• University of York Featured Masters Courses
  • Regent’s University London Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
  • Imperial College London Featured Masters Courses
  • Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • Leeds Beckett University Featured Masters Courses
King’s College London Featured Masters Courses
University of Sussex Featured Masters Courses
Cass Business School Featured Masters Courses
University of Sussex Featured Masters Courses
University of London International Programmes Featured Masters Courses
"e" AND "research"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (E Research)

  • "e" AND "research" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 3,163
Order by 
We're committed to developing our postgraduates into skilled researchers who can conduct rigorous research using a variety of methodologies and methods- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-psychology/. Read more
We're committed to developing our postgraduates into skilled researchers who can conduct rigorous research using a variety of methodologies and methods- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-psychology/

Supervision can be offered in any of the areas of departmental activity.

During your first year you may take a range of taught modules including research design and analysis, methodology, theoretical issues, and statistics; requirements will vary depending on any postgraduate research training you have already undertaken.

The MPhil programme offers the opportunity for you to continue your research to a PhD.

You will attend and contribute to research seminars, and through departmental and Goldsmiths-wide modules you are also encouraged to develop practical skills such as public speaking, poster preparation, scientific writing, and how to deal with the media.

You meet regularly with your supervisor at every stage, and develop a structured approach to designing, executing, analysing and writing up your research.

You will have access to the Department of Psychology's range of laboratories, testing rooms and research equipment. You have an annual allowance to contribute towards your research expenses and participation in at least one national or international conference.

What kind of research could I do?

We are able to support research in most areas of psychology. Some students have already formulated specific research ideas before they apply here, and find a supervisor in the department who is able to help them develop these into a doctoral research programme; if this applies to you, see information on the expertise of all our staff and contact any who you think may be able to help you to pursue these.

Other students are attracted by the research interests of our staff, and may decide to undertake a project which has been suggested by them and which relates to their ongoing research. To explore these or other research ideas, start by emailing the member of staff whose research interests you. Each staff member will discuss research ideas with you via email, skype or phone; and you are very welcome to visit staff at Goldsmiths to discuss your options further.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Denise Barry.

Structure

Our postgraduate students are offered a stimulating study environment in which to research their higher degree.

We have a thriving postgraduate school with some 40 current students on full-time and part-time programmes, including mature students and students from the EU and overseas.

We provide training modules in research methods in your first year, a regular report/presentation schedule, and excellent computing/research facilities.

If you are thinking of doing an MPhil at Goldsmiths, the first step is to get in touch with any members of our staff whose research is in line with your interests.

The MPhil programme offers the opportunity for you to continue your research to a PhD.

Training and support

All our MPhil students are assigned a specific research supervisor (or sometimes joint supervisors).

As well as receiving ongoing support and guidance from their allocated supervisor(s), our students undergo comprehensive training in psychological research methods (unless they already hold an MSc approved by the ESRC) in line with current ESRC training guidelines, which includes quantitative and qualitative research methodologies. This is mainly during the first year of registration (or first two years for part-time students. Our MPhil students also attend various short generic research skills and methods training (CRT) modules run by the College, also in their first year (or first two years if part-time).

Our students have full access to the Department's excellent facilities for lab and field research, and first-rate technical support is available from the Department's five-strong team of full-time technical staff.

Your progress

You may have the option to upgrade to a PhD after 12 months full-time, or 20 months part-time.

Your progress on your thesis is regularly monitored by the Department's Postgraduate Programmes Committee. The Head of Department can recommend suspension from the programme at any stage if progress is not satisfactory.

Postgraduate facilities

All full-time students have their own workplace and a networked computer with access to programmes for their research needs, plus email and internet facilities. Part-time students also have access to a networked computer, generally shared between two or three students. In addition, we have a lab solely for the use of postgraduates, and a postgraduate computing room. We also run a psychological test library for staff and students.

Seminars and presentations

Our postgraduates have regular opportunities to meet up with other students and to make contact with staff.

The Department runs a number of active visiting lecturer seminar programmes and a weekly Postgraduate Seminar Series, at which students learn about the research of their colleagues, and receive guidance on topics such as giving presentations or writing up a thesis. There are also several specialised research groups (including affective neuroscience, consciousness studies, development and social processes, occupational psychology, visual cognition) open to staff, researchers and postgraduate students which hold regular discussion sessions and talks.

All postgraduates are invited to attend an annual Research Seminar Weekend in an informal setting at Cumberland Lodge in Windsor Great Park, which is funded by the Department. Here, we have a programme of internal and external speakers.

In addition, our annual Postgraduate Poster Party gives students the opportunity to update the Department on their work.

Conferences

Besides the yearly presentation to the Department, our postgraduates are strongly encouraged to present their work, eg as a paper or poster, at external conferences and financial support is set aside for this. Some recent presentations by postgraduates include:

-Priming for depth-rotated objects depends on attention. (Vision Sciences, Sarasota)
-Imagining objects you have never seen: Imagery in individuals with profound visual impairment. (BPS Annual Conference)
-Modelling dopaminergic effects on implicit and explicit learning tasks. (Annual Summer Interdisciplinary Conference)
-Individual differences in affective modulation of the startle reflex and emotional stroop task. (BPS Conference)
-Evolution and psi: Investigating the presentiment effect as an adapted behaviour. (Society for Psychical Research 25th International Conference)
-Presence: Is your heart in it? (4th Annual International Workshop on Presence)
-The effects of state anxiety on the suggestibility and accuracy of child eyewitnesses. (11th European Conference of Psychology and Law)
-The psychosocial sequelae of aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage. (6th Scientific Meeting of the Stroke Association)
-The role of Electrophysiology in Human Computer Interaction. (HCI Conference)
-Categorical shape perception. Experimental Psychology Society and Belgian Psychological Society)
-Schizotypy, eye movements, and the effects of neuroticism. (10th Biennial Meeting of the International Society for the Study of Individual (ISSID))
-Eye movements in siblings of schizophrenic patients. (World Congress of Biological Psychiatry, Berlin, Germany)

Assessment

Thesis and viva voce.

Department

Psychology at Goldsmiths is ranked joint 3rd in the UK for the quality of our research**

**Research Excellence Framework 2014, Times Higher Education research intensity subject rankings

How does music affect mood?
Why do some people believe in the paranormal?
How do people with autism think?

In the Department of Psychology we try and investigate questions like this, conducting research that’s relevant to a range of sectors and industries – from advertising to education, and from banking to the public sector.

You’ll be taught by experts in the field, who are carrying out research that’s world class. And you’ll learn in a department with excellent specialist and general-purpose research laboratories, including:

EEG and brain stimulation labs for neuroscience research
a visual perception and attention laboratory equipped with state-of-the-art eye tracking systems
an infant lab
in-house technical support staff

Skills & Careers

You will receive training in and develop wide-ranging research skills, including:

database searching and bibliographic skills
managing and analysing data
presentation and communication skills
quantitative and qualitative research methods
handling legal and ethical issues in research
research design
project management

How to apply

Before you apply for a research programme, we advise you to get in touch with the programme contact, listed above. It may also be possible to arrange an advisory meeting.

Before you start at Goldsmiths, the actual topic of your research has to be agreed with your proposed supervisor, who will be a member of staff active in your general field of research. The choice of topic may be influenced by the current research in the department or the requirements of an external funding body. Supervision can be offered in any of the areas of departmental activity, as reflected in the research interests of our staff. Please contact a member of staff in the department, before making a formal application, and establish that they would be willing to supervise you in a research area of common interest.

If you wish to study on a part-time basis, you should also indicate how many hours a week you intend to devote to research, whether this will be at evenings or weekends, and for how many hours each day.

Research proposals

Along with your application and academic reference, you should also upload a research proposal at the point of application.

An approximate timeline of training and research plans and an outline of a previous research project in which you have played a leading role (for instance, a study you conducted for your undergraduate or MSc degree). The personal statement in the Departmental form will be structured in a different way to that on the College form. Please see guidelines on the form itself. Finally, your supervisor will be required to provide a statement detailing ways in which the project fits into their overall research programme and the wider research interests and facilities of the Department. Guidance on how to structure these is given on the form. Please do not exceed the word length, and DO NOT submit additional material emanating from your previous research (e.g. copies of dissertations, published papers) as this will not be read. Note that all aspects of the application are required for an application to be considered.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

Read less
As populations grow and competition for space and resources increases, society’s most pressing issues will need to be addressed by those who can work in collaboration with cognitive, occupational and social psychologists, as well as architects, educationalists, environmental scientists, engineers, landscape architects and planners. Read more
As populations grow and competition for space and resources increases, society’s most pressing issues will need to be addressed by those who can work in collaboration with cognitive, occupational and social psychologists, as well as architects, educationalists, environmental scientists, engineers, landscape architects and planners.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

How do individuals and groups react to different environmental situations (home, office, hospital, street, shop, and so on)? What psychological processes are triggered by our environment, and how do they affect our perception, attitude and actions?

How can individuals and groups change their environment so that it provides a more stimulating, less stressful and more enabling setting in which to live? How are our identities tied up with place? How might sustainability in environmental policy be better informed by current research?

Our MSc Environmental Psychology programme will help you gain advanced knowledge and understanding of theory and practice in environmental psychology.

You will also acquire a range of research skills that will give you the confidence and ability to undertake environmental psychology research in a professional setting.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time over two academic years. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Ergonomics and Human Factors
-Inquiry and Design
-Dissertation
-Qualitative Research Methods
-Quantitative Research Methods
-Key Questions in Environmental Psychology: People and Place
-Psychology of Sustainable Development
-Preparation for Academic Research in Psychology
-Conducting Health Psychology Research
-Social Change and Influence
-Maintaining Health Throughout the Lifespan
-Psychological Neuroscience: Electrophysiology

FUNDING

Funding is now linked to continuation funding for a PhD – that is, successful applicants to the Economic and Social Research Council will be given a grant for the MSc year and then further support (subject to satisfactory progress) to enable them to undertake a PhD.

Occasionally students receive financial support from industry through sponsorship. This would involve students undertaking a piece of research for their dissertation which would be of interest and value to industry or commerce, in return for which they will be given a grant by the commissioning company.

In the past, this sponsorship has ranged from £500 to £6,000. This is mutually beneficial to both the student and sponsor, and allows the student to undertake a ‘real’ piece of research that has practical or policy implications, whilst receiving a sum of money to assist with fees and subsistence costs.

ENVIRONMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY AT SURREY

The School of Psychology at the University of Surrey was the first in the world to establish an MSc in Environmental Psychology, in 1973. Since then there have been well over 250 graduates of the programme from over 25 countries worldwide.

It remains one of a few such postgraduate programmes in the world and the only one in the UK.

The MSc Environmental Psychology programme is part of a larger modular programme, thereby providing a flexible teaching and learning structure. The School of Psychology has a reputation for developing professional and innovative programmes reflecting contemporary societal concerns and employment opportunities.

Environmental Psychology at Surrey has always sought to be a multidisciplinary research activity. We are driven by psychological theories and methodologies, but draw on other social sciences, as well as the environmental and design disciplines.

We investigate environment behaviour relationships at every spatial scale and environment, from personal space and office design, through neighbourhood renewal, to the public understanding of global climate change.

PSYCHOLOGY AT SURREY

The School of Psychology at the University of Surrey is one of the most active and highly regarded psychology departments in the country. We specialise in applied and policy-oriented teaching and research within a strong theoretical context. The international, interdisciplinary, policy and applied strengths of the School mean that students’ theoretical and methodological research puts them at the cutting edge of the discipline.

We are one of the highest ranked Schools in the country for graduates entering employment, and also one of the largest providers of postgraduate training in the UK.

The University of Surrey’s School of Psychology has been the centre for many cross-national studies and has attracted funding from research councils and local and national government departments, such as:
-ESF
-Defra
-The Ministry of Defence
-Home Office
-The Environment Agency
-The Countryside Agency
-Surrey County Council
-The EU

If you choose to study psychology at the University of Surrey, you will be provided with a combination of opportunities that would be hard to match elsewhere. We offer you a degree that provides a thorough grounding in the theories, methods and practice of contemporary psychology.

Our programmes lay particular emphasis on the application of psychology to real-world problems, and also consider issues related to professional practice in preparation for your career as a professional psychologist.

The basis of good postgraduate programmes is the research activity of staff, the incorporation of current research programmes in teaching material and a reciprocal relationship between theory development and applied research in everyday contemporary issues.

We believe in involving all postgraduate students in the research life of the School through active participation in one of the research groups, attendance at research seminars and, where possible, an attachment to ongoing research projects.

As a student of the School of Psychology, you will also have access to a number of conferences, seminars and workshops hosted throughout the year.

COLLABORATIONS

Environmental psychology researchers have always enjoyed collaboration with other disciplines.

Current and recent research collaborations include an EPSRC funded research project on energy technologies in homes (REDUCE) with colleagues of environmental sciences (CES) and communications technology (CCSR), a DEFRA/ESRC-funded research programme on lifestyles in transition (SLRG) and a major ESRC funded research program on sustainable lifestyles (RESOLVE: research on lifestyles, values and the environment) both with colleagues from sociology, economics and environmental sciences.

We have long-established links with national and international academic institutions including the Department of Architecture at the University of Strathclyde, the Centre for Transport Studies at the University of West England and the Department of Psychology at Bath University.

The environmental psychology community is strongly international and this is reflected in the long-term active teaching and research collaboration we enjoy with the universities of Groningen, Madrid, La Coruña, Umeå and Rome.

Students on the MSc programme are encouraged to take advantage of these links during their dissertations.

MSc students are actively encouraged to participate in ongoing research projects. Our recent research clients include:
-Building Research Establishment
-Surrey County Council
-Eden Project
-Defra
-Environment Agency
-Forestry Commission
-European Commission
-Rentokil Initial
-King Sturge

RESEARCH

The Environmental Psychology Research Group (EPRG), of which students on the MSc in Environmental Psychology are automatically members, has been undertaking research for more than 30 years and has gained an international reputation.

Research undertaken by the EPRG is both ‘fundamental’ (that is, contributing to the development of the discipline and our understanding ofpsychological processes) and ‘applied and policy-oriented’.

Both government and business are concerned with effective policy development and delivery, and it is increasingly recognised that these can only be successfully achieved by informed evidence.

Students on the MSc Environmental Psychology programme are encouraged to make their research not only useful, but useable.

CAREER PROSPECTS

Recent graduates have progressed into careers in central and local government, undertaking policy-oriented research on a variety of environment behaviour (E-B) issues. Many of our graduates have become practice consultants, using their E-B research skills.

This could be a specialist E-B practice or an architecture, planning, design or engineering practice where graduates with a sensitivity to people-environment issues and a training in E-B research can provide an important and unique set of skills and expertise.

Those who have a background in architecture, landscape architecture, planning or design often return to their profession, but with an enhanced range of skills.

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The aims of the programme are as follows:
-To provide students with theoretical and qualitative/quantitative methodological expertise to conduct environmental psychological research by training them in the informed and systematic conduct of basic and applied research involving the critical reading of theories and empirical findings
-To provide students with an in depth knowledge of contemporary theoretical and methodological approaches to the discipline
-To enable students to link theoretical and empirical questions to social and environmental issues and to provide them with an in depth understanding of the practical applications and action implications of environmental psychological theories and empirical findings
-To provide students with the skills to evaluate possible interventions in a variety of environmental domains
-To offer opportunities to develop the basic interpersonal, technical and creative skills required for the effective analysis and formulation of problems into research questions and, where appropriate, testable hypotheses

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:
Knowledge and understanding
-Contemporary theoretical and methodological approaches to environmental psychology
-The practical applications and action implications of environmental psychological theories and empirical findings
-The principles of research design
-Quantitative and qualitative techniques and strategies to manage and analyse psychological data
-Ethical considerations when undertaking research and framing interventions

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Critically assess and comment on sources of research relevant to environmental psychology
-Critically evaluate the contributions and limitations of environmental psychological theories and research methods in environmental behaviour issues
-Evaluate actual and potential psychologically informed interventions in a variety of environmental domains
-Design, conduct and evaluate environmental psychological research
-Apply insights from environmental psychological theory and research to other domains of psychology

Professional practical skills
-Communicate work in a professional manner for academic and non-academic audiences in written and verbal formats
-Apply problem solving techniques to environmental and psychological topics effectively
-Use effective learning strategies
-Analyse and interpret environmental psychological theoretical analyses and quantitative and qualitative empirical evidence in a competent and critical manner

Key / transferable skills
-Communicate theories and methods in relation to environmental psychology by oral and written means
-Use information technology effectively
-Manage own personal development

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Read less
RECRUITING NOW FOR JANUARY 2016. The MSc Clinical Research is designed to recruit students who wish to learn about research methods and evidence based practice in a clinical setting and to develop a career in clinical academia or research with a potential to embark on further training such as a doctoral programme. Read more

About the course

RECRUITING NOW FOR JANUARY 2016
The MSc Clinical Research is designed to recruit students who wish to learn about research methods and evidence based practice in a clinical setting and to develop a career in clinical academia or research with a potential to embark on further training such as a doctoral programme. Students will receive training in qualitative and quantitative research methods to develop research competency, research skills and critical judgment in an area of clinical practice.

The programme is well suited for qualified Doctors, Nurses, Midwives, Allied Health Care Professionals, Dentists, Pharmacists, Health Science Professionals or Clinical Psychologists who have experience in a clinical setting.

This exciting and stimulating MSc Clinical Research is delivered by the established Centre for Research in Primary and Community Care (CRIPACC) within the School of Health and Social Work at the University of Hertfordshire. CRIPACC is a dedicated, enthusiastic and friendly research centre with a national and international reputation, offering an excellent opportunity to learn.

See the website http://www.herts.ac.uk/courses/clinical-research-msc

Aims of the MSc Clinical Research

- Develop a student's academic research career by advancing their research and leadership skills in a clinical area and provide outstanding preparation for future research training, including progression to doctoral studies.

- Equip the student with a core set of skills and knowledge of relevant theory and research methodologies in clinical research as well as a thorough understanding of the research process from planning, conducting, analysing and disseminating, to develop them into an independent researcher in their clinical setting.

- Enhance skills and knowledge that are transferable across a diversity of healthcare settings at an individual and organisational level, such as critical thinking, project management, use of IT and problem solving skills.

- Provide a supportive and stimulating blended learning environment, including small group teaching, Master classes, and a variety of e-learning teaching methods, and delivered by experienced and dedicated researchers in the internationally renowned research centre.

Why choose this course?

- Highly rated by past students as a positive experience and well organised course. Evidence Based Practice and Patient and Public Involvement in Research modules were particularly popular.

- Experienced multi-disciplinary lecturers with established track records in health-related research such as Adolescent, Child and Family Health; Older People’s Health and Complex Conditions; Food and Public Health; Patient Experience and Public Involvement; and Evidence Based Practice.

- Furthering the student’s academic career through personalised mentorship in line with the HEE/NIHR integrated academic career pathway. CRIPACC has a strong track record of mentoring having led the NIHR/CNO Health Research Training Fellow mentorship scheme and the local scheme developed in response to the Athena Swan Charter.

- Excellent opportunities to disseminate the student’s work through publication and presentation at conferences.

- A unique Clinical Research Dissertation where the student produces a ready-to-use research grant application for application in their clinical setting or a doctoral fellowship.

- In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, the School of Health and Social Work of which CRIPACC was a major contributor demonstrated an outcome of 82% of research quality being rated as 3* and 4*, with an impact and environment outcome of 100% at 3* and 4*.

- Two state-of-the-art Learning Resources Centres open 24/7 to meet modern integrated learning resources and services.

- Attainment a Good Clinical Practice Certificate and completion of the NHS Leadership “Edward Jenner” online programme.

Careers

On completion of the course, students will be well placed to carry out primary research, promote evidence-based practice by delivering and integrating research findings into their clinical practice and thereby improving health outcomes in their clinical settings. Students will be confident in publishing papers and presenting for conferences. Students will be prepared to apply for research grant funding and/or furthering their clinical academic career by pursuing a Doctorate degree.

Teaching methods

The programme is taught through a combination of innovative lectures, seminars, small group teaching, face-to-face tutorials, workshops, online teaching and individual supervision. Training is flexible and teaching is provided in blocks of two full days, which allows students to organise their time effectively to manage the demands of clinical practice and academic study.

Different assessment methods are used, including coursework and practicals. Coursework includes essays, short pieces of writing work, blogs, critical review, whereas practicals include oral presentations.

In addition, the University has an excellent reputation in blended learning and is supported by the Learning and Teaching Innovation Centre (LTIC). The MSc programme team collaborate with the LTIC and benefit from their expertise in incorporating effective learning, teaching and assessment methods into their modules.

The course is supported by a dedicated Information Manager and the two state-of-the-art Learning Resource Centres, which provide information, computing, study and coursework support. A versatile online inter-active learning environment, StudyNet, allows every student to access information relevant to their studies online through a web browser both on and off campus available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Programme Modules, Mode of Study and Awards

The MSc Clinical Research consists of six compulsory modules. As well as these modules, the students will have the opportunity to acquire their Good Clinical Practice certificate and complete the NHS Leadership “Edward Jenner” online programme during their studies.

The MSc Clinical Research is offered on a one year full-time basis or on a part-time basis from two years to a maximum of five years. Individual modules can also be taken.

The programme leads to the following awards:
- MSc Clinical Research – 180 credits required to be passed at level 7 and includes all six modules
- Postgraduate Diploma in Research Methodologies (Clinical Research) - 120 credits required to be passed at level 7 and includes all the modules, except the Clinical Research Dissertation module
- Postgraduate Certificate in Research Methodologies (Clinical Research) - 60 credits required to be passed at level 7 and includes the module Evidence Based Practice and either Qualitative Research Methods or Quantitative Research Methods modules

Find out how to apply here http://www.herts.ac.uk/courses/clinical-research-msc#how-to-apply

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.herts.ac.uk/apply/fees-and-funding/scholarships/postgraduate

Read less
This programme aims to provide students with a solid foundation in a broad range of social science research methods as well as basic research skills. Read more
This programme aims to provide students with a solid foundation in a broad range of social science research methods as well as basic research skills.

Students will acquire a general overview of the philosophy of social research, and understand how this informs research design, methods of data collection and analysis. They will also develop an ability to use a range of research methods, to communicate research findings effectively and an understanding of the potential use of and impact of their research within and beyond academia.

Core Modules

Philosophy of Social Science Research

The module considers fundamental philosophical debates about what counts as ‘knowledge’ across the social sciences. Teaching addresses (natural) science as a method of obtaining knowledge and the interpretative tradition in the social sciences. Students explore fundamental philosophical debates about what counts as ‘knowledge’ across the social sciences and apply these discussions to their own disciplines and field of study.

Research Design, Practice and Ethics

The module introduces students to social science research designs and ethical issues in research practice. Learning supports students to be able to make strategic choices when developing their own projects, and to assess the design and research ethics decision making in others’ published research work.

Fundamentals in Quantitative Research Methods

Concepts, methods and skills central to quantitative research, including data collection approaches and concept operationalization, are core throughout this module. Building on a grounding in ideas relating to probability sampling, sampling error and statistical inference, coverage of techniques extends from comparisons of means and simple cross-tabular analyses to a discussion of multivariate analysis approaches, focusing on linear and logistic regression.

Foundations in Qualitative Research

Qualitative research is examined across a range of topics, from different approaches and methods including ethnographic and observational research, discourse and conversation analysis, documentary and archival analysis, participatory research and the use of interviews. Ethics in qualitative research is specifically considered, as is the evaluation of qualitative research.

Advanced Training Programme

Unless stated, all advanced training courses run as 2-day intensive workshops from 10–4pm with breaks. This list is updated regularly as new courses are approved so do check this website from time to time to see what is on offer.

These advanced training courses are open to all research students in the College (and some departments in other Colleges, such as Geography, subject to the discretion of the Programme Team). However, places on each course are limited and priority will be given to MA Social Research students.

These advanced training courses are also open to all staff in the University who may wish to attend without completing the assessments. However, all doctoral researchers and staff who wish to do so will be placed on a waiting list. Confirmation will be sent a week before the course dates.

Advanced Training courses run in Semester 3, unless otherwise stated:

Analysing Hierarchical Panel Data
An Approach To Research On Discourse
Case Study Research Design
Documentary Research In Education
Factor Analysis
Introduction To Econometric Software
Introduction To Time Series Regression
Narrative Research
Multivariate Linear To Logistic Regression
Policy Evalution
Q Methodology - A Systematic Approach For Interpretive Research Design
Questionnaire Design
Researching Disability
Role Of Thinking: Philosophy Of Social Science Research
Visual Research Methods

NB: some courses have pre-requisites, e.g. to register on Multiple Linear and Logistic Regression, Factor Analysis, or Narrative Research, you will need to have passed Social Research Methods II (20 credits module), or equivalent. You will need to provide evidence that you have passed a similar course on quantitative/qualitative data analysis where appropriate.

To register for the above advanced training courses, please e-mail: specifying which courses you are interested in. When registering for courses, please provide your name, student ID, department/programme you are affiliated to, and your e-mail address.

In addition, you will write a 12,000-word dissertation (60 credits).

About the School of Government and Society

The School of Government and Society is one of the leading UK and International centres for governance, politics, international development, sociology, public management, Russian and European studies.
Established in 2008, the School comprises three Departments: Politics and International Studies (POLSIS); International Development (IDD) and Local Government Studies (INLOGOV).

POLSIS: The Department of Political Science and International Studies (POLSIS), one of the largest and most academically vibrant departments of Political Science and International Studies in the UK. In the latest Research Excellence Framework (REF) Politics and International Studies at Birmingham was ranked the 6th best in the power rankings highlighting the large number of staff in POLSIS producing world-leading and internationally excellent research.

IDD: Be part of global effort to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. Contribute to conflict resolution and post-conflict reconstruction. Help build capacity of nations and communities to adapt to climate change. Study with us to gain the skills and knowledge essential for working in international development in the 21st Century.

INLOGOV: The Institute of Local Government Studies (INLOGOV) is the leading academic centre for research and teaching on local governance and strategic public management. We enrich the world of local public service with research evidence and innovative ideas, making a positive difference.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgfunding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgopendays

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

Read less
The MPhil degree offered by the Department of Oncology is a 12 month full time programme and involves minimal formal teaching; students are integrated into the research culture of the Department and the Institute in which they are based. Read more
The MPhil degree offered by the Department of Oncology is a 12 month full time programme and involves minimal formal teaching; students are integrated into the research culture of the Department and the Institute in which they are based.

Each student conducts their MPhil project under the direction of their Principal Supervisor, with additional teaching and guidance provided by a Second Supervisor and often a Practical Supervisor. The role of each Supervisor is:

- Principal Supervisor: takes responsibility for experimental oversight of the student's research project and provides day-to-day supervision.
- Second Supervisor: acts as a mentor to the student and is someone who can who can offer impartial advice. The Second Supervisor is a Group Leader or equivalent who is independent from the student's research group and is appointed by the Principal Supervisor before the student arrives.
- Practical Supervisor: provides day-to-day experimental supervision when the Principal Supervisor is unavailable, i.e. during very busy periods. The Practical Supervisor is a senior member of the student's research team and is appointed by the Principal Supervisor before the student arrives. For those Principal Supervisors who are unable to monitor their students on a daily basis, we would expect that they meet semi-formally with their student at least once a month.

The subject of the research project is determined during the application process and is influenced by the research interests of the student’s Principal Supervisor, i.e. students should apply to study with a Group Leader whose area of research most appeals to them. The Department of Oncology’s research interests focus on the prevention, diagnosis and treatments of cancer. This involves using a wide variety of research methods and techniques, encompassing basic laboratory science, translational research and clinical trials. Our students therefore have the opportunity to choose from an extensive range of cancer related research projects. In addition, being based on the Cambridge Biomedical Research Campus, our students also have access world leading scientists and state-of-the-art equipment.

To broaden their knowledge of their chosen field, students are strongly encouraged to attend relevant seminars, lectures and training courses. The Cambridge Cancer Cluster, of which we are a member department, provides the 'Lectures in Cancer Biology' seminar series, which is specifically designed to equip graduate students with a solid background in all major aspects of cancer biology. Students may also attend undergraduate lectures in their chosen field of research, if their Principal Supervisor considers this to be appropriate. We also require our students to attend their research group’s ‘research in progress/laboratory meetings’, at which they are expected to regularly present their ongoing work.

At the end of the course, examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation (of 20,000 words or less), followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Course objectives

The structure of the MPhil course is designed to produce graduates with rigorous research and analytical skills, who are exceptionally well-equipped to go onto doctoral research, or employment in industry and the public service.

The MPhil course provides:

- a period of sustained in-depth study of a specific topic;
- an environment that encourages the student’s originality and creativity in their research;
- skills to enable the student to critically examine the background literature relevant to their specific research area;
- the opportunity to develop skills in making and testing hypotheses, in developing new theories, and in planning and conducting experiments;
- the opportunity to expand the student’s knowledge of their research area, including its theoretical foundations and the specific techniques used to study it;
- the opportunity to gain knowledge of the broader field of cancer research;
- an environment in which to develop skills in written work, oral presentation and publishing the results of their research in high-profile scientific journals, through constructive feedback of written work and oral presentations.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/cvocmpmsc

Format

The MPhil course is a full time research course. Most research training provided within the structure of the student’s research group and is overseen by their Principal Supervisor. However, informal opportunities to develop research skills also exist through mentoring by fellow students and members of staff. To enhance their research, students are expected to attend seminars and graduate courses relevant to their area of interest. Students are also encouraged to undertake transferable skills training provided by the Graduate School of Life Sciences. At the end of the course, examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation, followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of their MPhil course, students should:

- have a thorough knowledge of the literature and a comprehensive understanding of scientific methods and techniques applicable to their own research;
- be able to demonstrate originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- the ability to critically evaluate current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- demonstrate self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems;
- be able to act autonomously in the planning and implementation of research; and
- have developed skills in oral presentation, scientific writing and publishing the results of their research.

Assessment

Examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation of not more than 20,000 words in length, excluding figures, tables, footnotes, appendices and bibliography, on a subject approved by the Degree Committee for the Faculties of Clinical Medicine and Veterinary Medicine. This is followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Continuing

The MPhil Medical Sciences degree is designed to accommodate the needs of those students who have only one year available to them or, who have only managed to obtain funding for one year, i.e. it is not intended to be a probationary year for a three-year PhD degree. However, it is possible to continue from the MPhil to the PhD in Oncology (Basic Science) course via the following 2 options:

(i) Complete the MPhil then continue to the three-year PhD course:

If the student has time and funding for a further THREE years, after completion of their MPhil they may apply to be admitted to the PhD course as a continuing student. The student would be formally examined for the MPhil and if successful, they would then continue onto the three year PhD course as a probationary PhD student, i.e. the MPhil is not counted as the first year of the PhD degree; or

(ii) Transfer from the MPhil to the PhD course:

If the student has time and funding for only TWO more years, they can apply for permission to change their registration from the MPhil to probationary PhD; note, transfer must be approved before completion of the MPhil. If granted permission to change registration, the student will undergo a formal probationary PhD assessment (submission of a written report and an oral examination) towards the end of their first year and if successful, will then be registered for the PhD, i.e. the first year would count as the first year of the PhD degree.

Please note that continuation from the MPhil to the PhD, or changing registration is not automatic; all cases are judged on their own merits based on a number of factors including: evidence of progress and research potential; a sound research proposal; the availability of a suitable supervisor and of resources required for the research; acceptance by the Head of Department and Degree Committee.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

The Department of Oncology does not have specific funds for MPhil courses. However, applicants are encouraged to apply to University funding competitions: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding and the Cambridge Cancer Centre: http://www.cambridgecancercentre.org.uk/education-and-training

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

Read less
The MA in Anthropological Research Methods (MaRes) may be taken either as a free standing MA or as the first part of a PhD [e.g. as a 1 + 3 research training program]. Read more
The MA in Anthropological Research Methods (MaRes) may be taken either as a free standing MA or as the first part of a PhD [e.g. as a 1 + 3 research training program]. In either case, the student completes a program of research training that includes the Ethnographic Research Methods, Statistical Analysis and the Research Training Seminar as well as a language option. All MaRes students are assigned a supervisor at the start of the year, who will help the student choose other relevant course options. Candidates must also submit a number of research related assignments which, taken together with the dissertation, are equivalent to approximately 30,000 words of assessed work. All students write an MA dissertation, but for students progressing on to a PhD, the MA dissertation will take the form of a research report that will constitute the first part of the upgrade document for the PhD programme.

The MaRes is recognised by the ESRC.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthresmethods/

Aims and Outcomes

The MA is designed to train students in research skills to the level prescribed by the ESRC’s research training guidelines. It is intended for students with a good first degree (minimum of a 2.1) in social anthropology and/or a taught Masters degree in social anthropology. Most students would be expected to progress to PhD registration at the end of the degree. By the end of the program students will:

- Have achieved practical competence in a range of qualitative and quantitative research methods and tools;
- Have the ability to understand key issues of method and theory, and to understand the epistemological issues involved in using different methods.

In addition to key issues of research design, students will be introduced to a range of specific research methods and tools including:

- Interviewing, collection and analysis of oral sources, analysis and use of documents, participatory research methods, issues of triangulation research validity and reliability, writing and analysing field notes, and ethnographic writing.

- Social statistics techniques relevant for fieldwork and ethnographic data analysis (including chi-square tests, the T-test, F-test, and the rank correlation test).

Discipline specific training in anthropology includes:

- Ethnographic methods and participant observation;
- Ethical and legal issues in anthropological research;
- The logistics of long-term fieldwork;
- Familiarisation with appropriate regional and theoretical literatures;
- Writing-up (in the field and producing ethnography) and communicating research results; and
- Language training.

The Training Programme

In addition to optional courses that may be taken (see below), the student must successfully complete the following core course:

- Research Methods in Anthropology (15 PAN C011).

This full unit course is composed of Ethnographic Research Methods (15 PAN H002, a 0.5 unit course) and Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Social Research (15PPOH035, a 0.5 unit course hosted by Department of Politics and International Studies).

MA Anthropological Research Methods students and first year MPhil/PhD are also required to attend the Research Training Seminar which provides training in the use of bibliographic/online resources, ethical and legal issues, communication and team-working skills, career development, etc. The focus of the Research Training Seminar is the development and presentation of the thesis topic which takes the form of a PhD-level research proposal.

Dissertation

MA/MPhil Students meet regularly with their supervisor to produce a systematic review of the secondary and regional literature that forms an integral part of their dissertation/research proposal. The dissertation, Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology (15 PAN C998), is approximately 15,000 words and demonstrates the extent to which students have achieved the key learning outcomes during the first year of research training. The dissertation takes the form of an extended research proposal that includes:

- A review of the relevant theoretical and ethnographic literature;
- An outline of the specific questions to be addressed, methods to be employed, and the expected contribution of the study to anthropology;
- A discussion of the practical, political and ethical issues likely to affect the research; and
- A presentation of the schedule for the proposed research together with an estimated budget.

The MA dissertation is submitted no later than mid-September of the student’s final year of registration. Two soft-bound copies of the dissertation, typed or word-processed, should be submitted to the Faculty of Arts and Humanities Office by 16:00 and on Moodle by 23:59 on the appropriate day.

Exemption from Training

Only those students who have clearly demonstrated their knowledge of research methods by completing a comparable program of study in qualitative and quantitative methods will be considered for a possible exemption from the taught courses. All students, regardless of prior training, are required to participate in the Research Training Seminar.

Programme Specification 2013/2014 (msword; 128kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthresmethods/file39765.docx

Teaching & Learning

This MA is designed to be a shortcut into the PhD in that two of its components (the Research Methods Course and the Research Training Seminar, which supports the writing of the dissertation) are part of the taught elements of the MPhil year. Students on this course are also assigned a supervisor with whom they meet fortnightly as do the MPhil students. The other two elements of the course are unique to each student: and might include doing one of the core courses from the other Masters degrees (Social Anthropology, Anthropology of Development, Medical Anthropology, Anthropology of Media, Migration and Diaspora, or Anthropology of Food), as well as any options that will build analytical skills and regional knowledge, including language training. The MaRes can also be used to build regional expertise or to fill gaps in particular areas such as migration or development theory.

The dissertation for the MaRes will normally be assessed by two readers in October of the following year (that is, after the September 15th due date). Students who proceed onto the MPhil course from the MA will then have the first term of the MPhil year to write a supplementary document that reviews the dissertation and provides a full and detailed Fieldwork Proposal. This, along with research report material from the original MA dissertation, is examined in a viva voce as early as November of the first term of the MPhil year by the same examiners who have read the dissertation. Successful students can then be upgraded to the PhD in term 1 and leave for fieldwork in term 2 of the first year of the MPhil/PhD programme. This programme is currently recognised by the ESRC and therefore interested students who are eligible for ESRC funding can apply under the 1+3 rubric. (ESRC)

Destinations

Students of the Masters in Anthropological Research Methods develop a wide range of transferable skills such as research, analysis, oral and written communication skills.

The communication skills of anthropologists transfer well to areas such as information and technology, the media and tourism. Other recent SOAS career choices have included commerce and banking, government service, the police and prison service, social services and health service administration. Opportunities for graduates with trained awareness of the socio-cultural norms of minority communities also arise in education, local government, libraries and museums.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
Our MRes programme provide a personalised and focused introduction to postgraduate research allowing you to develop as an independent researcher with the support of an expert in Latin American Studies. Read more
Our MRes programme provide a personalised and focused introduction to postgraduate research allowing you to develop as an independent researcher with the support of an expert in Latin American Studies. It provides a rigorous overview of the current state of scholarship in your selected field, guides you, through a programme of directed, individualised reading, to the selection of a feasible research project, and allows you to complete a substantial piece of research.

As an MRes student you will benefit from your membership of the university research community, both students and academic staff. You will also have access to facilities available to doctoral students e.g. free Interlibrary loans, a print allowance and a research allowance.

Key Facts

REF 2014
We're ranked in top 50% for 4* and 3* research with 90% of environment at 4* and 3* (world leading and internationally excellent).

French
Since 2001, the Department has housed three major AHRC-funded projects in French; it also continues to be one of the leading centres in French studies for innovation in the application of IT and new technology to text-based research and the creation of international research networks. A major new monograph series, Liverpool University Press’s ‘Contemporary French and Francophone Cultures’, is co-edited within Modern Languages and Cultures.

German
Research in German studies at Liverpool continues to develop its breadth and vitality, through new appointments, and through a strategy directed towards promoting cooperation among staff in different subject areas. Colleagues are actively involved in interdisciplinary research centres, namely the Research Centre in Eighteenth-Century Studies, the Centre for the Study of International Slavery, and CAVA (The Centre for Architecture and the Visual Arts). These research centres provide a dynamic context for the development of staff and postgraduate research, and underpin and vitalise interdisciplinary research within the section and department as a whole.

Hispanic Studies
We continue to extend research activity over a broad range of areas in Iberian and Latin American Studies. The School is now at the forefront of high profile research in literary, historical, linguistic and cultural studies. Our research emphasises our understanding of ‘Hispanic studies’ in the broadest sense, as relating to the multiple geographical and linguistic contexts that make up the Hispanic and Lusophone worlds.

Latin American Studies and Italian Studies
The section has recently made new appointments including a new post extending our expertise to North America and the Caribbean. We have consolidated research clusters in American, Brazilian, Hispanic and Caribbean Studies, enhancing the research environment by providing institutional support to colleagues with related and overlapping interests. A University-wide research centre Research Institute of Latin American Studies (RILAS) fosters a robust research environment based in the Department.
Research in Italian studies is a recent addition to the School’s portfolio. The focus is on the contemporary and staff are involved in interdisciplinary research projects which feature, amongst others, the Linguistic Landscape, Italian political cinema and European cinema.

Why Department of Modern Languages and Cultures?

Introduction to Modern Languages and Cultures

We are a smaller department than many, but manage at the same time to maintain a variety of very distinctive areas of strength in research. As a result we are uniquely placed to offer taught programmes which are tailored to the individual in a friendly, supportive atmosphere and, for research students, close contact with your supervisors from the outset.

There is a high degree of interdisciplinary activity, with students and staff from all disciplines interacting through institutional research centres, cross-School reading groups, research groups and seminars.

We offer an MA in Latin American Studies and an MA in Modern Languages (French / German / Hispanic Studies/Italian) and supervision on a wide range of topics for both MPhil and PhD study.

Applications are welcome for both full-time and part-time study. Postgraduate students form an integral part of our research culture, and are encouraged to become involved in conference, workshops and seminar series, in addition, we have postgraduate reading groups and a regular programme of postgraduate workshops involving leading scholars visiting the institution. We have an active and vibrant research community, with staff engaging in research covering eight language areas consisting of French, German, Italian, Spanish, Galician, Catalan, Portuguese and Corsican. Research interests range from medieval manuscripts to contemporary cyber literature, and cover a wide geographical remit, with staff working on American, Latin American, and Caribbean, African and Indian contexts as well as European ones.

We are home to three scholarly journals: Bulletin of Hispanic Studies, Bulletin of Latin American Research, and Migrations and Identities as well as a number of prominent book series.

Research Overview

Our research activities are broadly organised around four research groups in addition to the Research Institute of Latin American Studies. The groups are engaged in interdisciplinary work, taking in literary, visual and historical sources, and collaborating across the language areas.

Latin American Studies

Latin American Studies is one of Modern languages and Cultures' major research specialisms. The six permanent members of staff have research interests in the following domains of Latin American Studies: anthropology, cultural studies, history, literature, politics, and sociology and extend to Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Central America, the Caribbean and southern USA. The Sydney Jones Library is an acknowledged centre of excellence for collections in Latin American Studies. Additional facilities for all postgraduates include access to regular seminars and short conferences, language tuition, and use of the University’s networked computer facilities.

Career prospects

Former postgraduates in French, German and Hispanic Studies are currently employed in senior positions at the universities of: Aberdeen, Sussex, Leeds, Sheffield, Kings College London, Loughborough, Salford and Liverpool, as well as in a variety of careers.

Read less
The MSc by Research in the Faculty of Social and Applied Sciences has been designed to offer a range of pathways for you to research your chosen subject interests within Social and Applied Sciences, whilst sharing in the multi-disciplinary nature of the taught component of course. Read more
The MSc by Research in the Faculty of Social and Applied Sciences has been designed to offer a range of pathways for you to research your chosen subject interests within Social and Applied Sciences, whilst sharing in the multi-disciplinary nature of the taught component of course.

You’ll share a breadth of experience – the multi- disciplinary nature of the taught component means you will share a broad experience of methodological and research issues, allied with subject specific supervision, allowing you to develop a unique awareness of knowledge and experiences across the natural and social sciences in addition to a focus on your own research topic.

Visit the website: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/courses/postgraduate/social-and-applied-sciences-research.aspx

Course detail

This exciting course “develops innovative training provision which cuts across disciplines and works at the boundaries with other scientific traditions”. It explicitly recognises the need to “offer high-quality integrated core provision in research skills and research methods training as well as subject-specific training” while using “flexible and imaginative methods of training provision and delivery”. (ESRC 2009).

It offers you the opportunity to complete an MSc in your chosen subject area over the course of one year (two years if part time). Beginning in early September, the course combines 60 credits of taught modules in the first (Michaelmas) term with 120 credits of research during the remainder of the year. The taught component of the course will be multi-disciplinary in nature with lectures and seminars led by experts from across the range of subjects in the Faculty.

Suitability

This course is suitable for students who wish to continue their studies beyond undergraduate level.

The course is ideal if you:
• may want to continue to doctoral level;
• wish to enhance your qualifications for career reasons;
• would like to undertake a research-based, rather than taught Masters;
• recognise the need for research training in your chosen career;
• wish to learn in a multi-disciplinary environment.

Content

You’ll follow a course of advanced study and research under the guidance of academic tutors and supervisors. This MSc aims to develop researchers who are conceptually aware, who can utilise a range of skills and methods, and who, in a multi-disciplinary environment, can practice and develop their own research capabilities, and disseminate that research in a meaningful way.

It offers you a wide range of specifically named pathways located within research subject areas.

See website for a list of named pathways.

Format

You will work closely with a supervisor on a research topic(s) leading to research output(s). The choice of topic will depend on your subject area, your expertise and that of your supervisor. In some instances you will have a research topic identified in advance by your supervisor, working on a specific project within existing research clusters in the Faculty.

Your MSc will be awarded based on grades obtained for the 40 credits of taught modules and 140 credits for a dissertation or other research-based outputs. The 40 credits taught component of the course is comprised of two modules:
• Research Praxis
• Research Methods

In the first week of your studies you will meet with your supervisor and familiarise yourself with your research topic.

The second week of the course will be an intensive week of lectures and practicals spread across the two modules. The following six weeks will include a range of optional sessions in both modules, or some specific sessions identified for students in specific subject areas.

After the second week all lectures, seminars and practicals will be held on Wednesday afternoons.

Assessment

Assessment will take many forms including traditional essays, team assignments, reflective logs, oral presentations, etc. All assessments will be completed before the end of the first term. You must pass all modules (40 credits) to progress to the research stage of the course. If any module is failed you’ll have one opportunity to resubmit prior to continuing with the research component of the module.

The largest part of the assessment will be based on your research output(s). Working with your Supervisor, you will have to decide what format the research output(s) will take. It may be a dissertation of approximately 16,000-20,000 word equivalent or a couple of research reports or research papers each of approximately 8,000 words in length. It may be possible that the research output could take some different form, e.g. an invention or patent, but a written component would still be required. The research output(s) will be assessed by an external examiner and you must pass this component of the module to receive the award of MSc. The Research Output(s) must be submitted by August 31, 2016.

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow this link: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/how-to-apply/how-to-apply.aspx

Funding

-Masters Loans-

From 2016/17 government loans of up to £10,000 are available for postgraduate Masters study. The loans will be paid directly to students by the Student Loans Company and will be subject to both personal and course eligibility criteria.

For more information available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/funding-your-postgraduate-degree.aspx

-2017/18 Entry Financial Support-

Information on alternative funding sources is available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/2017-18-entry-financial-support.aspx

Read less
The MSc Clinical Research is designed to recruit students who wish to learn about research methods and evidence based practice in a clinical setting and to develop a career in clinical academia or research with a potential to embark on further training such as a doctoral programme. Read more
The MSc Clinical Research is designed to recruit students who wish to learn about research methods and evidence based practice in a clinical setting and to develop a career in clinical academia or research with a potential to embark on further training such as a doctoral programme. Students will receive training in qualitative and quantitative research methods to develop research competency, research skills and critical judgment in an area of clinical practice.

The programme is well suited for qualified Doctors, Nurses, Midwives, Allied Health Care Professionals, Dentists, Pharmacists, Health Science Professionals or Clinical Psychologists who have experience in a clinical setting.

This exciting and stimulating MSc Clinical Research is delivered by the established Centre for Research in Primary and Community Care (CRIPACC) within the School of Health and Social Work at the University of Hertfordshire. CRIPACC is a dedicated, enthusiastic and friendly research centre with a national and international reputation, offering an excellent opportunity to learn.

Aims of the MSc Clinical Research

-Develop a student's academic research career by advancing their research and leadership skills in a clinical area and provide outstanding preparation for future research training, including progression to doctoral studies
-Equip the student with a core set of skills and knowledge of relevant theory and research methodologies in clinical research as well as a thorough understanding of the research process from planning, conducting, analysing and disseminating, to develop them into an independent researcher in their clinical setting
-Enhance skills and knowledge that are transferable across a diversity of healthcare settings at an individual and organisational level, such as critical thinking, project management, use of IT and problem solving skills
-Provide a supportive and stimulating blended learning environment, including small group teaching, Master classes, and a variety of e-learning teaching methods, and delivered by experienced and dedicated researchers in the internationally renowned research centre

Why choose this course?

-Highly rated by past students as a positive experience and well organised course. Evidence Based Practice and Patient and Public Involvement in Research modules were particularly popular
-Experienced multi-disciplinary lecturers with established track records in health-related research such as Adolescent, Child and Family Health; Older People’s Health and Complex Conditions; Food and Public Health; Patient Experience and Public Involvement; and Evidence Based Practice
-Furthering the student’s academic career through personalised mentorship in line with the HEE/NIHR integrated academic career pathway. CRIPACC has a strong track record of mentoring having led the NIHR/CNO Health Research Training Fellow mentorship scheme and the local scheme developed in response to the Athena Swan Charter
-Excellent opportunities to disseminate the student’s work through publication and presentation at conferences
-A unique Clinical Research Dissertation where the student produces a ready-to-use research grant application for application in their clinical setting or a doctoral fellowship
-In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, the School of Health and Social Work of which CRIPACC was a major contributor demonstrated an outcome of 82% of research quality being rated as 3* and 4*, with an impact and environment outcome of 100% at 3* and 4*
-Two state-of-the-art Learning Resources Centres open 24/7 to meet modern integrated learning resources and services

Careers

On completion of the course, students will be well placed to carry out primary research, promote evidence-based practice by delivering and integrating research findings into their clinical practice and thereby improving health outcomes in their clinical settings. Students will be confident in publishing papers and presenting for conferences. Students will be prepared to apply for research grant funding and/or furthering their clinical academic career by pursuing a Doctorate degree.

Teaching methods

The programme is taught through a combination of innovative lectures, seminars, small group teaching, face-to-face tutorials, workshops, online teaching and individual supervision. Training is flexible and teaching is provided in blocks of two full days, which allows students to organise their time effectively to manage the demands of clinical practice and academic study.

Different assessment methods are used, including coursework and practicals. Coursework includes essays, short pieces of writing work, blogs, critical review, whereas practicals include oral presentations.

In addition, the University has an excellent reputation in blended learning and is supported by the Learning and Teaching Innovation Centre (LTIC). The MSc programme team collaborate with the LTIC and benefit from their expertise in incorporating effective learning, teaching and assessment methods into their modules.

The course is supported by a dedicated Information Manager and the two state-of-the-art Learning Resource Centres, which provide information, computing, study and coursework support. A versatile online inter-active learning environment, StudyNet, allows every student to access information relevant to their studies online through a web browser both on and off campus available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Structure

Core Modules
-Clinical Research Dissertation
-Clinical Trials, Design and Management
-Evidence Based Practice - Distance Learning
-Patient and Public Involvement in Research
-Qualitative Research Methods
-Quantitative Research Methods

Read less
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Applied Linguistics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Applied Linguistics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The Department of English Language and Literature welcomes applications from students wishing to pursue graduate level research at MA level in Applied Linguistics, particularly topics in second language acquisition, bilingualism, vocabulary learning, corpus linguistics and discourse analysis.

MA by Research in Applied Linguistics

The MA by Research in Applied Linguistics would suit those wanting the freedom to explore a topic of their choosing under the close supervision of two experienced academics but without attending regular classes as required in taught programmes; an MA qualification in niche areas where taught programmes are not offered; the experience of a research degree without committing to a PhD at the outset. Research proposals are invited on any topic in Applied Linguistics for which staff can provide supervision. It is advisable to email a member of academic staff in the appropriate area before applying.

Key Features of Applied Linguistics MA by Research

An MA by Research in Applied Linguistics gives you the chance to pursue a project inspired entirely by your own particular interests in Applied Linguistics. The qualification would be a good preparation for proceeding to doctoral work. Alternatively, the proven ability to conduct independent research in Applied Linguistics will boost employment prospects in the area of English language teaching, but also outside academia (for example, in the media, publishing, the Civil Service, or education).

As a student of the Applied Linguistics programme you will be closely supervised by two experienced academics in your field. Typically, you will meet them fortnightly in the first term and at regular intervals thereafter. Meetings are logged and goals agreed each time. All research students in Applied Linguistics are required to attend skills and training courses at College and Institutional level. They give presentations to other research students and staff at departmental seminars and the annual departmental postgraduate symposium in June and the College of Arts and Humanities conference in October. MA by Research in Applied Linguistics typically last from one year (full-time study) to two years (part-time study).

Postgraduate Research

About 70 of the postgraduates currently studying at Swansea University’s Department of English Language and Literature [ELL] are researchers working on an MA, MPhil or PhD thesis. Each is supervised by two members of staff, 60% of whose own research publications were rated ‘internationally excellent’ or ‘world-leading’ in the 2008 REF exercise. We supervise interdisciplinary projects as well as traditional areas of the discipline - in language studies, creative writing, literature (from medieval to the present) and critical and cultural theory. If you have an idea for a research project in Applied Linguistics, do get in touch and discuss it with us informally before applying.

Postgraduates often join a research centre, e.g. the Centre for Research into Gender and Culture (GENCAS) or the Centre for Research into Welsh Writing in English (CREW) where they work alongside other students and staff in dedicated research rooms. As a student of the Applied Linguistics programme you will present your work in the friendly environment of our Research Institute’s annual postgraduate conference, ELL’s fortnightly research seminars, and the monthly workshop of the Creative Writing Programme. Our research environment was judged 100% ‘internationally excellent’ by the 2008 REF, and research students help staff organise a lively programme of conferences, readings and performances on campus and in the city’s arts centres. As well as being inducted into academic research and dissemination, doctoral students have the opportunity to undertake undergraduate teaching to prepare them for an academic career. We provide study stations with computers and postgraduate common-rooms, research training and the services of a research officer and subject librarian.

REF 2014

What the Research Excellence Framework 2014 had to say about Postgraduate research in the Swansea Department of English Language and Literature …

The environment in the Department is conducive to producing research of mostly at least internationally excellent and at its best world-leading quality’…
‘Arrangements for postgraduates were deemed of world-leading quality’
‘There is clear evidence of the development of a research culture into which research students are fully integrated’
‘Recruitment is strong’
‘There are excellent arrangements for support, training and employability’.

Summing up: ‘The unit makes an outstanding contribution to the health of the discipline’.

Read less
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study English at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study English at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The Department of English Language and Literature can offer supervision in most areas of literature from the middle ages to the present. We have particular strengths in gender, Welsh writing in English, American Literature, medieval, Renaissance, eighteenth and nineteenth-century writing and culture, modernism and postmodernism, Irish poetry, contemporary literature and critical and cultural theory.

Key Features of MA by Research in English

An MA by Research in English gives you the chance to pursue a project inspired entirely by your own particular enthusiasms in English language and literature. The qualification would be a good preparation for proceeding to doctoral work. Alternatively, the proven ability to conduct independent research in English will boost employment prospects outside academia (for example, in the media, publishing, the Civil Service, or education).

As a student of the MA by Research in English programme, you will be supervised closely by two experienced academics in your field. Typically, you will meet them fortnightly in the first term and at regular intervals thereafter. Meetings are logged and goals agreed each time.

All research students in English are required to attend skills and training courses at College and Institutional level. English students give presentations to other research students and staff at departmental seminars and the annual departmental postgraduate symposium in June and the College of Arts and Humanities conference in October. MA by Research in English degree typically lasts from one year (full-time study) to two years (part-time study).

The MA by Research in English would suit those wanting the freedom to explore a topic of their choosing in English language and literature under the close supervision of two experienced academics but without attending regular classes as required in taught programmes; an MA qualification in niche areas where taught programmes are not offered; the experience of a research degree without committing to a PhD at the outset. Research proposals are invited on any topic in English for which staff can provide supervision.

Postgraduate Research in the Department of English Language and Literature

About 70 of the postgraduates currently studying at Swansea University’s Department of English Language and Literature [ELL] are researchers working on an MA, MPhil or PhD thesis. Each is supervised by two members of staff, 60% of whose own research publications were rated ‘internationally excellent’ or ‘world-leading’ in the 2008 REF exercise. We supervise interdisciplinary projects as well as traditional areas of the discipline - in language studies, creative writing, literature (from medieval to the present) and critical and cultural theory. If you have an idea for a research project in English, do get in touch and discuss it with us informally before applying.

Postgraduate students including those of MA by Research in English, often join a research centre, e.g. the Centre for Research into Gender and Culture (GENCAS) or the Centre for Research into Welsh Writing in English (CREW) where they work alongside other students and staff in dedicated research rooms. Students present their work in the friendly environment of our Research Institute’s annual postgraduate conference, Swansea University’s Department of English Language and Literature (ELL)’s fortnightly research seminars, and the monthly workshop of the Creative Writing Programme. Our research environment was judged 100% ‘internationally excellent’ by the 2008 REF, and research students help staff organize a lively programme of conferences, readings and performances on campus and in the city’s arts centres. As well as being inducted into academic research and dissemination, doctoral students have the opportunity to undertake undergraduate teaching to prepare them for an academic career. We provide study stations with computers and postgraduate common-rooms, research training and the services of a research officer and subject librarian.

REF 2014

What the Research Excellence Framework 2014 had to say about Postgraduate research in the Swansea Department of English Language and Literature …

The environment in the Department of English Language and Literature is ‘conducive to producing research of mostly at least internationally excellent and at its best world-leading quality’

‘Arrangements for postgraduates were deemed of world-leading quality’

‘There is clear evidence of the development of a research culture into which research students are fully integrated’

‘Recruitment is strong’

‘There are excellent arrangements for support, training and employability’.

Summing up: ‘The unit makes an outstanding contribution to the health of the discipline’.

Read less
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

This Master's degree in Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience aims to equip students with the skills necessary for research careers across a range of scientific areas.

Key Features of Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience

Performance:

- One of four Psychology departments to achieve a 100% 4* rating (maximum score possible) for the reach and significance of its work in the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014. Based on this measure Psychology at Swansea was ranked 14th (out of 82) in the UK
- Top third ranking for UK Psychology Departments (2016 Complete University Guide)
- Joint 12th UK ranking for Psychology (Graduate prospects)
- The MSc Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience is unique and novel in the range of modules and techniques the programme offers

Teaching and Employability:

- Teaching is carried out by highly-respected, research active, professionals conducting research across a range of cognitive neuroscience research areas and publishing in top international journals
- Students benefit from state-of-the-art technology with over twenty general purpose research rooms and numerous specialised testing facilities
- Ability to offer international students mentoring throughout the course

Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience is at the intersection of cognitive science, brain imaging, and clinical neuroscience.

It is considered one of the most significant areas of contemporary science and it is beginning to transform the understanding of both normal and damaged brain function.

The importance of cognitive neuroscience has been recognised by the Welsh Government which created the multi-centre Wales Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, drawing together the psychology departments at Swansea, Cardiff and Bangor Universities.

A core aspect of the provision for MSc Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience will also be collaboration with the College of Medicine at Swansea University.

Modules

Modules on the Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience may include:

Theoretical Issues in Cognitive Neuroscience
Practical Applications in Cognitive Neuroscience
Statistical Methods
Computing skills
Generic Research Skills
Special Research Skills
Neuropsychology
Introduction to Research Programming
Psychology of Ageing

Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience Course Structure

The full-time master's degree for Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience is studied over one year and involves attending University for two full days a week (Monday and Tuesday).

The part-time degree in Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience, which is studied over two years, normally involves attending the University for one full day a week.

Taught modules are provided in the first two semesters, with a final high credit-bearing empirical research project with a strong cognitive neuroscience component typically undertaken over the summer.

Sessions may be arranged occasionally on other days of the week (e.g. visiting clinician talks/workshops and employability sessions).

Who should apply?

The Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience course is suitable for:

- anyone looking for a valuable academic foundation for future doctoral training
- anyone looking to demonstrate their employability across a range of disciplines within cognitive neuroscience and related fields, including psychology, computing, neuroscience, medicine and computer science
- UK and international psychology graduates seeking positions as researchers in psychology, cognitive neuroscience or related fields.
- psychology graduates aiming to secure a PhD by research in a psychology, cognitive neuroscience, or a related discipline
- graduates from other disciplines such as Biology, Neuroscience, and Medicine who wish to develop further skills related to psychology and cognitive neuroscience

Career Prospects

Students have successfully used the Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience qualification to gain positions on PhD research programmes. Others have successfully gained employment as Research Associates/ Officers, as well as working in Teaching positions, the Business Sector and in Administration.

On completion of the Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience course students should also be able to demonstrate their employability across a range of disciplines within cognitive neuroscience and related fields, including psychology, computing, neuroscience, medicine and computer science.

Staff Expertise

Many of the College of Human and Health Sciences team are leaders in their specialist fields of research. They undertake novel and original research in a variety of areas, including clinical and health psychology, brain injury, sleep, cognition, neuroscience and developmental psychology.

Postgraduate Community

The College of Human and Health Sciences has a vibrant postgraduate community with students drawn from a variety of backgrounds and nationalities. The College is known for its friendly, welcoming and supportive environment, which combined with its extensive facilities, state-of-the-art technology and superb beachside location, helps to ensure that students benefit from an exceptional student experience.

In addition, students have access to a wide range of excellent facilities and equipment for realistic workplace experiences.

Read less
The School of Civil and Building Engineering at Loughborough has an outstanding research reputation, 75% or its research was rated as world-leading or internationally excellent in the latest Government Research Excellence Framework. Read more
The School of Civil and Building Engineering at Loughborough has an outstanding research reputation, 75% or its research was rated as world-leading or internationally excellent in the latest Government Research Excellence Framework.

This programme is aimed at students training for a research career in energy and related areas, in either academia or industry. It focuses on energy demand reduction in the built environment, examining technical solutions within the wider social and economic context.

The course is closely linked with the London-Loughborough Centre for Doctoral Research in Energy Demand (the ‘LoLo CDT’) and is led by internationally-leading research staff at Loughborough University and the Energy Institute at University College, London.

The programme capitalises on the world-class building energy modelling and monitoring expertise in the Building Energy Research Group and the Royal Academy of Engineering Centre of Excellence in Sustainable Building Design. Students make use of our extensive laboratory and full-scale testing facilities, enriched by site visits, conferences, workshops and seminars by external experts. The programme begins with an intensive residential week studying Energy Demand in Context. Students attend lectures from energy experts in different fields, while working to produce a pathway satisfying the goal of a national 80% emissions reduction by 2050.

This is an intensive but rewarding course for future leaders in energy demand research; we accept approximately ten high calibre students each year.

Key Facts

- Research-led teaching from international experts. This unique programme is taught by acknowledged world experts in the field.

- An outstanding place to study. The School of Civil and Building Engineering is ranked 2nd in the UK for Building in the Times Good University Guide 2015.

- The MRes is an integral part of the London-Loughborough Centre for Doctoral Research in Energy Demand, which has just been funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council for a further eight years.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/civil/energy-demand-studies/

Programme modules

- Energy Demand in Context
The aim of this module is to provide an introduction into the many issues of energy demand in the built environment, setting them in the wider context of climate change policy and the history of energy use. Why is energy demand deduction complex? How did we get to where we are? What are the options for the future, and what is your possible role?

- Building Energy Systems and Models
This module will provide students with a thorough understanding of how systems and models of systems work at various levels, from heat transfer in materials and energy systems to the national building stock. They will understand approaches to modelling buildings, systems of energy demands and the influence of people. Students will be taught how to use building energy models and to interpret the results.

- Energy Theory, Measurement and Interpretation
The aims of this module are: to develop students understanding of the principles of measurement in the context of energy demand and associated factors; to explain how to interpret and represent the results accounting for uncertainties and limitations; and to apply this knowledge at different scales from individual components, to building, urban and national scale.

- Research Development and Dissemination
The module aims to provide students with the knowledge and skills needed to devise, plan and disseminate research projects. The module will provide skills in defining research questions and hypotheses; critically reviewing literature; planning a programme of research; communicating to different stakeholders including academia, industry and the public; preparing conference presentations and academic papers; engaging with the public; and producing an MRes Research Dissertation proposal. The module also includes project administration skills including, research ethics and confidentiality.

- Energy Demand: Society Economics and Policy
This module is delivered in the second semester in a series of weekly sessions at UCL. Its aim is to provide a broad understanding of the social, economic, and policy determinants of energy demand, taking into account areas such as pricing and demand, market structure, cost-benefit analysis, social environment and lifestyle, individual attitudes and behaviour, public-private goods, externalities and the policy cycle.

- Quantitative and Qualitative Research Methods
This module will provide students with the grounding in quantitative and qualitative research methods that they need to become effective researchers. The module will provide: skills in statistical analysis and use of the SPSS software; an ability to make informed choices about ways of handling data and to assess the appropriateness of particular analytical procedures; an understanding of questionnaire, interview and focus group design, delivery and analysis; and an ability to critically assess and evaluate the research of others. Whilst case-study applications will be relevant to building energy demand, the skills and knowledge acquired will be generic.

- Energy Demand Studies Research Dissertation
The aims of this module are to train students in the planning, execution and evaluation of a substantive research project; to train them in the art of persuading others of the importance of the research and outcomes and to project their work through academic writing. The dissertation enables students to explore a topic of interest in great depth.

Facilities

MRes students make use of the extensive laboratory facilities and test houses operated by the School of Civil and Building Engineering. The MRes combines measurements in buildings with modelling studies, allowing students to experience at first hand the ‘performance gap’ – the difference between modelling and real world behaviour.

Lectures at University College London provide access to world-class experts in energy economics and the societal context. Our staff pride themselves on their enthusiasm and availability to students, who often comment on this aspect of the course in their feedback.

How you will learn

The programme has a strong student-centred and research focus. Four taught modules set the context and provide subject-specific knowledge, whilst two further modules provide training in relevant research methods. A research dissertation forms half of the total credits and can lead to publishable work.

The MRes in Energy Demand Studies can be studied as a 1-year standalone programme and also forms the first year of the 4-year course for students accepted into the LoLo CDT, who then go on to study for a PhD. The opportunity exists for strong MRes students to join the LoLo Centre at the end of their MRes year.

- Assessment
The MRes is assessed entirely by coursework. A group presentation forms part of the assessment in the initial residential module; with the remainder assessed by an individual essay. Other modules include assessment by presentations and written work, including essays, reports and press releases.

The research project is assessed by a dissertation, an academic paper and a viva at which students present the work to an expert panel.

Careers and further study

Both the School of Civil and Building Engineering and the LoLo CDT have strong links with industry (e.g. Willmott Dixon, B&Q), policy makers (e.g. DECC), and the wider stake-holder community.
Dissertation projects are often linked to our industry sponsors’ interests, which provides a natural pathway to future employment and our visiting Royal Academy Professors and industry partners provide practice-based lectures and workshops.

Scholarships

This is a sought-after course, with a small intake, which ensures students’ access to highly qualified tuition. No scholarships are available for the standalone MRes.

Why choose civil engineering at Loughborough?

As one of four Royal Academy of Engineering designated Centres of Excellence in Sustainable Building Design, the School of Civil and Building Engineering is one of the largest of its type in the UK and holds together a thriving community of over 60 academic staff, 40 technical and clerical support staff and over 240 active researchers that include Fellows, Associates, Assistants, Engineers and Doctoral Students.

Our world-class teaching and research are integrated to support the technical and commercial needs of both industry and society. A key part of our ethos is our extensive links with industry resulting in our graduates being extremely sought after by industry and commerce world-wide,

- Postgraduate programmes
The School offers a focussed suite of post graduate programmes aligned to meet the needs of industry and fully accredited by the relevant professional institutions. Consequently, our record of graduate employment is second to none. Our programmes also have a long track record of delivering high quality, research-led education. Indeed, some of our programmes have been responding to the needs of industry and producing high quality graduates for over 40 years.

Currently, our suite of Masters programmes seeks to draw upon our cutting edge research and broad base knowledge of within the areas of contemporary construction management, project management, infrastructure management, building engineering, building modelling, building energy demand and waste and water engineering. The programmes are designed to respond to contemporary issues in the field such as sustainable construction, low carbon building, low energy services, project complexity, socio-technical systems and socio-economic concerns.

- Research
Drawing from our excellent record in attracting research funds (currently standing at over £19M), the focal point of the School is innovative, industry-relevant research. This continues to nurture and refresh our long history of working closely with industrial partners on novel collaborative research and informs our ongoing innovative teaching and extensive enterprise activities. This is further complemented by our outstanding record of doctoral supervision which has provided, on average, a PhD graduate from the School every two weeks.

- Career Prospects
Independent surveys continue to show that industry has the highest regard for our graduates. Over 90% were in employment and/or further study six months after graduating. Recent independent surveys of major employers have also consistently rated the School at the top nationally for civil engineering and construction graduates.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/civil/energy-demand-studies/

Read less
This programme offers a stimulating and practical training in mental health research. Read more
This programme offers a stimulating and practical training in mental health research. The UCL Division of Psychiatry offers teaching and supervision from leaders in international research in fields from neuroscientific to social and epidemiological, along with a range of relevant options from other leading UCL departments. This diversity of options allows students to tailor a programme that closely fits their needs.

Degree information

This programme will equip students with the research skills needed to undertake doctoral-level research and/or to collaborate in major research projects. They will produce a piece of original research ready to submit for publication, and will acquire current knowledge of cutting-edge research in mental health.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of two core modules (45 credits), five optional modules (75 credits) and a dissertation/report (60 credits).

Core modules
-Core Principles of Mental Health Research (double module)
-Statistical Methods in Mental Health

Optional modules - students will select at least 60 credits from the following modules of which at least 30 credits must be from the Division of Psychiatry’s own modules:
-Culture in the Clinic
-Current Research in Depression and Anxiety
-Current Research in Dementia
-Current Research in Learning Disability
-Current Research in Psychosis
-Epidemiological and Social Methods in Mental Health (double module)
-Introduction to Biological Research in Mental Health
-Mental Health Services – Policy, Design and Evaluation

Other approved modules:
-Cellular and Molecular Modules of Disease (Institute of Neurology)
-Ethnicity, Migration and Health (Department of Epidemiology & Public Health)
-Health Inequalities across the Lifecourse (Department of Epidemiology and Public Health)
-Higher Functions of the Brain (Institute of Neurology)
-Neuroimaging: Introductory Science and Methods (Institute of Neurology)
-Neuroimaging: Imaging Modalities (Institute of Neurology)
-Social Determinants of Global Health (Department of Epidemiology and Public Health)
-Or any other module approved by the Programme Director as having a large research component relevant to mental health.

The final 15 credits may be obtained from any available module at UCL, subject to the Programme Director approving the overall selection for each student.

Final report
All students undertake a final research project. This is reported as a research paper of 6,000-8,000 words ready for submission to a specified journal, a blog of 1,000 words and a 20-minute talk.

Teaching and learning
This programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars and practical workshops, with considerable use of supporting online learning. Assessment methods include unseen exams, coursework including designing questionnaires and systematic review strategies, developing protocols, analysing data, giving talks and presenting posters. There is a strong emphasis on developing practical research skills.

Careers

This new programme will equip graduates with strong practical research skills and understanding of the current status and direction of mental health research in their area of interest, preparing them to pursue doctoral studies, including through applications for nationally funded fellowships. Clinicians will be equipped to participate fully in collaborative studies and to begin to function as independent investigators. For those without clinical qualifications, the programme is likely to assist students in embarking on a career in mental health research by obtaining research posts and opportunities for PhD places.

Employability
Students will be taught by and carry out projects with leading researchers at the cutting-edge of their fields, learning about research directly from experts rather than from textbooks. Previous Division of Psychiatry MSc graduates have had a strong track record of publishing papers based on their research projects in peer-reviewed journals, and of going on to further academic posts and to doctoral studies.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL has a cluster of international research leaders in mental health in fields including genetics, epidemiology, and applied clinical research. Optional modules provide an entrance to other renowned departments at UCL e.g. in neuroscience and epidemiology.

The programme is strongly focused on student participation and acquisition of the practical skills needed to embark on a career in research. The wide range of research interests within our division allows us to offer a programme that integrates biological and psychosocial approaches.

We offer opportunities to get involved in the work of internationally significant research groups in a stimulating, friendly and supportive atmosphere.

Read less