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This contemporary Masters from Liverpool John Moores University is aimed at graduates and graduate practitioners keen to examine international approaches to early childhood education (ECE). Read more
This contemporary Masters from Liverpool John Moores University is aimed at graduates and graduate practitioners keen to examine international approaches to early childhood education (ECE).

•Unique in the UK, this contemporary Masters degree invites graduates and graduate-level practitioners to explore international approaches to early childhood education (ECE)

•Compare Montessori’s ideas with other approaches

•Learn from highly respected, research-active staff and early childhood professionals

•Critically engage with the theoretical and practical issues of ECE

•Enhance your learning with a European placement (also open to international students)

•This course will only run subject to minimum numbers

The programme comprises philosophy modules, research modules and international policy modules.

The philosophy modules emphasise a critical view of educational knowledge, the research modules consider the methodological implications of research skills and the international policy modules focus on the practical application of global childhood education. All of these themes then converge in the Dissertation module.

The course is taught by research-active staff with practical experience and close links to education providers in Sweden (Gothenburg) and Italy (Reggio Emilia). You can enhance your academic learning with a two month Erasmus work placement, gaining a valuable insight into the impact of different European cultures on their approaches to education.


The course can be studied full or part time. There are timetabled study sessions one day a week, with the emphasis on independent, self-guided study. The two month placement is, however, full time.

On joining the course you will be allocated a personal tutor who, alongside programme and module leaders and administrators, will be on hand to offer guidance throughout the course.

You will also have access to:

•24 hour learning support via Blackboard

•an MRes introductory weekend

•various programme, student and module guides

•LJMU counselling services

Please see guidance below on core and option modules for further information on what you will study.
Research Methods
You will identify and critically evaluate different research methodologies and methods pertinent to research with young children.

Philosophies of Early Childhood Education
This module explores personal views around the purpose of education and progresses to critically reflect on different philosophies of Education in relation to early childhood education, such as Maria Montessori and Reggio Emilia. In doing so you will develop and identify a personal philosophy of education.

The Critically Reflective Practitioner
This module involves critically reflecting on personal values, beliefs and assumptions in relation to early childhood practice. You will demonstrate the implications of relevant theory and research on your own practice having engaged in a critically reflective process.

ECE Curricula in an International Context
This module will enable you to develop a critically reflexive lens in exploring ideologies within a framework of curriculum theory in an international context.


Democracy and Participation in ECE
This module will develop your critical understanding of the rationale, issues and debates related to enhancing the democratic participation of diverse groups of young children in a range of education and care contexts in order to plan for future research and practice.

Global Issues, Childhoods and Education
This module critically examines contemporary global issues affecting children and their families drawing on key debates in education and care. In doing so, you will use your comprehensive knowledge base to focus on a global case study pertinent to early childhood education and care and critically analyse it.

Dissertation
This module will provide you with the opportunity to integrate the skills, facts, theory and practice that have been developed as part of engaging with the previous modules. You will design and carry out an empirically based research project.

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The graduate programs in Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) attract students from all over the globe; approximately 26 countries have been represented by our graduate students over the past decade. Read more
The graduate programs in Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) attract students from all over the globe; approximately 26 countries have been represented by our graduate students over the past decade. The department endeavors to create a warm, friendly, and collaborative atmosphere in which graduate students are encouraged to develop their full potential.

Graduate class sizes are typically small, allowing for substantial interaction between students and professors. In addition to various research opportunities, there are numerous teaching assistant (TA) positions available during the Fall and Winter terms; graduate students may also participate in the engineering co-op program once eligibility requirements are met.

ECE has developed research strengths in the areas listed below. Of special note is the world-class research conducted by the Sustainable Power Research Group and Emera & NB Power Research Centre for Smart Grid Techologies and the Optical Fiber Systems Research Laboratory (housed within ECE), as well as the research conducted by the Institute of Biomedical Engineering (closely affiliated with ECE) and COBRA (Collaboration Based Robotics and Automation). Emera & NB Power Research Centre for Smart Grid Technologies Our recent graduates have moved on to successful and rewarding careers at other universities, research institutions, power utilities, IT companies and numerous others ranging from local start-ups to large multi-national corporations.

Research Areas

-Biomedical Engineering
-Communications
-Controls and Instrumentation
-Electromagnetic Systems
-Electronics and Digital / Embedded Systems
-Signal Processing
-Software Systems
-Sustainable Energy

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UA’s Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering offers dynamic programs for students interested in a traditional electrical engineering degree or those who desire a specialization in computer engineering. Read more
UA’s Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering offers dynamic programs for students interested in a traditional electrical engineering degree or those who desire a specialization in computer engineering.

MISSION

UA’s Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering will

- provide high-quality and broad-based undergraduate and graduate education in electrical and computer engineering
- conduct high-quality research programs that will advance the state of knowledge
- contribute to the engineering profession and to society through service activities

Visit the website http://ece.eng.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

Master of Science–Thesis Option (PLAN I):

30 Credit Hours
A minimum of 24 credit hours of coursework is required. Constraints on these 24 hours shall include:
- A minimum of 12 hours of closely related Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) designated courses in the student’s area of concentration, as defined by the advisory committee.

- A minimum of 9 hours of courses in an elective area approved by the advisory committee.

- A minimum of 3 hours of Mathematics (MATH or GES) or Science (Physics, Chemistry, or Biology) courses at the 500 level or above.

- No more than 6 hours may be from courses at the 400 level. In order to receive degree credit, 400-level courses require written application and approval by the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/) prior to the semester in which any 400-level course is to be takentaken.

A minimum of 6 hours of thesis research (ECE 599) is required.

A student’s curriculum and thesis must be approved by the student’s graduate advisory committee. The student must pass a final comprehensive examination, which is typically a presentation and defense of the thesis. In addition, the student must satisfy all University requirements defined in the current edition of The University of Alabama Graduate Catalog (http://graduate.ua.edu/catalog/index.html).

[[Master of Science–Non-Thesis Option (PLAN II):]
30 Credit Hours
A minimum of 30 credit hours of coursework is required. Constraints on these 30 hours shall include:
- A minimum of 15 hours of closely related Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) designated courses in the student’s area of concentration, as defined by the advisory committee.

- A minimum of 12 hours of courses in an elective area approved by the advisory committee.

- A minimum of 3 hours of Mathematics (MATH or GES) or Science (Physics, Chemistry, or Biology) courses at the 500 level or above.

- No more than six (6) hours may be courses at the 400 level. In order to receive degree credit, 400-level courses require written application and approval by the Graduate School prior to the semester in which any 400-level course is to be taken taken.

A student’s curriculum must be approved by the student’s graduate advisory committee. The graduate advisory committee must also approve the submission of a manuscript, authored or co-authored by the candidate, to a refereed journal or conference proceeding. This publication submission shall constitute The University of Alabama Graduate School culminating experience requirement for an MS Plan II degree in electrical and computer engineering.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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The Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering offers a master of science in metallurgical engineering. Visit the website http://mte.eng.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/. Read more
The Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering offers a master of science in metallurgical engineering.

Visit the website http://mte.eng.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

The program options include coursework only or by a combination of coursework and approved thesis work. Most on-campus students supported on assistantships are expected to complete an approved thesis on a research topic.

Plan I is the standard master’s degree plan. However, in exceptional cases, a student who has the approval of his or her supervisory committee may follow Plan II. A student who believes there are valid reasons for using Plan II must submit a written request detailing these reasons to the department head no later than midterm of the first semester in residence.

All graduate students, during the first part and the last part of their programs, will be required to satisfactorily complete MTE 595/MTE 596. This hour of required credit is in addition to the other degree requirements.

Course Descriptions

MTE 519 Principles of Casting and Solidification Processing. Three hours.
Overview of the principles of solidification processing, the evolution of solidification microstructure, segregation, and defects, and the use of analytical and computational tools for the design, understanding, and use of solidification processes.

MTE 520 Simulation of Casting Processes Three hours.
This course will cover the rationale and approach of numerical simulation techniques, casting simulation and casting process design, and specifically the prediction of solidification, mold filling, microstructure, shrinkage, microporosity, distortion and hot tearing. Students will learn casting simulation through lectures and hands-on laboratory/tutorial sessions.

MTE 539 Metallurgy of Welding. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 380 or permission of the instructor.
Thermal, chemical, and mechanical aspects of welding using the fusion welding process. The metallurgical aspects of welding, including microstructure and properties of the weld, are also covered. Various topics on recent trends in welding research.

MTE 542 Magnetic Recording Media. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 271.
Basic ferromagnetism, preparation and properties of magnetic recording materials, magnetic particles, thin magnetic films, soft and hard film media, multilayered magnetoresistive media, and magneto-optical disk media.

MTE 546 Macroscopic Transport in Materials Processing. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 353 or permission of the instructor.
Elements of laminar and turbulent flow; heat transfer by conduction, convection, and radiation; and mass transfer in laminar and in turbulent flow; mathematical modeling of transport phenomena in metallurgical systems including melting and refining processes, solidification processes, packed bed systems, and fluidized bed systems.

MTE 547 Intro to Comp Mat. Science Three hours.
This course introduces computational techniques for simulating materials. It covers principles of quantum and statistical mechanics, modeling strategies and formulation of various aspects of materials structure, and solution techniques with particular reference to Monte Carlo and Molecular Dynamic methods.

MTE 549 Powder Metallurgy. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 380 or permission of the instructor.
Describing the various types of powder processing and how these affect properties of the components made. Current issues in the subject area from high-production to nanomaterials will be discussed.

MTE 550 Plasma Processing of Thin Films: Basics and Applications. Three hours.
Prerequisite: By permission of instructor.
Fundamental physics and materials science of plasma processes for thin film deposition and etch are covered. Topics include evaporation, sputtering (special emphasis), ion beam deposition, chemical vapor deposition, and reactive ion etching. Applications to semiconductor devices, displays, and data storage are discussed.

MTE 556 Advanced Mechanical Behavior of Materials I: Strengthening Methods in Solids. Three hours. Same as AEM 556.
Prerequisite: MTE 455 or permission of the instructor.
Topics include elementary elasticity, plasticity, and dislocation theory; strengthening by dislocation substructure, and solid solution strengthening; precipitation and dispersion strengthening; fiber reinforcement; martensitic strengthening; grain-size strengthening; order hardening; dual phase microstructures, etc.

MTE 562 Metallurgical Thermodynamics. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 362 or permission of instructor.
Laws of thermodynamics, equilibria, chemical potentials and equilibria in heterogeneous systems, activity functions, chemical reactions, phase diagrams, and electrochemical equilibria; thermodynamic models and computations; and application to metallurgical processes.

MTE 574 Phase Transformation in Solids. Three hours.
Prerequisites: MTE 373 and or permission of the instructor.
Topics include applied thermodynamics, nucleation theory, diffusional growth, and precipitation.

MTE 579 Advanced Physical Metallurgy. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
Graduate-level treatments of the fundamentals of symmetry, crystallography, crystal structures, defects in crystals (including dislocation theory), and atomic diffusion.

MTE 583 Advanced Structure of Metals. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
The use of X-ray analysis for the study of single crystals and deformation texture of polycrystalline materials.

MTE 585 Materials at Elevated Temperatures. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
Influence of temperatures on behavior and properties of materials.

MTE 587 Corrosion Science and Engineering. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 271 and CH 102 or permission of the instructor.
Fundamental causes of corrosion problems and failures. Emphasis is placed on tools and knowledge necessary for predicting corrosion, measuring corrosion rates, and combining this with prevention and materials selection.

MTE 591:592 Special Problems (Area). One to three hours.
Advanced work of an investigative nature. Credit awarded is based on the work accomplished.

MTE 595:596 Seminar. One hour.
Discussion of current advances and research in metallurgical engineering; presented by graduate students and the staff.

MTE 598 Research Not Related to Thesis. One to six hours.

MTE 599 Master's Thesis Research. One to twelve hours. Pass/fail.

MTE 622 Solidification Processes and Microstructures Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 519
This course will cover the fundamentals of microstructure formation and microstructure control during the solidification of alloys and composites.

MTE 643 Magnetic Recording. Three hours.
Prerequisite: ECE 341 or MTE 271.
Static magnetic fields; inductive head fields; playback process in recording; recording process; recording noise; and MR heads.

MTE 644 Optical Data Storage. Three hours.
Prerequisite: ECE 341 or MTE 271.
Characteristics of optical disk systems; read-only (CD-ROM) systems; write-once (WORM) disks; erasable disks; M-O recording materials; optical heads; laser diodes; focus and tracking servos; and signal channels.

MTE 655 Electron Microscopy of Materials. One to four hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 481 or permission of the instructor.
Topics include basic principles of operation of the transmission electron microscope, principles of electron diffraction, image interpretation, and various analytical electron-microscopy techniques as they apply to crystalline materials.

MTE 670 Scanning Electron Microscopy. Three hours
Theory, construction, and operation of the scanning electron microscope. Both imaging and x-ray spectroscopy are covered. Emphasis is placed on application and uses in metallurgical engineering and materials-related fields.

MTE 680 Advanced Phase Diagrams. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 362 or permission of the instructor.
Advanced phase studies of binary, ternary, and more complex systems; experimental methods of construction and interpretation.

MTE 684 Fundamentals of Solid State Engineering. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Modern physics, physics with calculus, or by permission of the instructor.
Fundamentals of solid state physics and quantum mechanics are covered to explain the physical principles underlying the design and operation of semiconductor devices. The second part covers applications to semiconductor microdevices and nanodevices such as diodes, transistors, lasers, and photodetectors incorporating quantum structures.

MTE 691:692 Special Problems (Area). One to six hours.
Credit awarded is based on the amount of work undertaken.

MTE 693 Selected Topics (Area). One to six hours.
Topics of current research in thermodynamics of melts, phase equilibra, computer modeling of solidification, electrodynamics of molten metals, corrosion phenomena, microstructural evolution, and specialized alloy systems, nanomaterials, fuel cells, and composite materials.

MTE 694 Special Project. One to six hours.
Proposing, planning, executing, and presenting the results of an individual project.

MTE 695:696 Seminar. One hour.
Presentations on dissertation-related research or on items of current interest in materials and metallurgical engineering.

MTE 698 Research Not Related to Dissertation. One to six hours.

MTE 699 Doctoral Dissertation Research. Three to twelve hours. Pass/Fail.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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The graduate programs in Electrical and Computer Engineering are designed to prepare students for a broad range of careers by providing a foundation of study in several technical areas. Read more
The graduate programs in Electrical and Computer Engineering are designed to prepare students for a broad range of careers by providing a foundation of study in several technical areas. Your course of study will be individualized to suit your interests, with intensive training in numerous specializations, such as all aspects of computer engineering, control systems, signal processing and communications, information assurance, VLSI, microelectronics, electro-optics, and power/energy.

The Master's of Science (MS) degree program prepares students for development-oriented engineering careers and/or continuation onto doctoral studies by providing a balance of advanced theory and practical engineering knowledge. The typical time for completion of the MS is 18–24 months of full-time study.

Applicant Qualifications

- Undergraduate major in electrical engineering, computer engineering or related field
- Previous coursework experience in each of the following (or equivalent) areas:
*Calculus through differential equations
*Computer programming
*Electrical circuits
*Electronics
*Digital design logic
*Laboratory experience

- Qualified applicants with non-ECE backgrounds may be extended an offer of conditional admission which will last until they fulfill the department's requirements for regular admission (generally, completion of specific undergraduate courses)
- Minimum GRE quantitative scores of 700 (old scale; 155 new scale); (750 old scale preferred; 169 new scale). GRE scores not required for graduates of ABET-accredited engineering programs
- Minimum TOEFL score of 80 (internet-based exam) for students whose native language is not English. A minimum score of 100 is desirable for students seeking teaching assistantships

All applicants must submit the following:

- Online graduate degree application and application fee
- Transcripts from each college/university at which you earned a degree
- Two letters of recommendation (except PhD applicants, as described above)
- Personal statement (2-3 pages) describing your reasons for pursuing graduate study, your career aspirations, your special interests within your field, and any unusual features of your background that might need explanation or be of interest to your program's admissions committee.
- Resume or Curriculum Vitae (max. 2 pages)
- Official GRE scores

And, for international applicants:
- International Student Financial Statement form
- Official bank statement/proof of support
- Official TOEFL, IELTS, or PTE Academic scores

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Please visit http://www.ece.ubc.ca/admissions/graduate/apply. - Degree. Master of Applied Science. - Specialization. Electrical and Computer Engineering. Read more
Please visit http://www.ece.ubc.ca/admissions/graduate/apply

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Applied Science
- Specialization: Electrical and Computer Engineering
- Subject: Engineering
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Thesis required
- Faculty: Faculty of Applied Science

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Humber’s Early Childhood Education – Advanced Studies in Special Needs graduate certificate program offers a unique opportunity to pursue an exciting and challenging career working with children with special needs and their families. Read more
Humber’s Early Childhood Education – Advanced Studies in Special Needs graduate certificate program offers a unique opportunity to pursue an exciting and challenging career working with children with special needs and their families. Through our practical, skill-based curriculum, you will develop many valuable skills, including how to:

• consult and collaborate interprofessionally with a team of early childhood educators, professionals and families to facilitate inclusion
• advocate and facilitate community outreach for children and their families
• observe, assess and implement using a variety of tools and techniques that support children’s development
• conduct independent research in a chosen area of interest
• plan and deliver professional development activities
• cultivate reflective practice skills for the purpose of self and professional development.

Course detail

Upon successful completion of the program, a graduate will:

• Apply the principle of normalization and critically evaluate its implications to the field of special needs.
• Develop and implement individualized program plans, which include long and short term goal setting, methodology, data collection, and evaluation.
• Plan and implement developmentally appropriate activities to enhance large motor, fine motor, speech-language, social, emotional, cognitive, and self-help abilities from infancy to adulthood.
• Demonstrate the ability to transfer the knowledge gained from theory in order to plan, implement and evaluate individualized program plans for home visits, classroom placements, and other field related practicum.
• Demonstrate effective written and oral communication skills in the daily interaction with families and allied professionals.
• Outline the responsibilities a teacher has when working with a family with a child with special needs.
• Demonstrate a professional and supportive role for parents of a child with special needs through assisting them to complete administrative tasks, communicate with professionals and by facilitating their involvement in special needs programs.
• Research the legislation and possible funding sources available to people with special needs and their families and make appropriate suggestions.
• Advocate and facilitate community outreach for children with special needs and their families.
• Develop his or her own personal philosophical approach for teaching children with special needs utilizing a theoretical and practical foundation in assessment, program planning, implementation and evaluation.
• Fulfil the role of the teacher in direct and indirect service delivery by assessing special needs, making referrals, analyzing assessment reports, planning individualized program plans and acting as a liaison between home, school and various agencies.
• Develop a self-directed learning contract and independently conduct research on a chosen area of focus.

Modules

Semester 1
• ECAS 5001: Effective Resource Teamwork
• ECAS 5002: Adapting Curriculum 1
• ECAS 5003: Field Practice 1
• ECAS 5004: Family Centred Practices
• ECAS 5005: Programming: Consultation and Collaboration
• ECAS 5006: Field Seminar 1
• ECAS 5016: Perspectives in Special Needs

Semester 2
• ECAS 5500: Advocacy and Community Resource
• ECAS 5501: Consultation and Case Management
• ECAS 5502: Independent Research Study
• ECAS 5503: Adapting Curriculum 2
• ECAS 5504: Resource Strategies for Special Needs
• ECAS 5506: Field Seminar 2
• ECAS 5509: Field Practice 2

Work Placement

You will be required to complete approximately 400 field placement hours within the two semesters. Placements are assigned by faculty. During that time, you may be assigned a placement in community based/government services and agencies such as a treatment centre, hospital, mental health agency, child-care centre or community association. You may have a full year placement, which allows you to become fully immersed in the agency or a different placement each semester, which ensures a variety of experiences. Each semester offers a block week for an intensive opportunity at your placement site.

International applicants are encouraged to also visit international.humber.ca to review additional requirements. Upon enrolment, international students are also required to obtain a co-op work permit in order to attend placement.

Your Career

Early learning experiences help shape children’s development and set the stage for them to be healthy, happy, productive adults. Some economists estimate that for every $1 spent on programs for children, there is a $2 social and economic benefit to Canada. Children with physical, intellectual, social and emotional challenges benefit significantly from early intervention and inclusive programming. Graduates enter employment ready to collaboratively support children with special needs and their families, applying the extensive knowledge and skills gained in the program.

Our graduates work with children with special needs and their families in both community based and government services and agencies, and have secured employment as:

• resource consultants
• early interventionists
• early childhood resource teachers
• teacher therapists
• community consultants
• resource support professionals
• educational assistants
• home support/respite workers
• early years’ specialists
• outreach workers
• intensive behaviour interventionists
• communicative assistants and infant development workers.

How to apply

Click here to apply: http://humber.ca/admissions/how-apply.html

Funding

For information on funding, please use the following link: http://humber.ca/admissions/financial-aid.html

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