• University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
  • Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Surrey Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • Northumbria University Featured Masters Courses
  • Aberystwyth University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Bristol Featured Masters Courses
  • Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
University of Nottingham in China Featured Masters Courses
Birmingham City University Featured Masters Courses
University of Dundee Featured Masters Courses
Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
Plymouth Marjon University (St Mark & St John) Featured Masters Courses
"economic" AND "sociology…×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Economic Sociology)

We have 289 Masters Degrees (Economic Sociology)

  • "economic" AND "sociology" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 289
Order by 
This MPhil pathway is designed to give students a basic understanding of major themes and debates in political and economic sociology. Read more
This MPhil pathway is designed to give students a basic understanding of major themes and debates in political and economic sociology. There are four core substantive modules on political and economic sociology that students are expected to attend, taught by Dr. Manali Desai, Dr. Hazem Kandil, Prof. Lawrence King, and Dr. Jeff Miley.

Other substantive modules may also have an economic sociology component, and these would complement the core modules well. In addition, all students must attend the module on comparative historical research methods taught by Dr. Miley as well as one other methods module to be decided in consultation with their supervisor.

Students have the option of doing one of their coursework essays on a topic taught on any sociology MPhil module (for instance, media, culture, globalisation or reproduction); all of the rest of the coursework essays and the dissertation (based on original research) must relate to the political and economic sociology options.

Topics to be covered include: the Marxist critique of capitalism; Weber’s theory of legitimacy; the transition from feudalism to capitalism; the emergence of the modern state; theories of the capitalist state; class structure and class formation under capitalism; the rise of democracy and dictatorship; theories of revolution; the rise of the welfare state; social movement theory; theories of imperialism; theories of development and underdevelopment; gender and ethnicity in post-colonial states; nationalisms; war and militarism, and state violence and genocide.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hssomppes

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the programme students should have:

- an advanced understanding of current sociological research in selected topics;
- skills necessary to conduct independent social research and experience in their use;
- an ability to apply and develop modern social theory with respect to empirical topics;
- a deeper understanding of their chosen specialist area, including command of the literature and current research;
- the ability to situate their own research within current developments in the field.

Format

The course offers teaching on Social Theory, Substantive modules and Research Methods. Students work towards a written dissertation supported by supervisions and a dissertation workshop.

Students receive written feedback on each essay and the dissertation. Feedback is also given during the dissertation workshop on the direction and progress of the dissertation research.

Assessment

Students write a dissertation of not less than 15,000 and not more than 20,000 words on a subject approved by the Degree Committee.

Students write one methods essay of not less than 2,500 and not more than 3,000 words (or prescribed course work) and two substantive essays of not less than 4,000 and not more than 5,000 words.

Continuing

Students are encouraged to proceed to the Faculty's PhD programme, provided they reach a high level of achievement in all parts of the course. MPhil students who would like to continue to the PhD would normally need to have a final mark of at least 70% overall and 70% on the dissertation.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

The Department of Sociology holds ESRC funding awards. Sociology is a recognised Doctoral Training Centre pathway toward a PhD. Therefore candidates for the MPhil in Sociology (Political and Economic Sociology) can apply for 1+3 ESRC funding.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

Read less
The MPhil in Sociology of Media and Culture pathway provides students with the opportunity to study the nature and transformation of media and cultural forms at an advanced level. Read more
The MPhil in Sociology of Media and Culture pathway provides students with the opportunity to study the nature and transformation of media and cultural forms at an advanced level. The programme gives students a firm grounding in the theoretical and empirical analysis of media and culture and enables them to study particular media and cultural forms in depth, examining their transformations over time and their impact on other aspects of social and political life. The programme consists of 4 components:

1. Theories of Culture and Media: all students taking this programme will be expected to follow this course of lectures that will cover some of the major theoretical contributions to the study of media and culture, ranging from Adorno and Habermas to Bourdieu and Becker and from medium theory to Castells and more recent theoretical work on new media and the internet. Students are also strongly encouraged to follow the course of lectures on social theory.

2. Substantive modules: there will be at least three core substantive modules taught by Prof John Thompson, Prof Patrick Baert and Dr Ella McPherson. The modules will be research-led and will reflect the research being undertaken by members of the Department. The content of specific modules may vary from year to year but topics covered will typically include the nature of the digital revolution and its impact on the media and creative industries; the changing nature of news and journalism in the digital age; the role of new media in the development of social movements and new forms of political mobilization and protest; the uses of social media and the internet and their impact on everyday life and culture; the role of ideas, intellectuals and media forms in processes of social and political change. Students in this programme will be expected to take at least three of these modules; they may also take the fourth module in this programme, or they may substitute one of these modules with a module taken from another MPhil programme offered by the Department (Modern Society and Global Transformations, Political and Economic Sociology, Sociology of Reproduction).

3. Research Methods: all students will take a course on research methods which includes sessions on philosophical issues in the social sciences; research design; data collection and analysis in relation to quantitative and qualitative methods; reflection on research ethics and practice; library and computer skills.

4. Dissertation: all students will write a dissertation on a topic of their choice that allows for theoretically informed empirical analysis of some aspect of media or culture in contemporary societies. The choice of dissertation topic is made in consultation with your supervisor, who can advise you on the suitability and feasibility of your proposed research and on research design. A dissertation workshop provides the opportunity to present aspects of your dissertation work and to receive constructive feedback from course teachers and fellow students.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hssompsmc

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the programme students should have:

- an advanced understanding of current sociological research in selected topics;
- skills necessary to conduct independent social research and experience in their use;
- an ability to apply and develop modern social theory with respect to empirical topics;
- a deeper understanding of their chosen specialist area, including command of the literature and current research;
- the ability to situate their own research within current developments in the field.

Format

The course offers teaching on Social Theory, Substantive modules and Research Methods. Students work towards a written dissertation supported by supervisions and a dissertation workshop.

Students receive written feedback on each essay and the dissertation. Feedback is also given during the dissertation workshop on the direction and progress of the dissertation research.

Assessment

Students write a dissertation of not less than 15,000 and not more than 20,000 words on a subject approved by the Degree Committee.

Students write one methods essay of not less than 2,500 and not more than 3,000 words [or prescribed course work] and two substantive essays of not less than 4,000 and not more than 5,000 words.

Continuing

Students are encouraged to proceed to the Faculty's PhD programme, provided they reach a high level of achievement in all parts of the course. MPhil students who would like to continue to the PhD would normally need to have a final mark of at least 70% overall and 70% on the dissertation.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

The Department of Sociology holds ESRC funding awards. Sociology is a recognised Doctoral Training Centre pathway toward a PhD. Therefore candidates for the MPhil in Sociology (Media and Culture) can apply for 1+3 ESRC funding.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

Read less
The Sociology of Education MA will guide students through the latest theories, concepts and research in the sociology of education, exploring the wider political, social and cultural contexts of policy and practice in education. Read more

The Sociology of Education MA will guide students through the latest theories, concepts and research in the sociology of education, exploring the wider political, social and cultural contexts of policy and practice in education. It will encourage them to use sociological research to reflect on their current and future roles in education and provide them with a grounding for evaluating education practice.

About this degree

Students will develop critical theoretical, methodological and analytical skills in educational research in the sociology of education field and learn to apply them in their own professional context.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (60 credits), two optional modules (60 credits), and a dissertation (60 credits) orreport (30 credits) plus one further optional module (30 credits).

Core modules

  • Sociology of Education
  • Understanding Education Research

Optional modules

  • Sociology of 'Race' and Education
  • Gender, Sexuality and Education
  • Rights and Education
  • Theoretical Foundations of Educational Ideas
  • Understanding Education Policy
  • Minorities, Migrants and Refugees in National Education Systems

Students can also choose from a wide range of Master's-level optional modules across the IOE offering.

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 20,000 words or a report of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a mix of face-to-face Saturday and evening sessions and interactive online learning. Sometimes a conventional lecture-based approach is taken, with the aim of providing an overview of the field. Lectures are usually followed by open discussion or group work. At other times a seminar format is adopted involving, for example, group discussion of set reading, a video or an introductory presentation. 

Assessment is through coursework essay assignments, plus submission of a report or dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Sociology of Education MA

Funding

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

Graduates of this programme are currently working as lecturers and teachers, local authority officers, government department officers, members of education think tanks, or as research students (MPhil/PhD, EdD).

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Secondary and Sixth Form Teacher (Sociology and Politics), Unspecifed Academy, Essex
  • Intern, Institute for Democracy and Economic Affairs (IDEAS) and studying MA Sociology of Education, Institute of Education, University of London (IOE)
  • Policy and Research Assistant, Unspecified Policy and Research Organisation

Employability

Students develop a capacity to critically engage with and conduct educational research on issues relating to sociology and education.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Department of Education, Practice and Society at UCL Institute of Education (IOE) is home to an interdisciplinary grouping bringing together high-quality teaching and research in the history, sociology and philosophy of education, international development, post-compulsory and vocational education and higher education.

The Sociology of Education MA is a cutting-edge programme taught by world-leading sociologists within the department who have expertise in research methods, policy analysis, equality and human rights: issues of gender, 'race', sexuality, youth, disability and social class.

Students gain invaluable networking opportunities with leading scholars and a cohort of internationally diverse students across the IOE's MA cluster in sociology, social justice and policy studies in education.



Read less
Join one of the top sociology departments in the UK and further your understanding of the tensions, interactions and networks that dictate how societies are organised. Read more
Join one of the top sociology departments in the UK and further your understanding of the tensions, interactions and networks that dictate how societies are organised. You contribute to the thinking that guides organisations such as the Home Office, Amnesty International and the United Nations.

You explore some of the most important and significant debates in contemporary social theory, learning to think analytically about theoretical questions. You discover the importance of social theory in developing a politically engaged understanding of concepts such as post-structuralism, feminism and actor-network theory, focusing on topics such as:
-The history of digital piracy
-Sociology of human rights
-Media and criminology
-Gender and sexuality
-Citizenship

You also develop the skills needed to make your own contribution to the field, gaining a critical and coherent perspective on empirical research and examining the key assumptions and ideological underpinnings of qualitative and quantitative research.

Our Department of Sociology was rated top 10 in the UK for research quality (REF 2014), and we consistently receive strong student satisfaction scores, including 96% overall student satisfaction in 2015.

Our expert staff

We are a large and friendly department, offering a diverse range of research interests and with staff members who are committed to teaching, research and publication that covers a broad geographical spectrum.

Many have worked at the local level with local authorities, justice councils, community partnerships and charities. Others have worked at a national and international level with bodies like the United Nations, the European Commission’s Expert Group on Public Understanding of Science, Amnesty International, The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health, the Home Office and national non-governmental organisations.

Specialist facilities

-Dedicated postgraduate support facilities
-Our renowned off-campus Graduate Conference takes place every February
-A unique Student Resource Centre where you can get help with your studies, access examples of previous students’ work, and attend workshops on research skills
-The Sociology common room is open all day Monday-Friday, is stocked with daily newspapers, magazines and journals, and has free drinks available
-Links with the Institute of Social and Economic Research, which conducts large-scale survey projects and has its own library, and the UK Data Archive, which stores national research data like the British Crime Survey
-Our students’ Sociology Society, a forum for the exchange of ideas, arranging talks by visiting speakers, introducing you to various career pathways, and organising debates

Your future

A good sociology course, especially one from a recognised centre of excellence like Essex, opens many doors.

This course provides excellent preparation for further academic study, and many of our postgraduates go on to successful academic careers, both in the UK and overseas.

Others have established careers in non-governmental organisations, local authorities, specialist think tanks, government departments, charities, media production, and market intelligence.

We work with the university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Read less
Businesses require an understanding of people - both of individuals, and of a potentially large customer-base. As the occupation of management grows and changes, it demands a more specialised understanding of the modern organisation and the world it operates in. Read more
Businesses require an understanding of people - both of individuals, and of a potentially large customer-base. As the occupation of management grows and changes, it demands a more specialised understanding of the modern organisation and the world it operates in. Potential managers need an up-to-date and in-depth understanding of their occupation and its context.

Our innovative MA Sociology and Management brings together expertise from our top-rated Department of Sociology and Essex Business School, providing you with a unique opportunity to gain a critical appreciation of the social dynamics of work in the twenty-first century.

Combining theoretical perspectives from the disciplines of sociology and management, you explore the importance of debates surrounding power, culture, class, gender, sexuality and new forms of labour as a means of understanding the complexities of today's contemporary workplace.

You explore topics including:
-Management and organisational processes
-Theory and practice of social research
-Management across cultures
-Creativity management
-The work-life balance

Essex Business School takes you beyond the basics of a business education. Our strong emphasis on ethics and sustainable business practice in the global economy, and our expertise in international management, accounting and finance, will provide you with the knowledge and skills necessary for your future career in an increasingly complex business world.

Our Department of Sociology was rated top 10 in the UK for research quality (REF 2014), and we consistently receive strong student satisfaction scores, including 96% overall student satisfaction in 2015.

Our expert staff

We are a large and friendly department, offering a diverse range of research interests and with staff members who are committed to teaching, research and publication that covers a broad geographical spectrum.

Many have worked at the local level with local authorities, justice councils, community partnerships and charities. Others have worked at a national and international level with bodies like the United Nations, the European Commission’s Expert Group on Public Understanding of Science, Amnesty International, The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health, The Home Office and national non-governmental organisations.

Within Essex Business School, our staff specialise in areas including SMEs, business-to-business relationship marketing, branding, marketing management, new product development and social entrepreneurship.

While maintaining core engagement with contemporary marketing practice, our staff enrich our courses with novel marketing ideas drawn from both the contemporary business world and cutting-edge academic research.

Specialist facilities

-Dedicated postgraduate support facilities
-Our renowned off-campus Graduate Conference takes place every February
-A unique Student Resource Centre where you can get help with your studies, access examples of previous students’ work, and attend workshops on research skills
-The Sociology common room is open all day Monday-Friday, is stocked with daily newspapers, magazines and journals, and has free drinks available
-Links with the Institute of Social and Economic Research, which conducts large-scale survey projects and has its own library, and the UK Data Archive, which stores national research data like the British Crime Survey
-Our students’ Sociology Society, a forum for the exchange of ideas, arranging talks by visiting speakers, introducing you to various career pathways, and organising debates
-Our landmark new Essex Business School building on our Colchester Campus is the first zero carbon business school in the UK. Set around a lush winter garden, the Eden-style dome gives the building its own micro-climate.

Our new building provides you with a stunning new work environment, offering:
-A virtual trading floor with Bloomberg Terminals offering direct use of Bloomberg data, information and analytics
-A light and spacious lecture theatre, with seating for 250 students
-Study pods and innovation booths for group working
-Dedicated office space for student entrepreneurs
-Networking opportunities with visiting businesses
-A café with an adjacent sun terrace

Your future

This course provides excellent preparation for further academic study, and many of our postgraduates go on to successful academic careers, both in the UK and overseas.

Others have established careers in non-governmental organisations, local authorities, specialist think tanks, government departments, charities, media production, and market intelligence.

We work with the university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-Dynamics of Home and Work (optional)
-Sociological Research Design
-Dissertation
-Management and Organisational Behaviour
-Interviewing and Qualitative Data Analysis (optional)
-Managing for Ethics and Sustainability (optional)
-Digital Economy (optional)

Read less
This course combines the schools’ expertise in criminology and sociology and explores the sociological context of issues in criminology. Read more
This course combines the schools’ expertise in criminology and sociology and explores the sociological context of issues in criminology.

A broad range of criminology and sociology subjects are studied which develop knowledge and understanding of broad spectrum of topics within this field including; crime, organisations and administrations in the field of criminal justice, the social causes and consequences of crime, social change and social structures, culture and identity and related issues.

The broad yet specialised nature of this degree allows students to develop advanced and specialised knowledge and skills in criminological and sociological research.

On completion of the course, students will be able to:

Demonstrate advanced, specialised knowledge and skills across a range of criminology and sociology applications, including an understanding of community cohesion and social identities, of criminal behaviour, its causes and consequences, its prevention and the response by criminal justice agencies.
Conduct empirical research projects. Students will have developed specialist research skills and critical thinking across a range of criminological and sociological areas and an understanding of the complex contexts in which criminologists and sociologists work.
Demonstrate the ability to problem solve and reason scientifically, even in complex contexts using appropriate qualitative and quantitative skills, including identifying, formulating and solving social problems and problems related to crime. Students will have the ability to create, evaluate and assess a range of options, and apply ideas and knowledge to a range of situations.
Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of advanced level theories and empirical evidence concerning crime, its causes and consequences, including the definition of deviant behaviour, public opinion, the media and fear of crime, political reactions to crime, support for victims, offender management and related topics.
Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of advanced level sociological theories and sociological findings, related to topics like the functioning of public sector organisations, social stratification, political and social movements, social values, consensus and conflicts, culture, community and identity, the social function of law.
Careers
The course prepares for a wide range of employment including:

Law-enforcement agencies: the police, customs, the prison service
Public administration: including crime prevention units, offender management, general administration, international institutions
Political associations, work for members of parliaments, for lobby groups related to the criminal justice system and to issues of social justice broadly conceived
Research institutes, researching criminological and sociological issues
Academic institutions such as universities
Course Sturcture
A full MA is valued at 180 credits, a Diploma at 120 credits and Certificate at 60 credits.

The first 120 credits are achieved by following a programme of taught courses. The final 60 credits will be achieved through dissertation, after successful completion of the taught part of the course.

The course employs a wide range of teaching and learning strategies, both formal and informal. These include: lectures, individual study – some of it involving assigned readings - interactive discussion of case studies in class, small group work and essay writing. The MA Criminology and Sociology very much employs the concept of “active learning” by students.

The programme is offered on a full-time and part-time basis.

Full Time Study:

In full-time mode, the course normally lasts for a period of twelve months. Taught courses are undertaken September – May, and the dissertation completed from May to September.

Part Time Study:

In part-time mode, the course normally lasts for a period of two and a half years. Taught courses are undertaken from September to May over a period of two years, and on successful completion of the 120 credits of taught courses, the dissertation may be undertaken. Lectures are concentrated on one day per week for part-time students.

Taught Modules
Compulsory Modules:

The Research Process: This module introduces the main varieties of both quantitative and qualitative research in the social sciences and addresses the principles of research design and issues of data collection.

Key Issues in Crime and Justice: This module focuses on four main themes: comparative criminology, comparative criminal justice, comparative victimology, and criminological perspectives.

International Case Studies in Criminology: This module provides an internationally comparative perspective on key areas of criminological concern. These include questions of crime and deviance, criminological theory and the operation of systems of criminal justice.

Sociology Modules (choose 2):

Researching Community: This module examines the developments in the field of community research and related theoretical and policy debates surrounding the application of ideas of ‘community’ to current economic and social changes.

Case Study: Case Study introduces students to sociological analysis by selecting a topic of joint interest to students and lecturer.

Social Theories of Culture: Social Theories of Culture introduces students to the sociological study of culture by introducing and assessing theories.

MA students take part in the fortnightly lecture series of the School of Social Sciences. Visiting speakers and Bangor staff present topics related to social policy, criminology and sociology.

Dissertation
The dissertation is undertaken on completion of the taught modules. It is valued at 60 credits (one-third of the MA degree) and will be around 20,000 words in length.

Under guidance of a dissertation tutor, students will in their MA dissertation work independently on a topic of their choice. This may be a piece of empirical research including primary or secondary data analysis or a theoretical dissertation. Part-time students in employment may choose a topic related to their profession and an area in which they wish to develop further expertise and specialisation.

Read less
Thank you for your interest in the master's programmes of the WiSo-Faculty. On this webpages you will find all required information on the Master . Read more

Thank you for your interest in the master's programmes of the WiSo-Faculty.

On this webpages you will find all required information on the Master Sociology and Social Research - you will get a sneak peak into the programme structure as well as all facts about the admission criteria and the selection procedure.

In a nutshell

  • Standard period of study: 4 semesters, full-time
  • Start: Fall term
  • Degree title: Master of Science (M.Sc.)
  • Language: English
  • Fees: Only social fee
  • Application Deadline: June 15th 2018

Some examples of the questions Sociology and Social Research students look at

  • How does human decision-making produce societal consequences?
  • What are the links between ethnic diversity, trust, and conflicts?
  • What are the determinants of successful aging in modern societies?
  • How do families cope with the competing demands of modern everyday life?
  • How can we explain trends in social inequality with respect to educational attainment, income, and wealth?
  • How can we explain crime and delinquency and what are the (dis-)advantages of different prevention and intervention policies?
  • Which methods and assumptions allow me to make causal inferences based on non-experimental data?
  • When and how do I apply special methods of data analysis, such as social network analysis, meta-analysis, or factorial surveys?

"The Cologne Master in Sociology and Social Research focuses on advanced methods of data collection and analysis, thus providing an increasingly sought-after key qualification. This is done in a practical and research-oriented manner in relation to current topics such as ageing, the labour market, education, family, health, integration, crime and the economy." Clemens Kroneberg, Professor at the Institute of Sociology and Social Psychology

Only the best for your career

The M.Sc. Sociology and Social Research at the WiSo-faculty of the University of Cologne deepens the knowledge gained in your bachelor studies and makes you an expert in your respective area. For many managing positions of different industries and for certain professions in research and teaching, a master is indispensable.

Possible areas of employment for sociologists can be found within market and opinion research, national and international statistic agencies, in national and international associations that are concerned with social and economic policy, research institutions, the departments of media research within mass media corporations and personnel administration of corporations. Additionally, other areas of employment present in positions of local government e.g. in departments responsible for school-, family-, city- or environmental policy as well as provincial and federal agencies. Graduates possess skills that qualify for the upper grade of civil service and leading positions in social and market research as well as social planning.

Take your professional future into your own hands and benefit from the theoretical and methodical-oriented approach of the WiSo-Faculty, which combines research as well as teaching with practical experience.

Double degree option

In addition to our regular master’s programme, students have the option to study the Double Master’s Programme in Demography and Social Inequality in cooperation with the University of Groningen. Students of the international study programme spend one year at the WiSo Faculty and one year at the University of Groningen. After successful completion of the programme, they are awarded two degrees.

International partner universities

There is the possibility to apply for a semester abroad at one of the selected partner universities with a partnership agreement for the Master Sociology and Social Research. For further information please refer to the website of the International Relations Center (ZiB WiSo).



Read less
Our Sociology and Social Research MA provides specialist research training. The course provides high-quality research training to enhance key skills and employability. Read more
Our Sociology and Social Research MA provides specialist research training. The course provides high-quality research training to enhance key skills and employability. The Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) recognise it as offering the requisite skills training for preparation for a PhD.

Sociology at Newcastle has a solid track record of excellence in research-grounded postgraduate studies.

Throughout the course you will gain:
-An appreciation of the theoretical traditions that influence and shape sociology as a discipline
-An awareness of the philosophical principles and epistemological frameworks that underpin all social enquiry
-An understanding of social divisions as structures of power and inequality
-An understanding of the profound transformations in contemporary society and the implications of this for understanding collective and individual agency
-A strong practical grounding in a range of research methods and awareness of the epistemological consequences of methodological issues and choices

Many of our graduates go on to study funded PhDs, others have pursued careers in:
-The corporate and financial sectors
-International and national non-governmental organisations
-Regulatory bodies such as environmental agencies

Delivery

Modules typically include a diverse range of approaches, including lectures, seminars, workshops, exercises and student presentations. Assessment is by continuous assessment only. The programme involves a dissertation on a sociological topic. You will work on this with a dedicated member of staff who will be your dissertation supervisor during your MA.

This programme is taught and based on the Newcastle campus. Teaching sessions happen at different times of the day to benefit the needs of both full and part time students. Contact and independent study times will vary depending on the modules chosen. You are typically expected to attend an average of three to four modules per week and pursue weekly independent study.

We aim for small groups of students which will enable constructive discussion and analysis. Some modules are seminar-based whilst others offer a combination of lectures and seminars. You are normally assessed through coursework and exam although modules may vary.

You are also welcome to attend the Sociology Seminar Series. At these events national and international speakers present their work to members of the subject area.

Facilities

The School provides a dedicated postgraduate computer room, postgraduate common room and postgraduate study rooms.

Read less
Research profile. This programme is aimed at students who have a specific topic of interest into which they wish to conduct their own research. Read more

Research profile

This programme is aimed at students who have a specific topic of interest into which they wish to conduct their own research. It provides structured research training while at the same time enabling you to pursue a research project that you design yourself, in consultation with supervisors. It serves as both a self-contained research programme and as preparation for further study for a PhD.

Economic and social history addresses the historical processes underlying the evolution of modern society by employing a range of insights and approaches from the social sciences, including economics, sociology and social anthropology. The programme focuses on civil society, material culture, youth, gender, crime, cinema, economic growth and energy policy in a variety of historical contexts.

Edinburgh has a large and distinguished group of academics in this research area. Their specialist fields provide you with an outstanding range of options, both in terms of historical period and areas of the world.

Facilities

Our building offers you exceptional, modern facilities, resources and study spaces, in a stunning location.

Our postgraduate students have access to:

  • A dedicated study and computing lab with printing, copying and scanning facilities, overlooking the Meadows, one of the city’s best-loved green spaces.
  • Two research rooms, shared with undergraduates, housing some of our impressive book collections and a small selection of computing facilities.
  • A large common room overlooking the Meadows, shared by students and staff.
  • Our PhD study room. Subject to available desk space, you may apply after semester one of your first year.
  • A number of small-scale teaching rooms, well-equipped with facilities such as data projection and smart boards.
  • Exhibition areas, filled with artefacts and artwork from our collections.

All of our facilities are in addition to the multiple libraries and computer labs provided across the University’s estate. Many of our rooms overlook the Meadows.

Our location, right in the heart of Edinburgh, means you will be based close to the city’s cultural attractions and facilities, including a wealth of libraries, archives, museums and galleries, which provide uniquely rich support for the disciplines we teach.

Programme structure

The programme combines lectures, seminars, tutorials, and computer-lab sessions. It also includes Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) recognised research courses in research design and methodology skills.

The skills and theory imparted in the research-training courses, along with many of the assignments, are designed to feed directly into your final dissertation work.

You will be examined through coursework and will work towards an independently researched dissertation.

You will take the following three core courses:

  • Economic and Social Theory for Historical Analysis
  • Supervised Reading Course (E&SH)
  • Core quantitative Data Analysis 1 and 2

In addition you will choose a pair of skills courses (ERSC funded students must take the first pair).

EITHER

  • Research Skills in the Social Sciences: Data Collection
  • Research Design

OR

  • Historical Research: Skills and Sources
  • Historical Methodology

You will then take one further option course of your choice. Option courses change from year to year and those available when you start your studies may be different from those shown.

  • Macroeconomics 1 OR Microeconomics 1
  • Economic and Social History Courses
  • Online History Courses

Career opportunities

This programme is specifically designed for students who anticipate progressing to a doctoral programme, but it can also function as excellent preparation for a wide variety of careers.



Read less
Societies such as Ireland are adjusting very rapidly to change in the external and internal environments. The aim of this MA is to interrogate the social, political, economic and cultural dimensions of the internet in contemporary societies. Read more

Overview

Societies such as Ireland are adjusting very rapidly to change in the external and internal environments.

The aim of this MA is to interrogate the social, political, economic and cultural dimensions of the internet in contemporary societies. From work to leisure, from education to politics, the internet provides a platform for new forms of interaction, engagement and socialisation. This exciting new MA will build upon the theoretical and methodological strengths of the Department of Sociology, with additional options offered by the Departments of Law and Media in Maynooth.

Course Structure

The taught programme is built around three components: a core theoretical module, substantive courses, and methods courses. Modules include the political economy and cultures of the internet, information technology and privacy law and advanced digital research methods. Beyond this, the researching and writing of a thesis constitutes 30 credits. Each module comprises on average 12 two hour seminars.

Career Options

The aim of the MA in Sociology (Internet and Society) programme is to prepare students for both academic and non-academic positions which support social behaviour online, including on social media and in large transnational online communities. Graduates of this course will be able to interface with programmers and designers and with those working on the deep statistical analysis of user data. There is a demand for digitally literate graduates who understand the social, cultural, political, legal and business aspects of transnational online users and communities. Graduates will be able to develop, execute and report on internet based research projects for a range of public and private sector employers. They may also wish to use their new skills to progress to PhD studies.

How to Apply

Online application only http://www.pac.ie/maynoothuniversity

PAC Code
MHY56 MA Sociology (Internet and Society)

The following information should be forwarded to PAC, 1 Courthouse Square, Galway or uploaded to your online application form:
Certified copies of all official transcripts of results for all non-Maynooth University qualifications listed MUST accompany the application. Failure to do so will delay your application being processed. Non-Maynooth University students are asked to provide a copy of their birth certificate or valid passport, two academic references and official transcripts. A personal statement is required. This should include any information that you consider relevant to your interest and ability in the MA in Sociology.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

Read less
About the MSc programmes. The MSc Sociology provides rigorous and in-depth training in sociological theory, methodology, and key areas of sociological research. Read more

About the MSc programmes

The MSc Sociology provides rigorous and in-depth training in sociological theory, methodology, and key areas of sociological research.

These areas reflect the Department’s commitment to understanding and analysing global challenges. For instance, we make important contributions to the analysis of escalating inequalities and injustices across the globe, and we draw on this research in our graduate teaching. We also have strong research clusters in political sociology, the sociology of economic life, and urban sociology – in all these areas, several optional courses will be available for you to take. Additionally, we offer options on culture and society; families in contemporary societies; gender and society; and science and technology studies. 

As a student on this programme, you will be part of a vibrant, international academic community. You will benefit from the Department’s collaboration with different LSE Centres (such as the International Inequalities Institute, Cities, Human Rights and the Gender Institute) and a vibrant public events programme led by LSE academics and leading external sociologists..

Graduate destinations

Students go into a wide variety of professions, such as teaching, research, politics, public administration, the social and health services, advertising, journalism, other areas of the media, law, publishing, industry, accounting, marketing, personnel and management.

Further information on graduate destinations for this programme 



Read less
Master's specialisation in Economics, Behaviour and Policy. Bridging the gap between theory and practice – and applying them to the design of sound, feasible policies – can provide the key to solving micro, meso and macroeconomic issues. Read more

Master's specialisation in Economics, Behaviour and Policy

Bridging the gap between theory and practice – and applying them to the design of sound, feasible policies – can provide the key to solving micro, meso and macroeconomic issues.

How do policy makers make decisions that affect economic, societal and personal welfare? How is welfare defined and measured? And how can we design more effective policies? This specialisation covers not only econometric questions, but also psychological, cultural, legal and philosophical ones. By improving your insight into complex issues, it will prepare you for designing successful strategies in your future career as a policy maker or consultant .

Our graduates are experts in economic policies who work for government and semi-government organisations, and also as consultants in business and industry. You can do the same. By examining real-world scenarios, you’ll acquire the analytical skills you need to take research results and apply them to a wide variety of problems.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ep

Why study Economics, Behaviour and Policy at Radboud University?

- You’ll tackle economic and policy issues at all levels – focusing mostly on the real economy.

- You’ll combine learning with research: your lecturers are researchers who incorporate the latest findings into their teaching. As a student, you’ll also do research.

- You’ll interact with your professors in small seminar groups.

- By taking our ‘Economics Plus’ package, you’ll combine ‘standard’ economics with disciplines such as psychology and sociology. This will give you the knowledge you need to tackle policy issues in today’s globalised world.

Change perspective

You’ll gain a strong theoretical background in both mainstream and heterodox (i.e. non-mainstream) economic theories, augmented by methods derived from disciplines that include psychology and sociology. There’s good reason for this broad approach: if an economic problem seems intractable, you may need to change your perspective. We also examine the policy relevance of theoretical insights and give you the tools you need to design policies that will make a difference to people’s lives.

Admission requirements for international students

1. A Bachelor's degree in Economics – or a closely-related discipline – from a research-oriented university, with sufficient background in Research Methods and Mathematics (and Economics if you took a different degree).

2. Proficiency in English

In order to take part in this programme, you must be fluent in both written and spoken English. Non-native speakers of English need one of qualifications below. Please note that certificates must have been awarded in the past two years, and that no other certificates are accepted:

- A TOEFL (iBT) Certificate with a minimum overall score of 90 and no subscore not less than 18, or

- IELTS Academic Certificate: a minimum overall score of 6.5 less than 6.0, or

- A Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE) with a minimum score of C, or

- A Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE) with a minimum score of C.

3. A letter of motivation (max. 2 pages)

Please explain why you want to follow this programme and why you think you should be part of this programme.

Career prospects

This programme will provide you with a toolbox filled with the skills and knowledge needed to tackle a whole array of economic problems. Besides issues at the micro and macroeconomic level, graduates learn to deal with issues at the meso level, for example, how to stimulate innovation.

Our graduates devise policies and learn to analyse critically which solutions are most likely to work in a specific economic and social context. They regularly find employment as policy makers for government and semi-government organisations, in ministries, national banks, NGOs, think tanks, the UN and the EU , as well as national and international labour organisations. But your career prospects are much broader than that. You could for example, work as a consultant in industry or as a lobbyist.

Our approach to this field

By giving you a strong theoretical grounding in a broad range of current economic theories – both mainstream and heterodox –this programme will show you not just what is happening, but also why and how. To ensure that it is always relevant, we update the content every year.

Our main aim is to unravel the diversity – and the complexity – of economic issues, and thus clarify the role of economics in society. At the micro level, we might look at, for example, policies for reducing traffic jams or encouraging citizens to opt for more sustainable ways of living. At the meso level, we might examine policies intended to determine which companies should be supported – those that are struggling or those that are successful? – and how companies can be encouraged to innovate. And at the macro level, we might try to determine whether government policies should respond to financial crises through austerity or through investment.

Lectures are devoted to detailed discussions of a wide range of real-world scenarios. As an active participant, you’ll join in debates with your lecturers and your fellow students, and sometimes with experts from the field. One module – Technology & Innovation Policy – is taught by an emeritus professor and two business leaders. Guest speakers are drawn from varied backgrounds, such as a recent speaker from the Dutch Ministry of Finance, who discussed financial illiteracy. Activities such as these all exemplify the kinds of concerns – economic and otherwise – you’ll be likely to encounter as a policy maker.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ep

Radboud University Master's Open Day 10 March 2018



Read less
About the MSc Programme. This programme offers a flexible yet comprehensive introduction to the sociologies of risk and economic life, thereby providing a strong theoretical and methodological foundation for engaging in current discussions on the future of our societies. Read more

About the MSc Programme

This programme offers a flexible yet comprehensive introduction to the sociologies of risk and economic life, thereby providing a strong theoretical and methodological foundation for engaging in current discussions on the future of our societies.

It is an advanced sociology degree which focuses on risk and economic life. Understanding the challenges and possibilities confronted by contemporary societies – from technological disasters and natural catastrophes to novel forms of economic organisation and public participation – requires grasping the role and dynamics of economies and regulatory institutions in today’s world. 

The programme is unique in its breadth and diversity. It covers the most significant and recent developments in the sociologies of risk and economic life, and will enable you to develop critical skills that advance your knowledge of the socio-economic dynamics of contemporary societies. A compulsory course in Regulation, Risk and Economic Life will introduce you to key discussions on the nature of power, knowledge, organisations and markets. Through optional courses, you can further specialise in the sociology of risk and regulation, the sociology of markets, employment relations, and the sociology of science and technology.

Graduate destinations

This programme provides an excellent foundation for graduates seeking careers in academia, government and the civil service, research-oriented industries, and the non-governmental sector.

Further information on graduate destinations for this programme



Read less
This degree is intended for students with a general interest in sociology who wish to update, extend and deepen their knowledge and understand current developments in the field. Read more
This degree is intended for students with a general interest in sociology who wish to update, extend and deepen their knowledge and understand current developments in the field. The programme aims to provide students with opportunities to expand their knowledge of the discipline by engaging with contemporary research and by undertaking historical and comparative study.

Compulsory modules:

The Research Process: This module introduces the main varieties of both quantitative and qualitative research in the social sciences. Principles of research design and issues of data collection and analysis are studied.

Applied Social Research: This module delivers specialist training in sociological research. It draws upon generic social science research skills and knowledge and applies them to a joint group project. In the group project, students will select the topic in which they will develop their skills as empirical researchers. It is a ‘hands on’ module and students will engage in hypothesis development, research design, data gathering, data analysis and interpretation of the results.

Optional modules:

Researching Community: This module examines the developments in the field of community research and related theoretical and policy debates surrounding the application of ideas of ‘community’ to current economic and social changes. The module focuses on four main themes:

Conceptual issues: the meaning of ‘community’ and its use as a concept in social scientific and popular discourse. This will be considered in relation to different theoretical approaches such as social constructionism, realism, and post-structuralism.
Empirical applications: an examination of classic and contemporary examples of community research and relevant case studies dealing with different forms of ‘community’.
Policy issues: relating to contemporary forms of intervention in relation to community development, regeneration, mobilisation, participation, leadership and power. This will be considered in the context of frameworks such as communitarianism, social capital, and the ‘third way’.
Community methodology: examines how ‘community’ has been researched and the tools and methods available for empirical investigation. These include ethnographic studies, large-scale surveys, ‘community profiling’ and auditing, and action research.
Nationalism and Minorities: This module will examine key issues and debates concerning the growing claims by ethnic and national minorities and indigenous peoples for distinct language, territorial and other minority rights and recognition within nation-states and beyond. The relationships between nationalism, citizenship and minority rights will be considered with reference to empirical examples. Debates and policies concerned with the management of cultural and ethnic diversity by the state will also be considered. The approach is interdisciplinary drawing on sociology, political theory, anthropology, law and education, with case study examples provided from Europe, North America, Asia and Oceania. It aims to provide students with a global and comparative understanding of individual cases, of their historical antecedents, and of the key similarities and differences between them.

Sociology of Everyday Life: The module deals with different theories of everyday life, for example those focusing on face-to face communication. Other theories emphasize how social life is “performed” in everyday contexts and its “dramaturgy”. It is discussed how individuals construct meaning out of their social lives. Some approaches reflect on the constraints of society, especially of powerful institutions, and how they affect the “lifeworld”. Empirical studies of everyday life will also be part of the module. From airports to zoos, human behaviour in different settings has been described and placed in theoretical context. The creation of social stigmas, or of social spaces can be studied. Students will be introduced to the use of different methodologies, like observation and listening to individuals telling their story.

Culture, Race and Civilization: The module explores normative and descriptive concepts of culture, the dichotomy of culture and civilization, and the dialectical tension between all of these. Culture appears in a number of different contexts: for example as promise of Enlightenment, or as social reality of the everyday. The relation between “multiculturalism” and ideas of “nation” and “race” will be part of the discussion. What is the role of the idea of “civilization” for racism and racialization? Another aspect to be covered is the relation between wealth and culture. “Cultural critique” and globalization theories provide different answers. Finally, the role of violence in relation to culture, race and civilization will be discussed.

MA Dissertation

The dissertation is undertaken on completion of the taught modules. It is valued at 60 credits (one-third of the MA degree) and will be around 20,000 words in length.

Part-time students in employment may choose a topic related to their profession and an area in which they wish to develop further expertise and specialisation. Under guidance of a dissertation tutor, students will undertake their MA dissertation work independently on a topic of their choice. This may be a piece of empirical research including primary or secondary data analysis or a theoretical dissertation.

Read less
Should those who are relatively poor regard international economic law as a means, end, obstacle or irrelevance to improving their lives?. Read more
Should those who are relatively poor regard international economic law as a means, end, obstacle or irrelevance to improving their lives?

From Shock Therapy 1992, to Seattle 1999, to Shock and Awe 2003, to Live8 2005, to Financial Crisis 2007, to G20 2009, to Haiti 2010, the impact of international economic law and institutions upon justice and development justifiably commands increasing attention from all quarters: local politicians and international celebrities, savvy pharmaceutical companies and bewildered farmers, moral philosophers and foreign investors.

This is the only postgraduate programme in the UK to address the law, institutions and practice which constitute global and local economies from an avowedly critical perspective, part- and full-time, in face-to-face evening sessions. It is particularly well suited to (current and aspiring) lawyers and non-lawyers within non-governmental organisations, government departments and in-house corporate social responsibility departments, who wish to critically reflect on their role as practitioners.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

A unique programme, training you in the critical examination of the law, institutions and practice that constitute global and local economies.
Taught by established experts on theory and practice in the field.
Introduces you to a broad geographical and institutional spectrum, from Latin America to Africa, from the European Union to the World Bank, and onwards to the World Social Forum.
The School of Law is an internationally recognised centre for critical and interdisciplinary legal research. It provides an exciting and innovative environment for a wide range of research with a strong theoretical and policy focus. The School is the home of Birkbeck Law Press and publishes Law and Critique: The International Journal of Critical Legal Thought.
We use technology, such as electronic learning environments, to enhance teaching and learning. Birkbeck Library has an extensive collection of books, journals and electronic resources in law and related disciplines such as economics, politics and sociology. You can also take advantage of the rich research collections nearby, including those of the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, Senate House Library, the British Library of Political and Economic Science (LSE Library) and the British Library.

Our research

Birkbeck is one of the world’s leading research-intensive institutions. Our cutting-edge scholarship informs public policy, achieves scientific advances, supports the economy, promotes culture and the arts, and makes a positive difference to society.

Birkbeck’s research excellence was confirmed in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, which placed Birkbeck 30th in the UK for research, with 73% of our research rated world-leading or internationally excellent.

We are among the top 10 law schools in the UK and in the top 3 in London in the Times Higher Education 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) rankings, while our research environment was judged conducive to producing research of the highest quality.

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X