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Masters Degrees (East Asia)

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How will East Asia accommodate the rise of a more economically and militarily assertive China? Is the US declining as a superpower in the region, or will it maintain its regional dominance? Does Japan still have designs upon regional economic leadership, and will it come to play a bigger military role in the region? How does a ‘non-state’ conduct international relations?. Read more

How will East Asia accommodate the rise of a more economically and militarily assertive China? Is the US declining as a superpower in the region, or will it maintain its regional dominance? Does Japan still have designs upon regional economic leadership, and will it come to play a bigger military role in the region? How does a ‘non-state’ conduct international relations?

Our MA in International Politics and East Asia gives you the opportunity to approach and answer these questions from a disciplinary basis. This is not a traditional area studies course on East Asia, but rather a disciplinary degree that focuses on the region for its case studies and thus offers unique advantages: strong disciplinary expertise combined with genuine regional expertise. East Asia’s emergence as the most dynamic region in the global political economy continues despite a series of crises since the early 1990s. If anything, the crises reinvigorated the study of the international relations and political economy of East Asia. Instead of just focusing on business and economics, the crises highlighted the politics of international economic relations, the impact of globalisation on the region and existing development paradigms, and the need for greater regional cooperation to cope with future economic shocks.

Our IPEA programme is one of the leading postgraduate programmes of its kind. We have among the greatest concentration of disciplinary based East Asia experts in the UK and Europe, and we are home to the Centre for the Study of Globalisation and Regionalisation, researching issues of Asia-Pacific and East Asian regionalism

Programme content

East Asia’s emergence as the most dynamic region in the global political economy continues despite a series of crises since the early 1990s. If anything, the crises reinvigorated the study of the international relations and political economy of East Asia. Instead of just focusing on business and economics, the crises highlighted the politics of international economic relations, the social, political, and security consequences of economic crises, the impact of globalisation on the region and existing development paradigms, and the need for greater regional cooperation to cope with future economic shocks. At the same time, the region has been faced with a series of major crises and challenges in the political and security dimensions, which are demanding of greater study by students of international relations.



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About the course. This course offers comprehensive training addressing both international political issues and media trends in East Asia. Read more

About the course

This course offers comprehensive training addressing both international political issues and media trends in East Asia.

You will learn about major international and domestic political trends in the region, while developing a comprehensive knowledge about the role media plays in these developments.

Your career

Our graduates hold influential positions in business, government, the arts and academia. Some of them are journalists, television producers, interpreters and translators. Others are city brokers and analysts. They work for organisations such as the BBC World Service, BNP Paribas, British Council, British Museum, Deloitte, HarperCollins, Jaguar Land Rover, Lloyds Banking Group, Nintendo, Siemens, Sony, Toyota and the World Food Programme.

Our expertise

We are one of Europe’s leading centres for the study of China, Japan and Korea. We have links with partner universities in East Asia that support our dynamic research culture. Our academics bring theories, methods and findings from their research to their teaching.

All three of our interdisciplinary research clusters inform what we teach. They are: East Asian Text and Culture; Movements, Economy and Development in East Asia; Power, Cooperation and Competition in East Asia.

The Sheffield Confucius Institute, which was named Global Confucius Institute of the year in 2015, explores Chinese language and culture. The Institute offers many opportunities for students to get involved in its activities which will help enhance their learning and deepen their cultural understanding of China.

Develop your skills

You’ll learn how to research and analyse, manage projects, write reports and give effective presentations. You will also have the opportunity to take language modules in Chinese, Japanese or Korean if you wish. Your in-depth knowledge of East Asian countries and your understanding of the region will give you an edge in the careers market.

Specialist resources

Our postgrads have their own study space and IT facilities at the Sir Sze-yuen Chung Resource Centre. The University’s libraries have an extensive selection of texts and online resources in Chinese, Japanese and Korean.

Options

You can study a shorter course for a Postgraduate Certificate (four months, 60 credits) or Postgraduate Diploma (nine months, 120 credits). You’ll need 180 credits to get a Masters degree, including 60 credits from your extended project.

Core modules

  • International Politics of East Asia
  • Media, Culture, and Society in East Asia
  • Project

Examples of optional modules

Choose from a range of modules which may include:

  • Contemporary Chinese Society and Media
  • Media and Public Communication in Japan
  • China and Korea in the Modern World
  • The Political Economy of China

Teaching and assessment

There are lectures and small-group seminars. You’re assessed on your essays, exams, presentations and an extended project.



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This programme is an unrivalled opportunity to study the arts of China, Korea and Japan. Read more
This programme is an unrivalled opportunity to study the arts of China, Korea and Japan. Students consider a wide range of East Asian arts, from Chinese archaeology to Japanese prints, Korean installation works to Buddhist monuments, exploring their specificity and the links between them, in historical and contemporary periods. In many parts of East Asia archaeological evidence is key to understanding early societies. The programme therefore relates excavated materials to the history of art.

The Department of the History of Art and Archaeology contains some of the world’s leading experts in the art history and archaeology of East Asia, whose ground-breaking research informs and is informed by their teaching. Students benefit from the unparalleled knowledge and enthusiasm of staff. As members of the School of Arts, they profit from the insights of scholars and students working in other related fields, such as East Asian Music, Film and Media. They can also select from courses in other departments, taking advantage of SOAS’s unrivalled expertise in the languages, history, religions and cultures of East Asia.

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

This MA can also be pursued over a two-year period combined with intensive language study in Japanese or Korean (http://www.soas.ac.uk/art/programmes/ma-art-and-archaeology-of-east-asia-and-intensive-language/).

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/art/programmes/maaaea/

Teaching

Teaching consists of a combination of lectures and seminars. Classes are normally between two and three hours per week for each course. Teaching methods include lectures with discussion, seminars (at which students present papers) and museum visits. Students at all levels are expected to take an active part in class presentations. A particularly important element is the training of the student's visual memory.

In addition to their studies on the MA programme, students at SOAS can participate in a wide range of research seminars, lectures and conferences that regularly take place in the School and in the University of London.

Assessment

For each of the three taught courses, the student will be expected to submit two or three pieces of written work usually around 3,000 to 4,500 words – for a total of 9,000 words per course. The emphasis is on developing essay skills during the session in preparation for the dissertation. In some courses the assessment is 100% on written work. On other courses, assessed course work forms 75% of the student’s final grade and an additional 25% is determined by slide quizzes, projects or other forms of assessment. The 10,000 word dissertation is submitted in September.

Learning Resources

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Destinations

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Graduates have gone on to work for a range of organisations including:

Asia House
Bonhams
British Museum
Christie's Hong Kong
Design Museum
Dr. Bhau Daji Lad Mumbai City Museum
Hong Kong Museum Of Art
India Foundation For The Arts
Museum of East Asian Art
National Gallery National Museum of Singapore
People Projects Culture & Change
Schoeni Art Gallery
Sotheby's
Taiwan Embassy
The Alliance for Global Education
The British Embassy
The Chester Beatty Library
The National Museum Of Korea
The Royal Collection

Types of roles that graduates have gone on to do include:

Manager of Communications
Culture Programme Coordinator
Research Assistant
Social Anthropology Lecturer
Specialist - Indian Art
Architect
Art Historian
Development Specialist
Archivist
Gallery Director Innovation Programmes Learning Manager
Creative Director
Organisational Consultant
Travel writer
Art Collector
Chinese Painting Specialist
Professor of Silk Road History
Rights and Reproductions Officer
Public Education Coordinator
Senior Curator of Photographs

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This two-year programme combines the strengths of the MA History of Art and Archaeology of East Asia with intensive language training in Japanese or Korean. Read more
This two-year programme combines the strengths of the MA History of Art and Archaeology of East Asia with intensive language training in Japanese or Korean. Students study the arts of China, Korea and Japan, exploring a wide range of East Asian arts, from Chinese archaeology to Japanese prints, Korean installation works to Buddhist monuments, in historical and contemporary periods. Instruction in the language of their choice is provided by teachers in the Faculty of Languages and Cultures. By the end of the programme, which includes a summer language school abroad, students have received sufficient instruction to reach near-proficiency in the language.

The Department of the History of Art and Archaeology contains some of the world’s leading experts in the art history and archaeology of East Asia, whose ground-breaking research informs and is informed by their teaching. Students benefit from the unparalleled knowledge and enthusiasm of staff. As members of the School of Arts, they profit from the insights of scholars and students working in other related fields, such as East Asian Music, Film and Media, as well as the expertise of specialist language teachers.

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/art/programmes/ma-art-and-archaeology-of-east-asia-and-intensive-language/

Structure

Students take two intensive language units and one East Asian History of Art and Archaeology unit in their first year. During the summer, they participate in a summer school abroad. Upon their return, they take one intensive language unit in their second year and two East Asian History of Art and Archaeology units. The dissertation is written on East Asian History of Art and Archaeology and submitted in September of year 2.

Teaching

Teaching consists of a combination of lectures and seminars. Classes are normally between two and three hours per week for each course. Teaching methods include lectures with discussion, seminars (at which students present papers) and museum visits. Students at all levels are expected to take an active part in class presentations. A particularly important element is the training of the student's visual memory.

In addition to their studies on the MA programme, students at SOAS can participate in a wide range of research seminars, lectures and conferences that regularly take place in the School and in the University of London.

Assessment

For each of the three taught courses, the student will be expected to submit two or three pieces of written work usually around 3,000 to 4,500 words – for a total of 9,000 words per course. The emphasis is on developing essay skills during the session in preparation for the dissertation. In some courses the assessment is 100% on written work. On other courses, assessed course work forms 75% of the student’s final grade and an additional 25% is determined by slide quizzes, projects or other forms of assessment. The 10,000 word dissertation is submitted in September of year 2.

Learning Resources

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Destinations

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Graduates have gone on to work for a range of organisations including:

Asia House
Bonhams
British Museum
Christie's Hong Kong
Design Museum
Dr. Bhau Daji Lad Mumbai City Museum
Hong Kong Museum Of Art
India Foundation For The Arts
Museum of East Asian Art
National Gallery National Museum of Singapore
People Projects Culture & Change
Schoeni Art Gallery
Sotheby's
Taiwan Embassy
The Alliance for Global Education
The British Embassy
The Chester Beatty Library
The National Museum Of Korea
The Royal Collection

Types of roles that graduates have gone on to do include:

Manager of Communications
Culture Programme Coordinator
Research Assistant
Social Anthropology Lecturer
Specialist - Indian Art
Architect
Art Historian
Development Specialist
Archivist
Gallery Director Innovation Programmes Learning Manager
Creative Director
Organisational Consultant
Travel writer
Art Collector
Chinese Painting Specialist
Professor of Silk Road History
Rights and Reproductions Officer
Public Education Coordinator
Senior Curator of Photographs

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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East Asia is the foremost dynamic region in the world. This Master's specialization is organized around the achievements, opportunities and challenges facing East Asia. Read more
East Asia is the foremost dynamic region in the world. This Master's specialization is organized around the achievements, opportunities and challenges facing East Asia. Taught by international staff affiliated with the Centre for East Asian Studies Groningen this International Relations Master's programme focuses on the political economy and international relations of China, Japan and Korea.

The programme takes a multidisciplinary approach. Lectures and seminars are taught by experts in international relations, history, economy or law. You will gain knowledge on the top-three economies in East Asia and develop oral, writing and research skills to analyze developments from a local and global perspective. Work placement and study abroad are optional.

Why in Groningen?

- A unique International Relations Master's programme on the Political Economy of contemporary East Asia
- A multi-disciplinary approach towards developments in contemporary China, Japan and Korea
- Optional opportunities to study or gain hands-on experience in East Asia
- Private sector participation and guest speakers from East Asia
- Further opportunities to focus on Hong Kong, Taiwan or emerging countries such as Mongolia

Job perspectives

This degree has been designed for students who aspire to a career related to East Asia in international business, international cooperation, diplomacy, media and academia.

Job examples

- Business consultant
- Lobbyist
- Diplomat
- Policy advisor
- Researcher
- Manager

Research

Individual research topics of faculty members include: Economic Transition and Institutional Change in Asia, Political Economy of China, China and the World Economy, Land Tenure and Land Governance in China, Land Registration in China, International Trade Law and China, China-EU Relations, 19th Century Business Cycles in China, Religion in Modern China, Private International Law and China, Carbon Emission Trading and Competition Law in East Asia, Political Economies of Global Health in Asia, History of Japan, Foreign Policy of Japan, Japan-EU relations, Technology and Culture in Contemporary Japan, regionalization in Asia, Foreign and Security Policies of Korea, Visual Politics and North Korea, Foreign Policy of Mongolia.

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This programme is for students who want an advanced knowledge of the main issues, problems and actors in the diverse region of East Asia today, or who wish to expand their knowledge of a dynamic and rapidly changing key economic region of the world, or to pursue any area of professional life in, or linked to, East Asia. Read more

This programme is for students who want an advanced knowledge of the main issues, problems and actors in the diverse region of East Asia today, or who wish to expand their knowledge of a dynamic and rapidly changing key economic region of the world, or to pursue any area of professional life in, or linked to, East Asia. A prior knowledge of the region is not necessary. 

This core pathway is designed for flexibility, allowing you to choose over half of the MA content from a wide range of optional modules.

In the School of Government and Society we offer much more than a degree. As a student here, whether undergraduate or postgraduate, you have the opportunity to take part in a wide range of events, with some or all of the costs paid for by the School.

Course details

The Asia-Pacific is a dynamic and rapidly changing key economic region in the world. Despite experiencing unrivalled economic growth, it must also face growing concerns over such issues as security, energy, the environment and internal cohesion. For the rest of the world, turning their back on the key players in the Asia Pacific, is not an option. This degree offers advanced knowledge of the main issues, problems and actors in the diverse region of East Asia today.

Each year, a number of students from East Asia take the degree, in order to study their region from a different cultural and theoretical set of perspectives. Students who wish to work in or with East Asia take the degree and its modules, in order to gain an insight into the cultural, economic and political opportunities and challenges of the region.

Issues and topics examined include

  • China's emerging status as a world power
  • The regional institutions of East Asia
  • Security issues, including nuclear weapons and terrorism
  • Human rights, peacekeeping and post-conflict reconstruction
  • Environmental security and climate change

One of the real strengths of our masters programmes is the wide range of available modules, giving students the ability to tailor their course of study to their own academic interests.

Who is the programme for?

This programme is for students who want an advanced knowledge of the main issues, problems and actors in the diverse region of East Asia today, or who wish to expand their knowledge of a dynamic and rapidly changing key economic region of the world, or to pursue any area of professional life in, or linked to, East Asia. A prior knowledge of the region is not necessary.

More information on: International Relations MA (with specialist pathways)

Learning and teaching

We advocate an enquiry-based approach to learning, which means that we encourage you to become an independent and self-motivated learner. Through the programme of study we offer, we will develop the qualities that employers value in today's university graduates - qualities that will set you apart in your future career.

To help you develop the above-mentioned skills, we adopt a range of teaching methods. They may include:

  • Lectures - listening to experts sharing their knowledge and discoveries in challenging and provocative ways. Students are expected to 'read-around' the subject matter of their lectures, adding to their understanding and developing their critical faculties and analytical skills.
  • Seminars - where you present and discuss your ideas and knowledge in smaller groups and debate interpretations and opinions with other students.
  • Tutorials - are your opportunity to discuss your work with your tutor, usually in small groups.
  • Workshops - are problem solving sessions facilitated by a member of academic staff; these sessions usually involve students working in groups.

Our lecturers and tutors will ensure you have all the resources you need to make the transition from A levels to the more rigorous demands of a degree.

More about teaching and learning at the University of Birmingham.

Enhancing your student experience

In the School of Government and Society we offer much more than a degree. As a student here, whether undergraduate or postgraduate, you have the opportunity to take part in a wide range of events, with some or all of the costs paid for by the School.

Some of these are targeted to help you build skills and experience for your CV, others are more open events designed to expose you to high-level speakers on current debates relevant to all Government and Society students.

Read more of our students' experiences and profiles on the school website.

Employability

Graduates from the School have gone on to work in a range of careers, with recent graduates working with organisations such as the United Nations, Foreign and Commonwealth Office, local authorities in the UK and overseas and the Department for International Development.

The School takes employability very seriously and as well as linking students to the central careers services, also incorporates opportunities to enhance their employment prospects, including highlighting work experience opportunities, encouraging volunteering in extra-curricular projects (such as student seminars and events) and by inviting backgrounds for students to meet.

More information about careers and employability

Careers Network

The Careers Network provides a dedicated service to help you find work experience or internship opportunities outside of your studies, either part-time during term-time, or over the summer vacation. Right from the start of your degree you will have access to our interactive careers service, through which many regional, national and international employers advertise their vacancies, and your college internship officers will go out and about to find vacancies that will be a useful addition to your CV. 

Find out more about support for work experience and internships, bursaries, or mentoring.



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This programme provides you with the systematic knowledge and intellectual tools to critically review developments in the theory and practice of international relations. Read more

This programme provides you with the systematic knowledge and intellectual tools to critically review developments in the theory and practice of international relations. It enables you to evaluate in a sophisticated and critical fashion concepts, theories and paradigms within the broad field of international relations, drawing lessons from empirical studies involving both quantitative and qualitative investigations.

Students are able to develop their ability to deploy research strategies and methods in an appropriately advanced fashion to critically evaluate current research and advanced scholarship. Each study route aims to provide advanced knowledge and understanding of the dynamics, including cultural and local political and ideological factors, which shape the contemporary international relations of the area.

The course also provides an opportunity for studying international relations and in comparative and historical perspective taking account of regional specific political and economic factors.

Course Structure

Students will take five core modules to the value of 150 credits and optional modules to the value of 30 credits, 15 of which must be from the regional module list.

Core Modules:

  • International Relations Theory
  • Model United Nations
  • Research Methods and Dissertation Production
  • Dissertation.

East Asia Route Core Module:

  • Strategic Asia: Policy and Analysis

Regional Modules:

  • Region, Nation and Citizen in SE Asia
  • Political Economy and Development in Chinese Business
  • Nationalism, Revolution and Reform in Contemporary China.

Non-regional Modules:

In previous years these have included:

  • European Institutions and the Policy Process
  • The European Union as a Global Actor
  • German Foreign Policy
  • Collective Identities and Political Thought in Britain
  • Collective Memory and Identity in Post-War Europe
  • Contemporary Socio-Political Issues in Muslim Religious Thought
  • European Security
  • International Relations and Security in the Middle East
  • The Contemporary Politics of the Middle East
  • The Political Economy of Development in the Middle East
  • America and the World: The Making of US Foreign Policy
  • Human Rights
  • Political Ideology
  • Issues in the Politics of Military Occupation
  • Just War in Political Theory and Practice
  • Political Ideology
  • A module offered by the School of Modern Languages and Cultures.

Course Learning and Teaching

At the beginning of the academic year, students go through five-day induction events in which they are informed about University, the School, the MA/MSc programmes and the facilities available for their learning.

The 180 credits one-year MA degree programme is divided into four core and two optional modules of 15 credits each. Furthermore, students have to submit a dissertation of 75 credits of not more than 15,000 words. Most of the modules are delivered during the first two terms and students spend the remaining time to write the dissertation.

Usually a module has 18 contact hours spread over 9 weeks and 132 hours of self-directed learning. The modules are mainly delivered through weekly 2 hours sessions which can either take the form of seminars or one hour of lecture and one hour of tutorial. The form in which seminars are conducted can differ from one module to another. Typically modules would have elements of lectures, discussions, and presentations from students—the extent of each of these components would differ from one module to another.

All modules have written exercise for formative assessments. Upon getting feedback on these assignments, students can meet their lecturers to discuss their marks before then eventually completing a summative assessment. Typically summative assessments are 3000 word essays but some modules may be assessed by examination. Students can also meet their module coordinators during their weekly contact hours or by making an appointment. When students are working on their dissertations during the later half of the year, they meet their assigned supervisors for a minimum of 6 hours. Students also have access to the academic advisors whenever there is a need.

SGIA has a wide variety of resources available to students such as: computer room/work room with networked PC’s, printing facilities including scanner and photocopier, audio system, Wi-Fi and a relaxation area with satellite television system.

SGIA conducts weekly seminars and organises lectures and conferences which all postgraduate students can attend. These events provide students the opportunity to engage with, and debate, the most important issues in current political and international studies.

Towards the end of the programme students can contact the Careers Office of the University to get advice on available job prospects and get assistance on applying for these.

Career Opportunities

Our students go on to a wide range of successful careers including civil service and other government agencies, UN/INGOs/CSOs, journalism, media, teaching, law, banking and finance, diplomatic services and risk analysis.



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About the course. On this course we focus on business practices and systems in East Asia, namely China, Japan and Korea. You’ll develop a thorough understanding of the Asian business environment and how it is shaped by domestic and social change, globalisation and political developments. Read more

About the course

On this course we focus on business practices and systems in East Asia, namely China, Japan and Korea.

You’ll develop a thorough understanding of the Asian business environment and how it is shaped by domestic and social change, globalisation and political developments.

Through optional modules you will have the opportunity to focus your studies on one particular East Asian country if you wish or keep your knowledge broad depending on your interests and career goals.

Your career

Our graduates hold influential positions in business, government, the arts and academia. Some of them are journalists, television producers, interpreters and translators. Others are city brokers and analysts. They work for organisations such as the BBC World Service, BNP Paribas, British Council, British Museum, Deloitte, HarperCollins, Jaguar Land Rover, Lloyds Banking Group, Nintendo, Siemens, Sony, Toyota and the World Food Programme.

Our expertise

We are one of Europe’s leading centres for the study of China, Japan and Korea. We have links with partner universities in East Asia that support our dynamic research culture. Our academics bring theories, methods and findings from their research to their teaching.

All three of our interdisciplinary research clusters inform what we teach. They are: East Asian Text and Culture; Movements, Economy and Development in East Asia; Power, Cooperation and Competition in East Asia.

The Sheffield Confucius Institute, which was named Global Confucius Institute of the year in 2015, explores Chinese language and culture. The Institute offers many opportunities for students to get involved in its activities which will help enhance their learning and deepen their cultural understanding of China.

Develop your skills

You’ll learn how to research and analyse, manage projects, write reports and give effective presentations. You will also have the opportunity to take language modules in Chinese, Japanese or Korean if you wish. Your in-depth knowledge of East Asian countries and your understanding of the region will give you an edge in the careers market.

Specialist resources

Our postgrads have their own study space and IT facilities at the Sir Sze-yuen Chung Resource Centre. The University’s libraries have an extensive selection of texts and online resources in Chinese, Japanese and Korean.

Options

You can study a shorter course for a Postgraduate Certificate (four months, 60 credits) or Postgraduate Diploma (nine months, 120 credits). You’ll need 180 credits to get a Masters degree, including 60 credits from your extended project.

Core modules

  • Work and Organisation in East Asia
  • Investing in East Asia
  • Project
  • International Business and East Asia

Examples of optional modules

hoose from a range of optional modules which may include:

  • Political Economy of China
  • Contemporary Chinese Business and Management
  • Business and the Economy of Japan
  • International Human Resource Studies
  • International Management

Teaching and assessment

There are lectures and small-group seminars. You’ll be assessed on your essays, exams, presentations and an extended project.



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This programme aims to develop your interest in and understanding of the economic, cultural and social transformations of the East Asian region. Read more
This programme aims to develop your interest in and understanding of the economic, cultural and social transformations of the East Asian region. In particular it explores East Asian development within the global economy, the contrasting fortunes of the region's key economies, the specific features of the business and commercial sectors in the region and the developing patterns of trade within East Asia and between East Asian nations and other regions of the world. Optional units offer more detailed examination of developments in the Chinese economy and the political and economic relations between Europe and East Asia.

Programme structure

The MSc programme comprises six taught units, normally taught over 12 weeks, and six assessed essays, followed by a dissertation.

Core units
You must complete the following three units:
-East Asia and Global Development
-International Political Economy
-Theories of Development

Optional units
You can choose three optional units from those offered by the School of Sociology, Politics and International Studies. Options vary each year but may include:
-Conflict, Security and Development
-Small Business Development
-Gender and Development
-Managing and Evaluating Development
-Development Skills in Practice
-Environmental Politics
-Faith and Development
-International Development Organisations
-Foreign Policy Analysis
-US Security Policy
-International Human Rights
-Sino-US relations in global politics
-Japan and East Asia
-East Asia, Europe and Global Integration
-Care, Labour and Gender
-China's International Relations
-European Security
-Religion and Politics in the West
-Understanding Risk
-The Politics of Insecurity

A full list of possible units is available on the SPAIS website: http://www.bristol.ac.uk/spais/prospective/prospectivepgt/msc-unit-guides/

Third term
Independent study for dissertation

Careers

Bristol graduates are in high demand and have an excellent record of employment following graduation. Students of our MSc programmes go on to pursue varied and interesting careers.

Many sectors - such as the civil service, NGOs and charity work - require an MSc and some volunteer/internship experience. Graduates from our programmes have gone on to work for Refugee UK, Shelter, Barnardos, Oxfam, Amnesty International, government departments and the European Parliament, among others.

Further details can be found on our careers and alumni website: http://www.bris.ac.uk/spais/prospective/prospectivepgt/ppgtcareersandalumni/

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With two of the leading economic powers situated in East Asia and a huge potential for regional conflict as well as cooperation, East Asia will be the focus of future global politics. Read more

With two of the leading economic powers situated in East Asia and a huge potential for regional conflict as well as cooperation, East Asia will be the focus of future global politics.

This programme is designed to equip students with the knowledge to critically engage with these developments through recognised masters-level training in both Chinese/Japanese/Korean Studies and the social, political, historical and cultural dimensions of international relations of East Asia.

The unique combination of expertise across the regions and across disciplines in Asian studies enables both in-depth and diversified knowledge about the interrelatedness of political, cultural and economic factors shaping international relations in the area and across the globe.

Programme structure

You will take three courses in the first semester: two compulsory courses and an option course. In the second semester you will choose three option courses from a wide range of subjects related to specialised regional knowledge and East Asian international relations. During the summer you will complete supervised dissertation work.

Compulsory courses:

  • East Asian International Relations
  • Research Skills and Methods

Option courses may include:

  • U.S. Foreign Policy in East Asia
  • Japanese-Chinese Relations: History and Contemporary Issues
  • International Relations Theory
  • International Security
  • Political Theory and International Affairs
  • Politics and Economics in the PRC after 1978
  • Foreign Policy Analysis
  • State, Society and National Identity in Japan after 1989
  • Korean Politics and International Relations: Historical and Contemporary Issues

Learning outcomes

The unique combination expertise across the regions and across disciplines in Asian Studies enables both in depth and diversified knowledge about the interrelatedness of political, cultural and economic factors shaping international relations in the area and across the globe.

On completion of the programme, you will have:

  • achieved a good understanding of historical and contemporary events, processes and actors involved in creating the dynamics of the East Asian region
  • obtained a thorough understanding of different academic approaches to East Asian Studies
  • acquired tools to analyse and understand the complexities of East Asian relations in a global context
  • received strong training in both social sciences and cultural studies

Career opportunities

The aim of this programme is to give you a thorough grasp of the historical and contemporary events, processes and actors involved in creating the dynamics of the East Asian region. Having acquired the tools to analyse and understand the complexities of East Asian relations in a global context, you could progress to a doctoral degree or apply your skills in professional areas, such as diplomacy, international relations and negotiations or journalism.



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About the course. Accredited by the Association of MBAs and the Charted Management Institute. Multinational companies must overcome various challenges to do business across borders. Read more

About the course

Accredited by the Association of MBAs and the Charted Management Institute

Multinational companies must overcome various challenges to do business across borders. On this course, you’ll develop your understanding of those challenges. Focusing on Europe and East Asia, you’ll look at the opportunities in these regions and the way business is done. You also have the option to study a language.

You can apply to do a project-based dissertation, working with an external organisation. Recent projects include researching the international student market in the UK for an immigration consultancy. You can also apply to spend summer at another leading university overseas.

Core modules

  • Research Methods
  • International Human Resource Studies
  • International Management
  • International Business Strategy
  • European Business
  • Marketing
  • Dissertation

Examples of optional modules

Three of the following:

  • Concepts and Approaches in Intercultural Communication
  • International Business and East Asia
  • Investing in East Asia
  • Work and Organisation in East Asia
  • Entrepreneurial Economies
  • Contemporary Chinese Business and Management
  • Creating Entrepreneurial Ventures
  • Negotiation and Intercultural Communication

How we teach

We teach management from a truly global perspective, and our courses are based on pioneering research into the challenges faced by businesses everywhere. We use a combination of lectures, seminars, case studies, group work for collaborative learning, and web-based discussion groups. You'll be assessed through Individual assignments, group projects, end-of-semester examinations and a dissertation.

We’ll teach you how to identify opportunities, solve problems and inspire others. Many of our teaching staff are world-class researchers working in policy-relevant areas. Our courses are based on their research. We also bring in guest speakers from business, local government and industry. You can apply to carry out a project with an external organisation as part of your course. We also offer you the chance to spend the summer at another university overseas.

Your career

At Sheffield University Management School, we are committed to focusing on employability and our postgraduate students’ future career prospects. We have two specialist careers advisors in the School, dedicated to providing full-time career support throughout your course.

You will have many opportunities during your course to engage in personal and professional development. Our courses are designed to enable you to acquire the transferable skills essential for employment: communication, organisation, and the ability to deal with complex issues creatively and systematically.

Our dedicated Employability Hub acts as a key interface between students and employers. Its staff will help you access employability support, skills development and opportunities throughout your masters.

Our graduates work for companies such as Adidas, ASDA, Boots, ExxonMobil, HSBC, Morgan Stanley, Pepsico International, Sainsbury’s and Vodafone. Their job titles include Head of Business Enhancement, Management Consultant, Product Marketing Manager, Web Marketing Consultant and Campaign Manager.



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Today, there are around 6-7,000 languages spoken in the world and it is widely agreed that at least half of those are under threat of extinction within 50 to 100 years. Read more
Today, there are around 6-7,000 languages spoken in the world and it is widely agreed that at least half of those are under threat of extinction within 50 to 100 years. Language documentation is a new sub-discipline within linguistics that has emerged as a response to the growing crisis of language endangerment. It emphasises data collection methodologies, in two ways: first, in encouraging researchers to collect and record a wide range of linguistic phenomena in genuine communicative situations; and secondly, in its use of high quality sound and video recording to make sure that the results are the best possible record of the language.

The MA programme in Language Documentation and Description is intended for students who wish to specialise in the documentation and description of languages, with a focus on minority and endangered languages. This specialist MA is characterised by an integrated core of subject offerings that are oriented around issues in language documentation and description, plus a series of options in linguistics, applied linguistics, and language studies.

The programme is formulated with two main pathways:

MA Language Documentation and Description [Language Support and Revitalisation] provides an introductory overview of the study of language as well as courses geared at enabling students to support endangered and minority language communities in a number of ways. This pathway is open to students with or without a background in linguistics.

MA Language Documentation and Description [Field Linguistics] provides students with a sound knowledge of state-of-the-art methods and technology for language documentation and description with an emphasis on endangered and minority languages. This pathway is open to students who already hold an undergraduate major in linguistics/applied linguistics, or an MA in linguistics.

This course is part of the Endangered Languages Academic Programme (ELAP), which specifically aims to advance the documentation and description of endangered languages. ELAP also runs seminars, workshops, and intensive courses on the documentation of endangered languages. The programme is funded by the Lisbet Rausing Charitable Fund, and forms part of the Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project (http://www.hrelp.org/).

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/malangdocdesc/

Structure

The MA Language Documentation and Description (LDD) consists of three components: core courses, option courses and dissertation research. This degree programme is formulated with two different pathways; one specialising in Language Support and Revitalisation and the other specialising in Field Linguistics.

Regardless of the pathway they chose, all students take the equivalent of 2 full units as core courses, and the equivalent of 1 full unit as option courses and submit a Masters dissertation at the end of the year. The MA may be taken part-time, over two or three years, and there is a possibility for transferring between the two pathways for part-time students.

- MA Language Documentation and Description [Language Support and Revitalisation]

This pathway is open for full-time study to students with or without a BA in linguistics and provides an introductory overview of the study of language as well as courses geared at enabling students to support endangered and minority language communities in a number of ways. For part-time options and details please see the MA Handbook.

- MA Language Documentation and Description [Field Linguistics]

This pathway is open to students with a BA in Linguistics and equivalent and provides students with a sound knowledge of state-of-the-art methods and technology for language documentation and description with an emphasis on endangered and minority languages. For part-time options and details please see the MA handbook.

- Optional Courses

Any course/s to the value of 1 unit from the list of running Linguistics PG courses.

Programme Specification

MA Language Documentation and Description - Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 29kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/malangdocdesc/file80773.pdf

Faculty of Languages and Cultures

Six of the academic departments are devoted to teaching and research in the languages, literatures and cultures of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, with the seventh teaching and conducting research in Linguistics. The Language Centre caters to the needs of non-degree students and governmental and non-governmental organisations. It maintains a huge portfolio of courses, including year-long diploma programmes, weekly evening classes in about 40 different African and Asian languages, and tailored intensive one-to-one courses. The Language Centre also offers courses in French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Their teaching is in three main areas:
- language competence acquisition;
- textual and cultural studies - both comparative and language-specific, and covering not only 'literature' in a strict sense but also visual media, performance, folklore, translation etc.;
- language studies with linguistics at its core - including the prestigious Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project.

The Faculty is also home to the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/).

While SOAS as a whole represents the most substantial concentration in the Western world of expertise dedicated to African, Middle Eastern and Asian studies, the Faculty of Languages and Cultures is heavily committed to teaching and research grounded in a knowledge of the principal languages and cultures of two thirds of humankind.

Department of Linguistics

The department is a centre for linguistic study in an unparalleled range of languages, many of which we are documenting for the first time. They include languages of Africa, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, South East Asia, Central Asia, Australia, the Pacific, and Siberia. The department has close academic ties to the rest of our faculty, the Departments of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, as well as the Language Centre.

The research interests of members of staff cover a wide range of theoretical and applied aspects of linguistics, including syntax, phonology, semantics, information structure, sociolinguistics, historical linguistics, linguistic typology, language documentation and description, language contact and multilingualism, language support and revitalisation, language archiving, lexicography, language pedagogy, translation studies, and the studies of individual languages and language families.

View Degree Programmes - http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This programme offers you extensive instruction in the theory of Japanese language learning, teaching and research methods. If you are seeking an advanced level training course or to pursue a career in higher education, research or publishing, this programme is for you. Read more
This programme offers you extensive instruction in the theory of Japanese language learning, teaching and research methods. If you are seeking an advanced level training course or to pursue a career in higher education, research or publishing, this programme is for you.

This programme focuses on the practical study of second language acquisition and Japanese language teaching in relation to linguistic theory, specifically in higher education.

The programme includes teaching on how to evaluate published materials and research papers related to Japanese language teaching, conducting pedagogical research, as well as designing teaching materials and lesson plans.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/ma-japanese-language-learning-and-teaching/

Structure

Students take core modules up to the value of three full units plus a 10,000-word dissertation. This includes two core compulsory modules, Language Pedagogy and Japanese Language Learning and Teaching. For those who have not previously studied linguistics an introductory module, Introduction to the Study of Language (ISL), is required. The remaining units can be taken from the list of optional modules.

Faculty of Languages and Cultures

Six of the academic departments are devoted to teaching and research in the languages, literatures and cultures of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, with the seventh teaching and conducting research in Linguistics. The Language Centre caters to the needs of non-degree students and governmental and non-governmental organisations. It maintains a huge portfolio of courses, including year-long diploma programmes, weekly evening classes in about 40 different African and Asian languages, and tailored intensive one-to-one courses. The Language Centre also offers courses in French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Their teaching is in three main areas:
- language competence acquisition;

- textual and cultural studies - both comparative and language-specific, and covering not only 'literature' in a strict sense but also visual media, performance, folklore, translation etc.;

- language studies with linguistics at its core - including the prestigious Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project.

The Faculty is also home to the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/).

While SOAS as a whole represents the most substantial concentration in the Western world of expertise dedicated to African, Middle Eastern and Asian studies, the Faculty of Languages and Cultures is heavily committed to teaching and research grounded in a knowledge of the principal languages and cultures of two thirds of humankind.

Department of Linguistics

The department is a centre for linguistic study in an unparalleled range of languages, many of which we are documenting for the first time. They include languages of Africa, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, South East Asia, Central Asia, Australia, the Pacific, and Siberia. The department has close academic ties to the rest of our faculty, the Departments of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, as well as the Language Centre.

The research interests of members of staff cover a wide range of theoretical and applied aspects of linguistics, including syntax, phonology, semantics, information structure, sociolinguistics, historical linguistics, linguistic typology, language documentation and description, language contact and multilingualism, language support and revitalisation, language archiving, lexicography, language pedagogy, translation studies, and the studies of individual languages and language families.

View Degree Programmes - http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This programme offers those with an interest in Korean language learning and teaching extensive practical and rigorous theoretical training. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

This programme offers those with an interest in Korean language learning and teaching extensive practical and rigorous theoretical training. The programme provides you with the skills and knowledge to succeed, whether you are interested in pursuing a career in linguistic research or Korean teaching.

You will study general areas of linguistic inquiry and study how they relate to the study of second language acquisition and language teaching. You will also learn about teaching Korean in higher education.

Throughout the degree, you will evaluate published materials (e.g. textbooks) and research papers related to Korean language teaching, conduct pedagogical research, and design teaching materials and lesson plans.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/ma-korean-language-learning-and-teaching/

Structure

Students take core courses up to the value of three full units plus a 10,000-word dissertation. This includes two core compulsory courses, Language Pedagogy and Korean Language Learning and Teaching. For those who have not previously studied linguistics an introductory course, Introduction to the Study of Language (ISL), is required. Students that have studied Linguistics before are required to take, History and Structure of the Korean Language.

Faculty of Languages and Cultures

Six of the academic departments are devoted to teaching and research in the languages, literatures and cultures of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, with the seventh teaching and conducting research in Linguistics. The Language Centre caters to the needs of non-degree students and governmental and non-governmental organisations. It maintains a huge portfolio of courses, including year-long diploma programmes, weekly evening classes in about 40 different African and Asian languages, and tailored intensive one-to-one courses. The Language Centre also offers courses in French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Their teaching is in three main areas:
- language competence acquisition;
- textual and cultural studies - both comparative and language-specific, and covering not only 'literature' in a strict sense but also visual media, performance, folklore, translation etc.;
- language studies with linguistics at its core - including the prestigious Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project.

The Faculty is also home to the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/).

While SOAS as a whole represents the most substantial concentration in the Western world of expertise dedicated to African, Middle Eastern and Asian studies, the Faculty of Languages and Cultures is heavily committed to teaching and research grounded in a knowledge of the principal languages and cultures of two thirds of humankind.

Department of Linguistics

The department is a centre for linguistic study in an unparalleled range of languages, many of which we are documenting for the first time. They include languages of Africa, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, South East Asia, Central Asia, Australia, the Pacific, and Siberia. The department has close academic ties to the rest of our faculty, the Departments of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, as well as the Language Centre.

The research interests of members of staff cover a wide range of theoretical and applied aspects of linguistics, including syntax, phonology, semantics, information structure, sociolinguistics, historical linguistics, linguistic typology, language documentation and description, language contact and multilingualism, language support and revitalisation, language archiving, lexicography, language pedagogy, translation studies, and the studies of individual languages and language families.

View Degree Programmes - http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This MA is unique in the UK in providing such a comprehensive overview of Asian archaeology and cultural heritage. The UCL Institute of Archaeology is one of the few places in the world with the expertise to deliver such a programme, encompassing not only India and China, but also South–East and Central Asia. Read more

This MA is unique in the UK in providing such a comprehensive overview of Asian archaeology and cultural heritage. The UCL Institute of Archaeology is one of the few places in the world with the expertise to deliver such a programme, encompassing not only India and China, but also South–East and Central Asia.

About this degree

The aim of this programme is to develop a comparative appreciation of the cultural histories and heritage of Asia, moving chronologically from early human history, through movements towards the Neolithic, and the rise of cities and states, to the present day. It looks at current debates around conservation ethics, reconstruction and authenticity of archaeological remains.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (45 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and a dissertation/report (90 credits).

Core modules

All students are required to take the following: 

  • Themes, Thought and Theory in World Archaeology: Foundations
  • Archaeologies of Asia
  • Archaeological Heritage Management in Asia

Optional modules

Students take three further optional modules to the value of 45 credits. These can be selected from the outstanding range of Master's options available at the UCL Institute of Archaeology, but for this degree, the normal choices include: 

  • Archaeology and Education
  • Archaeology of Buddhism
  • Archaeology of Egypt and the Near East: A Comparative Approach
  • Critical Perspectives on Cultural Heritage
  • Cultural Memory
  • Managing Archaeological Sites
  • Managing Museums
  • Public Archaeology
  • Social Complexity in Early China: from the Neolithic to the Early Empire

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures and seminars. Assessment is through essays, PowerPoint presentations, supervised independent research project and dissertation, and an oral viva towards the end of the degree.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Archaeology and Heritage of Asia MA

Careers

Graduates of this programme are expected to pursue further studies at PhD level or embark on a wide range of professional careers in archaeology - in the archaeological servics or heritage organisations specialising in Asian countries - and beyond.

Employability

The experience and skills acquired depends on the optional modules selected, and how those skills are developed through assessed work, practical elements and dissertation, but in general we expect students to develop expertise in the archaeology of specific regions of Asia (in particular East Asia, South Asia, Central Asia and to some extent South–East Asia) and a broader comparative, international perspective on that specific region. Students gain knowledge of both current scholarly debates in archaeology as well as heritage management issues.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This programme is unique in training pan-Asian specialists – escaping traditional study area boundaries where China, India, South–East and Central Asia are studied on their own – and conducting inter-regional dialogue on the human past.

Students are given the opportunity to develop depth of expertise in a particular region in Asia while benefiting from an innovative macro-regional comparative perspective.

This MA focuses on the development of human societies and civilisations in a part of the world which is becoming increasingly influential in world affairs but has been under-represented in most general and regional archaeological programmes.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Institute of Archaeology

73% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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