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Masters Degrees (E-Publishing)

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Explore your own original ideas in a specialist environment of feedback and critique from academics, novelists, playwrights and poets. Read more
Explore your own original ideas in a specialist environment of feedback and critique from academics, novelists, playwrights and poets. Housed within The Liverpool Screen School you will produce a body of creative work and gain an in-depth knowledge of your craft.

•Course runs on a biannual basis - next intake 2017
•Masters degree available to study part time (two years)
•Learn from practising and published writers
•Study on a unique programme providing training in e-publishing and detailed peer critique workshops
•Strong links with Curtis Brown, Blake Friedman, The Society of Authors, the Royal Literary Fund, NAWE, Hodder and Stoughton, Parthian, Salt, Everyman Theatre, Byte the Book, Tindall Street, BBC Radio, Comma Press and Faber & Faber
•Taught in the £38million Redmonds Building in the heart of Liverpool city centre

The part-time MA Writing programme is ideal if you want to develop your writing talent with tutors who are practicing and published writers.

What you will study on this degree

Please see guidance below on core modules for further information on what you will study.

Foundation: Reading as a Writer

Develop your creative, formal, research and technical skills appropriate to writing at masters level, in particular the techniques of contemporary writers and you will relate your own reading to your writing

Writers Workshop 1

Work towards achieving presentation to professional standards and further an original and creative voice as a writer by fostering close reading and constructive criticism

Defining a Writer's Identity: New Technologies and the Marketplace

Deepen your understanding and develop your creative formal and technical skills by acquainting yourself with the technological side of the writing industry and developing the relevant skills

Writers Workshop 2

The module will further develop the creative, formal, and technical skills of drafting and editing

Portfolio and Critical Commentary

You will show creative, formal and technical skills appropriate to creative writing at masters level - your finished portfolio will consist of a substantial piece of creative work negotiated with your tutor

Further guidance on modules

The information listed in the section entitled 'What you will study' is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change. Students will be required to undertake modules that the University designates as core and will have a choice of designated option modules. Additionally, option modules may be offered subject to meeting minimum student numbers.

Academic Framework reviews are conducted by LJMU from time to time to ensure that academic standards continue to be maintained.

Please email if you require further guidance or clarification.

The programme explores the process of writing from first inspiration to final draft and publication and reflects the need for writers to keep up-to-date with rapid advances in the new technologies of contemporary publishing. You will benefit from the close study of writerly techniques and strategies, develop your work to a professional standard and gain access to professional practitioners, such as visiting novelists, poets and screenwriters as well as editors, agents and publishers. In this way your work will be able to thrive in the wider world.

Examiners attest to the programme’s national standing, scrupulous assessments and high quality of teaching and student work. In the national 2014 Postgraduate Taught Experience Survey (PTES), the programme rated 100% satisfaction for most aspects of the course.

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Delivered by expert practitioners and aimed at graduates from various disciplines and industry professionals wishing to broaden their skills across film, digital, media, photography, writing and performance. Read more
Delivered by expert practitioners and aimed at graduates from various disciplines and industry professionals wishing to broaden their skills across film, digital, media, photography, writing and performance. This programme equips you for a creative media career, offering network contacts, an impressive portfolio and essential practical skills.

About the programme

This unique programme will help you explore and consolidate your creative identity, working with others from diverse creative backgrounds to nurture your creative potential and create new opportunities to help sustain your career.

Informed by research excellence and expert professional practice, the programme will bring out your creative potential, while providing the critical focus essential to respond flexibly to new opportunities and sustain your career.

Practical experience

The Pg Diploma and Masters programmes offer work-related learning through the module Creative Skills 2, either as a placement in the screen and broadcast industries and/or work on a professional project.

Your learning

There are three stages:

- Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits):
Core modules (20 credits each at SCQF 11 unless otherwise noted) include:
• Creative Skills 1 – introducing new creative skill areas in short creative projects

• Critical Media Contexts – an essential overview of contemporary critical debate

• Creative Media Practice – intensive CPD workshops with reflective analysis

Students choose one option including:
• Motion Graphics (SCQF 10)
• Producing for Film & Television (SCQF 10)
• Producing Factual Formats (SCQF 10)
• Writing the One Act Play (SCQF 10)
• Music Film and Sound Aesthetics (SCQF 10)
• Podcasting and New Media (SCQF 10)

- Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits):
• Creative Skills 2 – a placement in the screen and broadcast industries and/or work on a professional project

• Collaborative Project – a previous venture won the 2013 BAFTA New Talent Award

• Research: Critical Development – introduction to research methods associated with creative practice and preparation of a creative research proposal

- MA (180 credits):
A substantial practice-led research project, e.g. production of a feature screenplay, a documentary or digital media project. Previous successful Masters creative projects include an e-publishing project for fairy stories which was subsequently funded by Creative Scotland.

Our Careers Adviser says

Graduates have found roles such as independent producer; scriptwriter; TV development producer; documentary maker; and digital media producer/ developer. For graduates of design for the moving image, careers include artist filmmaker and motion graphics designer.

Financial support

In session 2015/16 the Postgraduate Diploma element of this programme carried SAAS postgraduate loan funding for eligible students. Check http://www.saas.gov.uk for 2016/17 loan info.

Great facilities

Accreditation by Creative Skillset, the Sector Skills Council for Creative Media, has led to the creation of the UWS Creative Media Academy. Operating across our campuses and through the UWS Glasgow Creative Enterprise Cluster, the Academy offers:
• A wide range of practice-led programmes

• First-rate facilities including an £81million investment in our new campus at Ayr

• Teaching in skills which are in demand by the creative industries

Research excellence

Our vibrant research culture spans a wide range of areas, including:
• providing advice on the cultural and educational aspects of the Olympic and Commonwealth Games

• student and industry collaboration on the creation of transmedia projects that offer real research and development potential and generate new online experiences for mobile and tablet users

• practice-led research in popular music, theatre, broadcasting and the visual arts

• new media art, ethics and emerging media technologies

• collaboration with leading arts festivals and venues including CCA Glasgow and Film City Glasgow

• creative writing for fiction, film, theatre and TV, working with leading broadcasters and arts companies

• cultural policy, cultural practice and cultural economy in Scotland and Europe, from small island communities to large urban areas

• participatory arts and media practice, community regeneration and public art

• journalism, politics and media representation

• the future of journalism and social media

• independent film and new media

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Since becoming the first London university to offer an MA Creative Writing in 2000, we have continued to pioneer, innovate and evolve the ways in which we approach the discipline. Read more
Since becoming the first London university to offer an MA Creative Writing in 2000, we have continued to pioneer, innovate and evolve the ways in which we approach the discipline. Now, in response to the world’s fast-changing media landscapes, we have developed a unique course to equip writers of all kinds with crucial skills, contemporary knowledge and industry insights to meet the challenges and opportunities of today’s digital, publishing and business environments.


Why study MA Writing for Creative and Professional Practice at Middlesex?

At Middlesex we support and nurture the creative aspirations of writers from a diverse range of backgrounds, from novelists to poets, essayists, biographers, media professionals and more. That’s why we developed our course to be flexible and interdisciplinary, drawing on the expertise of a wide range of professional writers, publishers and media professionals to enable you to pursue your creative projects with expert guidance on writing persuasively, getting published and promoting your work.

Based in our £80 million Media and Performing Arts School, you will explore both the traditional and contemporary opportunities for your writing, considering new media, online platforms and how maximise the potential of emerging markets. Our strong links to London’s vibrant literary community, including opportunities to be part of the North London Literary Festival, help you graduate with the skills, knowledge and industry contacts to turn your writing into a profitable career.

]]Course highlights:]]
- Valuable course of study for a wide variety of writers and professionals who will benefit from transferable skills in creative thinking, persuasive writing and audience awareness
- State-of-the-art facilities including brand new digital media suites, with expert guidance on digital platforms such as blogs, e-publishing, and social media
- Direct involvement with the North London Literary Festival, which attracts speakers such as Fay Weldon, Andrew Motion, David Nicholls and Michele Roberts, providing valuable insights, networking opportunities and masterclasses from some of the UK’s leading writers, publishers and literary figures
- Teaching staff who are all actively engaged in either writing, publishing or research, ensuring that you have access to the very latest thinking, findings and contemporary debates in Writing for Creative and Professional Practice
- Cross-curricular course structure to help enable you to collaborate with students who could enhance your creative projects, such as photographers and graphic designers

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The MSc in Archaeological Information Systems course will provide you with applied practical experience and critical theoretical engagement with a full range of computing systems and technology used for publishing, archiving, analysing, visualising and presenting archaeological information today. Read more
The MSc in Archaeological Information Systems course will provide you with applied practical experience and critical theoretical engagement with a full range of computing systems and technology used for publishing, archiving, analysing, visualising and presenting archaeological information today.

The University of York’s Archaeology Department has been at the forefront of researching and developing archaeological computer applications since the early days of digital practice in the discipline and has hosted the first online peer-reviewed e-journal for archaeology since 1996. It also hosts the world-leading Archaeology Data Service, which is the UK’s national digital data archive for the historic environment.

• Gain applied practical experience in internet applications, database design and management, GIS technology, CAD and computer modelling systems.
• Build a broad foundation of expertise in archaeological computing applications.
• Access the University of York’s world-leading expertise in e-publishing and digital archiving.
• Develop IT knowledge and skills that are highly valued in heritage-sector careers.
• Access a full suite of research computing hardware and software
• Receive tailored careers advice from staff with significant experience of recruiting within the sector.

York is one of the best places to study Archaeology, Heritage or Conservation. The Department has an excellent reputation and is one of the largest Archaeology teaching centres in the UK. The historic City of York is rich in architectural and archaeological treasures and resources which you will have easy access to during your studies.

What does the course cover?

Through a combination of academic studies, practical training, research and work placements, you will:
• Develop vital knowledge of the digital and internet technologies used for disseminating, publishing and archiving archaeological information.
• Learn practical skills in 3-D modelling, GIS, CAD and other technologies used for analysing and visualising archaeological information.

The course provides a detailed introduction to the broad range of information systems used in archaeology, and provides the opportunity to apply these systems in practice. The work placement and dissertation enable you to specialise in a particular technique or approach, giving you valuable practical experience in your areas of interest.

Who is it for?

The MSc in Archaeological Information Systems is designed for people who have a basic grounding in computer literacy and an interest in archaeology and heritage, and who wish to follow vocational training in archaeological information systems.

What can it lead to?

Many of our graduates go onto careers in archaeological computing, working in contract units or county-based records organisations. Others have founded their own consultancy businesses. Some apply their computing skills in more mainstream archaeological work, in museums, or in the wider world. Others have pursued further research at doctoral level. Click on the alumni tab above to find out what our alumni and current students have to say about the course.

Content

This one-year MSc course is taught via a combination of lectures, seminars and tutorials. You will study two core modules, two optional modules and four shorter skills modules of your choice. You will also gain valuable practical experience of applying information systems in the workplace on a work placement module. Finally, in the summer term you will develop your research and presentation skills by producing a dissertation and giving an assessed lecture.

Placement

Your work placement is a key feature of the course, providing valuable experience of using IT in an archaeological work environment. The placement offers you the chance to gain practical experience in a professional, academic or heritage environment. You will be able to work on projects that help you develop new skills or put into practice skills gained from your taught courses.

Aims
-To provide experience of computer applications within a workplace in the historic environment sector.
-To consolidate knowledge and understanding of computer applications from one or more of the taught modules.

Learning outcomes
Upon completing your placement you should have:
-Gained detailed knowledge of how information technology is applied in the workplace in the historic environment sector, under the guidance of experienced professionals.
-Developed an understanding of the contexts in which IT is applied, and of real world limitations.
-Developed your IT skills in one or more of the core areas covered by the taught programme (i.e. database design, web technologies, digital archiving, electronic publication, CAD, GIS and virtual reality modelling).

Placement providers
Although the organisations offering placements change from year to year, and you have the option of proposing other providers that match your specific interests, the following list is a good indication of some of the choices available:
-Yorkshire Museums Trust
-Archaeology Data Service
-City of York Council
-Internet Archaeology
-York Archaeological Trust
-Centre for Christianity and Culture
-L-P: Archaeology
-On Site Archaeology
-Council for British Archaeology
-West Yorkshire Archaeology Service
-Historic England
-English Heritage
-National Trust

Careers

The MSc in Archaeological Information Systems offers practical, careers-focused training for many essential roles in the professional world of archaeology. By the end of the course you will:
-Have examined how computers are applied in archaeology and their impact on the development of the discipline
-Understand the concept of the internet, be able to find and use relevant information and add materials to it
-Have the skills to evaluate critically the claims made for different computer applications and select the correct application for a given problem
-Have an understanding of authoring tools and be able to create an electronic text
-Have an understanding of database design and be able to design and implement a simple relational database
-Have an understanding of CAD and GIS and be able to create effective applications in each
-Have an awareness of digital archiving principles, resource discovery and metadata

Many graduates from this course go on to careers in archaeological computing with contract and county-based records units, or found their own consultancy businesses. Some apply their computing skills to more mainstream archaeological settings, such as museums, or in a range of the others sectors and roles, including:
-Archive management
-Social media management
-Local government and development
-Computing and IT services
-Business and administration
-Marketing and public relations
-Education

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The MA in Professional Creative Writing enables students to develop their writing craft and hone their writing skills towards the real world needs of the publishing, communication and media industries. Read more
The MA in Professional Creative Writing enables students to develop their writing craft and hone their writing skills towards the real world needs of the publishing, communication and media industries. The course covers traditional, contemporary and emerging forms of writing, from novel writing to the graphic novel and creative nonfiction, from playwriting to writing for television, screen and multimedia, from poetry to pyschogeography and ecowriting.

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

The MA Professional Creative Writing has been so named as to emphasise the professional aspects of creative writing: it is designed to enhance employability and focus is directed towards the development of students into professional writers. In particular:
-There are major mandatory modules in the key professional genres of narrative and dramatic writing (including ‘writing for television’), reflecting the real world professional activities of writers and employability opportunities for writers;
-Modules have professional coursework outputs in industry-ready form;
-Specific attention is given to commercial and related opportunities (professional networks, awards and competitions, submission windows, commissions and grants).

Innovation and internationalisation are key, with a focus on contemporary and emerging forms, such as the graphic novel, creative nonfiction, multimodal writing, eco-writing, e-publishing and writing for online video production. There will be a high level of virtual learning resources including video lectures, podcasts, virtual workshops, online writers’ groups, writers’ blogs and online peer-to-peer feedback, enabling easy global access. The course has and international outlook with texts studied coming from around the world and we have Online International Learning partners in institutions overseas: these offer the possibility of online student writing collaborations.

Two themed writers’ retreats are incorporated into the course: these are one week long field trips to coincide with significant writing up periods and may be in the UK or abroad. Current options include two of the following:
-The Horror: a winter week in the seaside town of Whitby, where Bram Stoker gave birth to Dracula;
-Romance: a spring week in the Lake District, haunt of the English Romantic poets;
-The Lost World: a spring or summer week in Spain, ‘lost’ in the remote mountains of the Alpujarras;
-Crime: a spring or summer week in Sicily, home of the Mafia;
-Myth and the Muses: a summer week in Greece, ancestral home of Western literature.

A student may as an alternative elect to organise a DIY writers’ retreat, aligned to their own specific needs as a writer.

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

The core mandatory modules are:
-The Novel, the Graphic Novel and Creative Non-Fiction
-Writing for Stage and Television
-Writing Genre Fiction
-Creative Dissertation

Optional modules* include:
-Writing for Film and Video Production
-Poetry and Style in a Digital Age
-Eco-writing
-Multimodal Writing

*Choose two. Note that the provision of optional modules is dependent on student choice and numbers and may vary year to year.

HOW WILL THIS COURSE BE TAUGHT?

Teaching and learning will take place in workshops, seminars, lectures and tutorials. Eco-writing sessions will take place outside of the classroom and multimodal writing will take place in an Art and Design laboratory. Specialist software is available for scriptwriting and screenwriting and there will be a large array of online materials and resources available. There will be guest lectures by industry professionals and themed trips. Writers’ retreats will also be an inclusive feature of this course: these enable students to write in a relaxed environment and are in places of special interest to writers.

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