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This course is available in Standard Track and in Special Track. The course (Standard Track) allows students to specialise in music of the medieval and early modern periods. Read more
This course is available in Standard Track and in Special Track.

The course (Standard Track) allows students to specialise in music of the medieval and early modern periods. Typically this area will be explored through a combination of different perspectives, such as historical musicology, editorial musicology, sacred music studies.

This will be supported by broader look at the methodological foundation of the discipline as a whole through the core module in musicology (WMP4041 Current Musicology, 30 credits).

The programme is divided into two parts: two semesters of taught study (Part 1, 120 credits) and a substantial independent piece of work in the main area, produced over the summer (Part 2, 60 credits).

Part 1 is centred on the Principal Subject module (WMM4044, 40 credits) in Early Music. It lays the foundations of a Part 2 project in the same area.

WMP4052: Preparing for the Part 2 project (10 credits) acts as a bridge between Parts 1 and 2.

An additional 40 credits will be gained through submissions in other fields through either one Major Open Submission (WXM4046, 40 credits) or two Minor Open Submissions (WMP4047 and WMP4048, 20 credits each). Students can select from a number of subject areas related to early music, including:

Historical Musicology
Editorial Musicology
Analysis
or the interdisciplinary modules:

HPH4018 Medieval Latin (20 credits)
QXE4032 Advanced Latin for Postgraduates (20 credits)
QXE-4025 Manuscript and Printed Books (20 credits)
Subject-specific teaching is provided through a combination of individual tuition and seminar session in small groups. Within each of the chosen subject areas, students can identify their own projects, for which they will receive expert supervision.

Course Structure
Part 1 (Diploma):

In addition to the Principal Subject, in which the student specialises; up to three additional subjects (each with a focus on music before 1700) can be studied.

(Total of 120 credits)

Part 2 (MA):

Normally consists of a dissertation or critical edition.

(60 credits)

Compulsory modules:

Standard Track

Principal Subject: Early Music (40 Credits).
Compulsory Core Module: Current Musicology (30 credits)
Open submission: to be chosen from the optional modules (40 credits)
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits)
(Total of 120 credits)

Special Track

Principal Subject: Early Music (60 credits)
Compulsory Core Module: Current Musicology (30 credits)
Independent Special Study (must be in the same area as the Principal Subject) (20 credits)
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits)
(Total of 120 credits)

Optional modules:

Standard Track:

Open Submissions (40 or 20 credits) are chosen from the following areas (with emphasis on music before 1700):

Historical Musicology; Editorial Musicology; Analysis; ELCOS Language Skills (20 credits, international students only).
Additionally, modules can be chosen from interdisciplinary programmes offered within the College of Arts and Humanities, as long as the emphasis is on history before 1700 (e.g. Manuscripts & Printed Books).

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Medieval Studies is a well-known and internationally recognised area of expertise at Bangor. Over the decades particular strengths in Arthurian literature, Welsh History and Archaeology and Cymraeg, as well as Music have attracted postgraduates to Bangor to work with experts in each of these areas. Read more
Medieval Studies is a well-known and internationally recognised area of expertise at Bangor. Over the decades particular strengths in Arthurian literature, Welsh History and Archaeology and Cymraeg, as well as Music have attracted postgraduates to Bangor to work with experts in each of these areas. Additional strengths include gender and devotional literature (in the School of English), Anglo-Norman studies, and early sacred music, among others. Interdisciplinary approaches form the core of medieval studies, and the current expertise at Bangor guarantees this approach both through the core module and through the option modules. In addition to this, Bangor can boast a unique combination of modules students can choose from, such as do not normally feature together: Welsh, Arthurian studies and Music form the distinctive core of the provision, alongside our widely recognised expertise in teaching palaeography and codicology.

Course Structure
In Part 1 of the course, students develop skills and acquire subject knowledge by way of preparation for Part Two, a 20,000 word dissertation. The Diploma, which consists of Part One of the MA programme, aims to develop learner autonomy to the point where the student is capable of beginning a scholarly dissertation at MA level.

Part 1: At the beginning of this course, all students must register for the following modules:

Understanding the Middle Ages (semesters 1 and 2)
Manuscripts and Printed Books (1 semester)
In addition to these modules, students may choose from a wide range of modules in this part of the course which may include:

Cymraeg:

CXC4004: Britain’s Celtic Heritage (40 credits)
CXC4005: Medieval Welsh literature (40 credits)
English:

QXE4030: Medieval Arthur (30 credits)

QXE4029: Women’s Devotional Writing (30 credits)

QXE4016: Pre-Modern Travel (30 credits)

QXE4032: Advanced Latin for Postgraduates (20 credits)

History, Welsh History and Archaeology:

HPH4000: The Age of Llywelyn ap Iorwerth (40 credits) (English: HPW-4000; Welsh: HPC-4000)

HPH4002: The Archaeology of the Early Medieval Celtic Churches (40 credits)

HPH4013: The Duke, Duchy and Institutions of Normandy, 942-1135 (40 credits)

HPH4017: Women and Power in the High Middle Ages (40 credits)

HPH4018: Medieval Latin (20 credits)

Music:

General explanation: Modules in Early Music place a thematic focus on music of the Middle Ages and Renaissance. They are intended to broaden the student’s knowledge of different types of music composed during these periods as well as the various contexts within which they were placed. This will include consideration of analytical, repertorial, palaeographic, biographical, institutional, social and cultural aspects. A number of case studies, complemented by directed reading and assignments, will explore the depth of historical and musicological study and understanding and enable a student to address specific, focused periods, topics and/or issues in which they have an interest.

Major (40 credits) and Minor (20 credits) Submissions are different in scope.

The choice of Early Music a s Principal Subject entails that students make their Part II submission in the area of Early Music as well.

WMM4044: Principal Subject: Early Music (40 credits)
WMM4046: Major Open Submission: Early Music (40 credits)
WMM4047 and WMM4048: Minor Open Submission: Early Music (20 credits)
WMM4050: Preparing for the Part II project (20 credits)
Students may also select relevant modules also on offer by the Graduate School of the College of Arts and Humanities which include:

QXE4032: Advanced Latin for Postgraduates
QXE4033: Postgraduate Portfolio
Further information about the above modules is available directly from the Directors of Graduate Studies in each contributing schools. Module availability depends on yearly internal arrangements in each contributing school. For further details, contact the School of History, Welsh History and Archaeology, the School of Music, and School of Welsh.

Part 2: Preparation of a 20,000 word dissertation on a subject related to medieval studies agreed by your chosen supervisor. This preparation will involve a series of one-to-one supervisory meetings during the summer, once Part 1 has been completed successfully.

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The course is available in Standard Track and in Special Track. Course Structure. Part 1 (Diploma). In addition to the Principal Subject, in which the student specialises; up to three additional subjects can be studied. Read more
The course is available in Standard Track and in Special Track

Course Structure
Part 1 (Diploma):

In addition to the Principal Subject, in which the student specialises; up to three additional subjects can be studied. Total of 120 credits.

Part 2 (MA):

Normally consists of a dissertation, composition portfolio, or critical edition (in the area of the Principal Subject). Total of 60 credits.

Course description
Standard Track:

The course combines specialisation in one area (including Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Composition, Solo Performance) with further training in up to three complimentary areas.

The range of choice on this course makes it one of the most flexible MA programmes in the UK. Students can make their education as broad or narrow as they wish. For those with a single-minded interest in one area specialised degrees are available.

The programme is divided into two parts: two semesters of taught study (Part I, 120 credits) and a substantial independent piece of work in the main area, produced over the summer (Part II, 60 credits).

Part 1 is centred on the Principal Subject module (WMM4044, 40 credits) in the student’s main area of interest. It lays the foundations of a Part 2 project in the same area. The following subjects are available:

Historical Musicology
Editorial Musicology
Ethnomusicology
Celtic Traditional Music
Music in Wales
Music and the Christian Church
Composition
Electroacoustic Composition
Composing Film Music
Studying Film Music
Solo Performance
Sacred Music Studies
Early Music
20th-/21st-century Music
WMP4052 Preparing for the Part 2 project (10 credits) acts as a bridge between Parts 1 and 2.

An additional 40 credits will be gained through submissions in other fields through either one Major Open Submission (WXM4046, 40 credits) or two Minor Open Submissions (WMP4047 and WMP4048, 20 credits each). Students can select from a number of subject areas, including, but not restricted to, those listed above. Additional offerings include modules in Arts Administration, Music in the Community, Ethnomusicology and Analysis.

Depending on the main area of specialism, students will attend a core module in musicology (WMP4041 Current Musicology, 30 credits) or composition (WMP4042 Contexts and Concepts in Composition, 30 credits). During these modules students will became familiar with up-to-date research and creative techniques and methodologies in the selected disciplines.

Subject-specific teaching is provided through a combination of individual tuition and seminar session in small groups. Within each of the chosen subject areas, students can identify their own projects, for which they will receive expert supervision.

Special Track:

The MA in Music (Special Track) allows students to specialise in any one of the following areas: Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Celtic Traditional Music, Music in Wales, Studying Film Music.

All the training will be centred on the student’s main area, aided by a broader look at the methodological foundation of the discipline as a whole (through the core module in musicology).

The programme is divided into two parts: two semesters of taught study (Part 1, 120 credits) and a substantial independent piece of work in the main area, produced over the summer (Part 2, 60 credits).

Part 1 is centred on the Principal Subject module (WMM4045, 60 credits) in the student’s area of specialism. Another aspect of the same area will be explored in the Independent Special Study (WMP4049, 20 credits).

WMP4052 Preparing for the Part 2 project (10 credits) acts as a bridge between Parts 1 and 2.

Depending on the main area of specialism, students will attend a core module in musicology (WMP4041 Current Musicology, 30 credits) or composition (WMP4042 Contexts and Concepts in Composition, 30 credits). During these modules students will became familiar with up-to-date research and creative techniques and methodologies in the selected disciplines.

Subject-specific teaching is provided through a combination of individual tuition and seminar session in small groups. Within each of the chosen subject areas, students can identify their own projects, for which they will receive expert supervision.

Compulsory modules:

Standard Track

Principal Subject, to be chosen from the published list for that Academic Year (40 Credits). Study areas currently offered are: Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Ethnomusicology, Celtic Traditional Music, Music in Wales, Music and the Christian Church, Composition, Electroacoustic composition / Sonic arts, Composing Film Music, Studying Film Music, Solo Performance, Music in the Community, Sacred Music Studies, Early Music, 20th-/21st-century Music.
Compulsory Core Module: either Current Musicology (for musicologists) or Concepts of Composition (for composers) (depending on the Principal Subject) (30 Credits).
Open submissions: to be chosen from the optional modules (40 credits).
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits).
(Total of 120 credits)

Special Track

Principal Subject, to be chosen from the published list for that Academic Year (60 Credits). Study areas currently offered: Historical Musicology; Editorial Musicology; Music in the Christian Church; Celtic Traditional Music; Music in Wales; Studying Film Music).
Compulsory Core Module: either Current Musicology (for musicologists) or Concepts of Composition (for composers) (depending on the Principal Subject) (30 Credits).
Independent Special Study (must be in the same area as the Principal Subject) (20 credits)
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits)
(Total of 120 credits)

Optional modules:

Standard Track

Open Submissions (40 or 20 credits) may be chosen in any of the following study areas (but have to be different from the Principal Subject): Historical Musicology; Editorial Musicology; Ethnomusicology; Celtic Traditional Music; Music in Wales; Music and the Christian Church; Composition; Electroacoustic Composition / Sonic Arts; Composing Film Music; Studying Film Music; Solo Performance; Sacred Music Studies; Early Music; 20th-/21st-century Music; Analysis, Arts Administration, Music Studio Techniques, Popular Music Studies, Techniques and Practice of Instrumental or Vocal Teaching (20 credits only), Performance Practice (20 credits only), Music for Instruments and Electronics (20 credits only), Supporting Studies (20 credits only), ELCOS Language Skills (20 credits, international students only.ded study (e.g. portfolio of compositions, performance recital).

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Our MA Composition/Ensemble/Jazz/Music Performance/Performer-Composer programme is designed for students wishing to develop their skills as performers and composers, and to become informed with engaged musicians. Read more
Our MA Composition/Ensemble/Jazz/Music Performance/Performer-Composer programme is designed for students wishing to develop their skills as performers and composers, and to become informed with engaged musicians. It aims to equip students with the musical skills, insight and experience necessaru to engage with the contemporary profession in its widest sense, with a focus on Western art music and jazz traditions.

Programme Content

You will receive individual principal study tuition, offered in a range of disciplines, as part of the Professional Studies module. Where appropriate, you may also receive tuition in related or supporting instruments/disciplines such as jazz, doubling instruments or early music.
You will also participate in department specific classes which are designed to give further support to your progress as performers or composers.
The programme offers a wide variety of performance opportunities focusing on skills applicable to both traditional and less traditional ensembles, and community and outreach work.
You will undertake an intensive Research Lab module which provides a foundation for Masters-level critical thinking to underpin all aspects of your programme.

The programme also offers a range of elective options, through which you will be able to develop and explore subjects appropriate to your developing artistic profile and which will enhance your employability in the professional world. These options will usually include:

- Arranging and Musical Techniques
- Creative Leadership
- Digital Musician
- Music Now
- Music Pedagogy for the 21st Century
- Musical Direction
- Psychology in Music Performance

In your second year of full-time study (or third and fourth years if studying part-time), you will have the opportunity to develop your skills and interests, particularly as these relate to your principal study, in the core Entrepreneurial Musician module.

You will also take part in Trinity Laban's unique Collaboration Lab (CoLab). This is an exceptional learning space in which you will be encouraged to take creative risks and explore the boundaries of your art form in collaboration with staff and students from across Trinity Laban, leading artists from across the artistic spectrum and many of our professional partner organisations.

Visit the website for a full Programme Specification: http://www.trinitylaban.ac.uk/study/music/master-of-arts-ma-in-music

Facilities

- 100-seat Peacock Room
- 100-seat Theatre Studio, with sprung dance floor
- Elegant Stuart & Mackerras Rooms for chamber music
- 80+ practice rooms
- Dedicated suites for Brass, Composition, Early Music, Harp Jazz and Percussion
- Music technology facilities including a recording studio and keyboard laboratory

Faculty of Music

Located within the beautiful Wren-designed King Charles Court at the Old Royal Naval College, Trinity Laban richly deserves its international reputation as one of the premier institutions in the United Kingdom for the study of music.

The Faculty of Music is celebrated for its fine facilities, which include state-of-the-art practice rooms equipped with superb pianos, the outstanding Jerwood Library of the Performing Arts and the magnificent concert halls in nearby Blackheath.

We have long been acknowledged for fostering and promoting a caring and supportive environment in which our students can flourish and we are particularly proud of the high profile of our professorial staff, who work as acclaimed soloists or belong to top London orchestras and opera companies.

The beautiful site set alongside the River Thames and Greenwich Park, the highly distinguished and talented professorial staff and our innovative and comprehensive course provision make Trinity Laban's Faculty of Music the natural choice for all who seek the best in professional music performance training.

How to apply: http://www.trinitylaban.ac.uk/study/how-to-apply/music-applications

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Our MMus Composition/Ensemble/Jazz/Music Performance/Performer-Composer programme is designed for those who wish to build on their undergraduate studies to develop their skills as professional musicians. Read more
Our MMus Composition/Ensemble/Jazz/Music Performance/Performer-Composer programme is designed for those who wish to build on their undergraduate studies to develop their skills as professional musicians: both performers and composers. It aims to equip students with the necessary musical skills, insight and and experience required by the contemporary profession in its widest sense but with a focus on the Western Classical and Jazz traditions (the Jazz pathway offers discrete comprehensive specialist training). Graduates of the MMus lead the way in developing new approaches to musical performance, composition and research and can be found in leading roles across the music profession worldwide.

Key benefits

- The MMus programme provides access to Trinity Laban's unique Collaboration Lab (CoLab), an exceptional learning space in which you will be encouraged to take creative risks and explore the boundaries of your art form in collaboration with staff and students from across Trinity Laban

Visit the website: http://www.trinitylaban.ac.uk/study/music/master-of-music-mmus

The MMus programme can be taken on a full-time basis for two years or a part-time basis over four years (for 2016/17 entry onwards).

Programme Content

- All students receive individual principal study tuition, offered in the full range of instruments/disciplines, as part of the Professional Studies module. Where appropriate, students may also receive tuition in related or supporting instruments such as jazz, doubling instruments or early music
- Students participate in department specific classes which are designed to give further support to students' progress as performers or composers
- The course offers a wide variety of performance opportunities focusing on skills applicable to both traditional and less traditional ensembles, and community and outreach work.
- You will undertake an intensive Research Lab module which provides a foundation for Masters level critical thinking to underpin all aspects of the programme
- The programme also offers a range of Electives, through which you will be able to develop and explore subjects appropriate to your developing artistic profile and which will enhance your employability in the professional world

Facilities

- 100-seat Peacock Room
- 100-seat Theatre Studio, with sprung dance floor
- Elegant Stuart & Mackerras Rooms for chamber music
- 80+ practice rooms
- Dedicated suites for Brass, Composition, Early Music, Harp Jazz and Percussion
- Music technology facilities including a recording studio and keyboard laboratory

Faculty of Music

Located within the beautiful Wren-designed King Charles Court at the Old Royal Naval College, Trinity Laban richly deserves its international reputation as one of the premier institutions in the United Kingdom for the study of music.

The Faculty of Music is celebrated for its fine facilities, which include state-of-the-art practice rooms equipped with superb pianos, the outstanding Jerwood Library of the Performing Arts and the magnificent concert halls in nearby Blackheath.

We have long been acknowledged for fostering and promoting a caring and supportive environment in which our students can flourish and we are particularly proud of the high profile of our professorial staff, who work as acclaimed soloists or belong to top London orchestras and opera companies.

The beautiful site set alongside the River Thames and Greenwich Park, the highly distinguished and talented professorial staff and our innovative and comprehensive course provision make Trinity Laban's Faculty of Music the natural choice for all who seek the best in professional music performance training.

How to apply: http://www.trinitylaban.ac.uk/study/how-to-apply/music-applications

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These courses offer a flexible route to advanced musical study including classical, popular, world, contemporary, early, folk and traditional. Read more

Course Overview

These courses offer a flexible route to advanced musical study including classical, popular, world, contemporary, early, folk and traditional. You can pursue these research-based courses through creative practice (eg composition, performance, improvisation, musicology, or a blend of these) or musicological study in a field of your choosing.

Practitioners are able to study in areas such as performance, composition, studio-based work, improvisation, sound-art and mixed media – focusing in any one of these, or blending them according to their creative needs. Musicologists are able to study in areas such as critical and cultural musicology, ethnomusicology and world music, folk music studies, early music, popular music studies, and music theory and analysis. It is also possible to combine practice-based and musicologically orientated projects.

The Music Research Training module teaches essential skills and methodologies for the rest of the research-focused course. A series of three elective projects allows you to pursue research selected from a range of topics taught in staff-led seminar groups, or undertake supervised solo study in practice-based or musicological research.

Elective projects offered in recent years include: Urban Musicology; Improvisation for Creative Practice; Debates in the Philosophy and Theory of Music; Advanced Studies in Ethnomusicology, Folk and Traditional Music; Environmental Sound Art; Indian Music in Practice; Studying Popular Music; Projects in Music Analysis; Early Music Notation and Editing; Early Modern Music Materials.

The MMus and PGDip can be regarded as qualifications in their own right, but they also offer preparation for doctoral study, not least because of the strong research emphasis.

Modules

For detailed module information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/music-mmus-pgdip/#modules

How to apply

For course application information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/music-mmus-pgdip/#howtoapply

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The Music MA is a flexible programme designed to cater for those with a wide range of interests and specialisms. It is conceived as a 'next step' after the undergraduate degree, either as a stepping stone to research, as a qualification for teaching in the FE sector or simply to satisfy a thirst for development. Read more
The Music MA is a flexible programme designed to cater for those with a wide range of interests and specialisms. It is conceived as a 'next step' after the undergraduate degree, either as a stepping stone to research, as a qualification for teaching in the FE sector or simply to satisfy a thirst for development. There are 12 specialist pathways that you can choose from; each includes a range of core and optional taught modules and you will complete the course with a dissertation, recital or composition portfolio.

Pathways

Music MA: British Music Studies pathway
Music MA: Choral Conducting pathway
Music MA: Critical Musicology pathway
Music MA: Early Music pathway
Music MA: Electroacoustic composition/sonic art pathway
Music MA: Global Popular Musics pathway
Music MA: Instrumental/Vocal Composition pathway
Music MA: Mixed Composition pathway
Music MA: Open Pathway with Performance
Music MA: Open Pathway without Performance
Music MA: Performance pathway
Music MA: Performance Practice pathway)

About the School of Languages, Cultures, Art History and Music

The School of Languages, Cultures, Art History and Music brings together a number of internationally renowned departments to offer an extensive portfolio of innovative and interdisciplinary programmes in an exciting and creative environment, underpinned by a vibrant research culture.

We received outstanding results across the School in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) exercise, with at least 75% of our research judged to be ‘world leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ across all subject areas.

The Department of Art History, Curating and Visual Studies is located in the Barber Institute of Fine Arts, which houses the Barber Institute gallery and an exceptional Fine Art Library. The Department of Music is based in the Bramall Music Building, with state-of-the-art facilities including the 450-seat Elgar Concert Hall, a suite dedicated to the study and performance of early music, five electroacoustic studios and a large rehearsal room. We also have one of the best music libraries in the country, with special collections including materials on 20th-century English music, Baroque music and an extensive microfilm collection.

In addition to housing one of the UK’s largest groups of internationally renowned researchers in the national cultures of Europe, the Department of Modern Languages also hosts a Language and Media Resource Centre which specifically supports language learning through the latest interactive learning technology. We have a vibrant, international postgraduate community and offer excellent study and research opportunities in a supportive working environment.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgfunding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgopendays

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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This course is due to be revalidated, please continue to check the website for changes to the programme. Read more
This course is due to be revalidated, please continue to check the website for changes to the programme.

The MA in Contemporary Arts and Music offers a comprehensive introduction to creative strategies and practice-based research methodologies for developing innovative contemporary arts and music and enabling an in depth development of your concerns and interests. It provides an excellent basis for both doctoral research and ongoing independent practice.

The course has been designed to allow artists and musicians/composers to develop their interests in a vibrant, interdisciplinary context. It encourages students to develop experimental approaches to their work and examines the conceptual and creative role of the artist and musician/composer in 21st century arts practice.

Key elements include a focus of the role of site, context and location, together with an examination of the relationship between work and audience.

It is one of four taught postgraduate courses for artists, composers and interdisciplinary practitioners currently offered by the School of Arts at Oxford Brookes University. The other three courses are:
- MA in Contemporary Arts
- MA in Contemporary Arts and Music
- MA in Social Sculpture.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/contemporary-arts-and-music/

Why choose this course?

- The School of Arts offers a unified hub for the arts in the Richard Hamilton Building, with state-of-the-art technical facilities and 24-hour studio access.

- A special feature of all four interdisciplinary arts MA courses is the MA Forum, in which students and staff meet to discuss creative practice in a supportive and stimulating environment.

- Innovative cross-disciplinary and socially-engaged creative practices, including internationally renowned programmes in sonic art and social sculpture.

- A stimulating environment where creative practitioners and writers about the arts and culture work closely together to form specialist research units and interdisciplinary research clusters in areas including the Sonic Art. Popular Music, Opera and Social Sculpture.

- Research and teaching programmes linked to some of Oxford’s leading cultural organisations such as Modern Art Oxford, Oxford Contemporary Music, and events such as the annual OXDOX International Documentary Film Festival.

- You have the opportunity to spend a semester at one of the following institutions: the Bauhaus University in Weimar; Piet Zwart Institute, Rotterdam; or the Vilnius Art Academy.

- The School of Arts has a thriving culture of practice-based PhD research students, linked to our specialist research units. Seventy per cent of these research students began on our MA courses.

- Opportunities for international study, with students recently visiting the United States, Europe and Australia.

Specialist facilities

The MA in Contemporary Arts and Music is situated in the Richard Hamilton Building, which includes a large lecture theatre, a smaller lecture room, studios and installation rooms, music practice rooms and a research room for postgraduate students. Access to the Richard Hamilton Building is available 24 hours a day for all arts students.

The department also has access to the drama studio where performances and installations can take place. This provides a live performance venue with versatile sound, lighting and staging possibilities, including surround sound, projections and raised staging and seating.

- Arts-related workshops and IT
Contemporary Arts and Music students have access to well-equipped workshops run by technical specialists in Artists’ Books, Printmaking, Photography, Video and a range of processes including casting, metalwork and woodwork. General internet, email and office software are available as well as workstations with more specialist programmes including Photoshop, Illustrator, Adobe Audition 3.0; Sibelius 6; Cubase Essential 4; Pure Data; Hyperprism; GRM Tools and Composers Desktop Project.

Field trips

You have the opportunity to spend a semester at the Bauhaus University in Weimar.

Attendance pattern

Full-time students meet twice weekly in the first semester - mondays and Tuesdays, and in the second semester, on Tuesdays only.

In the summer Full-time students work to develop their Major Project, which concludes in early October the following year.

Part-time students meet once a week every Tuesday in their first year, and in their second year, once a week on Mondays in Semester 1 and Tuesdays in Semester 2. In Year 2 they work through the summer on their Major Project which concludes in October of their second year.

Students doing full-time need to be on-site or nearby, at least half the week, and put in about 40 hours per week.

Part-time students are expected to be in at least one day a week, and work in their own time for at least 20 hours per week, on or off site, as appropriate.

Careers

This unique programme enables students to develop excellent creative capacities, combining the rigour of a more traditional academic arts programme with innovative practical and vocational components which makes them well placed for a variety of careers in the creative sector and to work as practising cross artform practitioners.

Many Contemporary Arts and Music master's students who have developed their practice at postgraduate level continue as practising cross artform practitioners and sound artists, whilst others develop careers related to their knowledge, expertise or interests, for example within performance, festival management, new technologies; arts administration; arts and music teaching, arts for health, acoustic ecology, and as community cross artform activists.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

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This programme leads to Qualified Teacher Status. It equips you to teach pupils from 3-7 years and covers all areas of the Early Years Foundation Stage and Key Stage 1 curriculum, through lectures, seminars, workshops and tutorials. Read more
This programme leads to Qualified Teacher Status. It equips you to teach pupils from 3-7 years and covers all areas of the Early Years Foundation Stage and Key Stage 1 curriculum, through lectures, seminars, workshops and tutorials. You'll gain 60 Masters level credits and be awarded with a Post-Graduate Certificate of Education.

The programme will give you an in-depth understanding of inclusive practice, equality and diversity to prepare you for a career in London schools. As a part of the programme you will experience different schools and also have an opportunity to work in an Alternative Education Setting. You will follow a specialist Masters level module focused on Early Years Education.

LSBU has a particular focus on social justice and equality that is well matched to the needs of schools in urban and multicultural areas. At LSBU we encourage creativity, reflective pedagogy and sensitivity to educational issues.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/early-years-pgce

Why specialise in an Early Years PGCE?

The PGCE course qualifies you to teach any age group, but this pathway will allow you to experience the majority of your placements in Early Years Foundation Stage (nursery and reception) and Key Stage 1 (Year 1 or Year 2) and give you opportunities to develop your understanding of pedagogy with an early years focus.

Bursaries

The Government provides the following bursaries to be off-set against tuition fees, via the Training Agency. Tuition fees need to be paid by all students direct to LSBU. Students can use any bursary they receive from the Training Agency for this purpose.

As a primary teacher specialising in the early years, you could be eligible for a training bursary of £3,000 with a first, 2:1, Master’s or PhD.

You do not need to apply for bursaries. Once you have firmly accepted an unconditional offer of a place on a Teacher Training course (and supplied proof of your degree grade) the University will liaise with the Department for Education to put your bursary in place.

Modules

H Level Modules:
- Key Stage 1 core curriculum
This module covers all aspects of the English, mathematics, science and computing national curriculum at Key Stage 1.

- Professional studies
This module covers theories of learning, planning, teaching and assessment, classroom management and employment.

- Foundation subjects
This module covers the national curriculum foundation subjects including: history, geography, art and design, music, and design technology and links this to progression from the early years areas of learning and development.

- School experience
School experience begins in week four of the course. During your Reading Mentor placement you'll be placed in a local school three times a week, gaining experience in the teaching of reading. You'll have opportunities to work with a designated child to develop an in-depth understanding of how teaching relates to pupil learning and progress. Your first block school experience is eight weeks and culminates with you leading a class. School experience 2 is a nine week block, and by the end of this placement you will be expected to teach the whole class for up to three days a week.

- Alternative education setting
In term two you will arrange your own placement following your interests in an Alternative Education Setting. This placement is designed to give you a wider view of education and develop explicit skills that you will then be able to take into mainstream practice. For example you may choose to work in a Special Educational Needs setting or in a Pupil Referral Unit.

M Level Modules:
- Equality, inclusion and citizenship
This module will allow you to reflect on key issues such as equality, diversity and sustainability in the educational context. You'll undertake a small piece of classroom research.

- Early Years Education
This module provides you with the academic background that underpins key educational concepts and learning development theory in the Early Years. The module supports you in developing your understanding of how to plan and manage the curriculum across the Early Years phase and appropriately deploy resources and manage staff and home-school links.

Employability

The success of our PGCE courses has been recognised by Ofsted and we have been identified as a good provider of initial teacher training. Completion and employment rates for our PGCE are both above the sector norms (OFSTED 2014).

All students entering the course have the possibility of gaining up to 60 credits at Masters level, which can be used by students to count towards the award of full Masters qualifications (such as the LSBU MA in Education) gained via further study after graduation.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement in modules from employers
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search

Professional links

Academics from other institutions and related industries are invited as guest speakers to form part of the Equality Inclusion and Citizenship module. The Alternative Educational Settings placement provides an opportunity for you to experience teaching and learning in a completely different environment, and is one of the unique aspects of our programme. This placement may be related to your choice of Masters Level option module.

Placements

During the course you'll spend 24 weeks on school placements which you'll undertake in at least two schools. There will be a specialised reading placement and a placement in an Alternative Educational Setting, allowing experience of working in the relevant age phases (Foundation Stage and Key Stage 1). Placement schools are chosen to provide different experiences including size, organisation and location.

Our partnership works with a wide range of nurseries and schools across London. Placements are allocated as best fit for each trainee, but if you live in outer London or beyond it may require careful planning by you so that you are able to work at assigned schools.

Teaching and learning

The university based sessions are taught through lectures, workshops, practical sessions, seminars and tutorials. The aim throughout is to encourage creativity, reflective pedagogy and sensitivity to educational issues, aims and objectives. We aim to provide a learning community that actively challenges inequality and injustice.

In particular, the module on Equality, Inclusion and Citizenship will allow you to reflect on key issues such as equality, diversity and sustainability in the educational context.

You will be encouraged to make links between the theoretical and practical elements of the course. We use an interactive model of teaching and learning and you will be encouraged to think critically about subjects to inform your understanding of effective methods of teaching and learning and how best to apply these in classroom situations.

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If your passion lies in research the Department provides a fertile and supportive environment to pursue your interests. Our staff features a diverse range of researchers and practitioners who provide expert guidance through our research-focussed courses, including practice-based and practice-led topics. Read more
If your passion lies in research the Department provides a fertile and supportive environment to pursue your interests. Our staff features a diverse range of researchers and practitioners who provide expert guidance through our research-focussed courses, including practice-based and practice-led topics.

The MPhil in Music can be taken through three different routes.

MPhil by Thesis

Research topics for MPhil/PhD by thesis may be proposed in any area closely related to the research interests of current members of staff (see staff profiles). Students work independently with regular supervision from their research supervisor, and attend research seminars (normally four each term). Thesis titles from recent years include:
-Music and Language in the Works of Samuel Beckett
-Beyond Simplicity: Approaches to the Analysis of Contemporary Music
-Melodic Oganisation and Improvisation in Thai Music with Special Reference to the Thaang Ranaat Eek
-A Ghanaian Perspective on the Changing Role of Traditional African Music in a Contemporary Society
-Passion and Persuasion: The Art of Rhetoric and the Performance of Early 17th Century Solo Sonatas
-The Community Education Work of Orchestras and Opera Companies: Principles, Practice and Problems
-Gesture and Affekt in the Performance of Baroque Vocal Music
-3 Masses by Frangiskos Leondaritis c1516 - c1572
-Interpreting Music: contemporary performance practice on the violin

MPhil by Performance

Outstanding performers, working in any area supported by the Department of Music, may propose a programme of research leading to the degree of PhD.

The PhD by Performance offers performers an opportunity to develop original, innovative projects in an area of musical practice, in an academic environment in which creativity and scholarship are equally balanced and in which work can be carried out without the constraints often encountered in the professional world.

Submission is by portfolio, which may be variously constituted, depending on the nature of the agreed research programme. The portfolio will contain up to six discrete performance projects, fully documented and supported by appropriate commentary, bibliography and discography. Alternatively, a portfolio may comprise a single extended public or recorded performance, accompanied by a single original thesis of 45,000 words, or by a portfolio of performances (usually five or more substantial submissions).

Candidates for the MPhil may submit a portfolio of up to four performance projects, fully documented and supported by appropriate commentary, bibliography and discography. Alternatively, a portfolio may comprise a single extended public or recorded performance accompanied by a single original thesis of c. 30,000 words, or by a portfolio of performances (usually three or more substantial submissions).

University regulations require all candidates to register for the degree of MPhil in the first instance; transfer to PhD depends on satisfactory progress in the first year. This decision is taken by the advisory panel during the Spring term of the second year.

Applications will be considered from candidates who hold a relevant university degree or approved equivalent qualification, or who can demonstrate sustained professional experience as a performer and an appropriate level of academic competence.

MPhil by Composition

Composers work independently, under the guidance of an academic supervisor. There are currently seven members of staff at York supervising composition. There are weekly Composition seminars (Tuesdays 4.00-5.30pm) throughout the academic year. Some of these are presented by visiting composers, others by staff or postgraduate students of the department.

The student run Chimera Ensemble provides a regular public platform for high quality performance of student compositions, and other performance opportunities are ofen provided by the resident ensembles, University Chamber Orchestra, and professional orchestras and ensembles in the region.

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Situated spectacularly at the western edge of the culturally vibrant city of Vancouver, the University of British Colombia offers exciting opportunities for graduate study in Music Education. Read more

Program Overview

Situated spectacularly at the western edge of the culturally vibrant city of Vancouver, the University of British Colombia offers exciting opportunities for graduate study in Music Education.

UBC graduate programs in Music Education are designed to meet a variety of needs and interests, including those of the busy professional teacher, the researcher, the administrator, the curriculum developer, and the future university professor. Specializations include conducting, music pedagogy, early childhood music, curriculum development, cultural studies, music and media studies, music and related technologies, and teacher education.

Music Education faculty members have a wide range of research interests and specialties, using methods that are both qualitative (based in philosophy, history, psychology, sociology, arts-based educational research, and a/r/tography) and quantitative (involving quasi-experimental research, survey research, and large-scale multivariate designs). Courses across the university are also available to our graduate students, and cross-faculty inquiry is actively encouraged.

UBC Music Education graduates have successful careers and have risen to leadership positions in North America, Europe, and Asia.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Arts
- Specialization: Music Education
- Subject: Education
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Thesis required
- Faculty: Faculty of Education

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Situated spectacularly at the western edge of the culturally vibrant city of Vancouver, the University of British Colombia offers exciting opportunities for graduate study in Music Education. Read more

Program Overview

Situated spectacularly at the western edge of the culturally vibrant city of Vancouver, the University of British Colombia offers exciting opportunities for graduate study in Music Education.

UBC graduate programs in Music Education are designed to meet a variety of needs and interests, including those of the busy professional teacher, the researcher, the administrator, the curriculum developer, and the future university professor. Specializations include conducting, music pedagogy, early childhood music, curriculum development, cultural studies, music and media studies, music and related technologies, and teacher education.

Music Education faculty members have a wide range of research interests and specialties, using methods that are both qualitative (based in philosophy, history, psychology, sociology, arts-based educational research, and a/r/tography) and quantitative (involving quasi-experimental research, survey research, and large-scale multivariate designs). Courses across the university are also available to our graduate students, and cross-faculty inquiry is actively encouraged.

UBC Music Education graduates have successful careers and have risen to leadership positions in North America, Europe, and Asia.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Education
- Specialization: Music Education
- Subject: Education
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Major Project/Essay required
- Faculty: Faculty of Education

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Early Childhood Studies at Roehampton is committed to babies and young children as people with agency and unique capacities, and to their overall wellbeing from the prenatal period. Read more

Summary

Early Childhood Studies at Roehampton is committed to babies and young children as people with agency and unique capacities, and to their overall wellbeing from the prenatal period.

The postgraduate programme draws on Froebel’s understanding of the transformative power of young children’s play on their thinking, and the crucial way that adults can either seek to assist or control young children’s intrinsic creativity. In adults’ interactions with children, however, Froebel recognised the profound influence of the community and social context.

The syllabus is underpinned by an awareness of the influence of these social, cultural and political contexts on young children’s lives, and of the roots and structures of inequality that arise from these issues. The programme will strengthen your awareness and understanding of these influences and explore how you take account of them in action. In these respects, the programme also draws inspiration from the work of Paulo Freire, the radical and pioneering educator.

The teaching is informed by active research and scholarship in early years policy and practice, as well as leading research into young children’s well-being, thinking and understanding. There is a deep commitment to working in partnership with families and communities and to the development of students’ professionalism, advocacy and leadership.

The programme is relevant, engaging and of professional and personal value for a variety of roles within the early years sector. For those working directly with young children, engagement with the course content will provide a platform for continuing professional development and career progression, while for those involved in early years policy or research, the course offers an opportunity to engage with up current thinking in a broad range of issues.

Content

Students will first look at babies' and children’s capacity for play, how they think, and how they communicate their ideas and emotions though a variety of ‘languages’ such as talk, mark-making, drawing, construction, movement, music and dance. This is studied from a variety of theoretical perspectives, critically looking at the values and assumptions underpinning these views.

There is special focus on Froebel’s legacy in early childhood practice and other key pioneers in the child-centred tradition, which embodies advocacy and respect for children and their families. You will gain an understanding of the political nature of this work, learn advocacy skills for the well-being of young children and their families and develop effective leadership and collaboration techniques across disciplines in the field of early childhood. Alongside modules going deeper into young children’s emotions and well-being, students will learn skills for undertaking their own social and educational research. These skills will be put into practice with an extended in-depth research-based project, critically enquiring into an identified social or educational problem.

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Our Music MPhil and PhD programmes enable you to pursue advanced research in the areas of classical, popular, world, contemporary, early, folk and traditional music through a range of approaches. Read more

Course overview

Our Music MPhil and PhD programmes enable you to pursue advanced research in the areas of classical, popular, world, contemporary, early, folk and traditional music through a range of approaches. These include practice-based research, and musicological and theoretical inquiry.

Practice-based research focuses on composition, performance and improvisation.

Areas of musicological and theoretical inquiry can include the following approaches: cultural and critical; historiographic; ethnomusicological; music analytical; philosophical and aesthetic.

If you choose to engage in academic research you are normally assessed by a thesis of no more than 100,000 words for PhD and 50,000 words for MPhil, inclusive of notes, bibliography and appendices. If you choose to undertake practice-base research you will normally submit a portfolio (eg of scores, sound files, video files, other forms of documentation or some combination of these), supplemented by a related dissertation to explain the larger, practice-based component.

Applications are welcome from students with academic or practice-based research interests in any field of expertise among our staff. To view the areas that we are able to supervise please see the ICMuS Research Website, as well as individual staff pages.

You will join a wider community of fellow postgraduate students working in the International Centre for Music Studies (ICMuS), and more widely in the School of Arts and Cultures and Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences. ICMuS also holds regular PhD/MPhil forums for students to discuss their research.

All PhD students are given the opportunity to undertake some undergraduate teaching, with appropriate mentoring, at a suitable point in their study.

Training and Skills

As a research student you will receive a tailored package of academic and administrative support to ensure you maximise your research and future career. The academic information is in the programme profile and you will be supported by our doctoral training centres, Faculty Training Programme and Research Student Support Team.

For further information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/music-mphil-phd/#training&skills

How to apply

For course application information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/music-mphil-phd/#howtoapply

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Our Music MLitt enables you to develop a flexible individual research programme in classical, popular, world, contemporary, early, folk and traditional music, applying approaches of interest to you (eg historiographic, theoretical, cultural, critical), under the supervision of specialists who are leaders in their field. Read more

Course overview

Our Music MLitt enables you to develop a flexible individual research programme in classical, popular, world, contemporary, early, folk and traditional music, applying approaches of interest to you (eg historiographic, theoretical, cultural, critical), under the supervision of specialists who are leaders in their field.

This programme is primarily aimed at students who want to pursue independent musicological research, and who like the idea of first working on shorter research assignments (which can be on related or separate topics), before embarking on an extended final dissertation.

It provides an excellent foundation for continuing on to doctoral study. It is also a valuable qualification in its own right and can add a further dimension to your undergraduate degree, in a 3+1 model.

The MLitt is a modular research programme, which means that it is made up of discrete areas of study: Music research training (20 credits); Research assignments (80 credits); Dissertation (80 credits).

The research assignments are one of the programme’s distinctive features. They allow you to propose and research two or three separate projects (weighted at 40+40, or 20+20+40 credits), which may be connected or on discrete topics, and which lay the ground for your final dissertation. These are completed at the end of April (in year two for part time students) leaving the rest of the programme devoted to your dissertation.

Training and Skills

For detailed information on modules, training and skills see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/music-mlitt/#training&skills

How to apply

For course application information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/music-mlitt/#howtoapply

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