• University of Glasgow Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
  • Cardiff University Featured Masters Courses
  • New College of the Humanities Featured Masters Courses
  • Coventry University Featured Masters Courses
  • St Mary’s University, Twickenham Featured Masters Courses
  • Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
De Montfort University Featured Masters Courses
Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia Featured Masters Courses
Queen Mary University of London Featured Masters Courses
FindA University Ltd Featured Masters Courses
Loughborough University Featured Masters Courses
"economics" AND "philosop…×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Economics And Philosophy)

  • "economics" AND "philosophy" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 186
Order by 
The major theme of the programme is the analysis of individual and collective decisions which will be studied from the perspective of the three disciplines involved. Read more
The major theme of the programme is the analysis of individual and collective decisions which will be studied from the perspective of the three disciplines involved. Students will learn how to combine insights from political science, economics and philosophy in order to solve decision problems arising in such diverse areas as politics, corporate governance, international relations and others.
The programme is research-oriented and aims to provide a thorough and rigorous training in modern theories and methods in political science, economics and philosophy.

In the first three semesters students attend disciplinary courses in political science, economics and philosophy as well as interdisciplinary seminars in economics and political science or philosophy.
The fourth semester is devoted to the Master's thesis.

Part-time studies are possible under special circumstances.

More information can also be found on the webpage: http://www.wiso.uni-hamburg.de/msc-pep

Read less
Taught jointly by the Department of Economics and the Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method, the MSc Economics and Philosophy offers a unique combination of rigorous training in economics together with the opportunity to engage with moral, methodological and foundational questions. Read more

About the MSc programme

Taught jointly by the Department of Economics and the Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method, the MSc Economics and Philosophy offers a unique combination of rigorous training in economics together with the opportunity to engage with moral, methodological and foundational questions.

This thoroughly interdisciplinary programme encourages students to engage constructively with key economic and political issues, whilst allowing them to explore and question their conceptual and theoretical foundations.

Questions typically addressed include: What are the moral advantages and disadvantages of market institutions? Can we make interpersonal comparisons of well-being, and if so, how? How do models of economic phenomena relate to the actual social world? What are the assumptions underlying the rational choice model in economics? Can they be normatively justified? Are they descriptively accurate?

Students on this degree have access to the wealth of resources available in both the Economics and the Philosophy departments, including research seminars and colloquia on topics in economics, rational and social choice, scientific evidence and policy-making.

Graduate destinations

The degree offers a good preparation for doctoral research in both economics and philosophy. It also prepares students for careers in financial institutions, and intergovernmental, governmental, and non-governmental organisations, and for employment in such fields as financial and economic journalism and consulting.

Read less
Philosophical issues are deeply relevant in many areas of public life and often arise in public discussion. They include issues about ethics, economics and the law, as well as politics. Read more
Philosophical issues are deeply relevant in many areas of public life and often arise in public discussion. They include issues about ethics, economics and the law, as well as politics.

This course covers topics in ethics, political philosophy and social choice, and provides an understanding of economics and research training in philosophy. It allows students to study a range of options at the intersection of philosophy and public affairs.

Course content

You will take the core 20 credit interdisciplinary module 'The PPE of Social Choice', which covers topics such as decision making, rights and justice relating to social choice (broadly interpreted) at an advanced level. This module is jointly taught by members of staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments.

The 10 credit 'PEP Graduate Skills Workshop' will prepare you for undertaking research, covering areas such as writing research proposals and specific interdisciplinary skills.

You will take two of five 20 credit Philosophy/Political Philosophy modules: 'Topics in Theoretical Philosophy' or 'Analytical Political Philosophy', and 'Topics in Practical Philosophy' or 'The Challenges of Pluralism: Contemporary and Comparative Perspectives' or 'Topics in the History of Political Thought'.

You will also take one of two 10 credit Economics modules: either 'Applied Microeconomics I', which covers central topics in microeconomics including consumer theory, decision theory, welfare and market equlibrium and efficiency; or 'Economic Analysis for PPE', which provides a non-technical introduction to Economics.

You will take a further 40 credits of taught modules of your choice, from a wide range of options offered by the Economics, Philosophy and Politics departments.

You will also write a 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits.

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be your seminar group, normally containing 10-16 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.

The School prides itself on the friendliness of its staff and on the support that it provides for its students. Lecturers, seminar tutors and your supervisor will all help you to get the most out of the programme and, in particular, to understand the importance of interdisciplinary study.

Most modules will use the University's virtual learning environment 'Yorkshare', which may be used to access module resources or for more interactive work.

The modular system is based on a notional 40-hour week for each student. The amount of 'contact' time (lectures and seminars) varies depending on the modules you choose. The remaining time will be spent reading, preparing for seminars and essays, analysing ideas and data, making interdisciplinary connections and, of course, thinking.

Assessment

There are three assessment periods during the academic year: week 1 of the Spring term, week 1 of the Summer term and weeks 5-8 of the Summer term. Assessments occur throughout your year of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. The majority of assessments are either unseen examination papers or essays, which varies depending on which department is running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but most Philosophy and Politics modules by essays.

You will spend the summer and summer vacation terms working on your dissertation, which will be handed at the end of the summer vacation (mid September).

Reasonable adjustments in assessments will be made for students with disabilities, for example extra time in exams or use of a computer. The School works with the Disability Services team to ensure all students have the support they require.

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the School of PEP postgraduate courses means you develop a wide range of transferable skills. Employers value these degrees precisely because they make you think across boundaries and engage critically with a range of different material.

The MA in PPE: Philosophy and Public Affairs equips you for a range of careers in research and public life.

The careers branch of the Club of PEP, YorkWorks, aims to provide a platform for students to meet with experts and industry insiders to learn about the world of work and find out more about a career path that interests them, for example by organising careers conferences with graduate employers.

Read less
If you're looking to develop your career in economics or econometrics this course provides you with analytical and technical skills you need for the profession, as well as a solid grounding in commerce. Read more
If you're looking to develop your career in economics or econometrics this course provides you with analytical and technical skills you need for the profession, as well as a solid grounding in commerce. The course will enable you to build your knowledge in one of the following specialisations: Applied Econometrics; Applied Economics and Econometrics or Business Economics.

You will engage in a comprehensive theoretical and practical curriculum across your chosen field and develop high-level expertise in applied economic and econometric tools.

The program also gives you the opportunity to undertake independent research in your chosen specialisation.

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/applied-economics-and-econometrics-b6001?domestic=true

Overview

Please select a specialisation for more details:

- Applied econometrics
Your qualification will be a Master of Applied Econometrics

The specialisation in applied econometrics provides specialist knowledge, tools and skills to enable econometric and statistical analyses required in the business, economics and finance sectors.

- Applied economics and econometrics
Your qualification will be a Master of Applied Economics and Econometrics

The specialisation in applied economics and econometrics provides specialist knowledge, tools and skills in economics and econometrics to address important economic policy questions.

- Business economics
Your qualification will be a Master of Business Economics

The specialisation in business economics provides an advanced knowledge of the theories explaining and analysing economic policies - focusing on how individuals, households, firms and governments interact and how economies work, with an emphasis on economic regulation and policy.

Course Structure

The course is structured in three parts. Part A. Advanced preparatory, Part B. Mastery knowledge and Part C. Application studies All students complete Part B. Depending on prior qualifications, you may receive credit for Part A or Part C or a combination of the two.

Part A. Advanced preparatory
These studies will introduce you to Economics and Econometrics at advanced undergraduate and graduate level. They are intended for students whose previous qualification is not in a cognate field (that is, not in a field likely to prepare them for advanced study in this field). Students admitted to the course, who have a recognised degree or a graduate certificate in a cognate discipline will receive credit for this part.

Part B. Mastery knowledge
These units will develop your capacity as a critical and creative professional who is able to apply your knowledge of a specialised area to provide discipline based solutions.

Part C. Application studies
This will enable you to further develop your knowledge of your specialisation, or more broadly, or alternatively to select any units from across the university in which you are eligible to enrol. Some students use these electives units to provide a research pathway towards a Doctor of Philosophy course.

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/business-and-economics

About us

Monash Business School is home to one of the leading departments of Economics.

Since the 1970s, the term "Monash Economics" has been widely used to describe the liveliness and rigour inherent in our activities. We have demonstrated a strong track-record of excellence over the last 40 years. Our excellent international reputation is supported by our ranking or rating of:

- a rating of 4 (which is above world standard) in the latest Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA) report for Economics

- no. 1 in the Asia-Pacific region for cognitive and behavioural economics; and development economics (RePEc)

The Department boasts more than 50 tenured economists undertaking work in virtually all major fields of economics.

Leading research and reputation
We have a vibrant research atmosphere in both theoretical and applied economics. Our particular strengths lie in development economics, behavioural and experimental economics, and macroeconomics. However, even within these broad areas, there is considerable heterogeneity in topics and techniques used.

Members of the department work individually and in collegiate teams, within the department and with other units of the Business School. A number of department members work collaboratively with colleagues in other universities, both in Australia and internationally.

Our Department also maintains particularly strong ties with the Centre for Development Economics and Sustainability, the Centre for Health Economics and the Monash Sustainability Institute. We have established other collaborative networks such as the South Asia Research Network (SARN) and the Monash Experimental Research Insights Team (MERIT), which further ensure the positive impact of our high calibre research.

Members of the Department have a distinguished publication record in numerous leading field journals as well as general interest journals, including the profession's most prestigious outlets. We also house excellent facilities. Our Monash Laboratory for Experimental Economics (MonLEE) laboratory enables us to complement field and artefactual field experiments with lab based activities.

Excellence in economic education
Economics provides training in logical thought and analysis which can be applied widely in every-day decision making, not just to matters that are usually labelled 'economic'. It was recognition of the meteoric rise of a new grouping of economists who emphasised the influence of economic policies on a rapidly changing world.

Continuing in this spirit, our Department's overarching goal is to prepare our students with a range of career options that are readily adapted to the issues of the day. These may be positions in industry, government, or in non-government and international organisations.

We achieve this by providing training in logical thought and flexible analytical skills which can be applied widely in every-day decision making – not just to matters which are typically labelled 'economics'.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/applied-economics-and-econometrics-b6001?domestic=true#making-the-application

Read less
This course explores both the economic and political dimensions of international development - differentiating it from MSc programmes in development economics - as well as the links between social choice and development economics. Read more
This course explores both the economic and political dimensions of international development - differentiating it from MSc programmes in development economics - as well as the links between social choice and development economics.

Course Content

You will take a core 20 credit Development Economics in PPE module, which covers topics such as well-being and human development, growth, poverty, corruption and rent-seeking, child labour, and the environment - at an advanced level. You will also take the core 20 credit interdisciplinary module 'The PPE of Social Choice', which covers topics such as decision making, rights and justice relating to social choice (broadly interpreted). This module is jointly taught by members of staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments.

The 10 credit 'PEP Graduate Skills Workshop' will prepare you for undertaking research, covering areas such as writing research proposals and specific interdisciplinary skills.

You will take at least 50 credits of economics modules, including applied microeconomics, macroeconomics, econometrics and Economics of Development: Theory and Practice.

You will also take a further 20 credits of taught modules, from a wide range of options offered by the Politics and Economics departments.

You will also write a 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits.

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be your seminar group, normally containing 10-16 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.

The School prides itself on the friendliness of its staff and on the support that it provides for its students. Lecturers, seminar tutors and your supervisor will all help you to get the most out of the programme and, in particular, to understand the importance of interdisciplinary study.

Most modules will use the University's virtual learning environment 'Yorkshare', which may be used to access module resources or for more interactive work.

The modular system is based on a notional 40-hour week for each student. The amount of 'contact' time (lectures and seminars) varies depending on the modules you choose. The remaining time will be spent reading, preparing for seminars and essays, analysing ideas and data, making interdisciplinary connections and, of course, thinking.

Assessment

There are three assessment periods during the academic year: week 1 of the Spring term, week 1 of the Summer term and weeks 5-8 of the Summer term. Assessments occur throughout your year of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. The majority of assessments are either unseen examination papers or essays, which varies depending on which department is running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but most Politics modules by essays.

You will spend the summer and summer vacation terms working on your dissertation, which will be handed at the end of the summer vacation (mid September).

Reasonable adjustments in assessments will be made for students with disabilities, for example extra time in exams or use of a computer. The School works with the Disability Services team to ensure all students have the support they require.

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the School of PEP degrees means you develop a wide range of transferable skills. Employers value these degrees precisely because they make you think across boundaries and engage critically with a range of different material.

The MA in PPE: Economics and Development prepares students for careers in economics and development, including careers in international organisations, public life and research. It also provides essential research training for doctoral study in economics.

The careers branch of the Club of PEP, YorkWorks, aims to provide a platform for students to meet with experts and industry insiders to learn about the world of work and find out more about a career path that interests them, for example by organising careers conferences with graduate employers.

Read less
Interconnections between economics and politics are deep and take centre stage in this course. Indeed in the early stages of its development, what we now call ‘economics’ was known as ‘political economy’. Read more
Interconnections between economics and politics are deep and take centre stage in this course. Indeed in the early stages of its development, what we now call ‘economics’ was known as ‘political economy’. This course is tailor-made to suit a wide range of students with interests in the two disciplines and the relation between them.

Course content

You will take the core 20 credit interdisciplinary module 'The PPE of Social Choice', which covers topics such as decision making, rights and justice relating to social choice (broadly interpreted) at an advanced level. This module is jointly taught by members of staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments.

The 10 credit 'PEP Graduate Skills Workshop' will prepare you for undertaking research, covering areas such as writing research proposals and specific interdisciplinary skills.

You will also take at least 30 credits of economics modules, including applied microeconomics, macroeconomics and econometrics.

You will take a further 50-60 credits of taught modules of your choice, from a wide range of options offered by the Economics and Politics departments. These will include at least 20 credits in Politics and 20-30 credits in Economics.

You will also write a 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits.

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be your seminar group, normally containing 10-16 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.

The School prides itself on the friendliness of its staff and on the support that it provides for its students. Lecturers, seminar tutors and your supervisor will all help you to get the most out of the programme and, in particular, to understand the importance of interdisciplinary study.

Most modules will use the University's virtual learning environment 'Yorkshare', which may be used to access module resources or for more interactive work.

The modular system is based on a notional 40-hour week for each student. The amount of 'contact' time (lectures and seminars) varies depending on the modules you choose. The remaining time will be spent reading, preparing for seminars and essays, analysing ideas and data, making interdisciplinary connections and, of course, thinking.

Assessment

There are three assessment periods during the academic year: week 1 of the Spring term, week 1 of the Summer term and weeks 5-8 of the Summer term. Assessments occur throughout your year of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. The majority of assessments are either unseen examination papers or essays, which varies depending on which department is running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but most Politics modules by essays.

You will spend the summer and summer vacation terms working on your dissertation, which will be handed at the end of the summer vacation (mid September).

Reasonable adjustments in assessments will be made for students with disabilities, for example extra time in exams or use of a computer. The School works with the Disability Services team to ensure all students have the support they require.

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the School of PEP postgraduate courses means you develop a wide range of transferable skills. Employers value these degrees precisely because they make you think across boundaries and engage critically with a range of different material.

The variety of optional modules available on the MA in PPE: Economics and Politics prepares students for a wide range of careers, including careers in economics and politics, finance, international organisations and international development. It also provides essential research training for doctoral study in economics.

The careers branch of the Club of PEP, YorkWorks, aims to provide a platform for students to meet with experts and industry insiders to learn about the world of work and find out more about a career path that interests them, for example by organising careers conferences with graduate employers.

Read less
This course explores the inter-connections between normative economics and ethics at an advanced level. Read more
This course explores the inter-connections between normative economics and ethics at an advanced level. These connections have been central to the development of modern economics and moral philosophy, and can be found in classic texts in economics and philosophy, including those of Adam Smith, Karl Marx and John Stuart Mill.

Course content

You will take the core 20 credit interdisciplinary module 'The PPE of Social Choice', which covers topics such as decision making, rights and justice relating to social choice (broadly interpreted) at an advanced level. This module is jointly taught by members of staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments.

The 10 credit 'PEP Graduate Skills Workshop' will prepare you for undertaking research, covering areas such as writing research proposals and specific interdisciplinary skills.

You will take at least 40 credits of economics modules, including 'Applied Microeconomics', 'Macroeconomics' and 'Econometrics'; and 20 credits of philosophy modules in 'Practical philosophy' or 'Analytical political philosophy'.

You will take a further 30 credits of taught modules of your choice, from a wide range of options offered by the Economics and Philosophy departments, to include at least 10 credits from Economics.

You will also write a 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits.

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be your seminar group, normally containing 10-16 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.

The School prides itself on the friendliness of its staff and on the support that it provides for its students. Lecturers, seminar tutors and your supervisor will all help you to get the most out of the programme and, in particular, to understand the importance of interdisciplinary study.

Most modules will use the University's virtual learning environment 'Yorkshare', which may be used to access module resources or for more interactive work.

The modular system is based on a notional 40-hour week for each student. The amount of 'contact' time (lectures and seminars) varies depending on the modules you choose. The remaining time will be spent reading, preparing for seminars and essays, analysing ideas and data, making interdisciplinary connections and, of course, thinking.

Assessment

There are three assessment periods during the academic year: week 1 of the Spring term, week 1 of the Summer term and weeks 5-8 of the Summer term. Assessments occur throughout your year of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. The majority of assessments are either unseen examination papers or essays, which varies depending on which department is running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but most Philosophy modules by essays.

You will spend the summer and summer vacation terms working on your dissertation, which will be handed at the end of the summer vacation (mid September).

Reasonable adjustments in assessments will be made for students with disabilities, for example extra time in exams or use of a computer. The School works with the Disability Services team to ensure all students have the support they require.

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the School of PEP postgraduate courses means you develop a wide range of transferable skills. Employers value these degrees precisely because they make you think across boundaries and engage critically with a range of different material.

The MA in PPE: Economics and Philosophy prepares students for a wide range of careers, including careers in economics, public life, finance and research. It also provides essential research training for doctoral study in economics.

The careers branch of the Club of PEP, YorkWorks, aims to provide a platform for students to meet with experts and industry insiders to learn about the world of work and find out more about a career path that interests them, for example by organising careers conferences with graduate employers.

Read less
The Graduate Diploma in Philosophy is a one-year conversion course (two years part-time), designed for those who already have a degree and wish to pursue an interest in philosophy. Read more
The Graduate Diploma in Philosophy is a one-year conversion course (two years part-time), designed for those who already have a degree and wish to pursue an interest in philosophy. No formal training in philosophy is required. The programme provides an ideal learning environment if you are interested in progressing to an MA in Philosophy, or simply want the opportunity to learn about philosophy.

Course structure

The Diploma has two main components:
-Four undergraduate modules. At least two of these must be at Level 3 and no more than one should be at Level 1.
-A dissertation of 12,000 words (double module).

You can choose from a wide range of modules, which in the past have included:
Level 1
-Ethics and Values
-Knowledge and Reality
-Introduction to Logic
-Reading Philosophy
-History and Theory of Medicine
-Introduction to the History and Philosophy of Science
Level 2
-Philosophy of Mind
-Philosophy of Religion
-Political Philosophy
-Language, Logic and Reality
-Moral Theory
-Theory, Literature and Society
-Biomedical Ethics Past and Present
-Science and Religion
-Modern Philosophy I
-Philosophy of Science
-Philosophy of Economics: Theory, Methods and Values
-Ancient Philosophies West and East
Level 3
-Modern Philosophy II
-Aesthetics
-Applied Ethics
-Issues in Contemporary Ethics
-Twentieth Century European Philosophy
-Language and Mind
-History of the Body
-Philosophical Issues in Contemporary Science
-Metaphysics
-History and Philosophy of Psychiatry
-Gender, Film and Society
-20th Century European Philosophy
-History and Philosophy of Psychiatry
-Ethics in Business Practice
-Formal and Philosophical Logic

Learning and Teaching

Students in the Graduate Diploma programme receive an average of eight timetabled contact hours per week over the course of the programme. The contact hours come in the form of lectures, tutorials and seminars, depending on the four modules chosen by the student. In addition, students are offered six hours of one-to-one dissertation supervision with an expert in their chosen research area.

Philosophical development involves not only familiarizing oneself with a body of knowledge but also acquiring skills in critical reasoning and argumentation. Thus, in addition to introducing students to key works in philosophy, the programme offers many opportunities for dialogical interaction. Lecture sessions include time for questions, tutorials consist mainly of structured, critical dialogue in a supportive environment, and seminars provide opportunities for extended discussion. Dissertation supervision meetings give guidance on suitable reading, critical discussion of relevant sources, detailed advice on how to write a 12,000 word piece of research, and intensive critical engagement with the student’s philosophical position and argument.

Timetabled contact is only a part of the learning process; its aim is to provide students with the knowledge and skills required to navigate the relevant literature themselves and to pursue independent learning. Lectures and accompanying documents contextualise material and introduce students to topics, positions and debates. At least four hours of additional study per week are recommended for each lecture or seminar, which includes reading and the completion of assignments. Having completed the reading, students engage in discussion in seminars or return to lecture topics in small group tutorials. These help students to refine their understanding of material and to develop the reasoning skills needed to formulate, present, defend and criticise philosophical positions.

Graduate Diploma students also can benefit from a range of other activities in the department, including the department’s postgraduate philosophy society (EIDOS), weekly research seminars and reading groups, and occasional conferences, workshops and Royal Institute of Philosophy lectures. The programme director remains in contact with students throughout the year and is always available to discuss any issues that might arise, whether personal or academic.

Read less
Unlike other Master programmes in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics, the focus in Witten is on the sound academic analysis of real-life problems in an increasingly interconnected world. Read more
Unlike other Master programmes in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics, the focus in Witten is on the sound academic analysis of real-life problems in an increasingly interconnected world. The challenges facing modern society transcend academic disciplines as well as national boundaries. The problem scenarios we observe today are undisciplined in this sense, and therefore require consistently interdisciplinary approaches. In the highly complex society of the 21st century, it will need people with a generalistic background in economics, politics and philosophy to offer sustainable solutions for the future. The Master PPE in Witten is a tailor-made programme for any career in leading positions at the interface of politics, economics and (civil) society.

Who should study PPE? And what happens afterwards?

- You will find career prospects in a range of political and social fields, NGOs, management, further education, personnel and organization development, economic and political consulting.
- You will have career options in institutions that demand a high level of analytical competence at the interface between economics and politics.
- The Master programme PPE also provides a basis for academic research on topics at the boundaries between economic and political sciences, as well as in political and economic philosophy

Training for critical thinkers

- You start your PPE-studies at one of Germany’s most prestigious departments of economics.
- You enjoy excellent education and training, personal supervision, freedom and flexibility.
- You can be certain to be trained in critical thinking.

Our target group:

- smart minds
- dedicated personalities
- original and unconventional thinkers
- generalists with an interdisciplinary background and specialization competences; future change makers, social entrepreneurs, political consultants, researchers and other problem solvers
- individuals who strive to grasp complex situations at the theoretical level and find smart and sustainable solutions in practice.

The Master programme is suitable for:

- Graduates of economics
- Graduates of political science
- Graduates of humanities
- Graduates of social science
- Graduates of philosophy, politics, and economics
- Graduates of related interdisciplinary programmes

Read less
The Master’s programme in Philosophy at Leiden University is characterised by a firm integration of historical and systematic approaches in philosophy and an emphasis on studying primary philosophical texts. Read more
The Master’s programme in Philosophy at Leiden University is characterised by a firm integration of historical and systematic approaches in philosophy and an emphasis on studying primary philosophical texts. This constantly links both historical scholarship and current philosophical debates.

Visit the website: http://en.mastersinleiden.nl/programmes/philosophy/en/introduction

Course detail

The Leiden Institute for Philosophy offers a combination of Continental and analytical philosophy, which is an attractive feature for students searching for a confrontation of different types of philosophical method.

Specialisations

- Ethics and Politics
- History and Philosophy of the Sciences
- Philosophical Anthropology and Philosophy of Culture
- Philosophy, Politics and Economics

The specialisations Ethics and Politics, History and Philosophy of the Sciences, and Philosophical Anthropology and Philosophy of Culture aim to give students a broad and deep knowledge of and insight into philosophy, a number of its branches, and their historical development. The programme is characterised by a firm integration of historical and systematic approaches in philosophy and an emphasis on studying primary philosophical texts. This constantly links both historical scholarship and current philosophical debates.

The specialisation Philosophy, Politics and Economics has a distinctively interdisciplinary profile. The programme enables students to engage with issues in philosophy, politics, and economics at the cutting edge of these fields. It aims to draw sophisticated connections between social, political, and economic phenomena, using the methods of philosophical inquiry as tools for addressing these issues.

Career

The MA programme in Philosophy prepares students for any career in which conceptual, analytic and interpretative skills are important, including careers in the public sector, business and the media. Successful completion of an MA can lead to PhD research and to an academic career.

Positions you could hold after your studies:

- Policy Officer at a ministry
- Copywriter at a media company
- Freelance editor
- PhD at an foreign university
- Freelance text writer

How to apply: http://en.mastersinleiden.nl/arrange/admission

Funding

For information regarding funding, please visit the website: http://prospectivestudents.leiden.edu/scholarships

Read less
This course offers a balanced and integrated education across the PPE disciplines. It is constructed around an interdisciplinary module on social decision making taught by staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments. Read more
This course offers a balanced and integrated education across the PPE disciplines. It is constructed around an interdisciplinary module on social decision making taught by staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments. The course provides you with a foundation in economics and research skills, and offers a wide range of philosophy and politics option modules.

Course Content

You will take the core 20 credit interdisciplinary module 'The PPE of Social Choice', which covers topics such as decision making, rights and justice relating to social choice (broadly interpreted) at an advanced level. You will also take a core 10 credit 'PEP Graduate Skills Workshop' module, which prepares you for undertaking research, covering areas such as formulation of research proposals and specific interdisciplinary skills.

You will also take one of two 10 credit Economics modules: either 'Applied Microeconomics I', which covers central topics in microeconomics including consumer theory, decision theory, welfare and market equlibrium and efficiency; or 'Economic Analysis for PPE', which provides a non-technical introduction to Economics.

In addition you will take a further 80 credits of taught modules of your choice, from a wide range of options offered by Politics, Economics, Philosophy or PEP. These will include at least 20 credits from Politics and 20 credits from Philosophy.

You will also write a 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits.

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be your seminar group, normally containing 10-16 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.

The School prides itself on the friendliness of its staff and on the support that it provides for its students. Lecturers, seminar tutors and your supervisor will all help you to get the most out of the programme and, in particular, to understand the importance of interdisciplinary study.

Most modules will use the University's virtual learning environment 'Yorkshare', which may be used to access module resources or for more interactive work.

The modular system is based on a notional 40-hour work week for each student. The amount of 'contact' time (lectures and seminars) varies depending on the modules you choose. The remaining time will be spent reading, preparing for seminars and essays, analysing ideas and data, making interdisciplinary connections and, of course, thinking.

Assessment

There are three assessment periods during the academic year: week 1 of the Spring term, week 1 of the Summer term and weeks 5-8 of the Summer term. Assessments occur throughout your year of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. The majority of assessments are either unseen examination papers or essays, which varies depending on which department is running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but most Philosophy and Politics modules by essays.

You will spend the summer term and vacation working on your dissertation, which will be handed at the end of the summer vacation (mid September).

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the School of PEP postgraduate courses means you develop a wide range of transferable skills. Employers value these degrees precisely because they make you think across boundaries and engage critically with a range of different material.

Career pathways for MA in PPE graduates are hugely varied, and have included accounting, the civil service, finance, international development, journalism, law, politics and research. The international dimension of the course allows students to pursue job opportunities both in the UK and abroad.

Read less
The Philosophy, Politics and Economics of Health MA aims to equip students with the skills necessary to play an informed role in debates concerning distributive justice and health. Read more
The Philosophy, Politics and Economics of Health MA aims to equip students with the skills necessary to play an informed role in debates concerning distributive justice and health. It explores the central ethical, economic and political problems facing health policy in the UK and globally, especially in relation to social justice.

Degree information

The programme covers relevant areas of moral and political theory, comparative policy analysis, and health economics, to allow students to come to a wide understanding of background issues, history and constraints, in order to be able to make a positive contribution to current debates in this field.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (45 credits), five optional modules (75 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma of 120 credits is available, consisting of three core modules (45 credits), and five optional modules (75 credits).

Core modules
-Philosophy Politics and Economics of Health
-Health Policy and Reform
-Key Principles of Health Economics

Optional modules
-Bioethics Governance
-Comparative Human Rights Law
-Law and Governance of Global Health
-Global Justice and Health
-Illness
-Madness
-Conflict, Humanitarianism and Health
-Ethics and Regulation of Research
-Contemporary Political Philosophy
-Normative Ethics
-Public Ethics
-Health Inequalities over the Life-course
-From Imperial Medicine to Global Health, 1860s to Present
-Death, Dying and Consequences
-Disability and Development
-Introduction to Deafhood
-Global Health and Development
-Anthropology and Psychiatry
-Medical Anthropology
-Modules from other UCL Master's-level programmes, subject to approval from the Course Director and timetabling constraints.
-Or any other suitable module from other UCL Master's-level programmes, subject to approval from the course Director and timetabling constraints

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of up to 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is taught through a combination of lectures, seminars and tutorials. Student performance is assessed through examinations, presentations and coursework (depending on the options chosen), and the dissertation.

Careers

Graduates have gone on to funded research in bioethics and in health policy, and to jobs in the health service, law, journalism, as well as medical education.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Journal development manager, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine
-Doctorate of Medicine, Harvard Medical School
-Health Policy Adviser, Doctors of the World UK
-PhD Critical Theory, University of Brighton
-Policy Officer, WHO (World Health Organization) and studying Medicine, The University of Western Australia

Employability
The programme gives students the ability to think precisely and rigorously about complex problems in health systems and beyond; to work with others to explore solutions; and to write cogently and concisely. Public and private sector health employers and NGOs particularly prize these skills in graduates. The skills that the course teaches also provide an ideal springboard to further academic study.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This MA is the only Master's programme in the world of its type. The compulsory modules provide necessary core skills, while the wide range of options enables students to further their own particular interests.

UCL is at the forefront of research in interdisciplinary research and teaching in philosophy, health humanities and global health through units such as the Health Humanities Centre, the Institute for Global Health and the Institute of Health Equity. The programme draws on highly regarded researchers in a range of UCL departments, and students benefit by instruction from some of the leaders in their fields.

Students further benefit from UCL's location in London, which is one of the world centres of philosophical activity, home of a number of internationally renowned journals - Philosophy; Mind & Language; Mind - and which enjoys regular visiting speakers from across the world. London has over 60 active philosophers making it one of the largest and most varied philosophical communities in the world.

Read less
This M.A. Read more

Overview

This M.A. brings together at a postgraduate level some of the most important approaches in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics in order to obtain the necessary abilities and understanding to deal with the challenges of globalisation and a globalised economy, democracy and becoming a responsible citizen, by addressing the intrinsic relationships between these subjects. Modules from the Department of Law will also be used, where suitable, to enable the students on an interdisciplinary level to engage with the practical political, social, and economic challenges faced by society today.

Philosophy, Politics and Economics overlap not only in the university, but also in public policy, business and commerce. The intellectual dexterity and versatility that emerges from a training and grounding in these three overlapping and cognate disciplines is an enormous professional, intellectual and vocational asset, valued and recognized by governments, policy makers, enterprises and employers. It enables one to act effectively under guidance in a peer relationship with qualified practitioners; lead multiple, complex and heterogeneous groups.

Course Structure

Candidates take six modules (three in each semester) and write a dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words under the supervision of a designated supervisor. The 90 credits for the MA will be made up of 60 credits awarded for taught modules and 30 credits for the dissertation. Candidates are required to take the core module PH636, at least one taught module in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics, and either EC690 (dissertation in Economics) or PH699 (dissertation in Philosophy) or SO690 (Thesis in Politics).

Career Options

Graduates in PPE most commonly chose a career in finance, politics, journalism, law, industry, teaching, social work, accountancy, business management, management consultancy, advertising and the many branches of the public services, including the civil and diplomatic services and local government.

How To Apply

Online application only http://www.pac.ie/maynoothuniversity

PAC Code

MHV64



The following documents should be forwarded to PAC, 1 Courthouse Square, Galway or uploaded to your online application form:

Certified copies of all official transcripts of results for all non-Maynooth University qualifications listed MUST accompany the application. Failure to do so will delay your application being processed. Non-Maynooth University students are asked to provide two academic references and a copy of birth certificate or valid passport.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

Read less
Decisions in society have important knowledge-related and ethical dimensions. They affect people's obligations, rights and liberties. Read more
Decisions in society have important knowledge-related and ethical dimensions. They affect people's obligations, rights and liberties. At the same time, they are often based on scientific findings. Studying reliable and responsible decision-making requires philosophical reflection from various perspectives: we have to reason about human rationality, morality, political institutions and the science/society interface.

The program adopts an interdisciplinary angle where cutting-edge philosophical research is inspired by findings from psychology, economics and cognitive science. Upon graduating, you will be an expert on ethical and epistemic aspects of social decision-making and you will be able to demonstrate how philosophical analysis contributes to solving societal challenges.

Moreover, the Tilburg University MA specialization in Philosophy, Science and Society offers you:
•Teaching by international and experienced faculty members. The lecturers in the Philosophy, Science and Society MA specialization have a strong international teaching record, including countries such as Belgium, Germany, Italy, the United States, and the United Kingdom. There are also guest lecturers from Australia, Canada and the US.
•At the forefront of international research. Your teachers are also internationally leading researchers. The Tilburg Center for Logic, General Ethics and Philosophy of Science (TiLPS), the philosophy department's research platform, regularly organizes international conferences, workshops and seminars that you are invited to attend free of charge.
•Research-Based Learning. Our MA program is in the forefront of current trends and reflects the commitment to include the most recent state-of-the-art approaches and developments in the field of philosophy. From the first day of your stay in Tilburg, you will be confronted with the latest philosophical research, and you will assist your teachers in developing and testing new research results.
•Innovative Methods. The program combines traditional philosophical methods (conceptual analysis, dialectical reasoning, case studies, thought experiments) with recently developed approaches, such as experimental philosophy, simulations and abstract modeling of philosophical problems.
•A Broad Range of Scholarships. There are several attractive scholarships to which you can apply, awarded at university, school or department level. They are open for European and non-European students alike.

Career Perspective Philosophy, Science and Society

Still think that a philosophy degree is not attractive to employers? That it is not your best career choice? Then have a look at these articles from major newspapers and magazines:
•The Atlantic: “Is Philosophy the Most Practical Major?”
•Huffington Post: “The Unexpected Way Philosophy Majors Are Changing The World Of Business”
•The Guardian: “What can you do with a degree of philosophy?”
•The Guardian: “I think, therefore I earn. The rise in stock of philosophy graduates”

True, a philosophy MA is not a Master of Business Administration. But it is a much better career choice than the cliché pretends. You acquire reasoning, analysis and argumentation skills that can be used in various fields and are highly valued by most employers. You are also trained in clear and persuasive writing, creative thinking and devising original solutions to hard problems. This gives you great flexibility in your job choice.

In addition, the Philosophy, Science and Society specialization makes you a genuine expert on human cognition, social decision-making and the interplay between science and society. This involves hot topics such as the ethics of science, risk assessment and the legitimacy of technocratic decision-making. This expertise is sought for in government agencies, research institutes and the private sector. Companies may be especially interested in your expertise in moral reasoning and the impact of moral factors on decision-making.
After graduating, you can also continue your career as an academic researcher who has already acquired an interdisciplinary background and who can apply for PhD positions in various fields.

Read less
This new master’s program combines high-level economics with application-oriented courses in business and finance. Economics is thereby taught based on the foundations of the Austrian School. Read more

Business and Austrian economics

This new master’s program combines high-level economics with application-oriented courses in business and finance. Economics is thereby taught based on the foundations of the Austrian School. Entrepreneurial Economics is the first English-taught master’s program in Europe that is solidly rooted in the Austrian tradition. However, besides the Austrian focus this program also committed to methodological pluralism, since all relevant schools of thought are included in the curriculum.

Austrian economics, by its very nature, is entrepreneurial economics. No other school of thought investigates markets under the paradigm of human action and constant change. Combining classes in business and Austrian economics is thus a natural step. Together, they build a first-class education portfolio that teaches theoretical understanding, entrepreneurial thinking and independent decision making. These skills, in combination with the general analytical competence that this program conveys, lay the foundation for many promising career paths.

The program

The core of this program is formed by a comprehensive education in Austrian Economics. This school of thought – rooted in the Vienna of the late 19th century – provides until today the most comprehensive approach to the social sciences. Humans are generally being regarded as individual entrepreneurs who influence their living conditions trough target-oriented actions.

This paradigm sharply contrasts with the model of the “homo oeconomicus”, which is central to mainstream economics. The homo oeconomicus allows for a mathematization of economics, but at the same time overemphasizes equilibrium thought, thus leaving no room for entrepreneurial actions. The Austrian School, in contrast, makes the „homo agens“ the centerpiece of analysis and thus assumes a process-oriented view. Instead of mathematical formalization the conceptual analysis of human action becomes the dominant scientific principle. Using this approach the Austrian School develops a holistic and philosophical understanding of economics.

The main goal of this program is to convey this economic understanding to students so as to shape entrepreneurial personalities who are able to think both theoretically and application-oriented. In assuming the Austrian perspective entrepreneurial spirit is stimulated immensely, since this perspective is directly linked to independent thinking and a liberal social philosophy. Beyond that, this study program comprises an application-oriented part that focuses on the relevant methods of business management and thus offers the best possible preparation for a professional career. The degree of practice orientation can be further increased if a student decides to do an internship instead of a research project or if he decides to write the master´s thesis in cooperation with a company. Also, special leadership trainings as well as extracurricular studies are offered so as to further support the development of entrepreneurial personalities.

Also from an academic point of view this program is highly ambitious. It intentionally refuses to adopt the methodological imperative that characterizes modern mainstream economics, but rather takes students to the research frontier in Austrian Economics. At the same time, however, the program does not limit itself to explaining the Austrian perspective, but also teaches competing ideas and approaches, such as, for example, the neoclassical or the Keynesian view. Thereby, the students gain a unique methodological expertise and learn to understand the originality of the respective approaches. With such knowledge they are well prepared to pursue a Ph.D., as science generally commences with an understanding of the controversies that govern the debate. In addition, having completed this program, the students also possess economic knowledge that is significantly superior to the formal training of mainstream economists.

Careers

The graduates of this program are highly qualified for various professions in the private sector. With their deep understanding of the economy the graduates of this program have a particular strategic competency and are therefore suitable for numerous tasks within consultancy firms, strategy departments, and medium-sized businesses, who all seek independent-minded people.

Such strategic competencies are especially important in the area of change management, a field that is nowadays often addressed using “Embedded Entrepreneurial Teams”. Economists with a profound knowledge of the financial and banking system are also sought after in the finance sector. The graduates of this program are well-prepared to start a career in any of these areas because they are able to critically discuss various opinions and provide strong and convincing arguments. In general, however, the graduates with a master´s degree in Entrepreneurial Economics and Management should consider themselves as entrepreneurs on their own behalves with personal business goals and ideas that they can put into practice.

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X