and advanced research skills

An important goal of the programme is to develop your ability to conduct high-quality scientific research using a wide variety of research methods. This is a particularly exciting field in which to conduct research, with different research sources opening up the possibility of completely fresh interpretations of the past. Many students conduct field research in a country abroad, visiting excavation sites, or participate in one of our department’s own research projects including excavations at Saqqara and the Dakhla Oasis.

Specialisations



Read less
The Classics and Ancient Civilizations (Research) programme at Leiden University covers the entire range of present-day research on the civilisations of Greece and Rome, Egypt and the Ancient Near East. Read more

The Classics and Ancient Civilizations (Research) programme at Leiden University covers the entire range of present-day research on the civilisations of Greece and Rome, Egypt and the Ancient Near East.

Choose from four specialisations

The research master's programme distinguishes itself from other similar master's programmes by consistently integrating Greek and Roman Antiquity, the world of the Hebrew Bible, ancient Judaism, emerging Christianity, Egypt (ancient, antique and late-antique) and the cuneiform cultures of Ancient Mesopotamia, within their broader context. The number of specialisations offered by the Classics and Ancient Civilizations (Research) programme is unparalleled.

Specialisations

Use a range of research methods

The programme makes creative use of a wide range of research methods, all of them well-represented at Leiden University. Traditional philology with its intimate knowledge of languages and texts, while still indispensable, is enriched by literary studies, cultural history, and the analysis of material culture.

Focus on your area of interest

You will be able to tailor your study programme to your personal interests by creating your own combination of courses within the specialisation of your choice from other research master’s programmes within the Faculties of Humanities.

It is also possible to study the one-year Master’s programme Classics and Ancient Civilisations.



Read less
The Special and Inclusive Education MA will develop a student's knowledge of key concepts and issues related to special and inclusive education, enhancing their understanding of disciplinary and theoretical perspectives. Read more
The Special and Inclusive Education MA will develop a student's knowledge of key concepts and issues related to special and inclusive education, enhancing their understanding of disciplinary and theoretical perspectives. It will give students the ability to analyse, evaluate and synthesise evidence, theory and practice, and help them to apply conceptual and theoretical frameworks to professional policy and practice.

Degree information

Graduates will be equipped to contribute to contemporary international and national debate in the field of special education and inclusion and disability studies; produce and communicate evidence-informed, reasoned argument in writing and orally; demonstrate how concepts, theories and evidence can inform an understanding of issues and practice; carry out a focused special, and inclusive education inquiry into educational practice; enhance professional practice through greater knowledge, skills, understanding and awareness.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four taught modules (30 credits each) and a dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules
- Concepts and Contexts of Special and Inclusive Education (Cairo)
- Research Design and Methodology (Cairo)
- Social, Emotional and Behavioural Development (Cairo)
- Understanding Specific Learning Difficulties (Dyslexia)

Dissertation/research project
All students undertake an independent research project in special and inclusive education which culminates in a 10,000 to 12,000-word dissertation.

Teaching and learning
This MA is taught by UCL Institute of Education tutors in Cairo, Egypt. The programme is modular; two to three modules are taught each year and these will vary from year to year to cover the full requirement of the MA. Modules are taught in intensive blocks of four days at the Learning Resource Center in Maadi, Cairo. Skype meetings and tutorials are available for all students enrolled on this programme of study.

The MA is taught through lectures, group discussions and small group one-to-one tutorials. Modules are assessed by a 4,000 to 5,000-word written assignment. In addition, students write a dissertation (10,000-12,000 words).

Note: this MA is not a teacher training programme and does not aim to train students via school-based training and teaching placements.

Careers

This programme provides students with the opportunity to study at one of the UK's leading specialist departments in special educational needs and disability (SEND), and educational psychology, working with internationally recognised tutors who have published widely in the areas of special education, inclusion and disability studies, and who contribute to Master's and doctoral programmes worldwide. Note: this programe is only available to students living and working full-time in Egypt.

The programme team is committed to creating an intellectually challenging context in which students are encouraged to discuss practical knowledge, experience and ideas in order to extend their understanding of special and inclusive education.

This programme attracts students with rich and varied professional and personal experience.

Read less
In the Water Engineering Department an academic staff of 15 professors and researchers is coaching small groups of international students in courses, lab… Read more
In the Water Engineering Department an academic staff of 15 professors and researchers is coaching small groups of international students in courses, lab and field experiments as well as projects concerning every part of the water cycle.The heads of all water related faculties of the TU Berlin are working together to address major challenges for the growing population in arid and semiarid regions while enhancing the cooperation with the closest disciplines Urban Development and Energy Engineering.

Besides newest analytical and field equipment, various test stands enable the students to apply their theoretically acquired knowledge hands-on. Throughout their studies in Egypt and Germany our master students get trained to become tomorrow’s problem solving managers, engineers and researchers to cope with the challenges of the rapidly increasing water scarcity.

Read less
The challenges surrounding urban growth require theoretical approaches and operational tools that are properly geared to the specific social, economic and institutional conditions of a specific region. Read more
The challenges surrounding urban growth require theoretical approaches and operational tools that are properly geared to the specific social, economic and institutional conditions of a specific region. In addition, urban low carbon concepts in recognition of local resources, know-how and management capacities are essential elements of an effective planning strategy for the future.

The central concern of the master’s program is to equip the participants with a critical understanding of the development of urban areas, unveiling the political, economic and social forces underlying the different types of urban conflict and exploring concrete approaches to address their causes. The program takes an interdisciplinary and international comparative perspective - with a special focus on the MENA region – exploring the specific conditions for interventions in differing urban contexts.

The Urban Development program is divided into a three semester study period along with a 4th semester in which students write their Master’s thesis. The first and third semesters will be in El Gouna, Egypt, while the second semester will be in Berlin, Germany. The location of the 4th semester is open to selection.

The courses consist of lectures, seminars, workshops, exercises and integrated projects. The integrated projects form the backbone of the study program: on the basis of real cases, interdisciplinary teams will be put together to find solutions for the development of complex topics in the field of urban development. The project work will include site viewings (excursions), enquiry sessions, moderated group discussions, teamwork and study and mediation workshops. The participants will gain professional experience through studying while developing their social and intercultural skills at the same time. The students' performance is assessed through course work, examinations and a final dissertation report (Master’s thesis).

Read less
Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Gender and Culture at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Gender and Culture at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in Gender and Culture offers an innovative interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary approach to the study of Gender and Culture.

Key Features of MA in Gender and Culture

This is an interdisciplinary MA scheme in Gender and Culture taught by Gender specialists across the Arts and Humanities – in the subject areas of Development Studies, Political and Cultural Studies, English Literature, Egyptology, European Languages, History, Media Studies, and Political and Cultural Studies.

If you are interested in gender and gender relations in politics, literature, culture, and history, like engaging in discussion and intellectual argument, and are excited about the idea of working within and across different subject areas, this MA in Gender and Culture is ideal for you.

The MA Gender and Culture examines the production, reproduction and transformation of gender in culture and society.

The Gender and Culture degree is supported by the research activity of GENCAS, the Centre for Research into Gender in Culture and Society in the College of Arts and Humanities. The College of Arts and Humanities has a Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

The full-time Gender and Culture course comprises three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. In part one, students study three compulsory modules and three optional modules. In part two, students are required to write the dissertation component which draws on issues and themes developed throughout the year.

Part-time study is available for the Gender and Culture programme.

Gender and Culture Programme Aims

To develop independent thinking and writing. You devise your own essay projects in consultation with a gender specialist - this combines the benefits of expert guidance with the rewards of shaping an intellectual project for yourself. To sharpen and develop your skills and take them to a new level by providing the chance for original thinking and intellectual freedom in writing the ‘dissertation’ element, where you complete your own research project.

Modules

Modules on the Gender and Culture programme include:

• Women and Politics

• Civil Society and International Development

• Critical Security Studies

• Rights-Based Approaches to Development

• War, Technology and Culture

• Approaches to IR

• Violence, Conflict & Development

• Governance, Globalization and Neoliberal Political Economy

• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention

• The Policy Making Process

• State of Africa

• Politics in Contemporary Britain

• War in Space

• Politics and Public Policy in the New Wales

• Postcolonialism, Orientalism and Eurocentrism

• War, Identity and Society

• Approaches to Political Theory

• International Security in the Asia Pacific

• Gender Trouble: the Medieval Anchorite, and Issues of Wombs and Tombs

• Women Writers of the 1940’s

• Women Writing India

• ‘The Great Pretender’: Masculinity in Contemporary Women’s Fiction

• ‘The Unsex’d Females’: Women Writers and the French Revolution

• British Women’s Fiction 1918-1939

• Contemporary Women’s Writing

• Angela Carter

• Gender in Contemporary European Culture

• Literature in Social Context

• Women and Gender in Ancient Egypt

• Nature’s Stepchildren: European Medicine and Sexual Dissidents, 1869-1939

• The making of Modern Sexualities, 1650-1800

Who should Apply?

Students interested in Gender and Culture from a Classics and Ancient History, English, European Languages, History, Media Studies, and Political and Cultural Studies or related background. Professionals interested in the challenge of digital studying Gender and Culture. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to gender and culture.

Career Prospects

Career expectations are excellent for Gender and Culture graduates. Our graduates are employed in diverse and dynamic vocations such as education, business, law and finance, marketing, sales and advertising; commercial, industrial and public sectors; media and PR; creative and professional writing; social and welfare professions; heritage and tourism; government and politics; foreign affairs and diplomatic corps; humanitarian organisations and some go on to study a PhD.



Read less
Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Ancient History and Classical Culture at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Ancient History and Classical Culture at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in Ancient History and Classical Culture offers a wide range of modules on the history and culture of ancient Greece and Rome, drawing on the expertise of internationally recognised scholars.

Key Features

Every aspect of the modern world has its roots in the civilisations of the Classical world. This MA in Ancient History and Classical Culture allows students to study a range of topics related to the history and culture of the classical world, from the Mycenaean world to the later Roman Empire. The range of options within the Ancient History and Classical Culture MA allows students to specialise in history or literature, or to combine study of the two.

Students on the Ancient History and Classical Culture MA are encouraged to develop a methodological awareness and are introduced to key concepts and interpretative techniques that shape the study of the ancient civilisations in the modern world. This programme develops research skills needed for high-level work in any field of Ancient History and Classical Civilisation.

Students have the opportunity to study ancient Greek or Latin.

Students of the MA Ancient History and Classical Culture can take advantage of the College of Arts and Humanities' Graduate Centre which fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

Modules

Modules on the Ancient History and Classical Culture course typically include:

• Research Methodologies in Ancient History and Classical Culture

• Ancient Greek or Latin

• Being Greek under Rome: Greek Literature and Culture in the Imperial Period

• The Army in the Roman Empire

• The City in the Greco-Roman World

• Explorers, Travel and Geography

• Saints and Sinners in Christian Late Antiquity

• Greek and Roman Magic: Exploring the Sources

• Private Life in Ancient Egypt

• Romance Refracted and novels renewed

Student Quote

"I studied the BA Ancient History and then the MA in Ancient History and Classical Culture. I chose Swansea University because of the variety of courses on offer in Classics, Ancient History and Egyptology. During my study I immersed myself in both academic and extra-curricular student life. I took up archery and I was a regular member of the University archery team. I enjoy both reading and writing fiction and in my final year of study, I was selected as one of four finalists in the “Swansea Life Young Writing Category” of the “Dylan Thomas Prize”. I held several positions of responsibility in the Society of Ancient Studies which was amazing; and I organised social events such as visits to sites such as Hadrian’s Wall, the British Museum, Caerleon, and Rome. I also had the opportunity to work on the Church Hill archaeological excavation (a suspected Roman villa) and the excavation at Oystermouth Castle organised jointly by the Glamorgan-Gwent Archaeological Trust. I thoroughly enjoyed my four years at Swansea."

Shaun Mudd



Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X