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Masters Degrees (Editorial)

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The course is available in Standard Track and in Special Track. Course Structure. Part 1 (Diploma). In addition to the Principal Subject, in which the student specialises; up to three additional subjects can be studied. Read more
The course is available in Standard Track and in Special Track

Course Structure
Part 1 (Diploma):

In addition to the Principal Subject, in which the student specialises; up to three additional subjects can be studied. Total of 120 credits.

Part 2 (MA):

Normally consists of a dissertation, composition portfolio, or critical edition (in the area of the Principal Subject). Total of 60 credits.

Course description
Standard Track:

The course combines specialisation in one area (including Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Composition, Solo Performance) with further training in up to three complimentary areas.

The range of choice on this course makes it one of the most flexible MA programmes in the UK. Students can make their education as broad or narrow as they wish. For those with a single-minded interest in one area specialised degrees are available.

The programme is divided into two parts: two semesters of taught study (Part I, 120 credits) and a substantial independent piece of work in the main area, produced over the summer (Part II, 60 credits).

Part 1 is centred on the Principal Subject module (WMM4044, 40 credits) in the student’s main area of interest. It lays the foundations of a Part 2 project in the same area. The following subjects are available:

Historical Musicology
Editorial Musicology
Ethnomusicology
Celtic Traditional Music
Music in Wales
Music and the Christian Church
Composition
Electroacoustic Composition
Composing Film Music
Studying Film Music
Solo Performance
Sacred Music Studies
Early Music
20th-/21st-century Music
WMP4052 Preparing for the Part 2 project (10 credits) acts as a bridge between Parts 1 and 2.

An additional 40 credits will be gained through submissions in other fields through either one Major Open Submission (WXM4046, 40 credits) or two Minor Open Submissions (WMP4047 and WMP4048, 20 credits each). Students can select from a number of subject areas, including, but not restricted to, those listed above. Additional offerings include modules in Arts Administration, Music in the Community, Ethnomusicology and Analysis.

Depending on the main area of specialism, students will attend a core module in musicology (WMP4041 Current Musicology, 30 credits) or composition (WMP4042 Contexts and Concepts in Composition, 30 credits). During these modules students will became familiar with up-to-date research and creative techniques and methodologies in the selected disciplines.

Subject-specific teaching is provided through a combination of individual tuition and seminar session in small groups. Within each of the chosen subject areas, students can identify their own projects, for which they will receive expert supervision.

Special Track:

The MA in Music (Special Track) allows students to specialise in any one of the following areas: Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Celtic Traditional Music, Music in Wales, Studying Film Music.

All the training will be centred on the student’s main area, aided by a broader look at the methodological foundation of the discipline as a whole (through the core module in musicology).

The programme is divided into two parts: two semesters of taught study (Part 1, 120 credits) and a substantial independent piece of work in the main area, produced over the summer (Part 2, 60 credits).

Part 1 is centred on the Principal Subject module (WMM4045, 60 credits) in the student’s area of specialism. Another aspect of the same area will be explored in the Independent Special Study (WMP4049, 20 credits).

WMP4052 Preparing for the Part 2 project (10 credits) acts as a bridge between Parts 1 and 2.

Depending on the main area of specialism, students will attend a core module in musicology (WMP4041 Current Musicology, 30 credits) or composition (WMP4042 Contexts and Concepts in Composition, 30 credits). During these modules students will became familiar with up-to-date research and creative techniques and methodologies in the selected disciplines.

Subject-specific teaching is provided through a combination of individual tuition and seminar session in small groups. Within each of the chosen subject areas, students can identify their own projects, for which they will receive expert supervision.

Compulsory modules:

Standard Track

Principal Subject, to be chosen from the published list for that Academic Year (40 Credits). Study areas currently offered are: Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Ethnomusicology, Celtic Traditional Music, Music in Wales, Music and the Christian Church, Composition, Electroacoustic composition / Sonic arts, Composing Film Music, Studying Film Music, Solo Performance, Music in the Community, Sacred Music Studies, Early Music, 20th-/21st-century Music.
Compulsory Core Module: either Current Musicology (for musicologists) or Concepts of Composition (for composers) (depending on the Principal Subject) (30 Credits).
Open submissions: to be chosen from the optional modules (40 credits).
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits).
(Total of 120 credits)

Special Track

Principal Subject, to be chosen from the published list for that Academic Year (60 Credits). Study areas currently offered: Historical Musicology; Editorial Musicology; Music in the Christian Church; Celtic Traditional Music; Music in Wales; Studying Film Music).
Compulsory Core Module: either Current Musicology (for musicologists) or Concepts of Composition (for composers) (depending on the Principal Subject) (30 Credits).
Independent Special Study (must be in the same area as the Principal Subject) (20 credits)
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits)
(Total of 120 credits)

Optional modules:

Standard Track

Open Submissions (40 or 20 credits) may be chosen in any of the following study areas (but have to be different from the Principal Subject): Historical Musicology; Editorial Musicology; Ethnomusicology; Celtic Traditional Music; Music in Wales; Music and the Christian Church; Composition; Electroacoustic Composition / Sonic Arts; Composing Film Music; Studying Film Music; Solo Performance; Sacred Music Studies; Early Music; 20th-/21st-century Music; Analysis, Arts Administration, Music Studio Techniques, Popular Music Studies, Techniques and Practice of Instrumental or Vocal Teaching (20 credits only), Performance Practice (20 credits only), Music for Instruments and Electronics (20 credits only), Supporting Studies (20 credits only), ELCOS Language Skills (20 credits, international students only.ded study (e.g. portfolio of compositions, performance recital).

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Magazines today offer a wide range of possibilities for anyone looking to start a career in journalism. Read more
Magazines today offer a wide range of possibilities for anyone looking to start a career in journalism. From glossy fashion monthlies and quirky independent quarterlies to weekly titles for business people, customer magazines for retailers and brands, purely digital magazines, websites and even freelancing – our MA Magazine Journalism prepares you for all these possibilities.

When you finish studying Magazine Journalism with us you will feel prepared to meet any challenge your first job on a magazine throws at you. Print, digital, social media – you will know how to handle the multimedia platforms a modern magazine uses.

You will be prepared to sit in your first editorial conference and know what is expected of you and how to pitch your ideas clearly and confidently.

You will gain a set of knowledge and skills that will not only enable you to compete effectively for any entry-level job in magazine journalism but also set you up for a rapid career trajectory.

Distinctive features:

• Magazine Journalism is accredited by the Professional Publishers Association (PPA)
• Industry placements in the second semester
• An outstanding alumni network across the media

Structure

The course is one year long and covers:

Feature and news writing in print and online
Interviewing techniques
Cross-platform media and multimedia
Design & layout
Subediting and production
Magazine brand development
How to be a successful freelance

Magazine journalism skills are acquired through a series of lectures, workshops, practical exercises and feedback sessions of increasing complexity and realism - from 'paper exercises' in the early days to complex features that report on real events. These sessions are supplemented by seminars, group discussions and guests from the magazine industry.

Basic writing, reporting and technical skills for both print and digital are taught in the first semester against a background of Media law and journalism Ethics. Shorthand is also available as an option.

The second semester offers more creative practice where you will plan, create and launch a brand new magazine brand across print and digital platforms, producing three issues to a fortnightly deadline.

During the Easter break you will test your skills against the real world in a work placement (or placements) of a minimum two weeks' duration.

The Major Project core module provides you with the opportunity to undertake:

• a Feature Project in which you will employ investigative journalism techniques and research skills acquired during the taught element of the course to explore a topic in depth by writing long-form feature articles, or

• an Enterprise Project in which you will develop the editorial and business plan for an innovative media product in print or purely digital/online.

You will also create a brand new magazine in groups. Starting from scratch you will:

Research the market
Develop an effective design
Plan and write editorial content
Create and execute a comprehensive digital and social media policy
Produce three issues of the magazine

Please visit the website to see the modules taught on this course:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/magazine-journalism-ma

Teaching

You will be taught through a variety of practical workshops, seminars and lectures as well as production days that replicate an industry environment.

You will be required to find and research stories in and around the local area, interviewing sources via a mix of methods and producing original multimedia content and photography.

Assessment

You will be assessed through a wide range of formative and summative assessments throughout the course. These range from practical classroom activities, varied journalistic articles and packages, class tests and examinations.

Career prospects

Graduates of the MA in Magazine Journalism at Cardiff University have an excellent track record when it comes to getting jobs.

Potential entry-level jobs in magazine media range from editorial assistants to web editors, community managers and content producers to sub-editors, staff writers and even self-starting entrepreneurs!

We are passionate about the industry and maintain an excellent alumni network, plus students have won several publishing awards for their work in the past.

As a graduate of MA Magazine Journalism you may move into almost any industry to produce in-house or public magazines or digital content. Typical industries include: fashion, craft, food, sport, film, music, games, news, wildlife, finance, business, history, travel, TV, health and celebrity.

Possible job opportunities include: Editorial assistant, Editorial intern, Features writer, Freelance reporter, Web and Social Media Editor, Junior reporter, Chief sub, Online content coordinator and Production assistant.

Placements

Placements are required as part of the Professional Development module and Programme Accreditation through the PPA. Placements will take place during the Easter Recess period. You will be required to complete a minimum of two weeks on placement(s), though you are free to do more.

All placements will be coordinated in correspondence with course directors ahead of the recess period. We will look at your CV, portfolio and covering letters and provide guidance. Our excellent alumni and industry network often offer placement opportunities that you wouldn’t get access to outside of the course.

You will be expected to cover any expenses associated with the placement(s), though some companies do cover travel or food expenses.

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The Creative Writing programme at Glasgow has gained an excellent reputation amongst writers, agents and publishers. It is perfect for talented and aspiring writers who want to develop their craft, take risks in their work, and gain creative and critical skills; all as part of a supportive community of fellow writers. Read more

The Creative Writing programme at Glasgow has gained an excellent reputation amongst writers, agents and publishers. It is perfect for talented and aspiring writers who want to develop their craft, take risks in their work, and gain creative and critical skills; all as part of a supportive community of fellow writers. Skills gained in the study of Creative Writing may lead to career opportunities in literary and cultural fields such as editing, publishing and arts development.

Why this programme

  • Our dedicated teaching staff comprises successful and well-regarded writers who work in and encourage a variety of genres and forms.
  • We have strong links with literary agents and publishers, and an impressive number of our graduates are published and acclaimed authors.

Programme structure

The MLitt in Creative Writing is directed at those who are already engaged in writing. The programme’s clear three-part structure, focused on creative, critical and practical issues, distinguishes it from others offered in the UK.

The programme structure covers:

Semester 1

  • Creative workshops and guest speakers
  • Reading as a writer (Craft & Experimentation 1)
  • Copyright, publishing and the culture of reception (Editing & Publication 1)

Semester 2

  • Creative workshops and guest speakers 
  • Experimentation (Craft & Experimentation 2)
  • Editing the twenty-first century: editorial project (Editing & Publication 2)

These courses have been developed to:

  • encourage you to experiment with a range of voices, techniques and genres alongside a consideration of major creative and editorial engagements from the modern through the contemporary period.
  • provide a space to undertake extended portfolios of creative and editorial work.
  • familiarise you with the writing context (audience, publishing in all its forms, the legal framework, modes of transmission); help you develop a critical understanding of diverse creative, theoretic and critical texts through consideration of major creative and editorial engagements in modern and contemporary writing.
  • and most importantly, to help you develop the discipline of regular writing by providing a stimulating workshop and tutorial environment in which writing skills can be acquired, discussed and honed.

Your portfolio, consisting of fiction, poetry, creative non-fiction, or script-writing, is at the heart of the summative assessment.

Glasgow is a city known for its culture and our students are involved in festivals, events, radio and literary magazines.

Career prospects

Graduates have gone into writing, journalism, publishing, and many other professions.

Many of our students have gone on to become published authors. You can find a list of alumni on our Creative Writing subject pages. Others have been published in magazines and journals, or have had their work produced and broadcast on radio and television. A number of our graduates have won or been shortlisted for major prizes for poetry, short fiction and fiction including the Dundee Book Prize, Booker Prize, Bailey’s Women’s Prize, Orange Prize, Fish Short Story Award, Bridport Prize, McCash Scots Poetry Competition, Macallan and Canongate short story awards, Saltire Awards, Scottish Book of the Year Awards. 

Positions held by recent graduates include Managing Director, Freelance Writer, Editor, Programme Manager, Author, Copywriter, Author and Community Arts Worker.



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Who is it for?. This MA is designed for aspiring professionals who recognise that the global publishing industry is changing dramatically - and who wish to equip themselves with the knowledge and skills needed by the next generation of publishers. Read more

Who is it for?

This MA is designed for aspiring professionals who recognise that the global publishing industry is changing dramatically - and who wish to equip themselves with the knowledge and skills needed by the next generation of publishers. Your first degree might be from the Humanities, the Social Sciences or the Sciences; and you might be a recent graduate or someone with work experience either in publishing or in another field.

Objectives

Located in the heart of London, the commercial centre of this global industry, this MA explores how publishing is evolving in the face of digitisation.

The programme provides you with an applied understanding of how books, journals, magazines and interactive resources are conceived, developed and marketed, including the key role of authorship.

You will be encouraged to explore whether your interests lie in publishing for entertainment, education, research or information. Alongside research-led analytical assignments, you will develop a portfolio of achievements relating to the global industry which reflect the range of professional roles in contemporary publishing, including editorial, marketing, production, and both print and digital content development.

Placements

All MA Publishing students at City, University of London are strongly encouraged to apply for and complete placements, whether in London or other locations, subject to the approval of the Programme Director.

To join the optional MA Publishing Professional Placement module in Term 2, you need to be offered a placement by the beginning of that term (or by the end of Term 2 for part-time students). Whether or not you join that module, you will be encouraged to apply for the many placement opportunities that are shared with the programme, and supported to develop a practice-related Major Project that furthers your career goals.

Teaching and learning

The course content covers all types of publishing, from trade and specialist publications to novels and non-fiction, and provides a thorough grounding in the drivers of commercial success for both print and digital products.

You will be taught both by research experts and publishing practitioners who share specialist expertise and up-to-date industry knowledge.

Your core modules aim to establish and develop your understanding of contemporary industry conditions, including the impact of digitisation. Your options in Term 2 allow you to develop more scholarly or applied interests, and include an optional Professional Placement module.

Our publishing programmes foster a nurturing community with great guest speakers and student opportunities. Search #citypublishing and find out more.

Modules

You will learn through lectures, project work, student-led projects and presentations, workshops, online learning and research, preparation of submitted work, site visits and discussions. Your final module is a substantial Major Project, which can include an approved industry project.

Visiting lecturers from the industry contribute to the programme throughout the teaching year, and in many cases directly support your project work.

A standard module consists of 20 timetabled hours in a combination of lectures, groupwork sessions and supervised project work. Each module also requires substantial study hours towards both individual and group assessments.

Core modules

  • PBM001 Business and Marketing in Publishing (15 credits)
  • PBM002 Creating and Managing Intellectual Property (15 credits)
  • PBM003 Digitisation and Publishing (15 credits)
  • PBM004 Publishing History and Culture (15 credits)
  • PBM008 Major Project (60 credits).

Elective modules

  • PBM005 Professional Placement (15 credits)
  • PBM006 Developing Creative Content (15 credits)
  • PBM007 Innovations in Content: Curating Cultural and Commercial Value (15 credits)
  • PBM011 Designing Interactive Media (15 credits)
  • AMM421 Digital Cultures (15 credits).

Part time students

Part-time students take the course over two years and normally chose an equal number of elective modules between the two years. All modules are 15 credits unless otherwise stated.

Core Modules

  • PBM001 Business and Marketing in Publishing (Year one, term 1)
  • PBM002 Creating and Managing Intellectual Property (Year one, term 1)
  • PBM003 Digitisation and Publishing (Year two, term 1)
  • PBM004 Publishing History and Culture (Year two, term 1)
  • PBM008 Major Project (60 credits, Year two)

Career prospects

City’s Publishing graduates develop careers in a variety of organisations, with the majority of each class achieving a publishing role within months of graduating. The roles of a recent class show the range of possible careers in global publishing, include:

  • Trainee, Foreign Language Publishing Co, Shanghai;
  • Rights Assistant, Literary Agency
  • Editorial, Production Assistant and Rights Assistants, Children’s Publishing
  • Contracts Assistant and International Sales Representative, Academic Publishing
  • Business Reporter in a Chicago newspaper
  • Marketing Assistant and Digital Marketing Executive, Bloomsbury
  • Rights Assistant, Fiction, Paris
  • Picture Researcher, Hodder
  • Marketing, Random House
  • Editorial Business Analyst, Condé Nast Japan
  • Editorial Assistant and Marketing Assistant, Specialist and Academic Publishing
  • PR and Literary Agent, Freelance
  • Editor, Economics website
  • Publicist, Hachette NZ
  • Magazine Publishing, Beijing
  • Production Assistant, ELT, Greece.


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Music is a vital form of cultural expression that shapes and is shaped by society around it. This programme allows you to study the critical theories and perspectives that have influenced the way we study music – how it is composed and performed as well as the role it plays in different communities. Read more

Music is a vital form of cultural expression that shapes and is shaped by society around it. This programme allows you to study the critical theories and perspectives that have influenced the way we study music – how it is composed and performed as well as the role it plays in different communities.

Core modules will allow you to explore issues in musicology such as race, class, gender, sexuality, popular music and mass culture, as well as how music has been received and interpreted and how musical ‘canons’ are formed. You’ll also develop your understanding of research methods in musicology, and have the chance to gain knowledge of aesthetic theory or editing and archival studies, allowing you to balance critical and applied forms of musicology.

In addition, you’ll choose from optional modules from across the School of Music allowing you to focus on topics that interest you, from performance or electronic and computer music to composition and psychology of music.

We have a variety of excellent facilities to support your learning, including rehearsal, performance and practice spaces, a lab for studying the psychology of music and studios for sound recording, software development and computer music composition. The Special Collections housed in our beautiful Brotherton Library contain significant collections of music manuscripts, rare printed music and letters from composers and critics to help inform your work.

We also have good working relationships with a range of prestigious arts organisations: we host BBC Radio 3 concerts, Leeds Lieder and the Leeds International Pianoforte Competition, as well as enjoying a close partnership with Opera North and many others in a city with a thriving music and cultural scene.

Course content

You’ll study core modules that develop your understanding of both critical and applied forms of musicology. One of these will allow you to explore issues and topics that have emerged in the past few decades – questions of race, gender, politics, deconstruction and more. You’ll also choose one or two from a cluster of optional modules, giving you an insight into editing and archival studies or introducing you to aesthetic theory.

In addition, you’ll have the chance to pursue another area of musical interest when you select from a range of optional modules. Whether you’re interested in computer music or psychology of music, or you want to continue to improve your performance or composition skills, you can pick one module allowing you to gain specialist knowledge in a field outside of musicology.

Throughout the year you’ll study a core module that develops your knowledge of research methods in music and musicology, laying the foundations for the rest of your studies. You’ll also be able to put the research skills you gain into practice if you choose to do a dissertation by the end of the programme – an independently researched project on a topic of your choice. Alternatively, you can complete a major editorial project, producing an extended edition of professional standard based on original musical sources.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Professional Studies 30 credits
  • Issues in Critical Musicology 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Individual Project 30 credits
  • Short Dissertation 30 credits
  • Dissertation 60 credits
  • Composition Studies 30 credits
  • Instrumental or Vocal Recital 30 credits
  • Concerto/Song-Cycle/Extended Work 30 credits
  • Applied Performance Studies 30 credits
  • Editing and Archival Studies 30 credits
  • Short Editorial Project 30 credits
  • Editorial Project 60 credits
  • Aesthetic Theory 30 credits
  • Electronic & Computer Music Practice 30 credits
  • Electronic & Computer Music Contexts 30 credits
  • Case Studies in the Applied Psychology of Music 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Critical and Applied Musicology MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Critical and Applied Musicology MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use a range of teaching and learning methods including seminars and tutorials, as well as vocal/instrumental lessons with our expert tutors. We’re also making more and more use of online learning. However, private study is also integral to this programme, allowing you to pursue your interests more closely and develop research and critical skills.

Assessment

To help you build diverse skills, we also assess you using different methods depending on the modules you choose. These could include presentations, essays, literature reviews, recitals and performances or project work; however, optional modules may also use alternative methods such as recitals and composition portfolios.

Career opportunities

This programme will give you in-depth subject knowledge, as well as specialist knowledge and skills in a different aspect of music studies to broaden your understanding. It will also allow you to gain key research, critical and communication skills that are in demand in a wide range of industries and sectors.

Graduates from the programme move on to a variety of careers. Recent graduates have entered areas such as arts management, librarianship, recruitment, and freelance teaching and performance. Many graduates go on to further study at PhD level in the UK and USA.

We also offer additional support as you develop your career plans: the School of Music boasts a unique Alumni Mentoring Network, where students can be supported by past students as they start to plan their next steps.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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This programme closely follows the established campus based MA publishing degrees. All modules are newly designed to be delivered online using interactive features of the virtual learning environment, Moodle. Read more
This programme closely follows the established campus based MA publishing degrees. All modules are newly designed to be delivered online using interactive features of the virtual learning environment, Moodle.

The 10-week 10-unit modules are delivered by a variety of media including video, audio, written materials and supplied text books, designed to accommodate a range of learning styles and personal circumstances.

Your study is supported by a tutor responsible for a small number of other students who together make up a study group. Further academic guidance comes from the Programme Lead. Assessment is through reports, discussion submissions, essays and independent research topics.

Why choose this course?

A flexible learning programme offering the skills and knowledge necessary for a successful entry into publishing that can be studied from home. Designed to be studied in conjunction with employment in any field, the programme addresses evidenced publishing employers' needs.

Unparalleled support from tutors and state-of-the-art learning technologies. Your enrolment at Oxford Brookes within the Oxford International Centre for Publishing Studies provides you with relevant and tailored learning opportunities. There is no similar distance learning provision offered by higher education institutions in the UK or Europe. Develop the skills and knowledge necessary to address the marketing, production and editorial functions in publishing, as well as skills in data analysis and writing practices - expertise that is currently in demand by the publishing industry which requires individuals who are able to asses, evaluate and synthesize data.

This course in detail

This part-time programme is usually studied over two years. However, you are able to take up to 5 years to complete the necessary credits.

Four core compulsory modules make up the first year and address marketing and sales, digital production and workflow, and editorial as publishing-related topics and research skills as preparation for the later dissertation.

In the second year, you choose one module from each of two groups: either International Publishing and Rights or Independent Study; and then either Culture of Publishing, Journals or Independent Study.

The Independent Study module is specifically designed to provide you with a structured pedagogic framework in which to reflect on and develop your experience of work in publishing.

You may, however, select the Independent Study module once only.

Your programme is completed with a longer period of research and writing (about 6 months), supported by a supervisor, which culminates in a 15,000-word dissertation. The modules are as follows:
-Marketing and Sales Management
-Digital Production and Workflow Management
-Editorial Management, Functions and Strategies
-Research Skills
-International Management of Publishing and Rights
-Culture of Publishing
-Management of Journals
-Independent Study
-Dissertation

Please note: as our courses are reviewed regularly as part of our quality assurance framework, the list of modules you choose from may vary from that shown, although this is a rare occurrence.

Teaching and learning

Teaching is presented in a structured modular framework of compulsory and optional modules which provide both core competencies and knowledge while offering the opportunity for you to tailor your programme. You will be encouraged through discussion forums, individual reading and investigative practices in the modules to engage actively with your study. This approach is informed by and based on the understanding that your learning should be relevant to your interests.

In presenting the learning materials online, each module clearly outlines the structure of the 10 units at the start, identifies points of increased input, discussion areas, activities and assessments enabling you to adjust your engagement with the learning, within the requirements of the module, to suit your individual timetables. Within the modules and during the course of the programme, culminating in the dissertation, your autonomy in your learning increases through structured activities that start with close guidance and build towards greater independence. Flexibility, where possible, while aiming for a cohesive and supportive group of fellow students, is built into the timetable of discussion forums, communication with associate tutors and other students.

Careers and professional development

This course is targeted at individuals who either want to start a career in publishing or who are already working and want to enhance their career with an advanced degree. If you are a recent graduate who wants to enter publishing but are unable to continue with full time study then this programme enables you to develop appropriate knowledge of the industry. If you are already working and want to progress your career or change career, then the topics we cover in this programme provide the basis for this change.

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Our celebrated creative writing programme is perfect for talented and aspiring writers looking to gain adventurous and needed creative and critical skills. Read more

Our celebrated creative writing programme is perfect for talented and aspiring writers looking to gain adventurous and needed creative and critical skills. This is an exciting and supportive online course that offers you the opportunity to develop your writing practice wherever you are in the world.

Why this programme

  • You will be taught by a number of successful and well-regarded writers and many of our graduates have gone on to be published and acclaimed authors.
  • We have strong links with literary agents and publishers, and an impressive list of published alumni.
  • This programme is delivered online and offers flexible study around your existing commitments.

Programme structure

This programme is directed at those who are already engaged in writing. Its clear three-part structure, focused on creative, critical and practical issues, distinguishes this programme from the others offered in the UK.

Taking the online distance learning MLitt full-time:

The programme structure covers:

Semester 1:

  • Creative workshops and guest speakers
  • Reading as a writer (CX1)
  • Copyright, publishing and the culture of reception

Semester 2:

  • Creative workshops and guest speakers 
  • Experimentation (CX2)
  • Editing the twenty-first century: editorial project

These courses have been developed to:

  • allow you to experiment with a range of voices, techniques and genres alongside a consideration of major creative and editorial engagements from the modern through the contemporary period.
  • help you develop a critical understanding of diverse creative, theoretic and critical texts.
  • provide a space to undertake extended portfolios of creative and editorial work.
  • familiarise you with the writing context (audience, publishing in all its forms, the legal framework, modes of transmission);
  • And most importantly, to subject you to the discipline of regular writing by providing a stimulating workshop and tutorial environment in which writing skills can be acquired, discussed and honed. 

Taking the online distance learning MLitt part-time:

  • Part-time year one: students take one semester of workshops and Craft and Experimentation both semesters, and have two tutorials. 
  • Part-time year two: students take one semester of workshops and Editing and Publication both semesters, and have three tutorials.

Career prospects

Graduates have gone into writing, journalism, publishing, and many other professions.

Positions held by recent graduates include Managing Director, Freelance Writer, Author, Copywriter, Author and Community Arts Work.

Find out more about our alumni and their publications by visiting our Creative Writing subject page.



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This flexible MA programme has pathways in Composition, Medieval Music, Musicology, Performance and Russian Music. Modules taken vary according to the pathway chosen, but all include basic music training such as Research Skills for Musicians, specialised units specific to the pathway, and a large menu of optional units. Read more
This flexible MA programme has pathways in Composition, Medieval Music, Musicology, Performance and Russian Music.

Modules taken vary according to the pathway chosen, but all include basic music training such as Research Skills for Musicians, specialised units specific to the pathway, and a large menu of optional units. These are followed by a major project: a musicological dissertation or edition for musicologists (including those on the Russian Music and Medieval Music pathways), a minor and a major recital for performers, and a portfolio of compositions for composers.

The content of this MA programme relates closely to the research interests of the academic staff.

Programme structure

Core units

All students take the Research Skills for Musicians unit (20 credits).

Optional units can vary each year but may include:

Composition Pathway
-Contemporary Compositional Ideas and Techniques (40 credits)
-Introduction to Professional Composing (20 credits)
-Two optional units (20 credits)
-Portfolio of Compositions (60 credits)

Medieval Music Pathway
-Readings in Musicology (40 credits)
-Latin (20 credits)
-Two optional units (20 credits each)
-Dissertation or Edition (60 credits)

Musicology Pathway
-Readings in Musicology (40 credits)
-Source Study, Palaeography and Editorial Techniques (20 credits)
-Two optional units (20 credits each)
-Dissertation or Edition (60 credits)

Performance Pathway
-Source Study, Palaeography and Editorial Techniques (20 credits)
-Four optional units (20 credits each)
-Performance (60 credits)

Russian Music Pathway
-Readings in Musicology (40 credits)
-Russian (20 credits)
-Two optional units (20 credits each)
-Dissertation or Edition (60 credits)

Careers

Students who completed the MA in Music have gone on to careers as musicians, senior music assistants, organ scholars and self-employed composers. A number of MA graduates have also become music teachers.

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Accredited with distinction by the Professional Publishers Association, this practical MA gives you the essential skills to work as a journalist for multiple audiences across myriad platforms. Read more

Accredited with distinction by the Professional Publishers Association, this practical MA gives you the essential skills to work as a journalist for multiple audiences across myriad platforms.

Journalism is about the world outside. It’s about the story and the people who make it. It’s about being on top of the zeitgeist. And being on top of the deadlines. 

What you will learn

This MA gives you the practical skills to work as a journalist at the highest level in print and online. We will learn what news means, and where it comes from. We will give you the ability to write compelling features and interviews. We’ll also be focusing on the kinds of questions you need to ask – of the individual, the state or the organs of power. And we address how the new digital world has transformed the way we go about journalism, adding new platforms and new technical skills.

The processes we use

The programme is practice-based so you’ll be creating magazines and working on our local news website while you’re here. EastLondonLines is a live news site run from the Department of Media and Communications and covering a large area of East and South London. Working on ELL as a journalist will give you unrivalled hands-on experience of being part of an editorial team, finding and breaking news stories and features, and using digital tools like data and video.

The approach we take

You will work in a small group both during your editorial control period of Eastlondonlines and on your digital and magazine project because working in such teams is common professional practice. Underpinning the practice-based work are more theoretical modules essential to give background – these cover media law and ethics, politics and public affairs, and journalism in context. 

You’ll discover how different mediums dictate how you create a story and how to adapt your style of writing to reflect the nature of the platform, from print newspapers to digital features. 

Join us and discover how to express yourself concisely, grab the attention of readers and think on your feet in this swipe-left-and-right world. 

Professional accreditation

The MA in Journalism has just received a renewed two-year accreditation from the Professional Publishers Association, with the new, highest accolade of a 'distinction' awarded to us. 

This is now given by the Association to reward programmes of the highest overall quality which achieve a distinction level in the majority of categories in the accreditation process, which cover all aspects of the programme.

The inspection team commended the programme as 'exceptional' and said we produced 'highly motivated' students who were given 'excellent opportunities to produce real live journalism on Eastlondonlines', received 'formidable feedback' and a high level of day-to-day support in their studies. They also believed that we had achieved the right balance between introducing new digital techniques and teaching traditional core practices. And they were incredibly complimentary about the students themselves and the work they produce.

Modules & structure

The programme is divided into a series of modules that cover the key practical skills and theoretical background. There are no optional modules or alternate pathways.

The four practical modules focus on the basic journalistic skills common to different media: news and feature research and writing, interviewing, image, video and data skills print and online production techniques. You will learn how to apply these skills across all platforms.

In the summer term, you work in groups to produce magazines. In the past, these have won the annual Periodical Publishers Association competition for student magazines. This year, one group of our students took the top prize in the successor Magazine Academy Awards for a magazine about independent cinema.

There are four lecture-based theoretical modules in which we give you the background theoretical knowledge to become expert practictioners. These are:

  • Journalism in Context, which places journalism in the wider political and social context
  • Media Law and Ethics, which delivers a grounding in legal issues
  • Politics and Power, a module that delivers a basic grounding in how government and public sector operate

Practice modules are largely assessed by portfolios of your work, while theory modules are all assessed by essays or written research work.

Guest speaker programme

Additionally, a wide range of journalists and those associated with the media are invited to speak to and network with students through various strands of our guest speaker programme - whether it is through the Asking the Right Questions module, Wednesday morning guest speakers or Thursday evening Media Forums.

Recent speakers have included Owen Jones and Felicity Lawrence of the Guardian, Patrick Strudwick of Buzzfeed and alumna Tabby Kinder from the Lawyer. Others have included Geoffrey Dobbs of the D Notice Committee and Guy Parker, chief executive of the Advertising Standard Authority. 

Skills & careers

We have a whole site dedicated to the careers of our graduates. Discover the kinds of opportunities this course creates.

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths



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The MA History of Wales is this department’s flagship Masters programme, as the world’s leading centre of teaching and research in Welsh history from the medieval to the modern period. Read more

About the course

The MA History of Wales is this department’s flagship Masters programme, as the world’s leading centre of teaching and research in Welsh history from the medieval to the modern period. It offers you the opportunity to explore the history of Wales from a variety of thematic and chronological perspectives, to develop your research skills in Welsh history (including Welsh language tuition), and to pursue your own research project in an aspect of Welsh history under expert supervision from a specialist in the field.

Our Masters programme in the History of Wales draws on the unrivalled expertise of our team of Welsh historians in the department to offer a degree scheme suitable both for those who have studied Welsh history in the past and those for whom it is a new field of study.

In Semester 1, you’ll follow a core module which introduces you to key themes and debates in Welsh history. This is followed in Semester 2 by a range of options covering topics in Welsh history from the medieval to the modern period.

Alongside this study you will benefit from specialist research training tailored to your particular research interests: for instance, palaeography; the use of public opinion data or private correspondence; visual and sound media; newspapers and broadcast sources; oral history, etc., as well as tuition in the Welsh language.

There are also classes to help you research and write your MA dissertation, an original research project (15,000 words) undertaken by you and written over the course of the year under the close supervision of a specialist within the Department.

All our lecturers are active researchers who publish their work, and you will benefit from being taught the latest historical theories and techniques. In the most recent Research Excellence Framework (2014) assessment the university was placed in the top 50 institutions for research power and intensity. It submitted 77% of eligible staff and 95% of the university's research was of an internationally recognised standard.

This degree will suit you:

• If you wish to study the History of Wales at an advanced academic level;
• If you desire a strengthen your critical and scholarly abilities through engagement with historical sources;
• If you wish explore your enthusiasm for this exciting and highly satisfying subject;
• If you aim to foster transferable skills and engage in professional and personal development for entering employment.

Course content

Core modules:

Dissertation: Welsh History *
Research Methods and Professional Skills in History
The Making of Modern Wales

Optional modules:

Class and Community in Wales 1850 - 1939
Gerald of Wales
Information and Society
Landownership and Society in Wales
Media History: An Introduction
Political Culture in Modern Britain, Europe and the Usa
Post Medieval Palaeography and Diplomatic
Qualitative Data Collection and Analysis
Qualitative Data Collection and Analysis (1120)
Sources for Postgraduate Research in the Modern Humanities and Social Sciences
Working with History

* Also available partially or entirely through the medium of Welsh

Contact time

Approximately 6 hours a week in the first two semesters. During semester three you will arrange your level of contact time with your assigned supervisor.

Assessment

The course is assessed through a diverse range of assignments, including the 15,000 word MA dissertation.

Careers & Placements

Many of our Masters graduates go on to PhD study and academic careers. Others apply their skills in heritage administration, in tourism, museums and archives, or related branches of public administration, the civil service and local government, or go on to careers in related fields such as teaching, journalism or the broadcast media.

Work placements in collaboration with the National Library of Wales, the Royal Commission on Ancient and Historic Monuments in Wales, or another of the heritage agencies based in and around Aberystwyth, are available for course credit in some schemes (please contact us for further information).

Employability

Every element of the Aberystwyth Masters in the History of Wales enhances your employability. Alongside the development of your subject-specific knowledge and experience, an especially noteworthy strength of this course is the emphasis on personal development. As an emerging Master historian, your strengthened research and critical faculties will make you a strong candidate for any post where ideas and topics need research, analysis, discussion, expansion and classification.

Throughout the course you will demonstrate initiative and self-motivated learning, supported by the crucial self-awareness to be flexible and independently-minded. Allied with strengthened skills in communication, you will be fully confident in framing coherent and insightful questions and expressing them in oral and written form.

Employers in every industry value such skills and the pattern of creativity, research, analysis and discussion you will undertake in this course creates highly marketable skills which will, upon graduation, stand you in excellent stead for entry into the jobs market. The organisational skills you will learn on this course will help you direct and therefore make the most of your individual flair, bringing a balance of skills that prospective employers will find attractive.

Advanced Skills in Writing and Reporting

This course will encourage precision in your writing abilities, not only in the historical transcription and calendaring skills relevant to certain modules, but also in reporting, presenting and adhering to specific editorial rules in your assignments. You will be trained in editorial methods of historical texts, their development and the principles of authentication. Strong emphasis is placed on applying theory to practice so your individual skills in the interpretation and transcription of manuscript sources will be stretched. This practical demonstration of theory ensures that our Masters graduates are adaptable and can apply their written expertise to the demands of the modern workplace.

As the assessment for this Masters course is done through essay-writing, tutorial and seminar presentation, culminating in the 20,000 word dissertation, you will receive much practice in writing and reporting, as well as rigorous feedback on your submissions. This will develop in you a thorough knowledge of the structure, conventions and development of written communications, which will, in turn, make your writing clear, accurate and authoritative. These skills will stand you in good stead for your future progression into employment.

A host of employers look for accuracy, thoroughness, an eye for detail and the ability to find and prove connections across broad subject matter, and you certainly will have proven yourself, simply by graduating from this prestigious MA course.

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COURSE OVERVIEW . Develop your writing voice through weekly workshops and tutor support. Participate in the creation and publication of an anthology. Read more

COURSE OVERVIEW 

  • Develop your writing voice through weekly workshops and tutor support
  • Participate in the creation and publication of an anthology
  • Receive advice and feedback from published writers, editors and agents
  • Specialise in a range of genres within children’s writing
  • Recent graduates have gone on to become published writers – some award winning. These include: Ally Sherrick, Mark Lowery, Sarah Rubin, Sarah Lean, Meaghan McIsaac and David Owen

Develop your writing skills in a challenging and stimulating environment, supported by teaching staff who are published writers and experts in their field. Explore the dynamic relationship between creative production and critical awareness of literature for children and young adults, and discuss a range of work by established writers and consider the theoretical, social and cultural contexts of contemporary writing for children and young adults.

This well-established programme encourages you to develop new creative work, to give and receive feedback in weekly workshops and to experiment with new forms, audiences and voices. The academics teaching on the programme are all professional novelists, scriptwriters, poets, critics, playwrights or non-fiction writers. They are supported by guests – most recently, children’s writers Marcus Sedgwick, Mark Lowery, Tanya Landman and Andrew Weale, Editorial Director Emma Layfield (Hodder), and literary agents Ella Kahn (DKW) and Jenny Savill (Andrew Nurnberg).  

You complete five core modules: Fiction for Children, The Writer as Researcher, The Publishing Project and two modules on independent study. In The Publishing Project, you develop a personal writing project to the point of submission for publication, such as the development of a publishing proposal, initial chapters and a letter to an agent or publisher.

You also choose one optional module from a selection including Fantastic Fiction for Children, Writing Non-fiction for Children, Contemporary Scriptwriting for Film and Television, and Advanced Contemporary Poetry. After the taught modules, you complete an independent study with tailored supervisory support leading to the dissertation – usually an extended piece or pieces of fiction for children amounting to 20,000 to 30,000 words.

Careers

Many graduates of the course have gone on to become published writers – some award-winning. These include, most recently: Ally Sherrick, Mark Lowery, Sarah Rubin, Sarah Lean, Meaghan McIsaac and David Owen. Others have careers in teaching, storytelling, publishing and the arts.

ABOUT THIS COURSE

Suitable for applicants from:

UK, EU, World

Work Placements

The annual University of Winchester Writers' Festival provides volunteering and hosting opportunities for students.

Learning and Teaching

The academics teaching on the programme are all professional novelists, scriptwriters, poets, critics, playwrights or non-fiction writers. They are supported by guests - most recently, children's writers Marcus Sedgwick, Mark Lowery, Sarah Lean and Andrew Weale, Editorial Director Emma Layfield (Hodder), and literary agents Ella Kahn (DKW) and Sallyanne Sweeney (Mulcahy Associates). Weekly workshops develop students' own writing through constructive critical feedback.

Location 

Taught elements of the course take place at King Alfred or at our West Downs, Winchester. 

Assessment

Modules are assessed by a combination of creative and critical work. Students undertake a dissertation of 20,000-30,000 words (or an appropriate equivalent) as part of their independent study, with full tutorial support. This comprises a creative piece, or pieces, of work for children or young adults in the form of fiction, poetry, script, creative non-fiction or picture books.

At the University of Winchester, validated programmes may adopt a range of means of assessing your learning. An indicative, and not necessarily comprehensive, list of assessment types you might encounter includes essays, portfolios, supervised independent work, presentations, written exams, or practical performances. The University is committed to ensuring that all students have an equal opportunity to achieve module learning outcomes. As such, where appropriate and necessary, students with recognised disabilities may have alternative assignments set that continue to test how successfully they have met the module's learning outcomes. Further details on assessment types used in the programme you are interested in can be found on the course page, by attending an Open Day/Evening, or contacting our teaching staff.

Our validated courses may adopt a range of means of assessing your learning. An indicative, and not necessarily comprehensive, list of assessment types you might encounter includes essays, portfolios, supervised independent work, presentations, written exams, or practical performances.

We ensure all students have an equal opportunity to achieve module learning outcomes. As such, where appropriate and necessary, students with recognised disabilities may have alternative assignments set that continue to test how successfully they have met the module's learning outcomes. Further details on assessment types used on the course you are interested in can be found on the course page, by attending an Open Day or Open Evening, or contacting our teaching staff.

Feedback

We are committed to providing timely and appropriate feedback to you on your academic progress and achievement in order to enable you to reflect on your progress and plan your academic and skills development effectively. You are also encouraged to seek additional feedback from your course tutors.

Further information 

For more information about our regulations for this course, please see our Academic Regulations, Policies and Procedures



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Add expertise to your talent and ideas and learn in the company of industry experts on this innovative, inspiring course for aspiring writers. Read more
Add expertise to your talent and ideas and learn in the company of industry experts on this innovative, inspiring course for aspiring writers.

If you want to make a career in writing, this course is for you. You already have talent and ideas, we’ll add the expertise you need to approach your chosen market with confidence, originality and skill. No ambitions are out of bounds: we love commercial genre fiction and literary experiments equally.

We aim to ensure our graduates are equipped to succeed - and to change the culture they choose to enter.

See the website http://www.napier.ac.uk/en/Courses/MA-Creative-Writing-Postgraduate-FullTime

What you'll learn

We take an innovative approach to the training and support of aspiring writers, driven by intellectual ambition and practical industry experience. There are four strands to the programme:

• developing narrative technique
• practising vocational skills (including abridgement, adaptation and collaborative creation)
• experimental, theoretical and personal development work
• regular one-to-one editorial mentoring

Uniquely, the course offers a dynamic range of cross-disciplinary options. Writing for graphic fiction, screenwriting, interactive media and creative non-fiction are all offered as specialisms, while our pioneering module in genre fiction covers crime, horror, fantasy and science fiction with YA options in each.

We host an exciting programme of lectures and master classes from award-winning authors and high-profile industry experts. In addition, an internationally recognised author joins us for 12 months as Writer in Residence, to develop new work alongside students, share experience and offer one-to-one consultations.

Our approach to full-length narrative development trains you to deploy a range of unique and dynamic pre-writing techniques invented by our programme. This energetic combination of conceptual development and critical self-reflection will transform you into a technically adept, purposeful writer ready to make your mark.

The course is taught by industry professionals Sam Kelly, a former literary agent and David Bishop, a successful working writer and former editor. In addition to campus facilities, our students have access to the Writers’ Room, a private workspace with Wi-Fi, available evenings and weekends. It houses an exclusive library of 2,000 hand-picked books, DVDs and graphic novels and is the venue for reading groups and social events.

The MA is piloting a Teaching Internship Scheme, offering selected graduates the opportunity to develop their teaching practice with the course for a further year.

Modules

• Creating Narrative – Writer’s Toolkit
• Innovation and Authorship
• Creative and Editorial Development
• Writing Practice – First Person Narrative
• Writing Graphic Fiction
• Writing Genre Fiction
• Creative Non-Fiction
• Interactive Media
• Major Project

Study modules mentioned above are indicative only. Some changes may occur between now and the time that you study.

Careers

Among our graduates’ achievements are:

• book deals
• representation by literary agents
• international and national competition wins
• publication in magazines and anthologies
• Edinburgh International Book Festival appearances
• paid editing and writing commissions
• performances and teaching
• working for national literary organisations

How to apply

http://www.napier.ac.uk/study-with-us/postgraduate/how-to-apply

SAAS Funding

Nothing should get in the way of furthering your education. Student Awards Agency Scotland (SAAS) awards funding for postgraduate courses, and could provide the help you need to continue your studies. Find out more: http://www.napier.ac.uk/study-with-us/postgraduate/fees-and-funding/saas-funded-courses

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Do you want to launch your graduate career in a competitive, dynamic global industry? At Plymouth you can develop vital editorial, production and marketing skills with industry relevant digital technologies. Read more
Do you want to launch your graduate career in a competitive, dynamic global industry? At Plymouth you can develop vital editorial, production and marketing skills with industry relevant digital technologies. Gain a network of professional contacts and invaluable experience through work placements and collaborative projects. Benefit from international events, such as London Book Fair, while exploring key publishing processes. You’ll also learn specialist software and create original publications.

This course is also available to study part-time.

Key features

-Engage with contemporary digital technologies, academic debate and research through Plymouth University’s Centre for Media, Art and Design research (MADr).
-Network with industry professionals, attend exclusive seminars and discover the global reach of publishing by attending London Book Fair through our MA programme.
-Take advantage of a range of professionally equipped facilities, including a suite of Apple Mac computers, small and large scale digital printers, a letterpress workshop and digital sound and video editing suites.
-Gain a vocational qualification endorsed by the publishing sector and establish your career in an industry that contributes £4.7 billion to the UK economy.
-Focus your specialist skills and graduate with an individually tailored exit award, by studying one of our specialist strands in editorial design, design commentary, digital futures or illustration.
-Develop an in-depth understanding of the publishing industry in context, through practical workshops with Rooks Books, to behind-the-scenes trips to commercial printers and international distributors.
-Refine and test your newly acquired skills by undertaking a proofreading and copyediting qualification, as part of your masters degree.
-Benefit from a long-standing partnership with the University of Plymouth Press, enabling you to gain work experience and collaborate on live publishing projects.
-Immerse yourself in the regional publishing and arts sector through involvement with projects such as Plymouth International Book Festival, the Peninsula Arts Programme or INK magazine.
-Join the list of our previous graduates who work for global publishers such as Oxford University Press, Cambridge University Press, Wiley, HarperCollins, Macmillan Publishers, FW Media and Quadrille Publishing.
-Establish a network of contacts through a dedicated work placement module. Benefit from invaluable partnerships with publishing professionals and a team of academic staff with extensive and diverse experience in the industry.
-Get ahead in a competitive, fast-paced sector by developing skills in editing, production, marketing, digital publishing, product development and publication design.
-Tailor your time at university to meet your needs by fitting your study around work and personal commitments. Our part-time route allows you to study over two years, giving you the flexibility to study at a pace which suits you.

Course details

Study our MA Publishing and you’ll gain insight into key areas of the publishing industry and achieve a qualification endorsed by the sector. You’ll also get the opportunity to focus your studies through one of our specialist strands. You’ll immerse yourself in the world of digital publishing, discovering new technologies and the impact these have on the industry. Through dedicated modules, you’ll develop an understanding of the skills and responsibilities essential to becoming a publishing professional, as well as the roles and collaborative processes vital to the industry. Engage with the different stages of the publishing process, from production and distribution to marketing and financial viability. You’ll be able to network with guest lecturers from established publishing companies and negotiate invaluable work experience, through placements and collaborative projects. Benefit from key industry partnerships with publishers such as FW Media and University of Plymouth Press.

Core modules
-MAPU713 Publishing process
-MAPU714 Publishing work experience/collaboration
-MAPU715 Publishing dissertation or Publishing project and report
-MAPU711 Publishing practice and target market
-MAPU712 Publishing as a Creative Industry

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This MA prepares you for a career in the challenging world of publishing. Taught by experts and practitioners and with masterclasses from industry leaders, the programme of study includes the knowledge, skills and understanding you need to become a successful publisher. Read more

This MA prepares you for a career in the challenging world of publishing. Taught by experts and practitioners and with masterclasses from industry leaders, the programme of study includes the knowledge, skills and understanding you need to become a successful publisher.

About this degree

The programme equips students with both a practical insight into how this complex industry functions and a range of transferable skills. These include training in editorial, sales and marketing skills, publishing business plans and their successful delivery, contract negotiation and copyright management, production processes, digital contexts, innovation and entrepreneurship.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of five core modules (120 credits), three optional modules (30 credits), and a dissertation (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits, full-time nine months or flexible study 2-5 years) is offered.

Core modules

  • Author Management
  • Publishing Contexts
  • Publishing Entrepreneurship
  • Publishing Skills
  • Sales, Marketing and Promotion

Optional modules

  • Academic and Journals Publishing
  • Illustration and Publishing
  • Book Production
  • Children's Publishing
  • Theories of the Book
  • Booksellers and Bookselling

Dissertation/report

All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through lectures and seminars, with an emphasis on practical skills and exercises based on real-world and team working. Assessment is through essays, presentations, reports, one unseen examination, and the dissertation.

Placement

Students are encouraged to acquire practical work experience in the publishing industry and part-time opportunities will be circulated as they arise to all students. Students may also organise their own placements with the approval of staff. Staff will also assist students with applications and writing CVs and covering letters.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Publishing MA

Funding

For more details on the scholarships we offer please visit: UCL Publishing Centre .

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

At the end of the programme you will be a professional publisher ready to launch your career with a qualification from a university that the industry recognises and values. 

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Editorial Assistant, Bloomsbury
  • Marketing Analytic Manager, Harper Collins
  • Publishing Accounts Manager, Clays
  • Senior Executive of Digital Marketing, Penguin Random House India
  • Marketing and Publicity Executive, British Museum

Employability

UCL's MA in Publishing aims to help train leaders in the industry. We employ a rigorous applications process to ensure we recruit the very best potential publishers, and professional behaviour is at the heart of everything we do. This is an intensive programme, which provides access to the publishing industry throughout its duration, and we work with each student to give them the best support for their individual professional development. As a result, our graduates are sought-after recruits. Recent job successes have been at Bloomsbury Digital, Sage, and Penguin.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Publishing MA aims to cover the entire spread of publishing disciplines, from fiction and trade to professional, academic, scholarly and educational.

Teaching staff possess a wide range of book trade experience and networks of contacts across all fields in the UK and internationally. Their research has helped shape how publishers have developed practices, and made an impact on the discipline as a field of academic study.

In addition, leading publishers, literary agents, authors, legal experts, booksellers and electronic authorities visit to give lectures and presentations. Students benefit from masterclasses from industry leaders on current and controversial issues and field visits to retailers, publishers and libraries.



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As a postgraduate research student of Italian studies, you will be exposed to an environment that celebrates both language and culture, through rigorous research and vibrant social events. Read more

As a postgraduate research student of Italian studies, you will be exposed to an environment that celebrates both language and culture, through rigorous research and vibrant social events.

Studied informally here at Edinburgh since the late 16th century, Italian was formally added to the curriculum in 1919. Since then it has developed into a broad area of study that engages with both contemporary culture and historical times, when Italy shaped our civilisation.

Postgraduates are an integral part of our research community. We can offer you supervision in:

  • comparative literature
  • digital philology and second language acquisition
  • film studies
  • Italian cultural studies (most areas, including literary studies from the Middle Ages to the present)
  • literary theory
  • translation studies

Training and support

Your place in our graduate school will see you taking part in a thriving research community, attending regular seminars, publishing papers, presenting your research at national and international conferences, and participating in interdisciplinary research clusters across the School of Literatures, Languages & Cultures.

Facilities

Just a few minutes away from our base in George Square is the Italian Cultural Institute, where you will receive a warm welcome and the opportunity to mix with Scotland’s wider Italian academic community.

You will also have access to its extensive library and programme of events. Also extending cultural and academic networks is the Edinburgh Journal of Gadda Studies, which is produced here at the School and offers opportunities for you to contribute to the editorial team as a research or editorial assistant. Through our membership of this network we also host the Edinburgh Gadda Prize, presented biennially.



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