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Now more than ever, we need to invite everyone in society, of all ages, to be part of the solution. The Master of Arts in Environmental Education and Communication program will empower you, and give you the depth and insight to lead and motivate others in developing a sustainable, environmentally sound society. Read more
Now more than ever, we need to invite everyone in society, of all ages, to be part of the solution. The Master of Arts in Environmental Education and Communication program will empower you, and give you the depth and insight to lead and motivate others in developing a sustainable, environmentally sound society.

Who It’s For

The MA in Environmental Education and Communication is for those interested in how education and communication can help develop environmentally sustainable social and economic systems. Learning how we can educate and communicate to engage those in our workplaces, communities and nations towards such a goal involves all sectors of society– agriculture, health, governance, media, business, architecture, community development, science, education, recreation and more.

Students likely already know about the complexities of our current unsustainability and the challenges faced by environmental educators and communicators trying to address this problem. Our program is designed for those who wish to widen their perspective on environmental and related social issues, deepen their understanding of those areas essential to a skilled educator and/or communicator, explore different ways of understanding the causes of our current unsustainable society, and develop attributes essential to effective leadership.

Participants seek opportunities to learn with others from diverse backgrounds, to engage in core classes, co-operative projects, team planning, and group discussions to reach a better understanding of the language, expertise, and concerns of a wide range of education and communication professionals.

Students are typically professionals with bachelor's degrees and at least two years' experience working or interest in environmental education and communication.

Graduates of the program have gone on to advance in a variety of fields, from creating schools within the public and private education systems, to leading communications sections within major national and international non-profit organizations, to advising senior government ministers and Premiers, to gaining their PhD degrees with one alumni recently taking on a professorial position in a North American university.

Financial Awards

Royal Roads University has a variety of awards, scholarships, and bursaries available to help offset your tuition fees. The MA in Environmental Education and Communication program has a comparatively high success rate in Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) grant competitions and many of the program’s students win significant financial awards. The SSHRC award at the MA level often aids the competitiveness of students for future grants, and grant writing is a marketable skill The unique advising structure and ability to gain one-to-one aid in grant writing are important features of RRU that help account for this success.

Outcomes

Graduates will return to their career with a range of theoretical knowledge and analytical and communications skills and competencies. Graduates have the skills and knowledge to develop and implement innovative programs to provide students, clients and other audiences with science-based information, psychologically-sound strategies, and culturally-appropriate, philosophically-nuanced and educationally-sophisticated approaches to current environmental issues.

Graduates will be able to:
-Develop and implement programs to provide students, clients and other audiences with up-to-date, reputable scientific and technological information, as well as traditional knowledge, about current environmental issues and opportunities
-Apply the best current knowledge of learning and cognition to the design, development, and implementation of programs about environmental education and communication
-Design, develop and implement environmental communications and education programs using a range of formats and incorporating relevant current technologies and media
-Evaluate the status of public information and prior knowledge concerning environmental values, issues and opportunities
-Possess a sophisticated awareness of the range of perspectives (e.g., attitudes, beliefs, values) towards the environment and human activity in the environment
-Evaluate environmental information and education programs
-Develop and implement strategies to foster conflict resolution, constructive dialogue and community knowledge construction concerning environmental issues
-Develop approaches to nurture effective and responsible environmental actions on the part of corporations, governmental and non-governmental organizations and citizens' coalitions
-Provide up to date information about innovations in environmental communication and education
-Possess a sophisticated awareness of the nature of contemporary human-environment issues and their implications for education and communications programs
-Develop a systems perspective on problems in environmental education and communications
-Develop an understanding of environmental education and communication functions within organizational contexts

Delivery Method

Combining the best of short residencies and innovative web-based instruction, the MA in Environmental Education and Communication program allows both busy working professionals and those just beginning their careers to get the most out of their academic experience. This combination of learning experiences allows students to benefit from the intensity of the program while still being able to meet the demands of family and workplace.

Participants in the MA program take 11 courses (41 credits) including the thesis course. Six courses are taken on-campus, and five are delivered at a distance through Internet-based technologies.

Certificate students take the first three courses in the schedule for a total of 9 credits. Diploma students take the first nine courses for a total of 24 credits.

We will utilize a range of educational methodologies, including case studies, field studies, cultural studies, team projects, lectures and seminar discussions, and online modules. RRU has become a leader in the delivery of web-based interactive distance education courses, and these will be of great value during non-residential periods.

Residency
Over two years, MA students attend two separate three-week residencies and one final two-week residency. The first residency introduces the cohort of students to each other, the faculty, and the RRU style of education as they participate in their first two courses. The middle residency incorporates two courses, may have a more directed field-based orientation, and helps prepare students for their thesis research. The final residency allows completing students to present their thesis findings to the larger environmental education and RRU community and incorporates their final courses, preparing them to be leaders in the field.

Students should expect to be fully occupied during the residency period. The regular classroom schedule is Monday to Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. with homework, readings, and team meetings done outside of these hours. There are activities during the regular workday and in the evenings. In addition to educational activities, there are a number of planned field trips and recreational events.

Online Courses
Online courses are delivered through the innovative use of internet technologies. Students draw on a range of learning resources, while using online discussion groups and drop boxes to develop and complete the electronic submission of both individual and team assignments.

Students take one nine-week distance course at a time. Each distance course requires an average time commitment of 10 - 20 hours per week.

Program Laddering
The structure of the program is laddered so that individuals are able to complete a Graduate Certificate, Graduate Diploma, or full Master's degree.

-The Graduate Certificate program was designed to be taken on its own, or to ladder into the Diploma or Master of Arts in Environmental Education and Communication. The Certificate would be awarded upon successful completion of a residency and one distance-based semester (approximately five months). Students may apply for transfer to the Diploma or MA stream during the Graduate Certificate program, or apply to the Diploma or MA program once they have completed the Certificate
-The Graduate Diploma program was designed to be taken on its own, or to ladder into the MA in Environmental Education and Communication. The Diploma would be awarded upon successful completion of two residencies and one distance-based semester (approximately 12 months). Students may apply for transfer to the MA stream during the Graduate Diploma program, or apply to the MA program once they have completed the Diploma
-The full two-year program leading to the MA is delivered through a combination of three residential periods, three distance-based semesters, and a thesis

Read less
Now more than ever, we need to invite everyone in society, of all ages, to be part of the solution. The Master of Arts in Environmental Education and Communication program will empower you, and give you the depth and insight to lead and motivate others in developing a sustainable, environmentally sound society. Read more
Now more than ever, we need to invite everyone in society, of all ages, to be part of the solution. The Master of Arts in Environmental Education and Communication program will empower you, and give you the depth and insight to lead and motivate others in developing a sustainable, environmentally sound society.

Who It’s For

The MA in Environmental Education and Communication is for those interested in how education and communication can help develop environmentally sustainable social and economic systems. Learning how we can educate and communicate to engage those in our workplaces, communities and nations towards such a goal involves all sectors of society– agriculture, health, governance, media, business, architecture, community development, science, education, recreation and more.

Students likely already know about the complexities of our current unsustainability and the challenges faced by environmental educators and communicators trying to address this problem. Our program is designed for those who wish to widen their perspective on environmental and related social issues, deepen their understanding of those areas essential to a skilled educator and/or communicator, explore different ways of understanding the causes of our current unsustainable society, and develop attributes essential to effective leadership.

Participants seek opportunities to learn with others from diverse backgrounds, to engage in core classes, co-operative projects, team planning, and group discussions to reach a better understanding of the language, expertise, and concerns of a wide range of education and communication professionals.

Students are typically professionals with bachelor's degrees and at least two years' experience working or interest in environmental education and communication.

Applicants who do not have the formal academic education to qualify for admission may be assessed on the basis of both their formal education and their informal learning, in accordance with the Flexible Admission Process.

Graduates of the program have gone on to advance in a variety of fields, from creating schools within the public and private education systems, to leading communications sections within major national and international non-profit organizations, to advising senior government ministers and Premiers, to gaining their PhD degrees with one alumni recently taking on a professorial position in a North American university.

Financial Awards

Royal Roads University has a variety of awards, scholarships, and bursaries available to help offset your tuition fees. The MA in Environmental Education and Communication program has a comparatively high success rate in Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) grant competitions and many of the program’s students win significant financial awards. The SSHRC award at the MA level often aids the competitiveness of students for future grants, and grant writing is a marketable skill The unique advising structure and ability to gain one-to-one aid in grant writing are important features of RRU that help account for this success.

Outcomes

Graduates will return to their career with a range of theoretical knowledge and analytical and communications skills and competencies. Graduates have the skills and knowledge to develop and implement innovative programs to provide students, clients and other audiences with science-based information, psychologically-sound strategies, and culturally-appropriate, philosophically-nuanced and educationally-sophisticated approaches to current environmental issues.

Graduates will be able to:
-Develop and implement programs to provide students, clients and other audiences with up-to-date, reputable scientific and technological information, as well as traditional knowledge, about current environmental issues and opportunities
-Apply the best current knowledge of learning and cognition to the design, development, and implementation of programs about environmental education and communication
-Design, develop and implement environmental communications and education programs using a range of formats and incorporating relevant current technologies and media
-Evaluate the status of public information and prior knowledge concerning environmental values, issues and opportunities
-Possess a sophisticated awareness of the range of perspectives (e.g., attitudes, beliefs, values) towards the environment and human activity in the environment
-Evaluate environmental information and education programs
-Develop and implement strategies to foster conflict resolution, constructive dialogue and community knowledge construction concerning environmental issues
-Develop approaches to nurture effective and responsible environmental actions on the part of corporations, governmental and non-governmental organizations and citizens' coalitions
-Provide up to date information about innovations in environmental communication and education
-Possess a sophisticated awareness of the nature of contemporary human-environment issues and their implications for education and communications programs
-Develop a systems perspective on problems in environmental education and communications
-Develop an understanding of environmental education and communication functions within organizational contexts

Delivery Model

Combining the best of short residencies and innovative web-based instruction, the MA in Environmental Education and Communication program allows both busy working professionals and those just beginning their careers to get the most out of their academic experience. This combination of learning experiences allows students to benefit from the intensity of the program while still being able to meet the demands of family and workplace.

Participants in the MA program take 11 courses (41 credits) including the thesis course. Six courses are taken on-campus, and five are delivered at a distance through Internet-based technologies.

Certificate students take the first three courses in the schedule for a total of 9 credits. Diploma students take the first nine courses for a total of 24 credits.

We will utilize a range of educational methodologies, including case studies, field studies, cultural studies, team projects, lectures and seminar discussions, and online modules. RRU has become a leader in the delivery of web-based interactive distance education courses, and these will be of great value during non-residential periods.

Read less
Now more than ever, we need to invite everyone in society, of all ages, to be part of the solution. Read more
Now more than ever, we need to invite everyone in society, of all ages, to be part of the solution. The Graduate Diploma in Environmental Education and Communication program will empower you, and give you the depth and insight to begin to lead and motivate others in developing a sustainable, environmentally sound society.

Who It’s For

The Graduate Diploma in Environmental Education and Communication program is for those interested in how education and communication can help develop environmentally sustainable social and economic systems. Learning how we can educate and communicate to engage those in our workplaces, communities and nations towards such a goal involves all sectors of society– agriculture, health, governance, media, business, architecture, community development, science, education, recreation and more.

Students likely already know about the complexities of our current unsustainability and the challenges faced by environmental educators and communicators trying to address this problem. Our program is designed for those who wish to widen their perspective on environmental and related social issues, deepen their understanding of those areas essential to a skilled educator and/or communicator, explore different ways of understanding the causes of our current unsustainable society, and develop attributes essential to effective leadership.

Participants seek opportunities to learn with others from diverse backgrounds, to engage in core classes, co-operative projects, team planning, and group discussions to reach a better understanding of the language, expertise, and concerns of a wide range of education and communication professionals.

Students are typically professionals with bachelor's degrees and at least two years' experience working or interest in environmental education and communication.

Outcomes

Graduates will return to their career with a range of theoretical knowledge and analytical and communications skills and competencies. Graduates have the skills and knowledge to develop and implement innovative programs to provide students, clients and other audiences with science-based information, psychologically-sound strategies, and culturally-appropriate, philosophically-nuanced and educationally-sophisticated approaches to current environmental issues.

Delivery Model

The Environmental Education and Communication program combines the best of short residencies and innovative web-based instruction to allow both busy mid-career professionals and those just beginning their careers to get the most out of their academic experience. This combination of learning experiences gives students a beneficial on-campus experience while still being able to meet the demands of family and workplace.

The first residency introduces the cohort of students to each other, the faculty, and the Royal Roads University style of education. The second residency diploma may have a more directed field-based orientation.

Participants in the Graduate Diploma in Environmental Education and Communication program take nine courses.

A range of educational methodologies are utilized including case studies, field studies, cultural studies, team projects, lectures and seminar discussions, and online modules.

Online Learning
Distance courses are delivered through the innovative use of Internet technologies. Participants draw upon web resources as well as more traditional print media, while using online discussion groups and drop boxes to work towards the electronic submission of assignments. Normally, students take one distance course at a time, for a period of 10 - 12 weeks. Each distance course requires an average time commitment of 10 - 20 hours per week.

Residency
Students should expect to work hard during the residency period. The normal classroom schedule is Monday to Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Homework, readings, and team meetings are done outside these hours. There are some activities in the evenings, as well as during the normal workday. In addition to the educational activities, there are a number of planned recreational events.

Advanced Standing
Students may apply for transfer to the MA in Environmental Education and Communication during the Graduate Diploma program, or apply to the MA program once they have completed the Diploma. The Diploma is awarded upon successful completion of two residencies and one distance-based semester (approximately 12 months). Academic credit earned through the completion of one credential (e.g. certificate or diploma) accepted towards the completion of another credential (e.g. diploma or degree) within the same program area. Laddering agreements must be approved by Academic Council. Laddering agreements enable students to build upon previously earned credentials hence the content must be identical (e.g. course completed in a certificate program must contain the same content as those in the degree program). Students who are only registered in a degree program do not receive multiple credentials (e.g. certificate and degree). Students registered in a degree program must apply to the Dean should they wish to transfer to a certificate or diploma program. Similarly, students registered in a certificate or diploma program eligible for laddering must apply and be accepted into the higher level program.

Sponsors
In general, students have secured the necessary approvals to enter the program from their employer. Many employers will therefore be the sponsor and will, through the creation of a Learning Agreement, provide the student with the support and mentorship necessary to complete the program. However, a sponsor is not mandatory.

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If you are broadly interested in science, and feel an urge to understand the social significance of your field of expertise, then it is worth looking at the details of this programme. Read more

Science Education and Communication

If you are broadly interested in science, and feel an urge to understand the social significance of your field of expertise, then it is worth looking at the details of this programme.

Specializations
After a joint first semester, you will specialize in one of the programme tracks:
-Teacher Degree (in Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics, or Computer Science)
-Research and Development in Science Education and Communication

If you want to obtain a teacher degree, your internship will be at school. For other students, the internship could also be in informal educational settings, such as a science museum.

As a graduate of this programme, your job perspectives may include science and mathematics teacher, educational researcher, staff member at a science museum, or communication adviser at a public health institution. There is a strong need in society for such professionals who can bridge the gap between science and the public, both in formal education, and in informal settings.

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Students in this graduate program have a core set of requirements in theory and method courses, which provide foundations in three research areas. Read more

Program Areas

Students in this graduate program have a core set of requirements in theory and method courses, which provide foundations in three research areas: Communication and Culture, Organizational and Interpersonal Communication, and Rhetoric and Political Discourse. In addition, students complete their plans of study, with elective courses from among any graduate courses in the department (see link below) or outside of the department, with the approval of their academic advisors.

Visit the website https://comstudies.ua.edu/graduate-program/

COMMUNICATION STUDIES (COM)

COM 500 Introduction to Graduate Studies. One hour.
The primary goal is to orient new graduate students to the expectations and procedures of graduate study in the department. Topics covered include developing the plan of study, thesis prospectus, comprehensive examination, and choosing advisors and committees.

COM 501 Introduction to Teaching Public Speaking. No hours.
The primary goal of this course is to facilitate the instruction of COM 123 Public Speaking. Students enrolled in this course will provide lesson plans for their classes and discuss options for improving classroom learning.

COM 513 Communication and Diversity. Three hours.
Study and analysis of issues of diversity as they relate to groups in society and in communication fields. Emphasis is on the media's treatment of various groups in society. Approved as a communication and cultural diversity elective.

COM 515 African American Rhetoric. Three hours.
A historical-critical investigation of African American public discourse from the Revolutionary era to the present, exploring rhetorical strategies for social change and building community.

COM 521 Political Communication. Three hours.
An exploration of rhetorical, media, and cross-disciplinary theories and literature related to political communication as expressed in campaigns and institutional governance.

COM 525 Gender and Political Communication. Three hours.
Study of the impact of gender on political communication activities. Topics include gender differences in political messages and voter orientation, masculine ideals of leadership, women’s roles and advancement in the political sphere, and media representations.

COM 536 Independent Study. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Written permission.
Students who want to count this course toward their Plans of Study must complete the official request form and submit it for the approval of their faculty advisor and the Graduate Program Director.

COM 541 Contemporary Rhetorical Theory. Three hours.
A survey of major contributions to rhetorical theory from the 20th century up to the present.

COM 545 Classical Rhetorical Theory. Three hours.
A systematic inquiry into the development of Greek and Roman rhetorical theory during the classical period (ca. 480 B.C.E.–400 C.E.).

COM 548 Seminar in Rhetorical Criticism. Three hours.
An examination of various methodological perspectives of rhetorical criticism. Specifically, the course aims to familiarize students with both traditional and alternative critical methods and to encourage students to perceive the rhetorical dimensions of all manner of public discourse, ranging from speeches, advertising, film, popular music to discursive forms in new media and the Internet.

COM 560 Group Leadership. Three hours.
An advanced study of small-group behavior, examining in detail theories of leadership as they relate to problem solving in group situations.

COM 550 Qualitative Research Methods. Three hours.
An introduction to qualitative research methods in communication, including data collection and analysis. The goals of the course are to provide exposure to a broad array of qualitative methods, help students learn to use some of these methods, and to help them to understand the role of research in our field. The course is designed to help student actually conduct research, resulting in two conference-worthy papers.

COM 555 Conflict and Negotiation. Three hours.
Negotiation is fundamentally a communicative activity. The main objective of this course is to understand processes of formal conflict management in mixed motive settings. Students will apply negotiation theory and skills to simulated negotiation cases that include buyer-seller transactions, negotiating through an agent or mediator, salary negotiations, deal making, resolution of workplace disputes, multiparty negotiations, international and intercultural negotiations, and ethical decision making and communication in negotiation. The skills and theory introduced in this course will help students manage integrative and distributive aspects of the negotiation process to achieve individual and collective goals.

COM 561 Human Communication Theory. Three hours.
A detailed review of selected theories of speech communication with a focus on the critical examination of the foundation of social scientific theories.

COM 562 Theories of Persuasion. Three hours.
A critical review of social-influence theories in the area of persuasion and human action.

COM 563 Relational Communication. Three hours.
Prerequisite: COM 220 or permission of the instructor.
Focused investigation of to communication in close personal relationships, with primary emphasis on contemporary concepts and theories of romantic relationships and friendships.

COM 565 Intercultural Communication. Three hours.
Survey and analysis of major concepts, theories, and research dealing with communication between people of different cultural backgrounds in multicultural and international settings.

COM 567 Seminar: Public Address. Three hours.
A topical consideration of individual case studies from public discourse, designed to probe problems of the nature of the audience, the ethics of persuasion, and the power of public advocacy in mass society. Topics may vary.

COM 569 Communication and Gender. Three hours.
Explores the role of communication in the construction of gender. Covers feminist theoretical approaches in communication and other disciplines, the intersections of gender with other marginalities, and the role of gender in various communication contexts. Approved as a communication and cultural diversity elective.

COM 571 Seminar in Organizational Communication. Three hours.
An introductory examination of historical and contemporary issues in organizational communication scholarship from a variety of theoretical and methodological perspectives.

COM 572 Organizational Assessment and Intervention. Three hours.
Examines the theoretical issues inherent in the study of organizational communication, the primary factors requiring assessment and intervention, the impact of on-going changes and new information techniques, current challenges facing the organizational consultant, and the practical application of communication processes for improving organizations.

COM 575 Technology, Culture, and Human Communication. Three hours.
Study of the complexity of technologically-mediated communication across cultures. This course combines literature and concepts from intercultural communication with human communication and technology and addresses the challenges of interacting with others via technology, working in global virtual teams and organizations, and participating as a citizen and consumer in the technology age.

COM 590 Internship in Communication Studies. One to three hours.
Prerequisite: Written permission from the graduate program director.
Proposal for supervised field experience in communication studies must be submitted and approved.

COM 595 Special Topics. Three hours. Topics vary by instructor.

COM 598 Professional Project. Three hours.

COM 599 Thesis Research. One to three hours.

Career Options

A Master of Arts degree in Communication Studies can offer many career options. Communication skills — oral, written, electronic — are now recognized as critical aspects in all major professions in the United States. Both in education and in the work force, there is a growing need for those who not only understand how human communication functions in its various forms, but also can analyze and advise others on ways to improve human communication. Graduates typically pursue one of three career paths: teaching public speaking, working in professional communication positions, or continuing with advanced academic study, such as in doctoral or law degree programs.

Find out how to apply here - https://comstudies.ua.edu/graduate-program/admissions/

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This course involves combining communication studies, applied linguistics, international management and intercultural communication. Read more
This course involves combining communication studies, applied linguistics, international management and intercultural communication.

Economic globalisation and rapid developments in ICT mean that many organisations now operate on an international scale, or at the very least interact with consumers, clients and/or partner organisations in other countries. Even ‘local’ companies and organisations may have a multicultural workforce, or offer their services or products abroad. As a result, communication has become increasingly international and intercultural.

Organisations seek to create communication strategies that support their overall strategy and objectives. In doing so, they need to interact with stakeholders who may have a variety of linguistic and cultural backgrounds. These stakeholders may include employees, customers, suppliers, financial backers or even local governments. In the Master’s specialisation in International Business Communication, you’ll learn about the all factors, including cultural and linguistic ones, that play a role in communication and need to be taken into account in order to create effective communication strategies.

In your future career as a business executive or communication specialist, you’ll need to be able to assess the quality, reliability and validity of the research that informs your practical decisions ‘on the job’. In other words, you’ll need to be able to judge whether existing research – as well as your own – complies with the ground rules of academic rigor. The programme therefore places emphasis not only on training your research skills but also on developing your awareness of what ‘good research’ entails.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ibc

Why study International Business Communication at Radboud University?

- This is one of very few programmes in Europe (and the only programme in the Netherlands) that also focuses on the cultural and linguistic dimensions of international business communication.

- The specialisation deals with theory and insights that are relevant to achieving effective communication in various organisational contexts; from interpersonal communication in a meeting with (multicultural) colleagues, to marketing communication aimed at reaching international target audiences.

- Students do a (group) internship in which they work towards solving a particular communication issue or answering a specific communication question for a company or organisation. This provides hands-on experience in a relevant organisational setting.

- This specialisation attracts students from different countries and because admission to the programme is selective (max. 50 students per year), you’ll be part of a small group of highly motivated Dutch and international students. This means that to a certain extent, your learning environment is international as well.

- Guest speakers are regularly invited to share their knowledge about current developments in business, management and organisational communication.

- Although the main focus is on international communication in larger, multinational companies, graduates of this programme will be able to apply what they’ve learned in a variety of organisations – for profit, non-profit or governmental institutes.

Language(s) and management perspective

Languages form the heart of communication and that is why this Master’s specialisation is taught within Radboud University’s Faculty of Arts. The programme places a strong focus on the role that languages play in effective corporate communication. Of course, the languages used are not the only factor to consider in a multicultural environment - which is why you will be encouraged to also consider communication issues and strategy from an international management perspective.

In short, you’ll explore the impact of globalisation on business communication, the role of linguistic and cultural diversity in corporate communication, and the human and operational consequences of organisations’ language policy or strategies. In doing so, you’ll also come to understand how such issues can shape and affect an organisation’s performance.

Career prospects

With a Master’s specialisation in International Business Communication, you could pursue a career in government, semi-government, business or academia. For example, our graduates work as internal or external communication managers or press spokespeople in companies, government departments, health institutions or non-profit organisations. Many work in marketing communications at multinational companies, as communication trainers for consultancies, as social media managers or as PR consultants.

- International perspectives
Since the programme focuses on communication in international contexts, and on communication with international target groups, a sizable number of graduates have found jobs outside the Netherlands or with international organisations operating from the Netherlands.

- Wide range of communication functions
Job openings for our graduates can cover a wide range of communication functions, organisational types and (business) sectors. This is because organisations have increasingly come to realise that effective communication is essential to all organisational functions (e.g. marketing, PR, HRM, R&D, finance), and have made a real effort over the past decades to professionalise communications, making (international) business communication an increasingly important discipline.

Our approach to this field

Corporate communication involves orchestrating internal and external communication instruments to support an organisation’s core activities and to manage its relationship with different types of stakeholders. Due to the internationalisation of markets and businesses, corporate communication has gone global in recent years. Organisations that operate internationally need to take different cultures and language backgrounds into account when designing their communication. Culture and language(s) may affect international communication at three levels:
- The management level: e.g. when CEOs communicate with internal or external audiences
- The organisational level: e.g. when a company communicates about its Corporate Social Responsibility policy
- The marketing level: e.g. when products or services are promoted to an international audience in (corporate) advertising.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ibc

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The Department of Education offers a one-year (12 month) taught full time MA in Global and International Citizenship Education. Globalisation is perhaps the key driving force of modern education systems. Read more
The Department of Education offers a one-year (12 month) taught full time MA in Global and International Citizenship Education.

Globalisation is perhaps the key driving force of modern education systems. Schools (and other educational enterprises in universities, businesses and communities) are part of a global network. This programme explores important issues about what it means to be a citizen in a global world - what could and should be done by educators to respond to the needs of individuals and groups in nation states and the new global society. We discuss issues about rights and duties and communities in the UK, Europe and globally and explore learning, teaching and assessment methods in schools and beyond.

This programme will be attractive to all those who have an interest in social studies education. This includes political and ideological education, moral education and education for diversity. This is a broad field that includes global education, comparative education, international education, intercultural understanding and citizenship education. In particular, the programme explores how to help people understand society and develop the skills to take part in it. This includes investigations of European citizenship and global citizenship education and focusing on learning and teaching methods. The programme will be of interest to those who see themselves as current or future teachers, researchers or policy makers. Applications are welcomed from both home and international students. Examples of what our graduates have done include PhD research in Australia; becoming and academic in a university in Japan; being an international student advisor at a university in the USA; working in business and in higher education in China.

Programme Aims

The MA programme aims to:
-Provide advanced-level study of forms of education appropriate for global citizens
-Illuminate the nature of citizenship and global education through insights into comparative education
-Link citizenship and global education to wider issues in society (history, politics and culture) and education via rhetorical and other perspectives
-Develop personal, academic and professional language skills in English
-Develop basic research capabilities in the field of citizenship and global education

Programme Content

Term 1
In term 1 there are 2 compulsory modules:
-Citizenship Education (20 credits)
-Research Methods in Education (20 credits)

And one option module (20 credits) which may be chosen from the full list of modules available to all taught MA students. Modules that may be of particular interest to MAGICE students are likely to include:
-Education and Social Justice
-Intercultural Communication in Education
-Motivation in Education
-Teaching and Learning in Schools

Term 2
-Teaching and Learning Citizenship & Global Education (20 credits)

And one option module (20 credits) from the full list of modules available to all taught MA students. Modules that may be of particular interest to MAGICE students are likely to include:
-Contemporary Issues in Teaching
-Cross-cultural Perspectives on Language and Discourse
-Qualitative and Quantitative Data Analysis
-Gender, Sexuality and Education
-Higher Education in the 21st Century

Term 3
-Planning and Communicating Research (20 credits, classes spread over Terms 2 and 3)

The third term and the summer is also devoted to writing a dissertation (60 credits) based on a small-scale research study to be submitted by early September. Previous studies have included an examination of global education; universities as sites of global citizenship; studying the media.

Careers

Our graduates find employment in a wide range of sectors within education and higher education, but also in journalism, information management, human resources and other careers.

Others find employment opportunities in the civil service, NGOs and other international organisations.

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This 36-credit program is designed for self-starters and independent thinkers; students who want to further their career in intercultural or international communication, including Strategic Communication, Health Communication, and Communication for Development. Read more
This 36-credit program is designed for self-starters and independent thinkers; students who want to further their career in intercultural or international communication, including Strategic Communication, Health Communication, and Communication for Development. The program is delivered by faculty with professional and practitioner industry insight, providing a functional, real-world understanding of the fundamental and advanced concepts related to intercultural and international communication issues.

The MA in Intercultural and International Communication program will give graduates the skills necessary to communicate effectively in complex circumstances, through the use of diverse media and communication genres and engaging different audiences across multiple cultural settings.

Graduates will be familiar with non-governmental, civic, and business organizations and will have an understanding of how the making and shaping of meaning is fundamental to the reproduction of culture.

Course themes include:
-Intercultural and International Communication
-Intercultural Competence
-Media Relations in a Global Context
-Public Affairs and Advocacy
-Social Marketing
-Sport for Society
-Communication for Health and Well-Being

This program is delivered in two formats: an 18-month on-campus program, or a two-year blended program incorporating online learning with one on-campus residency, with the opportunity for an internship or research course. As well, this program features an intercultural field study experience to ensure you have opportunities to apply your learning in both intercultural and international contexts.

This program is recognized as full-time by StudentAid BC, meaning B.C. residents on this program are eligible for full-time government student loan assistance.

Who It’s For

The MA in Intercultural and International Communication program is for strategic and independent-thinking communication managers looking to improve their ability to assist organizations respond to the rapidly changing global environment, as well as individuals with an arts or science undergraduate degree who want to pursue or advance their career in professional communication in the intercultural or international sphere. This program is designed to balance Intercultural Communication with International Communication to better integrate theory and practice.

There are two learning models available for this program, with each model traditionally attracting slightly different students:
-Two-Year Blended Model – The students that lean towards this option tend to have significant professional experience, and have a background as communication managers and leaders.
-18-Month On-Campus Model – Shortly after completing their bachelor degree, the students that tend to take up this model have a solid understanding of the theoretical aspects of communication, with some relevant work experience as communication specialists and liaisons.

Through our Flexible Admission process, significant professional experience in lieu of academic requirements is also considered.

Outcomes

The MA in Intercultural and International Communication prepares individuals for work in:
-International or multicultural governmental or non-governmental organizations (NGOs)
-International journalism and documentary-reporting
-Multi-ethnic and multicultural communities
-International media
-Intercultural conflict management
-International communication enterprises
-Social marketing and development aid
-International relations
-Community activism
-Sustainable international and intercultural development
-Cultural interpretation and mediation
-Further studies in any of these fields

Graduates will gain:
-Knowledge of both the fundamental and advanced concepts related to intercultural and international communication and an ability to communicate successfully through multiple modes (e.g. through written and oral discourse, visual language, multimodal media) across culturally diverse settings.
-The ability to use computer-mediated technology to manage the processes required for the production and reproduction of culture.
-Knowledge of traditional and new media and their operation across diverse audiences.
-Knowledge of government, non-government, civic, and business organizations and an understanding of how meaning-making is fundamental to the operation of these.
-An understanding of the social forces shaping the globalization of the world, combined with a practical understanding of how processes such as transnationalism, travel and tourism, global commerce, migration, diaspora, refugee movement, global identity politics, information flows, postcolonial governmental relations, and much more, shape communities worldwide.
-An understanding of the cultural dynamics underpinning the formation of local, regional and national communities with regard to issues such as the formation of cultural identities, the shaping of gender inclusion, racialization, multicultural policy and education, ritualization, language protection and cultural revival, multicultural health communication campaigns, environmental culture, political culture, indigenous governance, sustainable development, and all forms of cross-cultural interaction.
-An understanding of culture, international and intercultural communication, negotiation and conflict management. An ability to communicate ethically in diverse and difficult circumstances.

Upon successful completion of the MA Intercultural and International Communication program at Royal Roads University, you will have demonstrated your competency at a professional and international level, and that you are prepared to meet the challenges facing communication managers in today’s fast-changing cultural, socio-economic, and political environments.

Flexible Admission

Applicants who do not meet the Standard Admission requirements will be considered for Flexible Admission and assessed as follows:
-All applicants must show evidence of having sufficient knowledge, skills and abilities to complete a demanding academic course of study at a master's level and have significant professional communication experience.
-Applicants without an undergraduate degree, but more than three years (90 credits) of relevant post-secondary education, should have at least two years of relevant work experience, preferably in a leadership capacity.
-Applicants with 2-3 years (60-90 credits) of relevant post-secondary education should have at least five years of relevant international/intercultural work experience in a leadership capacity.
-Applicants with less than two years of relevant post-secondary education should have at least ten years of high-level, professional communication experience in a leadership capacity.

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The Department of Education offers a one-year (12 month) taught full time MA in Science Education. This programme will be attractive to all those who have an interest in science education, whether as teachers, researchers or policy makers. Read more
The Department of Education offers a one-year (12 month) taught full time MA in Science Education. This programme will be attractive to all those who have an interest in science education, whether as teachers, researchers or policy makers. Applications are welcomed from both home and international students.

Applicants are strongly advised to ensure that they submit applications no later than 1st September if they wish to begin a course of study beginning in the same year. No guarantee can be offered that applications received after this date will be processed for a September start date.

The Department also welcomes applications from people interested in studying for a PhD in science education in its areas of expertise (see below).

Why come to York?

The University of York Science Education Group (UYSEG) has an outstanding international reputation for the excellence of its work in research and curriculum development in science education. Our school science programmes such as Science: the Salters Approach, Salters Advanced Chemistry, Salters Horners Advanced Physics and, most recently, Salters Nuffield Advanced Biology and 21st Century Science are widely used in this country, and have received international acclaim. Science: the Salters Approach and Salters Advanced Chemistry have been adapted for use in many other countries, including Belgium, Hong Kong, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Russia, South Africa, Spain, Swaziland and the USA. If you come to York, you will have the opportunity to work with one of the leading groups in science education.

As members of the University of York Science Education Group, the science education staff in the Department of Education have made a significant contribution to the high profile of science education at York. Science specialist staff currently in the Department include Professor Robin Millar, Professor Judith Bennett, Martin Braund and Fred Lubben. All hold major grants for research and development in science education.

Areas of expertise include assessment, attitudes to science, the use of context-based approaches to the teaching of science, curriculum development (including international collaboration on projects), evaluation of curriculum interventions, gender issues in science education, practical work in science, scientific literacy, systematic reviews of research literature, and the transition from primary to secondary school. Current international work includes involvement in the PISA (Programme for International Student Assessment) project and a number of initiatives in Southern Africa.

The reputation of the University of York Science Education Group was a major contributory factor in York being chosen as the home of the new National Science Learning Centre, which opened in September 2005 and offers a programme of professional development courses for science teachers.

Programme Aims

The programme offers specialist tuition within an established framework for MA provision in the Department. The aims of the programme are:
-To enhance knowledge and understanding in science education
-To develop educational research capabilities and skills in the fields of education and science education
-To contribute, where appropriate, to professional development by enhancing capacity to investigate aspects of one or more of educational theory, policy and practice

Programme Content

Term 1
-Science, Education and Society (20 credits)
-Research methods in education (20 credits)

One option module from a list of about 10 (20 credits). Options are likely to include:
-Bilingualism
-Citizenship education
-Cross-linguistic influences in second language acquisition
-Discourse Analysis
-Education and social justice
-Evaluating ESOL classroom practice
-Intercultural communication in education
-Learning and teaching second/foreign language reading
-Motivation in education
-Teaching and assessing speaking skills
-Teaching and assessing writing skills
-Teaching and learning in schools
-Teaching World English
-Topics in second language acquisition

Term 2
-Recent research and innovation in science education (20 credits)

One option module from a list of about 10 (20 credits). Options are likely to include:
-Approaches to English teaching
-Contemporary issues in teaching
-Cross-cultural perspectives on language and discourse
-Developmental Psycholinguistics
-Learning and teaching grammar in a second language
-Pragmatics: language, meaning and communication
-Psychology of language and language learning
-Qualitative and quantitative data analysis
-Teaching and learning citizenship and global education
-Teaching English for academic purposes
-The practice of English language teaching
-Testing and assessment in English language teaching

Term 3
Planning and Communicating Research (20 credits). Classes are spread over Terms 2 and 3.

The third term and the summer is also devoted to writing a dissertation (60 credits) based on a small-scale research study to be submitted by early September.

Students will also be able to attend the department series of research seminars for Masters students which includes talks by visiting speakers.

Assessment

Students will complete:
-Four assessed coursework essay assignments (each 4,000 to 5,000 words in length)
-An exam in Research Methods in Education
-An assessed presentation + dissertation outline + ethics audit
-A dissertation of 12,000 words in length

Careers

Our graduates find employment in a wide range of sectors within education, but also in journalism, information management, human resources and other careers.

Our postgraduate courses can be used to complement teacher training/development programmes and voluntary or paid roles which focus on the more practical elements of teaching. However, other than our PGCE, our courses are not teacher training programmes in themselves.

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This course is designed to produce highly competent communicators for the modern business and media world. Combining the theory with the practice of communication, it has a distinctive vocational orientation and focuses on English as the medium of communication. Read more

Why take this course?

This course is designed to produce highly competent communicators for the modern business and media world. Combining the theory with the practice of communication, it has a distinctive vocational orientation and focuses on English as the medium of communication.

The course can be studied through campus-based learning or through distance learning.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Study the nature and function of communication in the modern world, so you will be able to produce text (written, spoken, printed and broadcast) for different purposes
Better understand and use modern communication technologies

What opportunities might it lead to?

The course is designed for graduates from any discipline who wish to work in business, commerce and the media as highly competent communicators. The course combines the theory of communication with the practice of communication, has a distinctive vocational orientation and focuses on English as the medium of communication.

Module Details

MA Communication and Applied Linguistics balances theory and practice and features units that have a high degree of professional relevance and training.

The course is structured on the basis of core units and optional units.

Core:

Theory and Practice of Communication: This unit deals examines communication theory and practice in a range of contexts. Students will use various analytical tools to examine different areas of communication (e.g. corporate communication, mass communication and semiotics. Through engaging with this unit, students can gain a practical understanding of communication which they can apply to their professional lives.

Analysing Discourse: This unit introduces various analytical tools (e.g. appraisal, speech acts, modality, metaphors, transitivity, cohesion, theme-rheme) which are valuable in the analysis of authentic discourses and texts (e.g. courtroom discourse, social media, educational science texts, newspaper texts, political speeches, advertisements, etc.). The importance of context in any analysis is emphasised.

Dissertation: Students undertake a piece of significant research, reported and analysed in an appropriate manner in an area of professional relevance. A research proposal will be produced in the first instance and supervision from a tutor will be available throughout the process.

2 options:

Technical Communication: This unit is designed to develop students’ ability to communicate technical information effectively to specific audiences. It will examine a range of factors that can influence the effectiveness of communication and provide strategies to overcome communication problems.

Intercultural Communication: This unit deals with intercultural communication issues in a global setting. Students can benefit from an awareness of the various factors including cultural factors, which influence communication in order to improve their own knowledge and practice of communication.

Communication in the Workplace: This unit examines how language is used in workplace settings. Analysing and evaluating a range of spoken, written and digital texts, can help students to reflect on and improve their own knowledge and practice of communication.

Digital Communication and Media Development: This unit is designed to give students a theoretical and a practical knowledge of digital media development and implementation. Students will use a range of software applications to design or develop their own digital marketing applications.

Second Language Acquisition: This unit reviews relevant research on the topic of SLA and builds on students’ previous experience of language learning, applying this to areas such as individual differences and types of learning, as well as to more formal approaches to SLA.

Professional Portfolio: This unit offers students the opportunity to profile their degree to their own professional and/or personal interests, allowing students the chance to study areas not covered elsewhere in the curriculum. Students negotiate an area for study and then pursue this with the support of a supervisor.

Please note. All optional units are subject to staff availability and student demand.

Exit levels

The credit system creates a flexible framework in which you can graduate with one of the following awards, depending on the number of credits gained:

MA Communication and Applied Linguistics (four core units plus the research management and dissertation units) 180 credits
Postgraduate Diploma in Communication and Applied Linguistics: 120 credits
Postgraduate Certificate in Communication and Applied Linguistics: 60 credits

Programme Assessment

Full time study is one full academic year, consisting of a taught part from October to June and a research part, in which the dissertation is written, from June to September. Part time students study for a period of two years. The dissertation is written in the summer period of the second year of study.

There are no formal examinations. A variety of different assessment methods are used which include essays, projects, portfolios, presentations and your dissertation. The research management unit will prepare you for your dissertation and you will be allocated a dissertation supervisor who will oversee your work throughout the process. You will also be encouraged to start thinking about it from the start of the course and submit a series of interim documents.

Student Destinations

Graduates will be able to progress to jobs in the public and private sectors in various areas of communication including, advertising, publishing, human resources departments, in higher education in their own country or elsewhere, or continue on to undertake doctoral research. Possession of a Masters qualification is often viewed as a requirement for promotion to a more responsible position where you may already be working.

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On this course you can. Study the nature and function of communication in the modern world, so you will be able to produce text (written, spoken, printed and broadcast) for different purposes. Read more
[[Why take this course?[[

This course is designed to produce highly competent communicators for the modern business and media world. Combining the theory with the practice of communication, it has a distinctive vocational orientation and focuses on English as the medium of communication.

The course can be studied through campus-based learning or through distance learning.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Study the nature and function of communication in the modern world, so you will be able to produce text (written, spoken, printed and broadcast) for different purposes
Better understand and use modern communication technologies

What opportunities might it lead to?

The course is designed for graduates from any discipline who wish to work in business, commerce and the media as highly competent communicators. The course combines the theory of communication with the practice of communication, has a distinctive vocational orientation and focuses on English as the medium of communication.

Module Details

MA Communication and Applied Linguistics balances theory and practice and features units that have a high degree of professional relevance and training.

The course is structured on the basis of core units and optional units.

Core:

Theory and Practice of Communication: This unit deals examines communication theory and practice in a range of contexts. Students will use various analytical tools to examine different areas of communication (e.g. corporate communication, mass communication and semiotics. Through engaging with this unit, students can gain a practical understanding of communication which they can apply to their professional lives.

Analysing Discourse: This unit introduces various analytical tools (e.g. appraisal, speech acts, modality, metaphors, transitivity, cohesion, theme-rheme) which are valuable in the analysis of authentic discourses and texts (e.g. courtroom discourse, social media, educational science texts, newspaper texts, political speeches, advertisements, etc.). The importance of context in any analysis is emphasised.

Dissertation: Students undertake a piece of significant research, reported and analysed in an appropriate manner in an area of professional relevance. A research proposal will be produced in the first instance and supervision from a tutor will be available throughout the process.

2 options:

Technical Communication: This unit is designed to develop students’ ability to communicate technical information effectively to specific audiences. It will examine a range of factors that can influence the effectiveness of communication and provide strategies to overcome communication problems.

Intercultural Communication: This unit deals with intercultural communication issues in a global setting. Students can benefit from an awareness of the various factors including cultural factors, which influence communication in order to improve their own knowledge and practice of communication.

Communication in the Workplace: This unit examines how language is used in workplace settings. Analysing and evaluating a range of spoken, written and digital texts, can help students to reflect on and improve their own knowledge and practice of communication.

Digital Communication and Media Development: This unit is designed to give students a theoretical and a practical knowledge of digital media development and implementation. Students will use a range of software applications to design or develop their own digital marketing applications.

Second Language Acquisition: This unit reviews relevant research on the topic of SLA and builds on students’ previous experience of language learning, applying this to areas such as individual differences and types of learning, as well as to more formal approaches to SLA.

Professional Portfolio: This unit offers students the opportunity to profile their degree to their own professional and/or personal interests, allowing students the chance to study areas not covered elsewhere in the curriculum. Students negotiate an area for study and then pursue this with the support of a supervisor.

Please note. All optional units are subject to staff availability and student demand.

Exit levels

The credit system creates a flexible framework in which you can graduate with one of the following awards, depending on the number of credits gained:

MA Communication and Applied Linguistics (four core units plus the research management and dissertation units) 180 credits
Postgraduate Diploma in Communication and Applied Linguistics: 120 credits
Postgraduate Certificate in Communication and Applied Linguistics: 60 credits

Programme Assessment

Full time study is one full academic year, consisting of a taught part from October to June and a research part, in which the dissertation is written, from June to September. Part time students study for a period of two years. The dissertation is written in the summer period of the second year of study.

There are no formal examinations. A variety of different assessment methods are used which include essays, projects, portfolios, presentations and your dissertation. The research management unit will prepare you for your dissertation and you will be allocated a dissertation supervisor who will oversee your work throughout the process. You will also be encouraged to start thinking about it from the start of the course and submit a series of interim documents.

Student Destinations

Graduates will be able to progress to jobs in the public and private sectors in various areas of communication including, advertising, publishing, human resources departments, in higher education in their own country or elsewhere, or continue on to undertake doctoral research. Possession of a Masters qualification is often viewed as a requirement for promotion to a more responsible position where you may already be working.

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Our full-time Master’s in Education provides an opportunity to study educational issues in depth and the programme will cover policy, practice and education theory within an international context. Read more
Our full-time Master’s in Education provides an opportunity to study educational issues in depth and the programme will cover policy, practice and education theory within an international context. Education is much more than the study of teaching. It is designed to get you questioning the assumptions that lie beneath educational policy and practice.

COURSE STRUCTURE AND CONTENT

Education Studies forms part of the Professional Master’s Programme within the School of Education and offer a mixture of theory and practice with professional development within a global and international context.

Students come from a wide range of countries - from Cyprus, the Gambia, the United States, Germany, Indonesia, China, Japan, and so on, as well as the United Kingdom. They also come from many backgrounds. Some have educational studies as a first degree while others have been marine biologists, musicians or experts in fibre optics. We welcome this diversity. All come, however, with a good first degree and a thirst to know more about education:

• What is the nature of learning and teaching in different countries and cultures?
• What is the relationship between education and the economy?
• How is education changing as it enters the market place?
• How are education systems managed?
• Who takes decisions about the curriculum and teaching?
• How far do governments control education?
• How far should they go?
• What is the role of professional educators?
• What will be the role of schools and universities in the future?
• What is the future for education in the knowledge economy?
• Is education becoming an ‘instrument’ of capitalism?

COMPULSORY MODULES

There are four compulsory modules and a dissertation:

• Research and the Professional Part 1 will improve your awareness of how to do educational research, covering topics from e-Literacy and the application of research library skills, through to epistemological and ontological questions that underpin research. The module will help you find the direction you wish to take with your own dissertation and give you time to examine and question research undertaken by fellow students.

• Research and the Professional Part 2 (Research Project Preparation) further develops your understanding of research and of your ability to engage critically with theoretical texts. Flexible learning themes are used in contact sessions, but mostly freestanding materials are used to structure the communication between you and your specialist tutor and produce clarity and enthusiasm for your main area of enquiry through a negotiated project action plan.

• Education, Politics and Society explores how education can be understood in a complex and changing world where education is a significant factor in economic growth and competition. You will learn to question how governments attempt to control education processes and outcomes and examine the impact of recent policy initiatives.

• Learning and Knowledge Technology concentrates on linking pedagogical theory with ICT tools and applications across the curriculum. It examines how technological tools can be integrated into teaching and learning in all educational sectors.

OPTIONAL MODULES

You also take two additional optional modules that allow for further in-depth study. There is also other modules from the part-time programme that may be relevant to your intended career.

• International Education and Globalisation looks at education within a global context and deals with issues like ‘antiglobalisation’ ‘terrorism’ and ‘cultural resistance’. It examines the nature of the entrepreneurial university, the idea of the ‘knowledge economy’, and the way governments have systematically used the curriculum for nation building.

• Global Citizenship reflects a concern in the twenty-first century for a curriculum that is increasingly expected to be responsive to a range of social and political needs, e.g. citizenship education, and the need for pupils to acquire a global perspective. It examines history, principles, research and educational practice where these fields converge as global citizenship.

• Education Policy is about the politics of education. At its core is the examination of who makes policy and the comparison of the UK with other countries, making links with global issues.

• Language, Ideology and Education looks at the way language mediates and constructs educational matters. It draws from Foucault and Fairclough for its rationale, and uses wide ranging educational discourses to illustrate its theoretical stance.

• Education in the Social and Cultural Context of the UK is devised for overseas students who need a clearer awareness of the social and cultural backdrop to UK education. Tailored to student’s interests and needs, it can include school and cultural visits.

TEACHING METHODS AND RESOURCES

Modules are taught through lectures and small group seminars. There are also individual tutorials and good opportunities for extended discussion with tutors. Analysis of ideas through discussion is the key to teaching and learning in the programme. Some lectures and seminars occur during the day. Others take place from late afternoon.

EMPLOYABILITY

Many of our students seek new career paths to educational management, training or in related fields, maybe in their non-UK home. Some wish to continue their undergraduate expertise in Education Studies and gain a broader and deeper view of education. Others wish to gain employment in , say, a museum or gallery setting, while others start with the intention of taking their studies further – to PhD level – and seek eventual employment in an academic institution.

ASSESSMENT METHODS

There are no written exams and each module is assessed by coursework. This typically involves an essay of 2,500 words for a 15 credit module and 5,000 words for a 30 credit module. Sometimes assessment is by verbal presentation. The dissertation is 15,000–20,000 words and worth 60 credits. It focuses on an area mutually agreed with a specialist tutor who also offers guidance and support in the writing of the dissertation. To achieve the award you will need 180 credits in total.

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The Social Justice and Education MA will help students to identify, examine and understand key sociological and philosophical perspectives on social justice, including issues of race, class, gender and sexuality and education. Read more
The Social Justice and Education MA will help students to identify, examine and understand key sociological and philosophical perspectives on social justice, including issues of race, class, gender and sexuality and education. Participants will explore the personal and political dimensions of social justice concerns and develop their professional, practical and research skills in this area.

Degree information

This programme provides students with the opportunity to address, in a unique way, the complex links between social justice and education, focusing on key current policy and political debates about the role of education. They will also be able to develop, extend and reflect on their own professional interests, concerns and practice and how to address pressing issues of social justice in their everyday profesional and personal lives. Through their engagmeent with cutting edge research in this area they will learn tools for fighting for social justice and transformation in the educational areas relevant for them.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (60 credits), two optional modules (60 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits), or a report (30 credits) and a third optional module (30 credits).

Core modules
-Sociology of Education
-Understanding Education Research

Optional modules
-Gender, Sexuality and Education
-Rights and Education
-Understanding Educational Policy
-Sociology of 'Race' and Education
-Theoretical Foundations of Educational Ideas
-Gender, Education and Development
-Values, Aims and Society
-Students can also choose from a wide range of Master's-level optional modules across the UCL Institute of Education offering.

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 20,000 words or a report of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a mixed mode, including face-to-face evening sessions and interactive online learning in a combination of teaching and learning styles. Sometimes a conventional lecture-based approach is taken, with the aim of providing an overview of the field. Lectures are usually followed by open discussion or group work. At other times a seminar format is adopted involving, for example, group discussion of set reading, a video or an introductory presentation. Assessment is through coursework essay assignments, plus submission of a report or dissertation.

Careers

Graduates of this programme are currently working across a broad range of areas. Some are leaders, managers, teachers and practitioners in the compulsory education sector across international contexts. Many are working as professionals in NGO organisations specialising in social justice across many countries such as Chille, Japan, Canada and the UK. Graduates can also be found working as civil servants and goverment officials. In addition, many find places in the higher education sector including across a range of professional roles, as researchers, and as university lecturers worldwide.

Employability
Students develop the capacity to:
-Reflect critically on debates concerning education and social justice across diverse contexts.
-Understand the ways in which knowledge forms, and is formed by, education politics, policy, practice and research .
-Consider the implications of theory, research and analyses about social justice in education and how it can impact their own future practice and professional development.
-Use oral and written communication skills in order to make arguments, examine evidence and creatively advance social justice and education.
-Understand processes entailed in social science and philosophical research and conduct their own unique research in the area of social justice and education.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Department of Education, Practice and Society at UCL Institute of Education (IOE) is home to an interdisciplinary grouping bringing together high-quality teaching and research in the sociology, philosophy and history of education, international development, post-compulsory and vocational education and higher education.

The Social Justice and Education MA is taught by world-leading sociologists and philosophers within the department who have expertise in theory, research methods, policy analysis and impacting social change. They are experts in issues such as equality and human rights, gender, 'race', sexuality, youth, disability and social class. Those teaching are active researchers and will introduce the latest research and developments in their fields.

This programme explores sociological and philosophical perspectives on social justice and equalities and also explores processes of social transformation and change. Key issues debated include understanding and responding to social and educational disparities in international contexts. The programme equips students with essential theoretical and methodological research skills for critically engaging with social justice issues including understanding power relations from various perspectives. The MA attracts a diversity of both home and international students thus providing excellent educational and professional networking opportunities.

Students gain invaluable opportunities to study with leading scholars and a cohort of internationally diverse students across the IOE MA cluster in sociology, social justice and policy studies in education.

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This course is flexible in that it offers several entry routes, choices for modular study and appropriate academic targets. Read more
This course is flexible in that it offers several entry routes, choices for modular study and appropriate academic targets. Those who have already completed either the BSMS Postgraduate Certificate in Medical Education (or equivalent, if APL requested) or the BSMS Postgraduate Certificate in Simulation Studies, may enter at Postgraduate Diploma Level. These participants would then successfully complete a further three 20-credit optional modules to achieve a Postgraduate Diploma in Clinical Education (120 M level credits). Normally these modules would be completed part-time within one academic year.

Participants wishing to progress to Masters level must include Module MDM 10 ‘Research Methods & Critical Appraisal’ in their choice of three. A 16000-word Dissertation (as well as a 3000-word draft paper for publication) in the academic field of clinical education completes the Master of Science degree (180 M level credits). This would normally be completed in a further year, but some students with busy NHS jobs find it can take up to two years to complete.

For those who have not yet taken any ‘M Level’ postgraduate study in this area, the normal route would be to take at least two of the the ‘PG Cert Med Ed’ modules in year 1 (MDM 28/140), and then proceed with the PG Diploma/Masters routes in years 2 & 3, as described above.

Key Areas of Study

The overall aim of the course is to promote knowledge of and research into learning, teaching and communication in a clinical context, together with facilitating a reflective awareness of participants’ related educational skills and their ongoing development.
-Learning, teaching and communication skills theory & practice in clinical education
-Development of the participant’s identity as a teacher and facilitator in educational settings
-Simulation in clinical education
-Feedback & debriefing in educational contexts
-Clinical educational research as an academic discipline and its importance in the praxis of teaching
-Teaching as leadership & facilitation, both face-to-face and through the use of technology enhanced and blended learning

Course Structure

The format of assessment throughout the course is varied: some modules are assessed by more traditional 3,000 word written assignments, centred on a topic relevant to the student’s own practice or in-depth analyses of specific case studies or significant educational events. Others feature the development of specific educational tools (e.g. on–line learning or simulation-based assessment), focussing on more practical aspects of clinical education. Students will also develop a personal educational portfolio of about 5,000 words using an appropriate national professional standards framework i.e. Health Education Academy (HEA) or Academy of Medical Educators (AoME).The Dissertation module involves a personal research project and is assessed by a 16,000 word thesis plus a draft paper for submission for publication in an appropriate academic journal.

MSc
-MDM28 Learning and Teaching in Medical Education PLUS Mandatory (20 credits)
-MDM140 Pedagogical Practice in Medical Education PLUS Mandatory (20 credits)
-MDM29 Advanced Communication Skills and Strategies in Medical Education
PLUS (2 of 4) Mandatory (20 credits)
-MDM148 Principles and Practice of Simulation and/or Optional (20 credits)
-MDM149 Feedback & Debriefing in Simulation and/or Optional (20 credits)
-MDM110 Leadership and Change Management in Clinical Services and/or Optional (20 credits)
-MDM162 Technology Enhanced & Blended Learning Optional (20 credits)
PLUS
-MDM10 Research Methods & Critical Appraisal
PLUS Mandatory (20 credits)
-MDM96 Medical Education Research Dissertation Mandatory (60 credits)

PGDip
-MDM28 Learning and Teaching in Medical Education PLUS Mandatory (20 credits)
-MDM140 Pedagogical Practice in Medical Education PLUS Mandatory (20 credits)
-MDM29 Advanced Communication Skills and Strategies in Medical Education Mandatory (20 credits)
PLUS (3 of 5)
-MDM148 Principles and Practice of SimulationAnd/or Optional (20 credits)
-MDM149 Feedback & Debriefing in SimulationAnd/or Optional (20 credits)
-MDM110 Leadership and Change Management in Clinical Services Optional (20 credits)
And/or
-MDM110 Leadership and Change Management in Clinical Services Optional (20 credits)
And/or
-MDM162 Technology Enhanced & Blended Learning Optional (20 credits)
And/or
-MDM10 Research Methods & Critical Appraisal Optional (20 credits)

PGCert
MDM28 Learning and Teaching in Medical Education PLUS Mandatory (20 credits)
MDM140 Pedagogical Practice in Medical Education Mandatory (20 credits)
PLUS (1 of 6)
MDM29 Advanced Communication Skills and Strategies in Medical Education Optional (20 credits)
MDM148 Principles and Practice of Simulation and/or Optional (20 credits)
MDM149 Feedback & Debriefing in Simulation and/or Optional (20 credits)
MDM110 Leadership and Change Management in Clinical Services Optional (20 credits)
And/or
MDM162 Technology Enhanced & Blended Learning Optional (20 credits)
And/or
MDM10 Research Methods & Critical Appraisal Optional (20 credits)

Career Opportunities

This course provides health professionals with a firm base to underpin their role as medical educators.

Formal credentialing in medical and clinical education is currently being considered seriously at national level in the UK and elsewhere, and the ‘Teaching Excellence Framework’ (May 2016) for higher education institutions in the UK also means that careers in medical or clinical education are likely to be enhanced via the acquisition of formal qualifications in clinical teaching. This course provides an ideal vehicle for participants to pursue an appropriate level of study for their educational commitments and in this national context, should help them in career development.

Any clinician wishing to take a professional approach to their postgraduate studies in medical or clinical education would be strongly recommended to consider this new course.

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The Education, Gender and International Development MA will develop a student's understanding of the gender dimensions of research, analysis, policy and practice in relation to education in low- and middle-income countries. Read more
The Education, Gender and International Development MA will develop a student's understanding of the gender dimensions of research, analysis, policy and practice in relation to education in low- and middle-income countries. It will encourage them to consider how developing countries connect with more affluent and powerful regions of the world.

[Degree information]]
The programme provides students with the opportunity to follow a course of study unique in the UK, looking at a range of current issues and debates, including discussions about girls’ access to and achievements in school; femininities, masculinities and gender relations within education; the ways in which the state and society shapes the politics of gender and education; and approaches to social justice and education.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (60 credits), and either two optional modules (60 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits), or three optional modules (90 credits) and a report (30 credits).

Core modules
-Education and International Development: Concepts, Theories and Issues
-Gender, Education and Development

Optional modules - students select either two or three optional modules from a range across UCL Institute of Education (IOE) Master's-level offering, including:
-Economic Perspectives of Education Policy
-Education and Development in Asia
-Education and Muslim Communities
-Education, Conflict and Fragility
-Gender, Sexuality and Education
-Learners, Learning and Teaching in the Context of Education for All
-Planning for Education and Development
-Promoting Health and Wellbeing: Planning, Practice and Participation

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in either a 20,000-word dissertation (60 credits) or 10,000-word report (30 credits).

Teaching and learning
Teaching is delivered by lectures or other structured inputs by staff; participant-led presentations and discussions based on selected readings or a clearly specified project; tutor-led seminars; workshops; problem/issue-based paired and small-group work; occasional debates and occasional invited speakers; reflections on film and video inputs. Assessment is via various forms of coursework including discursive essays, critical analysis of empirical research, reviews of literature, and the dissertation or report.

Fieldwork
Students may undertake fieldwork in relation to their research for their dissertation or report, but it is not a requirement. If undertaken, fieldwork must be self-funded.

Careers

Graduates of this programme are currently working across a broad range of areas. Some are working as specialist professionals in NGOs and international development organisations, while others have jobs as teachers and education managers. Graduates can also be found working as government officials, civil servants and university lecturers worldwide.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Director of Strategic Partnerships, Olusegun Obasanjo Foundation
-Gender and Communications Officer, Concern Worldwide
-Reports Officer, World Food Programme (WFP)
-Operations Analyst, Business Monitor International
-Research and Evaluation Officer, Coffey International Development

Employability
It is intended that students who have participated fully in the programme will be able to:
-Reflect critically on debates concerning education, gender and international development.
-Understand the ways in which knowledge forms, and is formed by, education politics, policy, practice and research in national settings in low- and middle-income countries, and in transnational organisations.
-Consider the implications of theory, research and analyses developed through class discussions for their own future practice and professional development.
-Use oral and written communication skills in order to make arguments, examine evidence and creatively advance this area of inquiry.
-Understand processes entailed in research and conduct a small research study.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Department of Education, Practice and Society at UCL Institute of Education is the well-established home of an interdisciplinary grouping bringing together high-quality teaching and research in the history, sociology and philosophy of education and international development.

The department has extensive experience and expertise in education planning, health and gender in Africa, Asia and Latin America; 'policy sociology'; education, equality and human rights; issues of gender, 'race', sexuality, disability and social class. Visits to international organisations, policy seminars and a vibrant student/alumni group provide excellent networking opportunities.

Linking research, policy and practice, students benefit from an extraordinarily powerful learning community.

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