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Masters Degrees (Early Music)

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Medieval Studies is a well-known and internationally recognised area of expertise at Bangor. Over the decades particular strengths in Arthurian literature, Welsh History and Archaeology and Cymraeg, as well as Music have attracted postgraduates to Bangor to work with experts in each of these areas. Read more
Medieval Studies is a well-known and internationally recognised area of expertise at Bangor. Over the decades particular strengths in Arthurian literature, Welsh History and Archaeology and Cymraeg, as well as Music have attracted postgraduates to Bangor to work with experts in each of these areas. Additional strengths include gender and devotional literature (in the School of English), Anglo-Norman studies, and early sacred music, among others. Interdisciplinary approaches form the core of medieval studies, and the current expertise at Bangor guarantees this approach both through the core module and through the option modules. In addition to this, Bangor can boast a unique combination of modules students can choose from, such as do not normally feature together: Welsh, Arthurian studies and Music form the distinctive core of the provision, alongside our widely recognised expertise in teaching palaeography and codicology.

Course Structure
In Part 1 of the course, students develop skills and acquire subject knowledge by way of preparation for Part Two, a 20,000 word dissertation. The Diploma, which consists of Part One of the MA programme, aims to develop learner autonomy to the point where the student is capable of beginning a scholarly dissertation at MA level.

Part 1: At the beginning of this course, all students must register for the following modules:

Understanding the Middle Ages (semesters 1 and 2)
Manuscripts and Printed Books (1 semester)
In addition to these modules, students may choose from a wide range of modules in this part of the course which may include:

Cymraeg:

CXC4004: Britain’s Celtic Heritage (40 credits)
CXC4005: Medieval Welsh literature (40 credits)
English:

QXE4030: Medieval Arthur (30 credits)

QXE4029: Women’s Devotional Writing (30 credits)

QXE4016: Pre-Modern Travel (30 credits)

QXE4032: Advanced Latin for Postgraduates (20 credits)

History, Welsh History and Archaeology:

HPH4000: The Age of Llywelyn ap Iorwerth (40 credits) (English: HPW-4000; Welsh: HPC-4000)

HPH4002: The Archaeology of the Early Medieval Celtic Churches (40 credits)

HPH4013: The Duke, Duchy and Institutions of Normandy, 942-1135 (40 credits)

HPH4017: Women and Power in the High Middle Ages (40 credits)

HPH4018: Medieval Latin (20 credits)

Music:

General explanation: Modules in Early Music place a thematic focus on music of the Middle Ages and Renaissance. They are intended to broaden the student’s knowledge of different types of music composed during these periods as well as the various contexts within which they were placed. This will include consideration of analytical, repertorial, palaeographic, biographical, institutional, social and cultural aspects. A number of case studies, complemented by directed reading and assignments, will explore the depth of historical and musicological study and understanding and enable a student to address specific, focused periods, topics and/or issues in which they have an interest.

Major (40 credits) and Minor (20 credits) Submissions are different in scope.

The choice of Early Music a s Principal Subject entails that students make their Part II submission in the area of Early Music as well.

WMM4044: Principal Subject: Early Music (40 credits)
WMM4046: Major Open Submission: Early Music (40 credits)
WMM4047 and WMM4048: Minor Open Submission: Early Music (20 credits)
WMM4050: Preparing for the Part II project (20 credits)
Students may also select relevant modules also on offer by the Graduate School of the College of Arts and Humanities which include:

QXE4032: Advanced Latin for Postgraduates
QXE4033: Postgraduate Portfolio
Further information about the above modules is available directly from the Directors of Graduate Studies in each contributing schools. Module availability depends on yearly internal arrangements in each contributing school. For further details, contact the School of History, Welsh History and Archaeology, the School of Music, and School of Welsh.

Part 2: Preparation of a 20,000 word dissertation on a subject related to medieval studies agreed by your chosen supervisor. This preparation will involve a series of one-to-one supervisory meetings during the summer, once Part 1 has been completed successfully.

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The course is available in Standard Track and in Special Track. Course Structure. Part 1 (Diploma). In addition to the Principal Subject, in which the student specialises; up to three additional subjects can be studied. Read more
The course is available in Standard Track and in Special Track

Course Structure
Part 1 (Diploma):

In addition to the Principal Subject, in which the student specialises; up to three additional subjects can be studied. Total of 120 credits.

Part 2 (MA):

Normally consists of a dissertation, composition portfolio, or critical edition (in the area of the Principal Subject). Total of 60 credits.

Course description
Standard Track:

The course combines specialisation in one area (including Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Composition, Solo Performance) with further training in up to three complimentary areas.

The range of choice on this course makes it one of the most flexible MA programmes in the UK. Students can make their education as broad or narrow as they wish. For those with a single-minded interest in one area specialised degrees are available.

The programme is divided into two parts: two semesters of taught study (Part I, 120 credits) and a substantial independent piece of work in the main area, produced over the summer (Part II, 60 credits).

Part 1 is centred on the Principal Subject module (WMM4044, 40 credits) in the student’s main area of interest. It lays the foundations of a Part 2 project in the same area. The following subjects are available:

Historical Musicology
Editorial Musicology
Ethnomusicology
Celtic Traditional Music
Music in Wales
Music and the Christian Church
Composition
Electroacoustic Composition
Composing Film Music
Studying Film Music
Solo Performance
Sacred Music Studies
Early Music
20th-/21st-century Music
WMP4052 Preparing for the Part 2 project (10 credits) acts as a bridge between Parts 1 and 2.

An additional 40 credits will be gained through submissions in other fields through either one Major Open Submission (WXM4046, 40 credits) or two Minor Open Submissions (WMP4047 and WMP4048, 20 credits each). Students can select from a number of subject areas, including, but not restricted to, those listed above. Additional offerings include modules in Arts Administration, Music in the Community, Ethnomusicology and Analysis.

Depending on the main area of specialism, students will attend a core module in musicology (WMP4041 Current Musicology, 30 credits) or composition (WMP4042 Contexts and Concepts in Composition, 30 credits). During these modules students will became familiar with up-to-date research and creative techniques and methodologies in the selected disciplines.

Subject-specific teaching is provided through a combination of individual tuition and seminar session in small groups. Within each of the chosen subject areas, students can identify their own projects, for which they will receive expert supervision.

Special Track:

The MA in Music (Special Track) allows students to specialise in any one of the following areas: Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Celtic Traditional Music, Music in Wales, Studying Film Music.

All the training will be centred on the student’s main area, aided by a broader look at the methodological foundation of the discipline as a whole (through the core module in musicology).

The programme is divided into two parts: two semesters of taught study (Part 1, 120 credits) and a substantial independent piece of work in the main area, produced over the summer (Part 2, 60 credits).

Part 1 is centred on the Principal Subject module (WMM4045, 60 credits) in the student’s area of specialism. Another aspect of the same area will be explored in the Independent Special Study (WMP4049, 20 credits).

WMP4052 Preparing for the Part 2 project (10 credits) acts as a bridge between Parts 1 and 2.

Depending on the main area of specialism, students will attend a core module in musicology (WMP4041 Current Musicology, 30 credits) or composition (WMP4042 Contexts and Concepts in Composition, 30 credits). During these modules students will became familiar with up-to-date research and creative techniques and methodologies in the selected disciplines.

Subject-specific teaching is provided through a combination of individual tuition and seminar session in small groups. Within each of the chosen subject areas, students can identify their own projects, for which they will receive expert supervision.

Compulsory modules:

Standard Track

Principal Subject, to be chosen from the published list for that Academic Year (40 Credits). Study areas currently offered are: Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Ethnomusicology, Celtic Traditional Music, Music in Wales, Music and the Christian Church, Composition, Electroacoustic composition / Sonic arts, Composing Film Music, Studying Film Music, Solo Performance, Music in the Community, Sacred Music Studies, Early Music, 20th-/21st-century Music.
Compulsory Core Module: either Current Musicology (for musicologists) or Concepts of Composition (for composers) (depending on the Principal Subject) (30 Credits).
Open submissions: to be chosen from the optional modules (40 credits).
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits).
(Total of 120 credits)

Special Track

Principal Subject, to be chosen from the published list for that Academic Year (60 Credits). Study areas currently offered: Historical Musicology; Editorial Musicology; Music in the Christian Church; Celtic Traditional Music; Music in Wales; Studying Film Music).
Compulsory Core Module: either Current Musicology (for musicologists) or Concepts of Composition (for composers) (depending on the Principal Subject) (30 Credits).
Independent Special Study (must be in the same area as the Principal Subject) (20 credits)
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits)
(Total of 120 credits)

Optional modules:

Standard Track

Open Submissions (40 or 20 credits) may be chosen in any of the following study areas (but have to be different from the Principal Subject): Historical Musicology; Editorial Musicology; Ethnomusicology; Celtic Traditional Music; Music in Wales; Music and the Christian Church; Composition; Electroacoustic Composition / Sonic Arts; Composing Film Music; Studying Film Music; Solo Performance; Sacred Music Studies; Early Music; 20th-/21st-century Music; Analysis, Arts Administration, Music Studio Techniques, Popular Music Studies, Techniques and Practice of Instrumental or Vocal Teaching (20 credits only), Performance Practice (20 credits only), Music for Instruments and Electronics (20 credits only), Supporting Studies (20 credits only), ELCOS Language Skills (20 credits, international students only.ded study (e.g. portfolio of compositions, performance recital).

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Why study at Roehampton. We are ranked best modern university in London for the quality of our research (Research Excellence Framework 2014). Read more

Why study at Roehampton

  • We are ranked best modern university in London for the quality of our research (Research Excellence Framework 2014).
  • Roehampton’s School of Education has a historical association with Froebel College which was founded in 1892. As a result, the programme is supported by the renowned Froebel Archive for Childhood Studies, and has developed an international reputation in the field attracting students at postgraduate level from around the world.
  • Students become part of the early childhood research centre with its internationally highly respected research team.
  • Students graduate with a high level of knowledge and expertise in early childhood and strengthened confidence to contribute to, and advance in their chosen career.

Course summary

Early Childhood Studies at Roehampton is committed to babies and young children as people with agency and unique capacities, and to their overall wellbeing from the prenatal period.

The postgraduate programme draws on Froebel’s understanding of the transformative power of young children’s play on their thinking, and the crucial way that adults can either seek to assist or control young children’s intrinsic creativity. In adults’ interactions with children, however, Froebel recognised the profound influence of the community and social context. 

The syllabus is underpinned by an awareness of the influence of these social, cultural and political contexts on young children’s lives, and of the roots and structures of inequality that arise from these issues. The programme will strengthen your awareness and understanding of these influences and explore how you take account of them in action. In these respects, the programme also draws inspiration from the work of Paulo Freire, the radical and pioneering educator. 

The teaching is informed by active research and scholarship in early years policy and practice, as well as leading research into young children’s well-being, thinking and understanding. There is a deep commitment to working in partnership with families and communities and to the development of students’ professionalism, advocacy and leadership.

The programme is relevant, engaging and of professional and personal value for a variety of roles within the early years sector. For those working directly with young children, engagement with the course content will provide a platform for continuing professional development and career progression, while for those involved in early years policy or research, the course offers an opportunity to engage with up current thinking in a broad range of issues.

Content

Students will first look at babies' and children’s capacity for play, how they think, and how they communicate their ideas and emotions though a variety of ‘languages’ such as talk, mark-making, drawing, construction, movement, music and dance. This is studied from a variety of theoretical perspectives, critically looking at the values and assumptions underpinning these views. 

There is special focus on Froebel’s legacy in early childhood practice and other key pioneers in the child-centred tradition, which embodies advocacy and respect for children and their families. You will gain an understanding of the political nature of this work, learn advocacy skills for the well-being of young children and their families and develop effective leadership and collaboration techniques across disciplines in the field of early childhood. Alongside modules going deeper into young children’s emotions and well-being, students will learn skills for undertaking their own social and educational research. These skills will be put into practice with an extended in-depth research-based project, critically enquiring into an identified social or educational problem.

Modules

Compulsory modules

  • Dissertation
  • Play, Thinking and Communication

Required module

  • Undertaking Social and Educational Research

Optional modules

  • Early Childhood Pedagogy and Practice
  • Exploring the Froebelian Legacy in Early Childhood Practice
  • Professionalism, Leadership and Advocacy
  • Emotion and the Roots of Wellbeing

Career options

  • Careers in professional practice and leadership in early childhood, education, health and social welfare.
  • Careers in policy making, implementation and administration of early childhood provision.
  • Careers in research and developing the early years workforce in further and higher education.

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Our MA Composition/Ensemble/Jazz/Music Performance/Performer-Composer programme is designed for students wishing to develop their skills as performers and composers, and to become informed with engaged musicians. Read more
Our MA Composition/Ensemble/Jazz/Music Performance/Performer-Composer programme is designed for students wishing to develop their skills as performers and composers, and to become informed with engaged musicians. It aims to equip students with the musical skills, insight and experience necessaru to engage with the contemporary profession in its widest sense, with a focus on Western art music and jazz traditions.

Programme Content

You will receive individual principal study tuition, offered in a range of disciplines, as part of the Professional Studies module. Where appropriate, you may also receive tuition in related or supporting instruments/disciplines such as jazz, doubling instruments or early music.
You will also participate in department specific classes which are designed to give further support to your progress as performers or composers.
The programme offers a wide variety of performance opportunities focusing on skills applicable to both traditional and less traditional ensembles, and community and outreach work.
You will undertake an intensive Research Lab module which provides a foundation for Masters-level critical thinking to underpin all aspects of your programme.

The programme also offers a range of elective options, through which you will be able to develop and explore subjects appropriate to your developing artistic profile and which will enhance your employability in the professional world. These options will usually include:

- Arranging and Musical Techniques
- Creative Leadership
- Digital Musician
- Music Now
- Music Pedagogy for the 21st Century
- Musical Direction
- Psychology in Music Performance

In your second year of full-time study (or third and fourth years if studying part-time), you will have the opportunity to develop your skills and interests, particularly as these relate to your principal study, in the core Entrepreneurial Musician module.

You will also take part in Trinity Laban's unique Collaboration Lab (CoLab). This is an exceptional learning space in which you will be encouraged to take creative risks and explore the boundaries of your art form in collaboration with staff and students from across Trinity Laban, leading artists from across the artistic spectrum and many of our professional partner organisations.

Visit the website for a full Programme Specification: http://www.trinitylaban.ac.uk/study/music/master-of-arts-ma-in-music

Facilities

- 100-seat Peacock Room
- 100-seat Theatre Studio, with sprung dance floor
- Elegant Stuart & Mackerras Rooms for chamber music
- 80+ practice rooms
- Dedicated suites for Brass, Composition, Early Music, Harp Jazz and Percussion
- Music technology facilities including a recording studio and keyboard laboratory

Faculty of Music

Located within the beautiful Wren-designed King Charles Court at the Old Royal Naval College, Trinity Laban richly deserves its international reputation as one of the premier institutions in the United Kingdom for the study of music.

The Faculty of Music is celebrated for its fine facilities, which include state-of-the-art practice rooms equipped with superb pianos, the outstanding Jerwood Library of the Performing Arts and the magnificent concert halls in nearby Blackheath.

We have long been acknowledged for fostering and promoting a caring and supportive environment in which our students can flourish and we are particularly proud of the high profile of our professorial staff, who work as acclaimed soloists or belong to top London orchestras and opera companies.

The beautiful site set alongside the River Thames and Greenwich Park, the highly distinguished and talented professorial staff and our innovative and comprehensive course provision make Trinity Laban's Faculty of Music the natural choice for all who seek the best in professional music performance training.

How to apply: http://www.trinitylaban.ac.uk/study/how-to-apply/music-applications

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Our MMus Composition/Ensemble/Jazz/Music Performance/Performer-Composer programme is designed for those who wish to build on their undergraduate studies to develop their skills as professional musicians. Read more
Our MMus Composition/Ensemble/Jazz/Music Performance/Performer-Composer programme is designed for those who wish to build on their undergraduate studies to develop their skills as professional musicians: both performers and composers. It aims to equip students with the necessary musical skills, insight and and experience required by the contemporary profession in its widest sense but with a focus on the Western Classical and Jazz traditions (the Jazz pathway offers discrete comprehensive specialist training). Graduates of the MMus lead the way in developing new approaches to musical performance, composition and research and can be found in leading roles across the music profession worldwide.

Key benefits

- The MMus programme provides access to Trinity Laban's unique Collaboration Lab (CoLab), an exceptional learning space in which you will be encouraged to take creative risks and explore the boundaries of your art form in collaboration with staff and students from across Trinity Laban

Visit the website: http://www.trinitylaban.ac.uk/study/music/master-of-music-mmus

The MMus programme can be taken on a full-time basis for two years or a part-time basis over four years (for 2016/17 entry onwards).

Programme Content

- All students receive individual principal study tuition, offered in the full range of instruments/disciplines, as part of the Professional Studies module. Where appropriate, students may also receive tuition in related or supporting instruments such as jazz, doubling instruments or early music
- Students participate in department specific classes which are designed to give further support to students' progress as performers or composers
- The course offers a wide variety of performance opportunities focusing on skills applicable to both traditional and less traditional ensembles, and community and outreach work.
- You will undertake an intensive Research Lab module which provides a foundation for Masters level critical thinking to underpin all aspects of the programme
- The programme also offers a range of Electives, through which you will be able to develop and explore subjects appropriate to your developing artistic profile and which will enhance your employability in the professional world

Facilities

- 100-seat Peacock Room
- 100-seat Theatre Studio, with sprung dance floor
- Elegant Stuart & Mackerras Rooms for chamber music
- 80+ practice rooms
- Dedicated suites for Brass, Composition, Early Music, Harp Jazz and Percussion
- Music technology facilities including a recording studio and keyboard laboratory

Faculty of Music

Located within the beautiful Wren-designed King Charles Court at the Old Royal Naval College, Trinity Laban richly deserves its international reputation as one of the premier institutions in the United Kingdom for the study of music.

The Faculty of Music is celebrated for its fine facilities, which include state-of-the-art practice rooms equipped with superb pianos, the outstanding Jerwood Library of the Performing Arts and the magnificent concert halls in nearby Blackheath.

We have long been acknowledged for fostering and promoting a caring and supportive environment in which our students can flourish and we are particularly proud of the high profile of our professorial staff, who work as acclaimed soloists or belong to top London orchestras and opera companies.

The beautiful site set alongside the River Thames and Greenwich Park, the highly distinguished and talented professorial staff and our innovative and comprehensive course provision make Trinity Laban's Faculty of Music the natural choice for all who seek the best in professional music performance training.

How to apply: http://www.trinitylaban.ac.uk/study/how-to-apply/music-applications

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This course is for performers interested in live or recorded performance within classical or jazz styles. Throughout you’ll receive one-to-one instrumental or vocal tuition from our team of experienced tutors as part of a series of performance modules. Read more

This course is for performers interested in live or recorded performance within classical or jazz styles. Throughout you’ll receive one-to-one instrumental or vocal tuition from our team of experienced tutors as part of a series of performance modules. The course culminates with a final project, where you’ll prepare a performance, normally a high-profile public recital. Alongside your solo work you’ll develop your research, collaborative, ensemble and publicity skills.

COURSE STRUCTURE AND CONTENT

This course gives you, as a instrumental/vocal performer, the skills and opportunities to develop your individual and ensemble skills to a high level. You’ll undertake four modules over two trimesters and a double module in your third trimester.

You may explore areas of your own interest, which may relate to staff specialisms, such as opera (Garth Bardsley), early music and music of the Georgian period (Dr Matthew Spring), and romantic and early twentieth-century music (Dr Charles Wiffen), piano skills and improvisation (Thomas Whorley).

MODULES

In Performance 1, you’ll develop your performance skills and technique, and extend your repertoire. Alongside this the Research Methodologies and Context module gives you a thorough grounding in research methodology. Your development as a performer is supported by regular one-to-one lessons with a specialist teacher.

The Performance 2 module develops performance skills and repertoire while furthering your understanding of performance history and practice. You’ll also explore strategies for marketing yourself. You’ll have a choice of modules at this stage and the opportunity to work with peers and across subject boundaries.

You’ll have a choice of modules at this stage: Collaborative and Interdisciplinary Practice, Intercultural Musicology and Opera Studies.

The third trimester involves a Major Project for which you'll prepare a programme for a substantial public performance. The content and structure of this project is to be negotiated with course tutors.

For more information on modules, please go to: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/courses/pg-music-performance/

TEACHING METHODS

Modules are normally taught through one-to-one lessons, seminars and practical workshops. These are supported by individual tutorials and online activity within the Virtual Learning Environment.

The Major Project involves student-directed work, with supporting tutorials and instrumental/vocal lessons. We encourage you to make full use of library and IT resources, and time will be scheduled in studios and workstations labs for independent study, as appropriate.

ASSESSMENT METHODS

You’ll complete individual assignments for each module. Performance based modules (Performance 1, Opera Studies and Major Project) are assessed through performance on your instrument or voice, reflective commentaries on your process, or a lecture recital in the case of Performance 2. Intercultural Musicology and Research Methodologies and Context modules will be be assessed on written submissions.

For more information on assessment, please view the course handbook via the website: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/courses/pg-music-performance/

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Previous graduate destinations include:

• Doctoral studies at Durham University

• Freelance repetiteur and keyboard/continuo specialist

• Choir Director and Piano/Vocal Tutor

• Marines Conductor

• Opera Studies at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama

• Freelance classical and early music singer

Our graduates work in a wide range of performance-related areas such as:

• Orchestral performance

• Opera

• Conducting

• Choral direction

• Chamber music

• Accompaniment

• Session work

• Music promotion

• Record labels

• Broadcast media

• Instrumental teaching

• Group teaching

• Community music projects

• University lecturing



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The Music MA is a flexible programme designed to cater for those with a wide range of interests and specialisms. It is conceived as a 'next step' after the undergraduate degree, either as a stepping stone to research, as a qualification for teaching in the FE sector or simply to satisfy a thirst for development. Read more
The Music MA is a flexible programme designed to cater for those with a wide range of interests and specialisms. It is conceived as a 'next step' after the undergraduate degree, either as a stepping stone to research, as a qualification for teaching in the FE sector or simply to satisfy a thirst for development. There are 12 specialist pathways that you can choose from; each includes a range of core and optional taught modules and you will complete the course with a dissertation, recital or composition portfolio.

Pathways

Music MA: British Music Studies pathway
Music MA: Choral Conducting pathway
Music MA: Critical Musicology pathway
Music MA: Early Music pathway
Music MA: Electroacoustic composition/sonic art pathway
Music MA: Global Popular Musics pathway
Music MA: Instrumental/Vocal Composition pathway
Music MA: Mixed Composition pathway
Music MA: Open Pathway with Performance
Music MA: Open Pathway without Performance
Music MA: Performance pathway
Music MA: Performance Practice pathway)

About the School of Languages, Cultures, Art History and Music

The School of Languages, Cultures, Art History and Music brings together a number of internationally renowned departments to offer an extensive portfolio of innovative and interdisciplinary programmes in an exciting and creative environment, underpinned by a vibrant research culture.

We received outstanding results across the School in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) exercise, with at least 75% of our research judged to be ‘world leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ across all subject areas.

The Department of Art History, Curating and Visual Studies is located in the Barber Institute of Fine Arts, which houses the Barber Institute gallery and an exceptional Fine Art Library. The Department of Music is based in the Bramall Music Building, with state-of-the-art facilities including the 450-seat Elgar Concert Hall, a suite dedicated to the study and performance of early music, five electroacoustic studios and a large rehearsal room. We also have one of the best music libraries in the country, with special collections including materials on 20th-century English music, Baroque music and an extensive microfilm collection.

In addition to housing one of the UK’s largest groups of internationally renowned researchers in the national cultures of Europe, the Department of Modern Languages also hosts a Language and Media Resource Centre which specifically supports language learning through the latest interactive learning technology. We have a vibrant, international postgraduate community and offer excellent study and research opportunities in a supportive working environment.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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This course is primarily a research programme with taught elements. You can study a range of musicological and creative practice topics. Read more
This course is primarily a research programme with taught elements. You can study a range of musicological and creative practice topics.

The MMus is a research Master's. It is 12 months full time or 24 months part time. This is a research programme, but there are some taught modules.

The MMus is an excellent foundation for students going on to a PhD. It is also a valuable qualification in its own right. For some the MMus adds a further dimension to their undergraduate degree, in a 3+1 model.

Your studies

The styles or repertories covered during your study can range across the full spectrum of early, classical, avant-garde, folk, popular and world music genres.

You can focus on creative musical practice, musicology, or a combination of the two. Use the elective projects to tailor your studies.

Careers

Studying music is both intellectually and musically demanding. You'll develop transferable skills to help you in your career, whatever you choose to do.

Transferrable skills
Studying music requires you to engage in a broad range of practical and intellectual activities. These include performance, composition, improvisation, analysis, research and critical intellectual enquiry. We foster teamwork and initiative through participation in music ensembles. You'll gain communication skills through performance, presentations and written work. Flexibility, self-discipline and good time management are all required to attain high technical standards. These skills are necessary to balance the demands of study, practice and performance.

Employability
Our graduates often become self-employed musicians, performers, composers, teachers, academics, music therapists, studio managers or sound engineers. Other opportunities include arts administration, music production, specialist magazine journalism, music librarianship or music publishing. The wide range of transferable skills music graduates develop means that you can easily move into any discipline. These include management, marketing, accountancy, law, events management, journalism and IT.

Careers resources
The University's award-winning Careers Service can help with planning for your future career from the day you arrive. They can help you even after you graduate from Newcastle. Read our Careers with a degree in Music publication. This will tell you more about:
-What a music degree is like
-How it prepares you for the world of work
-Our graduates who have pursued various roles

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Additional Entry Requirements. Interview. You can apply between October to May. Places are offered on a first come, first served basis and applicants are advised to apply as early as possible. Read more

Additional Entry Requirements:

Interview: You can apply between October to May. Places are offered on a first come, first served basis and applicants are advised to apply as early as possible. Interviews are usually held between January to June. The personal statement should include: reasons why the applicant feels drawn to the profession of music therapy; specific musical skills; and details of relevant experience within caring professions. Some applicants will be asked to attend for audition and interview. This will usually include group improvisation with other applicants and an individual audition in which the applicant will: play prepared pieces; improvise on a given theme; and sing a short song of their own choice, if voice is not main study. The interview will assess each applicant’s personal suitability for this profession, ability to reflect, and readiness for the demands that the course entails. For overseas applicants, auditions and interviews may be conducted by Skype.

Criminal Records Check: A satisfactory criminal records check will be required

Course Description:

The theoretical focus of this course encompasses psychodynamic, humanistic, developmental and music-centred approaches to music therapy. Some lectures in theoretical studies are shared with students from the MSc Art Psychotherapy. The training is designed to prepare students for work with vulnerable children, adolescents and adults with a wide range of needs, including learning disabilities and mental health needs.

Teaching, Learning and Assessment

Teaching includes practical and academic elements with an emphasis on experiential learning and teaching methods, including lectures, seminars and tutorials. Assessments are both practical and written. The following areas are covered:

  • Therapeutic musical skills, with an emphasis on improvisation, interaction and application in a therapeutic context 
  • Relevant psychological, developmental, and music therapy theory
  • Different client groups: knowledge of different areas of need, diagnosis, and work context
  • Self-development 
  • Observation and critical thinking skills 
  • Professional issues, such as ethics and team communication

Placements include work in a variety of settings and are organised by QMU. In  Level One, practice placement is with a music therapist, one day per week from October to March. In Level Two, students attend practice placement two days per week in both semesters and work in a more autonomous way. Students are required to meet costs for travel to placement. Personal development is fundamental to therapeutic training and it is a course requirement (and requirement by the Health and Care Professions Council) that students attend regular personal therapy throughout the course, with a minimum of 40 hours attendance. This work is non-assessed and students are required to cover the cost.

Teaching hours and attendance

Each module requires you to attend classes at QMU and to study independently. Attendance requirements at QMU will depend on the module. In Level One students attend QMU on Tuesdays and Wednesdays. In Level Two, classes are on a Thursday. Practice placement days are additional.

Links with industry/professional bodies

Part of our strength comes from our location. Being based in Edinburgh means that the course has been developed over time in cooperation with key national cultural agencies and other bodies with a strategic interest in the development of arts organisations and festivals. Our location in the ‘festival city’ also allows for strong practical links between the course and the many arts, festival and cultural organisations based in and around Edinburgh, across Scotland and the UK. The course is validated by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC).

Modules

Level 1: Practice Placement 1/ Interdisciplinary Studies 1/ Therapeutic Skills and Interpersonal Learning/ Research Methods (all 30 credits)

Level 2: Practice Placement 2/ Interdisciplinary Studies 2 and Interpersonal Learning (both 30 credits), plus Professional project (60 credits)

Careers

On graduation you will be eligible for registration with HCPC, and will be qualified to apply for work in organisations such as the NHS, education, charitable bodies, social services, or in the private sector.  Music therapists are employed throughout the health, education and community sectors. Registered  music therapists are eligible for full membership of the British Association for Music Therapy.

Most of our graduates have found employment within care homes, schools, the NHS, and charities including Nordoff-Robbins Music Therapy in Scotland. Many others have become successful freelance practitioners.

Quick Facts

  • This is the only music therapy training course in Scotland. 
  • Exciting collaborative opportunities between this course and MSc Art Psychotherapy (International) course. 
  • Practice Educators for all Year One students are music therapists.


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Our Music MLitt enables you to develop a flexible individual research programme in classical, popular, world, contemporary, early, folk and traditional music, applying approaches of interest to you (eg historiographic, theoretical, cultural, critical), under the supervision of specialists who are leaders in their field. Read more
Our Music MLitt enables you to develop a flexible individual research programme in classical, popular, world, contemporary, early, folk and traditional music, applying approaches of interest to you (eg historiographic, theoretical, cultural, critical), under the supervision of specialists who are leaders in their field.

This programme is primarily aimed at students who want to pursue independent musicological research, and who like the idea of first working on shorter research assignments (which can be on related or separate topics), before embarking on an extended final dissertation.

It provides an excellent foundation for continuing on to doctoral study. It is also a valuable qualification in its own right and can add a further dimension to your undergraduate degree, in a 3+1 model.

The MLitt is a modular research programme, which means that it is made up of discrete areas of study:
-Music research training (20 credits)
-Research assignments (80 credits)
-Dissertation (80 credits)

The research assignments are one of the programme’s distinctive features. They allow you to propose and research two or three separate projects (weighted at 40+40, or 20+20+40 credits), which may be connected or on discrete topics, and which lay the ground for your final dissertation. These are completed at the end of April (in year two for part time students) leaving the rest of the programme devoted to your dissertation.

Delivery

The course is delivered on the Newcastle campus (with options – under certain circumstances – for study abroad). All students are required to complete the Music Research Training module during their first two semesters of study and beyond this, study is based on one to one tutorials with supervisors appropriate to your research assignments or dissertation.

The subjects of your Research Assignments and final dissertation require a formal proposal and approval; if these are practicable and within our areas of expertise, these can all be on a topic of your own choosing.

The MLitt is designed primarily with scholarly types of research in mind, but can also accommodate some practical components where appropriate, for example performance in the context of performance practice research.

Facilities

We have outstanding specialist music facilities, including our £4.5m purpose built Music Studios, designed with performance, multimedia and studio-based work in mind.

Additional facilities include:
-Two professional grade recording studios
-A large student common room, including a work area with PCs featuring specialist music software
-A range of recently refurbished rehearsal spaces
-A full range of recently refurbished teaching facilities, including a 100-seat lecture theatre, two 50 seat lecture theatres and three 25-seater seminar rooms
-12 practice rooms with integrated recording facilities
-A dedicated postgraduate workspace
-A project room equipped with 5.1 mixing system

The University Library also has extensive music collections (including a number of important manuscript and microfilm collections), subscribes to many specialist Music journals, has access to a significant body of online resources, and is widely recognised for the supportive service it offers students and staff.

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If your passion lies in research the Department provides a fertile and supportive environment to pursue your interests. Our staff features a diverse range of researchers and practitioners who provide expert guidance through our research-focussed courses, including practice-based and practice-led topics. Read more
If your passion lies in research the Department provides a fertile and supportive environment to pursue your interests. Our staff features a diverse range of researchers and practitioners who provide expert guidance through our research-focussed courses, including practice-based and practice-led topics.

The MPhil in Music can be taken through three different routes.

MPhil by Thesis

Research topics for MPhil/PhD by thesis may be proposed in any area closely related to the research interests of current members of staff (see staff profiles). Students work independently with regular supervision from their research supervisor, and attend research seminars (normally four each term). Thesis titles from recent years include:
-Music and Language in the Works of Samuel Beckett
-Beyond Simplicity: Approaches to the Analysis of Contemporary Music
-Melodic Oganisation and Improvisation in Thai Music with Special Reference to the Thaang Ranaat Eek
-A Ghanaian Perspective on the Changing Role of Traditional African Music in a Contemporary Society
-Passion and Persuasion: The Art of Rhetoric and the Performance of Early 17th Century Solo Sonatas
-The Community Education Work of Orchestras and Opera Companies: Principles, Practice and Problems
-Gesture and Affekt in the Performance of Baroque Vocal Music
-3 Masses by Frangiskos Leondaritis c1516 - c1572
-Interpreting Music: contemporary performance practice on the violin

MPhil by Performance

Outstanding performers, working in any area supported by the Department of Music, may propose a programme of research leading to the degree of PhD.

The PhD by Performance offers performers an opportunity to develop original, innovative projects in an area of musical practice, in an academic environment in which creativity and scholarship are equally balanced and in which work can be carried out without the constraints often encountered in the professional world.

Submission is by portfolio, which may be variously constituted, depending on the nature of the agreed research programme. The portfolio will contain up to six discrete performance projects, fully documented and supported by appropriate commentary, bibliography and discography. Alternatively, a portfolio may comprise a single extended public or recorded performance, accompanied by a single original thesis of 45,000 words, or by a portfolio of performances (usually five or more substantial submissions).

Candidates for the MPhil may submit a portfolio of up to four performance projects, fully documented and supported by appropriate commentary, bibliography and discography. Alternatively, a portfolio may comprise a single extended public or recorded performance accompanied by a single original thesis of c. 30,000 words, or by a portfolio of performances (usually three or more substantial submissions).

University regulations require all candidates to register for the degree of MPhil in the first instance; transfer to PhD depends on satisfactory progress in the first year. This decision is taken by the advisory panel during the Spring term of the second year.

Applications will be considered from candidates who hold a relevant university degree or approved equivalent qualification, or who can demonstrate sustained professional experience as a performer and an appropriate level of academic competence.

MPhil by Composition

Composers work independently, under the guidance of an academic supervisor. There are currently seven members of staff at York supervising composition. There are weekly Composition seminars (Tuesdays 4.00-5.30pm) throughout the academic year. Some of these are presented by visiting composers, others by staff or postgraduate students of the department.

The student run Chimera Ensemble provides a regular public platform for high quality performance of student compositions, and other performance opportunities are ofen provided by the resident ensembles, University Chamber Orchestra, and professional orchestras and ensembles in the region.

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Your programme of study. You have come to the right place in every respect to learn about Medieval and Early Modern Studies. Read more

Your programme of study

You have come to the right place in every respect to learn about Medieval and Early Modern Studies. The campus and university were initiated in 1495 so there are plenty of architectural wonders and history to interest you whilst you study in 'Old Aberdeen.'  The architecture is truly stunning and totally unexpected as you enter the university from the centre of Aberdeen. As you would expect in a university of this age and rich heritage there are also special collections hosting a variety of cultural artefacts. If you haven't visited University of Aberdeen it is well worth a tour to understand just how much history you get whilst you study. There are obvious connections from the university with many of the periods of medieval and early modern eras you study. 

This is an interdisciplinary programme which allows you to connect our contemporary world with the past. You can study a great range of areas in terms of courses that make up your programme and you have the ability to really understand ancient kingdoms and civilisations from the past. You may want to study further after this programme or you may be able to advise within heritage tourism, museums and tourist sites. You may also like to get involved in writing and publishing or a wide range of other careers. Aberdeen provides you with a great teaching experience in an even greater setting which is medieval in origin.

The courses reflect research interests drawn from various disciplines including History, Church History and Divinity, Celtic, English, French, History of Art, Law, Philosophy and Scottish and Irish Studies and is supported by highly specialised teaching and research staff. The MLitt provides ample opportunity to use the large depository of late medieval and early modern materials in the University's Special Collection, which has new state of the art rooms in the new Library.

Courses listed for the programme

Introduction

You must acquire 180 credits (105 credits from courses, 75 dissertation)

Optional Potential areas for study:

  • The Enlightenment in Comparison: Scotland, Ireland and Central Europe 
  • The Scottish Wars of Independence
  • The Three Kingdoms of The Seventeenth Century
  • Crime and Society in Early Modern England and Scotland
  • Back in the Viking Homelands
  • Jacobites: War, Exile and Politics of Succession in Britain
  • Celtic and Anglo-Saxon Manuscript Studies
  • Introduction to Old English Language
  • Controversy and Drama: Marlowe to Revenge Tragedy
  • Art and Society in Eighteenth-Century England
  • Seventeenth-Century Netherlandish Art
  • Medieval Manuscripts: Illustration of Medieval Thought
  • Kant's Critique of Pure Reason
  • Scottish Legal history, 14th - 18th century

Optional Courses

  • Special Subject
  • Engaging with Historiography
  • Old Norse1: Language, Literature and Culture
  • Palaeography
  • Latin 1

Find out more detail by visiting the programme web page

Why study at Aberdeen?

  • You develop a strong understanding of culture and history within the UK and Scotland joining a lively research environment
  • You are taught by experts in their specialist areas of Medieval and Early Modern Studies, if you specialise in renaissance and early modern periods you can attend seminars from the Centre of Early Modern Studies

Where you study

  • University of Aberdeen
  • Full Time or Part Time
  • 12 Months or 24 Months
  • September

International Student Fees 2017/2018

Find out about fees

*Please be advised that some programmes have different tuition fees from those listed above and that some programmes also have additional costs.

Scholarships

View all funding options on our funding database via the programme page

Living in Aberdeen

Find out more about:

  • Your Accommodation
  • Campus Facilities
  • Aberdeen City
  • Student Support
  • Clubs and Societies

Find out more about living in Aberdeen and living costs



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Studying music in depth. Our. Research Master’s in Musicology. will train you in advanced research while giving you academic insight into the theoretical and artistic principles underpinning music across history and cultures. Read more

Studying music in depth

Our Research Master’s in Musicology will train you in advanced research while giving you academic insight into the theoretical and artistic principles underpinning music across history and cultures. You will also investigate the contextual circumstances influencing the production, distribution, and reception of music.

Western music from the middle ages to the present - music and media

The Musicology programme at Utrecht University focuses on Western music from the Middle Ages to the present, the impact of media on the reception and conceptualisation of music, and digital musicology. Interdisciplinary work is central to the programme, and there are particularly strong links with Medieval and Renaissance Studies, New Media & Digital Culture, Gender Studies, Postcolonial Studies, Computational Humanities, as well as Game Research, the focus area Cultures, Citizenship and Human Rights, and the strategic theme Institutions. This programme aims to innovate, while at the same time retaining its links to the traditional musicological research fostered at the University over the past 85 years.

Hallmarks of research

Our current research focuses on late medieval music from the 13th to the early 15th centuries, Renaissance Franco-Flemish polyphony, music and migration, Baroque opera, Dutch music since the 17th century, music and its epistemologies from the late 18th century to the present, 20th-and 21st-century art and popular music, the complex relationship between music and politics (in particular, during the 19th, 20th and 21st century), the interaction between music and media (in particular, film and digital media, but also the materiality and semiotics of notations), and the impact of digital research tools on musicology. This research is firmly imbedded within the taught components of this programme, which are further enhanced by guest lectures and master classes led by international experts.

After graduation

  • You will possess thorough knowledge of the field of musicology.
  • You have acquired sophisticated knowledge of a research specialism, either within the field of musicology, and/or an interdisciplinary subject.
  • You are equiped with the academic and professional skills needed to identify, define, analyse, and solve research problems.
  • You have learned to conduct independent research in the field of musicology and to report on this research at an advanced level.

This programme will give you the specialist knowledge, insight and skills necessary to pursue further study at PhD level or a career as a researcher. Many alumni pursue academic careers  in international musicological research.



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UBC graduate programs in Music Education are designed to meet a variety of needs and interests, including those of the busy professional teacher, the researcher, the administrator, the curriculum developer, and the future university professor. Read more

Program Overview

UBC graduate programs in Music Education are designed to meet a variety of needs and interests, including those of the busy professional teacher, the researcher, the administrator, the curriculum developer, and the future university professor. Specializations include conducting, music pedagogy, early childhood music, curriculum development, cultural studies, music and media studies, music and related technologies, and teacher education.

Music Education faculty members have a wide range of research interests and specialties, using methods that are both qualitative (based in philosophy, history, psychology, sociology, arts-based educational research, and a/r/tography) and quantitative (involving quasi-experimental research, survey research, and large-scale multivariate designs). Courses across the university are also available to our graduate students, and cross-faculty inquiry is actively encouraged.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Arts (research-based), Master of Education (course-based)
- Specialization: Music Education
- Subject: Education
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Faculty: Faculty of Education

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Early modern history has become increasingly interdisciplinary, with researchers drawing on the insights of anthropology, sociology, cultural and literary studies, art history, and musicology, as well as history, when writing about the past. Read more
Early modern history has become increasingly interdisciplinary, with researchers drawing on the insights of anthropology, sociology, cultural and literary studies, art history, and musicology, as well as history, when writing about the past.

Topics such as violence, clothing, gender, exploration, art, drama, music, buildings and material culture have come to be seen as crucial to understanding the transformations that were taking place across the period c.1500-c.1700. These new approaches are integral to the teaching and research training provided on this course. There is also an annual field trip, designed to explore key themes and issues outside of the classroom, in the context of key buildings, documents and historical artefacts.

You will study two core modules in early modern history:

Introduction to Early Modern History
Writing Early Modern History: Sources and Approaches

You will also study the department's core module in 'Historical Methods', take a module in research preparation, and choose from a range of optional modules, including special subjects, advanced options, and further research training.

Finally, you will complete a 15,000-word dissertation on an agreed topic. The range of supervisory expertise within CREMS means that we can support dissertations in almost any area, so long as there are sufficient historical sources to support your chosen topic. Birmingham provides access to excellent library resources in early modern history, including an impressive range of digitised primary source material, from state papers and archives to printed books and much more.

About the School of History and Culture

The programmes in the School of History and Cultures offer students enquiry based learning within a rich and diverse environment to stimulate debate and challenge conventional thinking.
The programmes derive from departments which are all excellently rated by the QAA both in teaching and research terms (Medieval History 5, Modern History 5 and African Studies 5*). Our staff publish widely, and we are developing and consolidating a strong, supportive research culture in the School.
We are extremely proud to announce in June 2016, that History at Birmingham was ranked the top research department in the country by the Research Excellence Framework (REF). The national REF exercise assessed research publications and the public impact of research carried out in all universities in the UK between 2008-2014. Our department had an impressive 45% of its research judged to be ‘world-leading’.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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