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Masters Degrees (Economics And Sociology)

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Economics Plus. looking beyond money, markets and regulations and becoming an economist that can tackle complex economic issues in today’s fast-changing, globalising world. Read more

Overview

Economics Plus: looking beyond money, markets and regulations and becoming an economist that can tackle complex economic issues in today’s fast-changing, globalising world.

Radboud University offers six Master’s specialisations in Economics. When choosing a specialisation it’s important to realise that each specialisation may lead to very different future prospects. Each with its own unique challenges and charm. Do you want to immerse yourself in the nitty-gritty of a company’s finances? Or would you prefer to understand financial markets and perhaps be the one that discovers how they can be tamed? Or are you more interested in the economies of developing countries that offer great challenges but also surprising potential?

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/economics

Specialisations of the Master’s programme in Economics

- Accounting and Control
- Multinational Corporate Finance
- Financial Economics
- International Economics & Business
- International Economics & Development
- Economics and Policy

Why study Economics at Radboud University?

- Economics at Radboud University could be called ‘Economics Plus’: the ‘standard’ economics package is expanded with relevant knowledge from related disciplines such as Political Science, Psychology and Sociology.
- Education and research at Radboud University go hand in hand. Our lecturers are active in academic and applied research and incorporate the latest academic developments and applied issues in their teaching.
- In our Master’s programmes, professors and students interact in small groups, thus strengthening the academic atmosphere.
- Our programme is academic. We believe in a strong theoretical background in a broad range of economical theories so that students thoroughly understand not just what is happening, but also why and how. However, we never lose sight of practical relevance. Real-world case scenarios, guest-speakers and the very latest theories on current events, will contribute to you becoming a professional that upon graduating immediately attracts the attention of potential employers.

Change perspective

Radboud University challenges you to look at Economics differently and to discover that within all specialisations this field is much more than money, markets and regulations. Economists also examine consumers’, businesses’ and governmental financial behaviour and decision-making. Their decisions as to where and why they spend money is fundamental in economics. And because their reasoning is not always rational, it’s important to have a clear understanding of thought processes. We therefore include aspects of sociology and psychology in our programme, and we look at our field from a cultural, legal and even philosophical perspective.

Having an eye for all these facets will give you a much better basis to tackle the complex economic issues in today’s fast-changing globalising world than when you just focus on numbers and methods. Simply put, Radboud University’s Master’s programme in Economics will put you ahead of the game.

Career prospects

The career prospects for the Master’s programme in Economics differ slightly, depending on which Master’s specialisation you choose. Below you can find the career prospects of each specialisation:
- Accounting and Control http://www.ru.nl/english/education/masters/economics-accounting/career-prospects
- Corporate Finance and Control http://www.ru.nl/english/education/masters/economics-corporate/career-prospects
- Financial Economics http://www.ru.nl/english/education/masters/economics-financial/career-prospects
- Economics and Policy http://www.ru.nl/english/education/masters/economics-policy/career-prospects
- International Economics and Business http://www.ru.nl/english/education/masters/economics-business/career-prospects
- International Economics and Development http://www.ru.nl/english/education/masters/economic-development/career-prospects

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/economics

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From start-ups to multinationals, the MSc Business Economics course is about applying economics to business – and London is the ideal place to do it. Read more
From start-ups to multinationals, the MSc Business Economics course is about applying economics to business – and London is the ideal place to do it.

Who is it for?

The MSc Business Economics / International Business Economics is for students who want to apply economics to real-world issues. From transfer pricing, to the complexity of financial markets and the pros and cons of EU membership, you will need to be strong at statistics and quantitative methods to get to grips with the material that makes up the core modules. The MSc is designed to give you the tools to apply your knowledge, so we expect you to be downloading the free FT app and getting on top of current issues from the second you start.

Objectives

On the MSc Business Economics / International Business Economics you won’t be deriving equations. Instead, we use them to apply economics to current business issues.

The programme has been designed to equip students with a wealth of resources combining data banks from City’s Cass Business School and School of Arts and Social Sciences. This means you have access to everything from Datastream, Bloomberg and Bankscope, to Morning Star and Orbis.

MSc Business Economics / International Business Economics maximises City’s central London location. With high-profile guest lecturers such as Jim O’Neill, former Chief Economist from Goldman Sachs, you gain insight straight from the City studying in the heart of "the world's biggest financial centre" (Economist, 2012.)

Teaching and learning

The course is taught through a series of lectures (which are also available as online resources), seminars, student presentations and interactive group work. Computer laboratory teaching gives you practical experience using software packages to develop statistical and econometric skills that are formatively assessed by computer-based exercises.

You also undertake a research project or economics literature survey on a subject that is of interest to you. This must cover a current topic that is within the remit of Business Economics or International Business Economics.

Assessment

You are assessed by coursework and examination. Your overall degree result is based on your performance in the taught modules and the dissertation.

Modules

The core content is covered in the first term, making this a programme with a lot of choice. There is an economics and econometrics focus, but you also can study topics including the economics of micro-finance, e-commerce, asset pricing and the history of economic thought.

If you choose to study MSc International Business Economics you will need to study the International Business Economics elective in the second term, and your research project has to cover more than one country. So, for example, you could not focus on a single-country subject such as privatisation in the UK. For a detailed module breakdown, see the website: http://www.city.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/business-economics-international-business-economics/2017

Career prospects

When it comes to employer recognition, City is well established. City has become synonymous with quality and the Government Economic Service regularly recruits postgraduate students from this programme. There is also a range of career service events across the School of Arts and Social Sciences and Cass Business School, which you can attend throughout the programme.

Our graduates include Yuliya Bashmakov, Senior Gas Control Scheduler for ExxonMobil and Youssef Intabli who is now working as an account manager at Bloomberg.

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Our Sociology master's degrees offer students training in the most significant recent developments in sociology. All three streams enable students to specialise in particular areas, developing their critical and analytical abilities, their methodological skills and their expertise in substantive sociological topics. Read more

About the MSc programmes

Our Sociology master's degrees offer students training in the most significant recent developments in sociology. All three streams enable students to specialise in particular areas, developing their critical and analytical abilities, their methodological skills and their expertise in substantive sociological topics.

Students develop their own research projects in any aspect of the discipline that interests them, and choose optional courses from a wide selection both within and outside the Sociology Department. Each stream emphasises a different aspect of research training, provided through its specification of compulsory courses: MSc Sociology provides a balance of sociological theory, methodology and substantive topics. The Contemporary Social Thought stream is built around a compulsory course in theory and analysis. The MSc Sociology (Research) has a higher weighting of qualitative and quantitative methods training, originally designed as an ESRC approved training course for doctoral studentships.

You take a total of three course units through a combination of full and/or half units and you complete a dissertation of up to 10,000 words on a subject of interest related to the courses and approved by the Department.

Graduate destinations

Students go into a wide variety of professions, such as teaching, research, politics, public administration, the social and health services, advertising, journalism, other areas of the media, law, publishing, industry, accounting, marketing, personnel and management.

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This new Masters is designed to bridge the gap between economics and development, providing strong training in quantitative and policy analysis in development economics. Read more
This new Masters is designed to bridge the gap between economics and development, providing strong training in quantitative and policy analysis in development economics.

Who is it for?

The Development Economics MSc course at City is designed for those looking to gain an understanding of key issues in economic development and provide you with rigorous economic theory and statistical tools to be able to analyse policies and assess their impact on economic and human development.

Objectives

The aim of this course is to develop your critical and analytical abilities in economics, with particular reference to development. By the time you graduate, you should be able to:
-Demonstrate that modern economic theory is relevant to development economics.
-Critically interpret current research in development economics and evaluate its relevance to development practice and policy analysis.
-Understand the enduring determinants of poverty.
-Analyse the issues of fertility, education, health, work, migration and microfinance and their contribution to economic development.
-Develop microeconomic models to explain how people make such decisions and how policy is likely to affect their choices.
-Assess policies designed towards helping the poor by taking into account how people react to policy interventions, and statistically assess the success of such policies.
-Undertake empirical investigations in development economics, using appropriate quantitative methods.

Academic facilities

You will benefit from City's London location, and our proximity to the centres of decision-making in development economics. (We are six tube stops away from the Department for International Development, for example.).

Teaching and learning

The Development Economics MSc course is designed to be flexible in the range of teaching methods used. You learn through a mixture of lecturing, discussions, analysis of case studies, student presentations and particularly for the quantitative elements of the course, interactive computer-based exercises. You are encouraged to participate actively in the classes.

The taught modules usually run for a term and have three hours of teaching each week. This time may include workshops and tutorials as well as lectures.

Outside your timetabled hours you have access to City’s library and computing facilities for independent study. Your independent study will include reading recommended books and papers, and “reading around” the field to develop a deeper understanding.

In your third term we organise for experts from outside City to come in and present current research on both methodological and applied topics.

For the dissertation or literature survey, each student is allocated a supervisor, who will guide you in your research and writing for this module. We also offer pre-sessional induction courses covering topics such as probability, microeconomics and the Stata software.

Assessment

For each taught module in the Department of Economics, you are assessed through a combination of coursework and one final examination. For most modules the coursework contributes 30% of the overall mark and the examination contributes 70%. The nature of the coursework which the lecturer assigns varies according to the module, for example essays, presentations or computer-based data analysis and calculations. Modules taught in the Department of International Politics are usually assessed solely by coursework.

Overall assessment is based on your performance in the taught modules and a dissertation or literature survey. Students require 180 credits to pass the MSc. The weighting of each module within the overall mark is determined by the credit value assigned to that module.

Modules

You will complete 180 credits. This includes taught modules worth 120 credits plus 60 credits through either of the below paths.
-Literature Survey: two extra elective taught modules of 15 credits each and a Literature Survey worth 30 credits
-Dissertation: a 60 credit Economics Research Project.

Each module typically has a weekly two-hour lecture and a one-hour tutorial, but this may vary.

Note: It is not possible to give exact hours per week because these can vary from one term to the other, depending on which electives you choose.

Dissertation Path
Core modules
-The Economics of Micro-Finance (15 credits)
-Development Economics (15 credits)
-Microeconomic Theory (30 credits)
-Econometrics (30 credits)
-Dissertation (60 credits)
Elective modules
-Asset Pricing (15 credits)
-Macroeconomics (15 credits)

Literature Survey Path
Core modules
-The Economics of Micro-Finance (15 credits)
-Development Economics (15 credits)
-Microeconomic Analysis (30 credits)
-Quantitative Methods (30 credits)
-Literature Survey (30 credits)
Elective modules
-Welfare Economics (15 credits)

Elective modules for both paths
-International Macroeconomics (15 credits)
-Economics of Regulation and Competition (15 credits)
-Health Economics (15 credits)
-History of Economic Thought (15 credits)
-Corporate Finance (15 credits)
-Experimental Economics and Game Theory (15 credits)
-Development and World Politics (15 credits)*
-Political Economy of Global Finance (15 credits)*
-The Politics of Forced Migration (15 credits)*

*Students on the Dissertation Path can take only 1 of these modules, which are taught in the Department of International Politics. Students on the Literature Survey Path can take up to 2 of these modules.

Career prospects

Upon completion of this course you will have the skills to work in:
-Consulting firms specialising in development.
-Governmental bodies such as the Department for International Development (DFID).
-Major international financial and development institutions such as World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, the United Nations or the Overseas Development Institute, which regularly recruits MSc graduates for overseas postings.

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Gain a thorough foundation in the tools required to analyse aspects of public policy. York enjoys a prominent international reputation in public economics and in the use of economics in the design of social policy. Read more
Gain a thorough foundation in the tools required to analyse aspects of public policy.

Overview

York enjoys a prominent international reputation in public economics and in the use of economics in the design of social policy. If you already work in the public sector, the NHS or for an international agency, the MSc in Economics and Public Policy will help you upgrade your existing skills. You'll gain more exposure to up-to-date techniques and knowledge relevant to policy analysis in social and other public policy areas, and to public sector administration and financial management.

If you have completed a degree in economics, the Masters will allow you to build on this by gaining further knowledge and expertise in more specialised areas, such as health economics, social policy analysis and public finance.

The programme is also suitable for those with a background in disciplines such as government, sociology, mathematics or natural sciences, who wish to develop their abilities in economics and related areas, particularly economic and social policy, administration and management. If you don't have a strong background in economics, but have other relevant qualifications or experience, you can take a Summer Session course in Economics and Quantitative Methods.

Course Content

The MSc in Economics and Public Policy will offer you a thorough training in core areas of economics used in the evaluation of public policy. Taught by leading experts, you'll complete modules to the value of 180 credits. This includes 100 credits of taught modules - some core and some optional - and an 80 credit dissertation.

Modules
For the Masters you will take 100 credits of taught modules. There are five core modules which make up 80 of your 100 taught credits:
-Applied Microeconomics 1 and Applied Microeconomics 2 or Advanced Microeconomics (20 credits)
-Public Policy Analysis (20 credits)
-Econometrics 1 & 2 or Statistics and Econometrics or Econometric Methods for Research orEconometrics 1 and Applied Microeconometrics (20 credits)
-Public Finance (10 credits)
-Public Sector Economics (10 credits)

In addition you can choose 20 credits from:
-Advanced Macroeconomics (10 credits)
-Applied Microeconometrics (10 credits)
-Design and Analysis of Mechanisms and Institutions (10 credits)
-Evaluation of Health Policy (10 credits)
-Experimental Economics (10 credits)
-Health and Development (10 credits)
-Industrial Economics (10 credits)
-International Macroeconomics (10 credits)
-Labour Economics (10 credits)
-Project (10 credits)

You'll complete a piece of independent research carried out over three months of the summer, guided by a supervisor. The dissertation, of up to 10,000 words, is worth 80 credits and offers you the chance to examine a topic in depth and to develop your academic research skills.

Careers

The MSc in Economics and Public Policy will open up a broad range of career options in government, the public sector, health or public administration. It is an ideal basis for progression to a PhD.

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The course is designed to give students a thorough background in the latest advances in theoretical, applied and empirical economics. Read more
The course is designed to give students a thorough background in the latest advances in theoretical, applied and empirical economics.

Who is it for?

This course is designed for anyone who wants to undertake rigorous training in modern economics either immediately after completion of an undergraduate degree or as a mid-career professional. Students have the option of studying full time over the course of one year or part time over the course of two.

Objectives

The aim of this course is to develop your critical and analytical abilities in economics and to prepare you academically for a career as a professional economist. The dissertation track also serves as a stepping stone to an Economics PhD.

By the time you graduate, you should be able to:
-Demonstrate knowledge of modern economic theory, at both a micro and a macro level.
-Analyse the strengths and weaknesses of the relevant empirical and theoretical research methodology.
-Demonstrate knowledge of econometric theory and techniques.
-Critically interpret current research in a combination of fields offered, namely, behavioural and experimental economics, financial economics, health economics, macroeconomics, regulation and competition, and development.
-The dissertation track also serves as a stepping stone to an Economics PhD.

Academic facilities

You will benefit from City's London location and our proximity to, and connections with, the City of London. We are minutes away from the Square Mile - London's world-famous financial district - and the headquarters of financial and professional institutions.

Teaching and learning

The teaching takes place over 2 terms from September to June. Full-time students who pass all the taught modules during the main exam sessions finish the programme at the end of September when they submit their dissertation or literature review.

Full-time students who successfully complete the taught modules in the August resit exam session submit their dissertation or literature review in December.

Part-time students complete their modules over the course of four terms from September to June before undertaking their dissertation or literature review.

Course is taught by research active academic staff. Assessments are a combination of unseen written examinations (70% for each module) and coursework (30% for each module).

Modules

You will take 120 credits taught modules and have to accrue 60 extra credits through one of the following routes:
-Literature Survey: two extra elective taught module of 15 credits and a literature review (Economics Literature Survey) worth 30 credits;
-Dissertation: a 60 credit Economics Research Project.

In the dissertation route, you take four core modules and two elective modules. In the literature survey path, you take three core modules and five elective modules.

It is not possible to give exact hours per week because these can vary from one term to the other depending on which electives the students choose.

Dissertation route modules
Core modules
-International Macroeconomics (15 credits)
-Microeconomic Theory (30 credits)
-Econometrics (30 credits)
-Macroeconomics (15 credits)
Elective modules
-Macroeconomics (15 credits)
-Financial Derivatives (15 credits)
-Asset Pricing (15 credits)
-Corporate Investment under Uncertainty** (15 credits)

**cannot be chosen if ECM157 Development Economics is chosen.

Literature survey route modules
Core modules
-International Macroeconomics (15 credits)
-Microeconomic Analysis (30 credits)
-Quantitative Methods (30 credits)

Elective modules
-Macroeconomics (15 credits)
-Corporate Finance (15 credits)
-Welfare Economics* (15 credits)

*available subject to timetabling feasibility.

Career prospects

On completing the Masters in Economics course you will have a range of employment possibilities, to some extent determined by the electives you choose.

For example, if you choose two financial economics electives, one from health economics and the fourth from economic regulation and competition, you may work in the financial industry as a consultant, or in the health industry as a financial analyst, or in any industry that requires a financial or industry analyst.

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This MPhil pathway is designed to give students a basic understanding of major themes and debates the sociology of reproduction and new reproductive technologies. Read more
This MPhil pathway is designed to give students a basic understanding of major themes and debates the sociology of reproduction and new reproductive technologies. Two core modules introduce key concepts and approaches to the sociology of reproduction, and core methodologies in this field. Other substantive modules can be chosen in consultation with the student's supervisor or the course director.

Topics to be covered include: core theories of gender, reproduction and kinship; the reproductive division of labour; social reproduction and the meaning of the 'mode of reproduction'; the sociology of new reproductive technologies; reproduction and globalisation; reproductive rights; media representation of reproduction and visual cultures of reproduction.

Background readings will be drawn from feminist science studies, the history of science and medicine, and the anthropology of reproduction as well as the sociology of reproduction.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hssompsrp

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the programme students should have:

- an advanced understanding of current sociological research in selected topics;
- the skills necessary to conduct independent social research and experience in their use;
- an ability to apply and develop modern social theory with respect to empirical topics;
- a deeper understanding of their chosen specialist area, including command of the literature and current research;
- the ability to situate their own research within current developments in the field.

Format

The course offers teaching on Social Theory, Substantive modules and Research Methods. Students work towards a written dissertation supported by supervisions and a dissertation workshop.

Students receive written feedback on each essay and the dissertation. Feedback is also given during the dissertation workshop on the direction and progress of the dissertation research.

Assessment

Students write a dissertation of not less than 15,000 and not more than 20,000 words on a subject approved by the Degree Committee.

Students write one methods essay of not less than 2,500 and not more than 3,000 words (or prescribed course work) and two substantive essays of not less than 4,000 and not more than 5,000 words.

Continuing

Students are encouraged to proceed to the Faculty's PhD programme, provided they reach a high level of achievement in all parts of the course. MPhil students who would like to continue to the PhD would normally need to have a final mark of at least 70% overall and 70% for the dissertation.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

The Department of Sociology holds ESRC funding awards. Sociology is a recognised Doctoral Training Centre pathway toward a PhD. Therefore candidates for the MPhil in Sociology (Sociology of Reproduction) can apply for 1+3 ESRC funding.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The MPhil in Sociology of Media and Culture pathway provides students with the opportunity to study the nature and transformation of media and cultural forms at an advanced level. Read more
The MPhil in Sociology of Media and Culture pathway provides students with the opportunity to study the nature and transformation of media and cultural forms at an advanced level. The programme gives students a firm grounding in the theoretical and empirical analysis of media and culture and enables them to study particular media and cultural forms in depth, examining their transformations over time and their impact on other aspects of social and political life. The programme consists of 4 components:

1. Theories of Culture and Media: all students taking this programme will be expected to follow this course of lectures that will cover some of the major theoretical contributions to the study of media and culture, ranging from Adorno and Habermas to Bourdieu and Becker and from medium theory to Castells and more recent theoretical work on new media and the internet. Students are also strongly encouraged to follow the course of lectures on social theory.

2. Substantive modules: there will be at least three core substantive modules taught by Prof John Thompson, Prof Patrick Baert and Dr Ella McPherson. The modules will be research-led and will reflect the research being undertaken by members of the Department. The content of specific modules may vary from year to year but topics covered will typically include the nature of the digital revolution and its impact on the media and creative industries; the changing nature of news and journalism in the digital age; the role of new media in the development of social movements and new forms of political mobilization and protest; the uses of social media and the internet and their impact on everyday life and culture; the role of ideas, intellectuals and media forms in processes of social and political change. Students in this programme will be expected to take at least three of these modules; they may also take the fourth module in this programme, or they may substitute one of these modules with a module taken from another MPhil programme offered by the Department (Modern Society and Global Transformations, Political and Economic Sociology, Sociology of Reproduction).

3. Research Methods: all students will take a course on research methods which includes sessions on philosophical issues in the social sciences; research design; data collection and analysis in relation to quantitative and qualitative methods; reflection on research ethics and practice; library and computer skills.

4. Dissertation: all students will write a dissertation on a topic of their choice that allows for theoretically informed empirical analysis of some aspect of media or culture in contemporary societies. The choice of dissertation topic is made in consultation with your supervisor, who can advise you on the suitability and feasibility of your proposed research and on research design. A dissertation workshop provides the opportunity to present aspects of your dissertation work and to receive constructive feedback from course teachers and fellow students.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hssompsmc

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the programme students should have:

- an advanced understanding of current sociological research in selected topics;
- skills necessary to conduct independent social research and experience in their use;
- an ability to apply and develop modern social theory with respect to empirical topics;
- a deeper understanding of their chosen specialist area, including command of the literature and current research;
- the ability to situate their own research within current developments in the field.

Format

The course offers teaching on Social Theory, Substantive modules and Research Methods. Students work towards a written dissertation supported by supervisions and a dissertation workshop.

Students receive written feedback on each essay and the dissertation. Feedback is also given during the dissertation workshop on the direction and progress of the dissertation research.

Assessment

Students write a dissertation of not less than 15,000 and not more than 20,000 words on a subject approved by the Degree Committee.

Students write one methods essay of not less than 2,500 and not more than 3,000 words [or prescribed course work] and two substantive essays of not less than 4,000 and not more than 5,000 words.

Continuing

Students are encouraged to proceed to the Faculty's PhD programme, provided they reach a high level of achievement in all parts of the course. MPhil students who would like to continue to the PhD would normally need to have a final mark of at least 70% overall and 70% on the dissertation.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

The Department of Sociology holds ESRC funding awards. Sociology is a recognised Doctoral Training Centre pathway toward a PhD. Therefore candidates for the MPhil in Sociology (Media and Culture) can apply for 1+3 ESRC funding.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Applying behavioural economics to real-world problems is becoming increasingly widespread. The main findings from behavioural economics are that individuals deviate from optimal behaviour in a consistent and regular manner. Read more
Applying behavioural economics to real-world problems is becoming increasingly widespread. The main findings from behavioural economics are that individuals deviate from optimal behaviour in a consistent and regular manner. Furthermore, emotions play an important role in decision making in many scenarios. As a consequence, policy-makers are beginning to appreciate the relevance of applying tools and techniques from behavioural economics in understanding the behaviour of individuals.

Over the past decade, techniques in behavioural economics have been applied by a large number of both private and public sector organisations. These include the Bank of England, Coca-Cola, the Financial Conduct Authority, Google, HMRC, Hyundai, HSBC, Oxfam, VISA and the NHS, while concepts from behavioural economics are widely used in areas such as marketing, organ donor framing, incentives to save, incentives to spend etc. There does not seem to be an aspect of life in which applications from behavioural economics are not relevant.


Why study MSc Behavioural Economics in Action at Middlesex?

As a result of this growth in demand, we are offering MSc Behavioural Economics in Action with a strong emphasis on real-world applications, that is, in action. It is the very first programme of its type to be offered in the London area.

The programme will provide a unique learning experience for its students. The course offers as much emphasis on behavioural theories as on the practical applications of behavioural economics, but what makes our masters programme unique is that - as part of their degree - our students will be required to undertake a three-month long behavioural project with real-world implications supported by a mentor.

The course is particularly aimed at individuals with extensive work experience in areas such as policy making and senior management in any type of organisation in the public or private sector. The tools and techniques we teach are also in great demand in organisations that seek to understand customer and consumer behaviour.

Recent graduates from related disciplines looking to enter into the fast growing area of behavioural economics are also encouraged to apply, including anthropology, business, economics, finance, political science, psychology, sociology, neuroscience, etc. Those holding degrees in maths or physics are also welcome.

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The master programme Health Economics consists of 120 ECTS- (European Credit Transfer System) Points and is designed as a 4-semester full-time programme. Read more

Information on the Programme

The master programme Health Economics consists of 120 ECTS- (European Credit Transfer System) Points and is designed as a 4-semester full-time programme. It is a consecutive master degree based on a bachelor degree within the field of health economics.
The Core and Advanced Section of the master programme Health Economics contains 48 credit points. This area covers the basics of health economics.
The Specialisation Section, where students altogether complete 36 credit points, includes seminars as well as specialisation modules in health economics and medicine.
In the Supplementary Section, at least one module from economics and/or sociology has to be completed. Furthermore, to accomplish the required 18 credit points within this section, further modules from business administration and/or medicine have to be completed.

Detailed information concerning the curricular design is available on our homepage in the area of “study”.

Only the best for your career

The M.Sc. Health Economics at the WiSo-faculty of the University of Cologne widens the knowledge gained in your bachelor studies and makes you an expert in your respective area. For many managing positions of different industries and for certain professions in research and teaching, a master is indispensable.

Graduates find possible fields of employment primarily in consulting functions on a leadership level in private as well as public organisations like clinics, large medical practices, health insurers, institutions and in organisations and corporations within health care management as well as within the sport-, fitness-, and preventive and rehabilitation sector. The goal of the M.Sc. Health Economics is to make graduates mediators between commercial executives, chief physicians and the respective other people involved in the health sector and to solve arising conflicts of interest.

Take your professional future into your own hands and benefit from the theoretical and methodical-oriented approach of the WiSo-Faculty, which combines research as well as teaching with practical experience.Take your professional future into your own hands and profit from the theoretical and methodological approaches taken at the WiSo Faculty, combining research and teaching with practice and thus underscoring our motto: “Innovation for society".

Not international enough?

If this is the case, get information on the opportunity to complete a semester abroad at one of our numerous partner universities. Further Information can be found on the homepage of our International Relations Center.

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IMRD, part of the Erasmus Mundus scholarship programme, is a joint degree which offers you the opportunity to study rural development in its diversity of international approaches and applications. Read more
IMRD, part of the Erasmus Mundus scholarship programme, is a joint degree which offers you the opportunity to study rural development in its diversity of international approaches and applications. The 2 year master programme (120 ECTS) is jointly organized by 12 institutes leading in agricultural economics and rural development from all over the world. IMRD offers a combination of basic and specialized theoretical and practical training in technical, economic and social sciences. This competitive master programme has a high extent of international student mobility, making it possible to learn from specialists worldwide.
-Study each semester at a different university and compare international views on rural development.
-Gain practical experience through a 1 month case study in Italy or Slovakia.
-Several scholarship opportunities: Erasmus Mundus, IMRD consortium, ICI-ECP.
-1/3 of our graduates start a PhD; others work at UN, FAO and in the agribusiness industry
-Obtain a joint MSc in Rural Development.
-European and US students can combine this degree with a MSc in Agricultural Economics (University of Arkansas, US) and obtain a double degree at the end of the programme. Choose the ATLANTIS learning path.
-European and South-Korean students can combine this degree with a Master of Arts in Economics (Korea University, Seoul National University). Choose the EKAFREE learning path.
-Study in Europe, the US, South-Korea, India, South Africa, Ecuador or China, depending on the learning path you choose.

IMRD offers you the opportunity to study rural development in its diversity of international approaches and applications. Depending on the focus and mobility track you choose, you can study at one or a combination of our 12 partners in Europe, India, South-Africa, Ecuador, China, the US or South-Korea.

Learning path IMRD >> International MSc in Rural Development: study 2 years at the IMRD - Erasmus Mundus programme, possibly supported by an Erasmus Mundus scholarship. At the end you obtain the Joint IMRD Diploma. Study at one or a combination of our partners in Europe, India, South-Africa, Ecuador or China.

Learning path ATLANTIS >> MSc in Rural Development and MSc in Agricultural Economics: European and US students can combine this degree with a MSc in Agricultural Economics (University of Arkansas, US) and obtain a double degree at the end of the programme.

Learning path EKAFREE >>MSc in Rural Development and MA in Economics: European and South-Korean students can combine this degree with a Master of Arts in Economics (Korea University, Seoul National University).

Structure

Structure of the programme:
-General Entrance Module - Semester I 30-35 ECTS - UGent.
-Advanced Module I - Semester II 15-40 ECTS - any partner university or thesis partner university.
-Case Study - Summer Course 10 ECTS - Nitra University or Pisa University.
-Advanced Module II - Semester III 15-40 ECTS - opposite choice of semester II.
-Thesis Module - Semester IV 30 ECTS - thesis partner university.

Learning outcomes

Our programme will prepare you to become:
-A trained expert in integrated rural development specialized in agricultural sociology, economics, policy and decision making, with a competitive advantage on the international job market.
-A master of science with a unique international theoretical knowledge in development and agricultural economics theories and policies, combined with a practical based comparative knowledge of different approaches to rural development
part of an international network of specialists in agronomics and rural development.

Other admission requirements

The English language proficiency can be met by providing a certificate (validity of 5 years) of one of the following tests:
-TOEFL IBT 80.
-TOEFL PBT 550.
-ACADEMIC IELTS 6,5 overall score.
-CEFR B2 Issued by a European university language centre.
-ESOL CAMBRIDGE English CAE (Advanced).

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Explore sustainable solutions for environmental problems. You'll develop the skills needed by today's environmental managers, policymakers and scientists to tackle environmental issues at local, regional and global levels. Read more
Explore sustainable solutions for environmental problems.

Overview

You'll develop the skills needed by today's environmental managers, policymakers and scientists to tackle environmental issues at local, regional and global levels. You'll be prepared for a wide range of careers across the public and private sectors. This Masters also provides a good basis for further study at PhD level.

The core modules will provide you with knowledge in Environmental Economics and a appreciation of the challenges to which economic analysis can be applied. You'll also be equipped to incorporate environmental feedback into economic decision making in a way that satisfies both ecological managers and economists.

This Masters is suitable for students from a wide range of backgrounds, including economics, human geography, business, sociology, politics, environmental science and more. You'll be taught by a range of interdisciplinary staff with varied Environmental research interests.

Course Content

You'll learn about the economics and management of natural resources and develop your critical and analytical skills in these areas. You'll gain both theoretical and practical experience of issues in environmental economics and management. You will be trained in suitable research methods and relevant ethical and legal issues. You'll develop your research skills and experience through completing a large research project.

For the Masters you will need to take a 100 credits of taught modules. There are four core modules, which amount to 50 of your 100 required credits:
-Current Research in Environment, Economics and Ecology (10 credits)
-Applied Environmental Economics (10 credits)
-Biodiversity Conservation and Protected Areas (10 credits)
-Research Skills and Statistical Methods (20 credits)

You'll also choose 50 credits from a range of optional modules:
-Business and Environment (10 credits)
-Development Economics (20 credits)
-Economics for Natural Resources and Environmental Management (20 credits)
-Environmental Governance (10 credits)
-Environmental Impact Assessment (10 credits)
-Spatial Analysis (10 credits)

You'll also complete a 8,000 word dissertation, worth 80 credits, as part of the MSc. Staff will suggest a range of possible subjects and titles, but you can also devise your own dissertation title. You'll have a dissertation supervisor who will provide regular guidance and will be able to comment on your first draft of the dissertation.

Careers

You'll develop the skills and knowledge you will need to follow a career in an environmental organisation in both the public and private sectors. The Masters in Environmental Economics and Environmental Management also provides an ideal basis to progress to further study at PhD.

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Bridging the gap between theory and practice – and applying them to the design of sound, feasible policies – can provide the key to solving micro, meso and macroeconomic issues. Read more

Master's specialisation in Economics, Behaviour and Policy

Bridging the gap between theory and practice – and applying them to the design of sound, feasible policies – can provide the key to solving micro, meso and macroeconomic issues.
How do policy makers make decisions that affect economic, societal and personal welfare? How is welfare defined and measured? And how can we design more effective policies? This specialisation covers not only econometric questions, but also psychological, cultural, legal and philosophical ones. By improving your insight into complex issues, it will prepare you for designing successful strategies in your future career as a policy maker or consultant .
Our graduates are experts in economic policies who work for government and semi-government organisations, and also as consultants in business and industry. You can do the same. By examining real-world scenarios, you’ll acquire the analytical skills you need to take research results and apply them to a wide variety of problems.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ep

Why study Economics, Behaviour and Policy at Radboud University?

- You’ll tackle economic and policy issues at all levels – focusing mostly on the real economy.
- You’ll combine learning with research: your lecturers are researchers who incorporate the latest findings into their teaching. As a student, you’ll also do research.
- You’ll interact with your professors in small seminar groups.
- By taking our ‘Economics Plus’ package, you’ll combine ‘standard’ economics with disciplines such as psychology and sociology. This will give you the knowledge you need to tackle policy issues in today’s globalised world.

Change perspective

You’ll gain a strong theoretical background in both mainstream and heterodox (i.e. non-mainstream) economic theories, augmented by methods derived from disciplines that include psychology and sociology. There’s good reason for this broad approach: if an economic problem seems intractable, you may need to change your perspective. We also examine the policy relevance of theoretical insights and give you the tools you need to design policies that will make a difference to people’s lives.

Admission requirements for international students

1. A Bachelor's degree in Economics – or a closely-related discipline – from a research-oriented university, with sufficient background in Research Methods and Mathematics (and Economics if you took a different degree).

2. Proficiency in English
In order to take part in this programme, you must be fluent in both written and spoken English. Non-native speakers of English need one of qualifications below. Please note that certificates must have been awarded in the past two years, and that no other certificates are accepted:
- A TOEFL (iBT) Certificate with a minimum overall score of 90 and no subscore not less than 18, or
- IELTS Academic Certificate: a minimum overall score of 6.5 less than 6.0, or
- A Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE) with a minimum score of C, or
- A Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE) with a minimum score of C.

3. A letter of motivation (max. 2 pages)
Please explain why you want to follow this programme and why you think you should be part of this programme.

Career prospects

This programme will provide you with a toolbox filled with the skills and knowledge needed to tackle a whole array of economic problems. Besides issues at the micro and macroeconomic level, graduates learn to deal with issues at the meso level, for example, how to stimulate innovation.
Our graduates devise policies and learn to analyse critically which solutions are most likely to work in a specific economic and social context. They regularly find employment as policy makers for government and semi-government organisations, in ministries, national banks, NGOs, think tanks, the UN and the EU , as well as national and international labour organisations. But your career prospects are much broader than that. You could for example, work as a consultant in industry or as a lobbyist.

Our approach to this field

By giving you a strong theoretical grounding in a broad range of current economic theories – both mainstream and heterodox –this programme will show you not just what is happening, but also why and how. To ensure that it is always relevant, we update the content every year.

Our main aim is to unravel the diversity – and the complexity – of economic issues, and thus clarify the role of economics in society. At the micro level, we might look at, for example, policies for reducing traffic jams or encouraging citizens to opt for more sustainable ways of living. At the meso level, we might examine policies intended to determine which companies should be supported – those that are struggling or those that are successful? – and how companies can be encouraged to innovate. And at the macro level, we might try to determine whether government policies should respond to financial crises through austerity or through investment.

Lectures are devoted to detailed discussions of a wide range of real-world scenarios. As an active participant, you’ll join in debates with your lecturers and your fellow students, and sometimes with experts from the field. One module – Technology & Innovation Policy – is taught by an emeritus professor and two business leaders. Guest speakers are drawn from varied backgrounds, such as a recent speaker from the Dutch Ministry of Finance, who discussed financial illiteracy. Activities such as these all exemplify the kinds of concerns – economic and otherwise – you’ll be likely to encounter as a policy maker.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ep

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The Master in Sociology is an English-taught program that focuses on the analysis of problems of social cohesion (e.g., crime, social contacts, solidarity). Read more
The Master in Sociology is an English-taught program that focuses on the analysis of problems of social cohesion (e.g., crime, social contacts, solidarity). It does so comparing individuals and countries. The Master program has a theoretical- empirical research focus. That is, social problems and issues are translated into sociological research questions and analyzed with the aid of theories and advanced research methods. Students will also learn how policy solutions can be derived from results of sociological analyses, and to evaluate policy.

Career Perspective Sociology

Sociology is a broad program that can lead to employment in a wide range of fields, giving excellent employment prospects for graduates, both within the Netherlands and beyond. People with a Master's degree in Sociology work for either local or national governmental institutions, private companies, and for research agencies. The work may be in the field of labor and employment, culture, welfare, recreation, entertainment or health care. Sociologists may be employed as researchers, policy officers, advisors or management team members. Jobs in communication, media, research and education are also suitable for sociologists. Some graduates work as organizational or human resources policy advisors in the public or private sector.

The broad and in-depth knowledge acquired during your Sociology studies here at Tilburg will enable you to make a substantial contribution to the analysis of and solutions to today's social problems.

The range of careers open to our sociology graduates include:
•general policy officer, secretary or board member for national, provincial, municipal or private institutes working on issues related to employment, welfare, culture, education, recreation or health care
•adviser on organizational or personnel policy for the government, the education sector or the business sector
•jobs in journalism and the media within the field of verbal and written communication, and jobs in the information sector
•researcher for the government, the education sector or the business sector
•teacher in secondary or tertiary education.

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The master programme Sociology and Social Research consists of 120 ECTS- (European Credit Transfer System) Points and is designed as a 4-semester full-time programme. Read more

Information on the Programme

The master programme Sociology and Social Research consists of 120 ECTS- (European Credit Transfer System) Points and is designed as a 4-semester full-time programme. It is a consecutive master degree based on a bachelor degree within the field of sociology.
The Core and Advanced Section of the master programme Sociology and Social Research includes 27 credit points and covers methodological basics of sociology and social research.
The Specialisation Section contains 39 credit points and consists of a research seminar, in which 15 credits points will be obtained, as well as advanced modules of sociology and social research.
The Supplementary Section serves as an additional section to develop a more specific profile – either by deepening and specialising or by diversifying knowledge. Further modules from business administration as well as from social sciences and economics are available to students. This area will contain two subareas that both require 12 credit points.

Detailed information concerning the curricular design is available on our homepage in the area of “study”.

Only the best for your career

The M.Sc. Sociology and Social Research at the WiSo-faculty of the University of Cologne deepens the knowledge gained in your bachelor studies and makes you an expert in your respective area. For many managing positions of different industries and for certain professions in research and teaching, a master is indispensable.
Possible areas of employment for sociologists can be found within market and opinion research, national and international statistic agencies, in national and international associations that are concerned with social and economic policy, research institutions, the departments of media research within mass media corporations and personnel administration of corporations. Additionally, other areas of employment present in positions of local government e.g. in departments responsible for school-, family-, city- or environmental policy as well as provincial and federal agencies. Graduates possess skills that qualify for the upper grade of civil service and leading positions in social and market research as well as social planning.
Take your professional future into your own hands and benefit from the theoretical and methodical-oriented approach of the WiSo-Faculty, which combines research as well as teaching with practical experience.
Take your professional future into your own hands and profit from the theoretical and methodological approaches taken at the WiSo Faculty, combining research and teaching with practice and thus underscoring our motto: "Innovation for society".

Not international enough?

If this is the case, there is the possibility to apply for a semester abroad at one of our numerous partner universities. Further Information can be found on the homepage of our International Relations Center.

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