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Masters Degrees (E Government)

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Better government through technology. e-Government is a growing area. As our world becomes increasingly connected through ICT, governments need skilled professionals who understand how to manage the impact of these ever-evolving technologies. Read more

Better government through technology

e-Government is a growing area. As our world becomes increasingly connected through ICT, governments need skilled professionals who understand how to manage the impact of these ever-evolving technologies.

At Victoria's School of Government, you'll discover innovative new uses for ICT—building new ways for communities to engage with government and use public services.

A unique qualification in an emerging field

Victoria's Master of e-Government is the only course of its kind in the Asia-Pacific region.

Focusing on the management rather than the technical aspects of e-Government, your courses are designed by experts in government and ICT and taught by leading academics in this new field.

International students, global insights

Be part of a school that attracts not only local professionals but a talented group of international students—many highly experienced employees of government organisations in their own countries. Take advantage of the diverse experience in public policy and public management these students take to the classroom—providing valuable insights and bringing the comparative perspective alive.

What you'll study

The MEGov will give you the skills and knowledge to manage transformational government ICT projects, using real-life examples from New Zealand and overseas. Your studies will include:

  1. Up to eight core courses depending on your previous work and study experience—you'll learn about the theories, concepts, frameworks and strategies that underpin the management of public service ICT. You'll also find out how e-Government relates to good government and examine the risks and benefits of using ICT to enable public engagement.
  2. A research project–you'll research and report on a specific topic in e-Government or apply your knowledge to the design and management of a transformational e-Government project.
  3. Four other courses–choose from a wide variety of courses depending on your career goals, looking at issues in public policy, public management and information management in government and the private sector.

How you'll learn

Courses are delivered in a Block, Intensive or Weekly format. Whatever format your course is delivered, you need to attend all of the classes to pass and to get the most out of your study.

Block

Most MEGov courses are delivered on-campus in a block format, which means that you'll need to attend classes on three full days each semester. These classes are separated by about six weeks.

Weekly

Some of your core classes are delivered in a weekly format, with classes taking place in the evening during the standard university trimesters.

Intensive

Depending on the courses you take, you may have a class that's delivered in an intensive format. Intensive courses are structured as one-off blocks of four days, or two blocks of two days separated by six weeks.

Workload

If you are studying full-time you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students doing two courses per trimester will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working full-time.

You can estimate your workload by adding up the number of points you'll be doing. One point is roughly equal to 10–12 hours work.

Duration

The MEGov can be completed in two years part-time, or one year of full-time study.

Community

Postgraduate study at Victoria will help you build valuable relationships and networks with peers, university staff and future colleagues.

You’ll get an orientation to introduce you to the people you’ll work with, a working space with desk, computer and storage, and use of a common room or kitchen when you want to take a break or mingle.

You'll also have opportunities to attend events, workshops, social functions and seminars such as the Student Learning Postgraduate Research skills sessions.

The Postgraduate Student's Association can give you information and provides a voice for you on campus.

Careers

You'll be well-placed to take part in the emerging area of e-government, leading and managing ICT projects at government departments or non-governmental organisations (NGOs).

And while you'll develop skills that will uniquely prepare you for e-government projects, you'll also have capabilities and knowledge you can use in private industry.



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Our E-Business MSc combines leading technology, business strategies, entrepreneurship and organisational behaviour. It will prepare you to take total leadership on any e-business initiative. Read more
Our E-Business MSc combines leading technology, business strategies, entrepreneurship and organisational behaviour. It will prepare you to take total leadership on any e-business initiative.

A modern e-business firm not only markets and sells online, but also integrates its sales systems with its internal systems in real-time.

This makes it possible to easily invoice and update the order status of clients. At the same time the systems have to interact with a vast network of partners who manufacture and dispatch the products to consumers. This success relies on a strong customer-centric organisational culture.

What you'll learn

You will learn how companies plan, implement and conduct electronic business with customers, suppliers and partners - from start-ups to multinational corporations.

You will also learn how e-business integrates with internal systems such as logistics, operations and finance.

Your development

The course will also support your personal development, shape your entrepreneurial mind-set and enhance your employability prospects. We will prepare you to succeed in the modern e-business world.

On completion of the course you will demonstrate knowledge of:
-The business value of contemporary technologies
-Your personal development as an entrepreneur and intrapreneur
-The feasibility of disruptive business models
-How to foster innovation in firms
-Business planning and new ventures
-The link between business strategy and e-business systems
-Business processes, such as the ones involving customers and suppliers
-Business intelligence systems
-Programme and project management
-Organisational alignment for the attainment of e-business benefits
-The mutual impact between technology and organisations

Other topics you will cover include:
-Participatory analysis of e-business issues
-Business processes design
-E-business systems integration
-Stakeholder analysis in e-business environments
-Organisational structures and innovation
-Technological change in society
-Government policy on technology and innovation

Career focus

This course is designed for professionals from any academic background who want to take general responsibility for e-business initiatives in any function of a company. This ranges from internet operations to internal systems, technology start-ups to multinational corporations, and includes product and service providers.

Our graduates progress into careers as e-business consultants, information system managers or project managers. The course is also relevant to industry analysts and product development managers in the e-business sector.

Many graduates from our E-Business courses have worked for international companies, such as:
-Google
-Yahoo
-IBM
-Dell
-Accenture
-KPMG
-Ernst & Young
-PwC
-Hewlett-Packard
-The Hut Group
-Travix International
-Hitachi Solutions
-BAE Systems Applied Intelligence
-Ctrl-Shift
-HSBC
-Lloyds Banking Group
-GlaxoSmithKline
-Datwyler
-Walmart

Other graduates have used their acquired expertise to start up their own companies, or develop their family business.

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Our E-Business (Information Systems) MSc will build on your existing computing-related studies. You will develop advanced technical skills and business knowledge, which will equip you to differentiate your career in the modern corporate world. Read more
Our E-Business (Information Systems) MSc will build on your existing computing-related studies. You will develop advanced technical skills and business knowledge, which will equip you to differentiate your career in the modern corporate world.

On this course you will study within two world-class schools at Newcastle University. Newcastle University Business School deliver the course in conjunction with the School of Computing Science, which is the number one school in the UK for research impact in society as listed by the British government.

The e-business revolution would not exist without the never-ending research, development and application of innovative information and communication technologies. For example:
-Marketing managers would struggle to design promotional campaigns without business intelligence applications based on data warehouses and online analytical processing (OLAP) technologies
-Buyers would not be able to order the right products, from the right suppliers or during the correct time frames without integrated enterprise resource planning systems based on service-oriented architecture (SOA)
-The procurement process would not integrate supply chain partners in real-time and in an economic way without the extensible markup language (XML) protocol.

These examples show that visionary technologists must have solid strategic, entrepreneurial and organisational knowledge in order to make things happen.

Your development

The course will support your personal development, shape your entrepreneurial mind-set and enhance your employability prospects. We will prepare you to succeed in the modern e-business world.

On completion of the course you will demonstrate knowledge of:
-The business value of contemporary technologies
-Your personal development as an entrepreneur and intrapreneur
-The feasibility of disruptive e-business models
-Business planning and new ventures
-The link between business strategy and systems
-Business processes, such as the ones involving customers and suppliers
-Business intelligence systems
-Organisational alignment for the attainment of e-business benefits
-The management and development of e-business systems

Advanced computing technology such as:
-Cloud computing architecture
-Virtual machines
-Scalable computing
-Information security vulnerability and metrics
-Human factors and economic drivers effecting security
-Cryptography
-Information flow management
-Protocol analysis
-Advanced Java programming
-Distributed programming
-Advanced data communications
-XML/XSLT

Career focus

This course is for professionals with a computing-related academic background. You should want to excel in the technical and business sides of e-business initiatives in any area of a company. This ranges from Internet operations to internal systems, technology start-ups to multi-national corporations, including product and service providers.

You career will benefit through your enhanced computing expertise integrated with business objectives.

Our graduates progress into careers as technology consultants, IT managers, or project managers. The course is also relevant to industry analysts and product development managers in the e-business sector.

Many graduates from our E-Business courses have worked for international companies, such as:
-Google
-Yahoo
-Dell
-IBM
-Accenture
-KPMG
-Ernst & Young
-PwC
-Hewlett-Packard
-The Hut Group
-Travix International
-Hitachi Solutions
-BAE Systems Applied Intelligence
-Ctrl-Shift
-HSBC
-Lloyds Banking Group
-GlaxoSmithKline
-Datwyler
-Walmart

Other graduates have used their acquired expertise to start up their own companies, or develop their family business.

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This programme aims to provide students with a solid foundation in a broad range of social science research methods as well as basic research skills. Read more
This programme aims to provide students with a solid foundation in a broad range of social science research methods as well as basic research skills.

Students will acquire a general overview of the philosophy of social research, and understand how this informs research design, methods of data collection and analysis. They will also develop an ability to use a range of research methods, to communicate research findings effectively and an understanding of the potential use of and impact of their research within and beyond academia.

Core Modules

Philosophy of Social Science Research

The module considers fundamental philosophical debates about what counts as ‘knowledge’ across the social sciences. Teaching addresses (natural) science as a method of obtaining knowledge and the interpretative tradition in the social sciences. Students explore fundamental philosophical debates about what counts as ‘knowledge’ across the social sciences and apply these discussions to their own disciplines and field of study.

Research Design, Practice and Ethics

The module introduces students to social science research designs and ethical issues in research practice. Learning supports students to be able to make strategic choices when developing their own projects, and to assess the design and research ethics decision making in others’ published research work.

Fundamentals in Quantitative Research Methods

Concepts, methods and skills central to quantitative research, including data collection approaches and concept operationalization, are core throughout this module. Building on a grounding in ideas relating to probability sampling, sampling error and statistical inference, coverage of techniques extends from comparisons of means and simple cross-tabular analyses to a discussion of multivariate analysis approaches, focusing on linear and logistic regression.

Foundations in Qualitative Research

Qualitative research is examined across a range of topics, from different approaches and methods including ethnographic and observational research, discourse and conversation analysis, documentary and archival analysis, participatory research and the use of interviews. Ethics in qualitative research is specifically considered, as is the evaluation of qualitative research.

Advanced Training Programme

Unless stated, all advanced training courses run as 2-day intensive workshops from 10–4pm with breaks. This list is updated regularly as new courses are approved so do check this website from time to time to see what is on offer.

These advanced training courses are open to all research students in the College (and some departments in other Colleges, such as Geography, subject to the discretion of the Programme Team). However, places on each course are limited and priority will be given to MA Social Research students.

These advanced training courses are also open to all staff in the University who may wish to attend without completing the assessments. However, all doctoral researchers and staff who wish to do so will be placed on a waiting list. Confirmation will be sent a week before the course dates.

Advanced Training courses run in Semester 3, unless otherwise stated:

Analysing Hierarchical Panel Data
An Approach To Research On Discourse
Case Study Research Design
Documentary Research In Education
Factor Analysis
Introduction To Econometric Software
Introduction To Time Series Regression
Narrative Research
Multivariate Linear To Logistic Regression
Policy Evalution
Q Methodology - A Systematic Approach For Interpretive Research Design
Questionnaire Design
Researching Disability
Role Of Thinking: Philosophy Of Social Science Research
Visual Research Methods

NB: some courses have pre-requisites, e.g. to register on Multiple Linear and Logistic Regression, Factor Analysis, or Narrative Research, you will need to have passed Social Research Methods II (20 credits module), or equivalent. You will need to provide evidence that you have passed a similar course on quantitative/qualitative data analysis where appropriate.

To register for the above advanced training courses, please e-mail: specifying which courses you are interested in. When registering for courses, please provide your name, student ID, department/programme you are affiliated to, and your e-mail address.

In addition, you will write a 12,000-word dissertation (60 credits).

About the School of Government and Society

The School of Government and Society is one of the leading UK and International centres for governance, politics, international development, sociology, public management, Russian and European studies.
Established in 2008, the School comprises three Departments: Politics and International Studies (POLSIS); International Development (IDD) and Local Government Studies (INLOGOV).

POLSIS: The Department of Political Science and International Studies (POLSIS), one of the largest and most academically vibrant departments of Political Science and International Studies in the UK. In the latest Research Excellence Framework (REF) Politics and International Studies at Birmingham was ranked the 6th best in the power rankings highlighting the large number of staff in POLSIS producing world-leading and internationally excellent research.

IDD: Be part of global effort to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. Contribute to conflict resolution and post-conflict reconstruction. Help build capacity of nations and communities to adapt to climate change. Study with us to gain the skills and knowledge essential for working in international development in the 21st Century.

INLOGOV: The Institute of Local Government Studies (INLOGOV) is the leading academic centre for research and teaching on local governance and strategic public management. We enrich the world of local public service with research evidence and innovative ideas, making a positive difference.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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At the University of Hertfordshire we have been delivering distance-learning courses since 2004. We understand how people learn online, and you can as well with this Master's degree in e-Learning Technology. Read more
At the University of Hertfordshire we have been delivering distance-learning courses since 2004. We understand how people learn online, and you can as well with this Master's degree in e-Learning Technology. The online course focuses on e-Learning design and development, enabling you to develop applications that are learner-centred.

The MSc eLearning Technology draws on the University’s extensive experience in distance-learning, this online Master’s focuses on designing and developing e-Learning, equipping you to develop effective, learner-centred applications.

Why choose this course?

-Gain a master's degree in one year full-time or at a pace that suits you through online study
-Chose from two different routes depending on your qualifications: an advanced programme for Computer Science graduates - or a route for other graduates that combines foundation modules with options from the advanced modules
-Flexible online learning allows you to fit study around your other commitments, without travel and accommodation costs
-Gain an internationally-recognised master's degree from the UK's University of Hertfordshire
-Benefit from the same academic standards and quality control procedures as our equivalent on campus course
-We have an excellent track record in research, with over half of our outputs rated at world-leading or internationally excellent in REF 2014, the most recent national assessment.

Careers

Our online masters programme is designed to give graduates the up-to-date skills and knowledge sought after by employers, whether in business, industry, government or research.

There are many opportunities within the rapidly growing e-Learning industry for technical staff who are highly skilled in the application of advanced IT techniques to e-Learning design.

Typical roles could be those found in traditional IT development projects such as Business Analyst, Programmer, User-interface Designer, Quality Controller or Project Manager. Alternatively there are more specialist roles such as Instructional Designer or Learning Technologist.

Teaching methods

Our online degree programmes are taught 100% online when studied independently, or supplemented by tutorial support when studied at a local study centre run by one of our online partners. Find out more about Tutored eLearning. Assessment is by coursework and online tests.

You will participate in the learning experience through the University's on-line learning environment, StudyNet. You will receive learning materials, take part in discussions and submit your assignments online. Additionally, you will receive study resources such as e-books and any specialist software. You will have access to the University's extensive online library facilities, or be able to visit in person if you so choose.

The amount of study time required is no different from that needed for an on campus programme. You should expect to spend at least 30 hours per week if studying full-time, and in proportion if part-time.

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Fast-track your career in policy. Policy-makers create strategic and operational policies that make life better—locally, nationally and internationally. Read more

Fast-track your career in policy

Policy-makers create strategic and operational policies that make life better—locally, nationally and internationally.

Give yourself the opportunity to get a high-level overview of the latest public sector developments and insights. You'll develop your abilities, broaden your perspective, deepen your understanding, challenge your thinking—and increase your employability.

You'll study at the School of Government, learning to help decision makers get the best outcomes in environmental, economic and social areas. Find out about the machinery of government and get the skills to design, evaluate and put in place strategic and operational policies that improve our lives.

Well connected

Victoria is the only New Zealand university that is connected to the Australia and New Zealand School of Government (ANZSOG)—so you know your qualification is of the highest standard.

Our lecturers are actively involved in the public sector, exchanging ideas on key policy and management issues. They're connected to decision makers from local, regional and national government, giving you the opportunity to meet and learn from those in the know.

We're also associated with important public and volunteer sector organisations like the Society of Local Government Managers (SOLGM), Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ), the NZ Council of Social Services (NZCOSS) and Hui E! Community Aotearoa.

International students, global insights

Be part of a school that attracts not only local professionals but a talented group of international students—many highly experienced employees of government organisations in their own countries. Take advantage of the diverse experience in public policy and public management these students take to the classroom—providing valuable insights and bringing the comparative perspective alive.

Qualification family structure

  • Master of Public Policy
  • Postgraduate Diploma in Public Policy
  • Postgraduate Certificate in Public Policy

Choose the qualification that suits your career goals, time constraints and financial situation.If you are initially accepted for a certificate or diploma, you can apply to transfer to the Master’s degree at a later stage. Both your performance in the programme and your professional work experience will be taken into account when looking at your application.

If you're working towards a Master of Public Policy and illness, promotion or other reasons for leaving your studies come up, you may still be able to graduate with a certificate or diploma.

What you'll study

You'll take a mixture of foundation and core courses that will give you the skills and capability to design, implement and evaluate policy for a range of different outcomes.

Learn about the theory and practice of policy making and examine the role of government and others in policy creation and implementation. Understand the issues at play in different policy areas like local government, health or development. If you're working while you study, you can apply what you learn to your own workplace policy challenges immediately.

MPP students should also take a research paper as part of their qualification. This could be a research topic that is relevant to your workplace. If you want to complete your Master's by coursework only, you need to get approval from the Master's Programme Director.

How you'll learn

Most classes are delivered on-campus in a block format. That means you'll need to attend day-long classes on three different days each semester, each of these separated by about six weeks. You'll also need to complete an additional six hours of structured class work, which may be face-to-face or online.

Some classes are delivered in a weekly or intensive format. Intensive courses are structured as one-off blocks of four days, or two blocks of two days separated by six weeks. Classes for weekly courses usually take place in the evening during the standard university trimesters.

Whatever format your course is delivered in, you'll need to attend all of the classes to pass and to get the most out of your study.

Study while you work

Because of the block format of the classes, you can fit your study commitments around your work and home life. And if you're struggling at any time, just let us know—we want your study to be a success.

Workload

If you are studying full-time you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students doing two courses per trimester will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working full-time.

You can estimate your workload by adding up the number of points you'll be doing. One point is roughly equal to 10–12 hours work.

Duration

The MPP can be completed in three years part-time, or in two years of full-time study.

Top locations

Surrounded by Parliament Buildings, government offices and corporate headquarters, you'll benefit from the strong links the School of Government maintains with the industry.

Community

Postgraduate study at Victoria will help you build valuable relationships and networks with peers, university staff and future colleagues.

There will be opportunities to attend events, workshops, social functions and seminars such as the Student Learning Postgraduate Research skills sessions. You'll also have access to the postgraduate student workspace on the 2nd floor of Rutherford House—make use of the spacious computer lab, meeting rooms, printer and kitchen.

The Postgraduate Students' Association can give you information and provides a voice for you on campus.

Careers

Skilled-policy makers are in demand both in and outside of government, due to their technical and creative skills and commitment to solving society's challenges.

You might find work in central, local or regional government, a Crown entity or a not-for-profit organisation, or a private consultancy or corporation active in policy-making and implementation processes.



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Spatial eHumanities is a truly interdisciplinary programme combining geocomputation, cultural heritage, design, and humanities/arts research. Read more

Overview

Spatial eHumanities is a truly interdisciplinary programme combining geocomputation, cultural heritage, design, and humanities/arts research. It takes an interdisciplinary approach to focus on spatio-temporal concepts, methods, and tools in the development of computational and visual frameworks from which to explore the past and better understand our present.

The MSc in Spatial eHumanities has been jointly designed by An Foras Feasa and the National Centre for Geocomputation to provide both a historical background and theoretical grounding to the field while providing students with solid skills in contemporary digital methods and technologies, including Geographic Information Systems and 3D computer graphics modelling. It is also excellent preparation for those wishing to pursue a computationally-enabled PhD in the arts, humanities, social science, or digital cultural heritage.

Students have opportunities to:

Learn how to use open source and proprietary geographical information systems (GIS) software such as QGIS and ArcGIS;
Become familiar with standards and methods common to digital humanities including XML, TEI, and Dublin Core;
Learn how to create virtual worlds and acquire an expertise in computer graphic design for cultural heritage;
Become actively involved in current Spatial eHumanities projects;
Learn how to encode literary and historical sources, as well as newer sources (such as social media) to identify and visualise spatial and temporal networks and patterns;
Gain practical project-based experience and project management skills by becoming an intern in a cultural heritage institution, a commercial organisation, or a digital spatial project;
Learn programming languages and apply these to spatial and temporal data in the various fields of the arts/humanities, archaeology, and geography.
The course is delivered in our state-of-the-art facilities in An Foras Feasa and National Centre for Geocomputation (Iontas Building, North Campus), which include the MakersLab for Computational Imaging and 3D Printing projects, the Digital Humanities Lab with high-end desktop computers for computer graphics and image processing, the Green Screen Studio for audio-visual recording, and the GIS Lab

Course Structure

90 ECTS are needed to complete the Masters. The course is comprised of the following elements:

Required Taught Modules: 40 ECTS*

Elective Taught Modules: 20 ECTS

Project and Dissertation: 30 ECTS

*Required modules include 1) Mapping and Modelling Space and Time; 2) Intro to Geographical Information Science; 3) Digital Heritage: Theories, Methods and Challenges; 4) Digital Humanities Practicum (10 ECTS each). All modules are integral to the building of practical and theoretical knowledge of the discipline, its development and its intersection with public projects. The Digital Humanities Practicum module guarantees students a work placement at a cultural heritage institution or on a Digital Humanities project.

Part-time students are advised to register for ‘Mapping and Modelling Space and Time’ in the first semester, while working for the ‘Digital Humanities Practicum’ in the second year of the course.

Applicants with little previous programming experience, are advised to register for ‘Structured Programming’, an intensive 3-week 90-hour pre-semester laboratory-based programming course.

Elective Modules in the second semester provide students with specialised skills either on geocomputation or 3D modelling. Students who don’t register for the pre-semester structured programming module can register for both geocomputation and 3D modelling-related modules therefore getting a much broader specialisation in the field of Spatial eHumanities.

The project and dissertation will be undertaken over the last semester of the course and will be individually supervised or co-supervised by an academic from one or both of the contributing departments.

For students who wish not to write a final thesis, this course is also offered as a postgraduate diploma in Spatial eHumanities.

Career Options

This course would be attractive to professionals in the cultural heritage and library sectors to update existing skills to work specifically with spatial data. It would also be attractive to computer scientists wishing to work with new datasets being created by the cultural heritage sector as well as organisations such as Google (e.g. Google Books, Google Cultural Institute, and Google Maps). This MSc would also be attractive to students wishing to go into fields such as GIS and spatial consultancy, government departments that work with spatial data (e.g. Office of Public Works). Potential graduates would also be skilled in areas of content and data analysis and recommender systems in organisations such as TripAdvisor and Amazon.

How To Apply

Online application only http://www.pac.ie/maynoothuniversity

PAC Code
MH56F/MH57F

The following documents should be forwarded to PAC, 1 Courthouse Square, Galway or uploaded to your online application form:

Certified copies of all official transcripts of results for all non-Maynooth University qualifications listed MUST accompany the application. Failure to do so will delay your application being processed. Non-Maynooth University students are asked to provide two academic references and a copy of birth certificate or valid passport.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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Spatial eHumanities is a truly interdisciplinary programme combining geocomputation, cultural heritage, design, and humanities/arts research. Read more

Overview

Spatial eHumanities is a truly interdisciplinary programme combining geocomputation, cultural heritage, design, and humanities/arts research. It takes an interdisciplinary approach to focus on spatio-temporal concepts, methods, and tools in the development of computational and visual frameworks from which to explore the past and better understand our present.

The Postgraduate Diploma in Spatial eHumanities has been jointly designed by An Foras Feasa and the National Centre for Geocomputation to provide both a historical background and theoretical grounding to the field while providing students with solid skills in contemporary digital methods and technologies, including Geographic Information Systems and 3D computer graphics modelling. It is also excellent preparation for those wishing to pursue a computationally-enabled PhD in the arts, humanities, social science, or digital cultural heritage.

Students have opportunities to:

Learn how to use open source and proprietary geographical information systems (GIS) software such as QGIS and ArcGIS;
Become familiar with standards and methods common to digital humanities including XML, TEI, and Dublin Core;
Learn how to create virtual worlds and acquire an expertise in computer graphic design for cultural heritage;
Become actively involved in current Spatial eHumanities projects;
Learn how to encode literary and historical sources, as well as newer sources (such as social media) to identify and visualise spatial and temporal networks and patterns;
Gain practical project-based experience and project management skills by becoming an intern in a cultural heritage institution, a commercial organisation, or a digital spatial project;
Learn programming languages and apply these to spatial and temporal data in the various fields of the arts/humanities, archaeology, and geography.
The course is delivered in our state-of-the-art facilities in An Foras Feasa and National Centre for Geocomputation (Iontas Building, North Campus), which include the MakersLab for Computational Imaging and 3D Printing projects, the Digital Humanities Lab with high-end desktop computers for computer graphics and image processing, the Green Screen Studio for audio-visual recording, and the GIS Lab.

Course Structure

60 ECTS are needed to complete the Diploma. The course is comprised of the following elements:

Required Taught Modules: 40 ECTS*

Elective Taught Modules: 20 ECTS

*Required modules include 1) Mapping and Modelling Space and Time; 2) Intro to Geographical Information Science; 3) Digital Heritage: Theories, Methods and Challenges; 4) Digital Humanities Practicum (10 ECTS each). All modules are integral to the building of practical and theoretical knowledge of the discipline, its development and its intersection with public projects. The Digital Humanities Practicum module guarantees students a work placement at a cultural heritage institution or on a Digital Humanities project.

Applicants with little previous programming experience, are advised to register for ‘Structured Programming’, an intensive 3-week 90-hour pre-semester laboratory-based programming course which takes place in late August running into early September.

Elective Modules in the second semester provide students with specialised skills either on geocomputation or 3D modelling. Students who don’t register for the pre-semester structured programming module can register for both geocomputation and 3D modelling-related modules therefore getting a much broader specialisation in the field of Spatial eHumanities.

Career Options

This course would be attractive to professionals in the cultural heritage and library sectors to update existing skills to work specifically with spatial data. It would also be attractive to computer scientists wishing to work with new datasets being created by the cultural heritage sector as well as organisations such as Google (e.g. Google Books, Google Cultural Institute, and Google Maps). This MSc would also be attractive to students wishing to go into fields such as GIS and spatial consultancy, government departments that work with spatial data (e.g. Office of Public Works). Potential graduates would also be skilled in areas of content and data analysis and recommender systems in organisations such as TripAdvisor and Amazon.

How To Apply

Online application only http://www.pac.ie/maynoothuniversity

PAC Code
MH52F/MH53F

The following documents should be forwarded to PAC, 1 Courthouse Square, Galway or uploaded to your online application form:

Certified copies of all official transcripts of results for all non-Maynooth University qualifications listed MUST accompany the application. Failure to do so will delay your application being processed. Non-Maynooth University students are asked to provide two academic references and a copy of birth certificate or valid passport.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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The MA focuses on the use of rights discourse and tools within the human rights mainstream and in a range of related fields (development, humanitarianism, conflict transformation, the environment, public health etc.). Read more
The MA focuses on the use of rights discourse and tools within the human rights mainstream and in a range of related fields (development, humanitarianism, conflict transformation, the environment, public health etc.).

As such, it is designed for practitioners and would-be practitioners across this spectrum who wish to engage with applied human rights.

Overview

Our MA in Applied Human Rights is distinctive in five main ways:
-Tt is uniquely applied, exploring how human rights can advance social justice in law, policy and social activism
-It is interdisciplinary and holistic (integrating knowledge of human rights, development, conflict, and more)
-Students will acquire relevant knowledge but also skills that are vital for a career in human rights e.g. project management skills
-The lecturers are both academics and experienced practitioners, and the international human rights defenders hosted by the Centre will attend and lead classes
-An international field trip to South Africa takes place in the first term (student numbers permitting), enabling students to work alongside local NGOs and human rights defenders on concrete projects

Course content

The MA structure has two components: compulsory modules, and optional modules. In total, students need to complete five modules (two compulsory, in the first term; one compulsory, running over two terms; two options in the second term). A dissertation will fulfill the requirements for an MA. This structure has been chosen so as to maximize the choice available to students, but to guide the selection process in a constructive way eg: indicating where modules are practice-based and where they are not.

Continuous assessment of applied skills is a feature of the programme.

Compulsory modules
-Defending human rights (40 credits; terms 1-2)
-Social sciences and human rights practice (20 credits; term 1)
-International human rights law and advocacy (20 credits, term 1)
-Dissertation (60 credits, terms 3-4)

Optional modules
In the second term students will be able to take two options. Those offered by CAHR will share the characteristics of the MA (practice based and interdisciplinary) and will explore areas where rights are being used in new and innovative ways. Students may also select from optional modules listed below taught by other departments.
Optional modules taught at CAHR:
-Asylum, migration and trafficking
-Culture and protest
-Development Alternatives: Development, Rights, Security
-Truth, justice and reparations after violence

Optional modules taught in other departments
-Conflict and development (Politics)
-Globalisation and social policy (Social Policy and Social Work)
-Global social problems (Social Policy and Social Work)
-International organisations (Politics)
-New security challenges (Politics)
-Teaching and learning citizenship and global education (Education)
-Women, citizenship and conflict (Centre for Women's Studies)

*Please note that optional modules may not run if the lecturer is on leave or there is insufficient demand.

Careers

Our MA provides career advice, networking opportunities, hands-on experience, and personalised reference letters to help our graduates find good jobs with human rights NGOs, humanitarian and development organisations, policy think-tanks, national governments, and UN agencies.

Recent graduates have secured work with:
-Government departments, e.g. working on health equality and trafficking in the UK, Finnish Centre for Human Rights (NHRI)
-Human rights organisations, e.g. Freedom House, the Terrence Higgins Trust, the Afghanistan Human Rights and Democracy Organisation, the Gay & Lesbian Victory Institute (Washington, DC), Freedom from Torture (Yorkshire & Humberside), International Services and Brave New Films (USA)
-Development and humanitarian organisations, e.g. Norwegian People's Aid and Merlin
-Inter-governmental agencies, e.g. the Unrepresented Nations and Peoples Organisation in The Hague, UNDP in Bangladesh, UNRIC in Brussels and Quaker UN Office in Geneva
-Research posts, e.g. PhD positions and Research Assistant on Corporate Social Responsibility at the American University, Beirut
-Think-tanks, e.g. Involve, London
-Businesses, e.g. Ethical Trade Coordinator at New Look Retailers

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Both geopolitics and security are defining issues of our era. As a global community, we face unprecedented challenges relating to environmental catastrophe, resource shortages, economic meltdown, terrorism and infrastructural failure. Read more
Both geopolitics and security are defining issues of our era. As a global community, we face unprecedented challenges relating to environmental catastrophe, resource shortages, economic meltdown, terrorism and infrastructural failure. We need to understand the conditions that make our daily lives vulnerable and to develop strategies to manage risk and mitigate the impact of crisis, whilst also fostering critical reflections on those very strategies and techniques which seek to keep us secure.

This course combines thematic elements which theorise geopolitics and security with specialist options, which allow you to follow your own interests, alongside a dissertation, which can be strongly connected to work-related/future career interests. Multiple methods of assessment and diverse research methods encourage skills development and employability. We will encourage students to network with relevant organizations and institutions, building on staff expertise and experience.

The course is designed for both ambitious young graduates and experienced professionals working in commercial or political organisations such as banking, energy, media, think tanks, NGOs and government, where risk (management), threat and insecurity are critical to strategic policy development.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/geography/coursefinder/mscgeopoliticsandsecurity.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The Departments of Geography and Politics and International Relations are top-ranked research-led departments.

- The course is taught by world-class scholars and informed by cutting-edge research and experience outside the academy.

- The course offers an advanced grounding in geopolitics and security while allowing you to specialize in issues and themes of interest to you.

- There is a strong emphasis on skills development especially communication.

- Highly focused on employability – invited outside speakers will provide networking opportunities.

Department research and industry highlights

- Leading researchers and research groups (e.g. Politics, Development and Sustainability Group in Geography) with established track record in grant awards (e.g. from the ESRC, AHRC, Leverhulme Trust, EPSRC, British Academy, British Council, Falkland Island Government and the EU Marie-Curie fund).

- External networking and public engagement (e.g. working with UK government departments including MOD (British Antarctic Survey); Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Civil Contingencies Secretariat; the Parliamentary Office for Science and Technology and the Canada-UK Colloquium.

- Networking and Knowledge Transfer (e.g. collaborative postgraduate projects with major institutions such as the British Library, Science Museum and Royal Geographical Society). We have also worked closely with the BBC and its world service contributing to programme development and televised broadcasting.

- Ongoing collaboration with leading think-tanks such as Royal United Services Institute (RUSI) and Chatham House.

On completion of the course graduates will have:

- A sophisticated knowledge and critical understanding of geopolitics and security including core debates, and case studies.

- A detailed appreciation of methods and sources used to investigate geopolitical and security related issues and themes

- High-level skills development especially in communication (including social media), report writing, briefing papers, political debate and critical thinking

- Opportunities to enhance employability through practical experience and exposure to relevant individuals and organizations in the geopolitical/security-related field

Assessment

Formal and informal assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, oral and group work presentations, policy, briefing and media reports, video and documentary production, and a dissertation. Field visits to important sites and organisations, including RUSI, will also be available, supporting collegial interaction between students and staff. Emphasis is placed on informal assessment (especially through group work) so that students have plenty of opportunities to receive formative support and guidance.

Employability & career opportunities

Geography and PIR graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many careers including working in government, media, non-governmental organizations and public organizations both in the UK and the wider world. This new course is intended for both experienced professionals seeking further academic training/reflection and also younger graduates eager to gain further skills development and relevant experience through study. Assessment and presentation opportunities as well as strategic field visits will help develop these skills, while a programme of external speakers will provide insight into the field. There will also be the potential for internships and work placements. The course will act as an ideal stepping-stone for PhD progression should this be chosen as a career pathway.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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Veterinary epidemiology is a key component in a number of the global grand challenges relating to disease control, food security and climate change. Read more

Veterinary epidemiology is a key component in a number of the global grand challenges relating to disease control, food security and climate change. Consequently, there is a need to improve our ability to understand, predict and respond to patterns and dynamics of disease and to control outbreaks.

The R(D)SVS and SRUC partnership creates the greatest concentration of research power in veterinary and agricultural sciences in the UK. The MSc draws on this wealth of experience and research activity to provide scientific knowledge of the fundamental biological processes (e.g. behaviour, physiology, immunology, ecology) and environmental and farming management practices (e.g. husbandry, nutrition, livestock trade) driving disease transmission, persistence, prevalence and spread in livestock production systems. This enables in-depth understanding of complex environmental patterns of disease, which facilitates prediction of disease risk and control. This multidisciplinary systems approach will provide you with the skills to make significant contributions to tackling food security, climate change and disease control in your role as an animal health professional.

By the end of the programme you will not only have a detailed understanding of the biology driving disease persistence and prevalence, but also how the biology scales up from individuals to populations. You will understand how this interacts with agricultural management practices to determine the efficacy of disease control strategies and livestock production (i.e. interdisciplinary systems thinking and communication). Furthermore, the systems approach offers a way to frame disease challenges and problem solve disease risk at a range of scales (e.g. from veterinarians tackling specific outbreaks to the consequences of climate change on disease risk). To this end the programme provides training in methodological skills for the design, implementation, analysis, interpretation and communication of epidemiological studies, disease surveillance and disease control in animal populations and wider host communities.

Courses are delivered by active researchers presenting their own research, which is placed into context with global grand challenges. As such, you will be exposed to and taught skills appropriate for developing a research career.

Online learning

The programme will use the University’s award winning online learning environments, which includes video podcasts, web-based discussion forums and expert tuition.

Programme structure

The programme is delivered part-time by online learning over period of 3-6 years.

You may undertake the programme by intermittent study (flexible progression route), accruing credits within a time limit of:

  • 1 years for the Certificate (maximum period 2 years)
  • 2 years for the Diploma (maximum period 4 years)
  • 3 years for the MSc (maximum period of 6 years including a maximum period of 12 months from the start of your written reflective element to it being completed)

The programme is modular in structure, offering a flexible student-centred approach to the choice of courses studied; other than the three core courses required for the certificate, students may choose to study individual courses, to complete a sufficient number of credits to be awarded the:

  • Certificate (60 credits)
  • Diploma (120 credits)
  • MSc (180 credits)

Postgraduate Professional Development

Postgraduate Professional Development (PPD) is aimed at working professionals who want to advance their knowledge through a postgraduate-level course(s), without the time or financial commitment of a full Masters, Postgraduate Diploma or Postgraduate Certificate.

You may take a maximum of 50 credits worth of courses over two years through our PPD scheme. These lead to a University of Edinburgh postgraduate award of academic credit. Alternatively, after one year of taking courses you can choose to transfer your credits and continue on to studying towards a higher award on a Masters, Postgraduate Diploma or Postgraduate Certificate programme. Although PPD courses have various start dates throughout a year you may only start a Masters, Postgraduate Diploma or Postgraduate Certificate programme in the month of September. Any time spent studying PPD will be deducted from the amount of time you will have left to complete a Masters, Postgraduate Diploma or Postgraduate Certificate programme.

Learning outcomes

  • Acquire knowledge about disease systems in livestock production environments and the interactions between the biological and livestock management processes driving disease dynamics.
  • Acquire specific skills to link individual farm environments and management practices to disease risk and production efficiency at farm and national scales.
  • Be able to interpret, be critical of and communicate scientific results and information in research.

Career opportunities

The courses and programme as a whole will provide:

  • general postgraduate training (e.g. for people in education, government, policy-making, agricultural and veterinary organisations) to enable promotion, further employment opportunities or personal fulfilment
  • general postgraduate training for people considering a career in research (e.g. a precursor to a PhD)
  • topic-specific postgraduate training (e.g. for veterinarians for continuing professional development) to enable promotion, further employment opportunities or personal fulfilment


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The MSW in Social Work is a 2-year, full-time, postgraduate degree course. The qualification is recognised throughout the UK and it’s expected that in due course it will meet the criteria for recognition in the EU and elsewhere overseas. Read more

Why this course?

The MSW in Social Work is a 2-year, full-time, postgraduate degree course.

The qualification is recognised throughout the UK and it’s expected that in due course it will meet the criteria for recognition in the EU and elsewhere overseas. The course is based on the Standards in Social Work Education (SiSWE) and is to be validated by social work's professional body in Scotland, the Scottish Social Services Council (SSSC).

The course provides a stimulating blend of university-based teaching and agency-based learning opportunities across both years.

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/socialwork/

You’ll study

You'll undertake a range of taught modules, a dissertation and assessed placements in a range of social work service settings.

Work towards the Masters dissertation is mostly scheduled for the period beyond Year 2 of the programme. You’ll be told of the arrangements during year 1.

Teaching staff

The School of Social Policy and Social Work has a long and rich tradition of education, research and consultancy in social work. It brings together a staff group with extensive experience in the varied areas of social work practice i.e. children and families, criminal justice social work and community care.

Facilities

The Centre for Excellence for Looked After Children in Scotland (a multi-million pound development funded by the Scottish Government to support research and training in residential child care), the Centre for the Child and Society, and Community Care Works are all based within the School and contribute to teaching in the course as well as to research and consultancy.

Relevant work experience

We normally expect you to have had at least six months full-time work experience, or its equivalent in part-time work, at the point of the application.

We’re more concerned with the quality of experience than whether or not it’s paid. It’s useful to think about experience in three dimensions - duration, range and depth. While longer and more diverse experience is of great value, depth (or quality) is perhaps more important since this is what allows learning and professional development. Often experience is "deeper" in contexts where supervision is offered regularly, allowing for in-depth discussion in practice issues and dilemmas. Undertaking relevant reading and training while working often helps people to "deepen" the quality of their work experience.

- Criteria for work experience
The following indicate the kinds of criteria we look at in considering the relevance and suitability of your work experience:
- does it involve direct contact with people either as service users e.g. individuals, families or groups where the focus is on helping them live with or manage major difficulties in their lives, or in stimulating collaborative ventures to seek social change?

- does it develop critical awareness of the range, depth and complexity of social and personal problems and the variety of individual and agency responses which can address these?

- does it develop basic knowledge of the functions of social work, social care and/or community development agencies?

- does it develop skills in helping other people in difficulty e.g. skills in identifying and assessing problems, jointly planning and supporting a response to them or coping with stress?

- does it provide opportunities to reflect on, and take action to combat, discrimination and oppression in people's lives?

- does it generate an awareness, and an ability to act in the light of the value dilemmas involved in both helping activities and social change activities e.g. reflecting on the tensions between individual rights and freedoms and collective social obligations?

- Relevant work settings:
- work may be undertaken in a wide variety of settings e.g. community-based offices, residential provision, day care services, community organisations.
- work may be carried out with a range of client groups. These will commonly be people who experience various forms of disadvantage.
- it should be supervised by a member of staff of the status and experience to provide a reference indicating suitability for entry to social work education.

Personal qualities

The kinds of personal qualities which we look for in an applicant include:
- the ability to convey genuine warmth and interest in people
- an ability to see strengths and potential in even the most difficult circumstances and people
- a genuine interest in difference and diversity and an obvious ability to adapt and change
- a willingness to question conformity and risk discomfort in challenging attitudes which encourage discrimination and complacency
- the ability to support people who live with difficult, sometimes worsening circumstances
- an ability to help people set and follow their own agendas while being capable of asserting your authority where their welfare requires it
- being level-headed and helpful in the face of people's distress, pain and anger, even when it's turned on you
- a quiet confidence in your own ability and the capacity to argue and defend your views in a constructive way
- satisfaction in helping manage and, where possible, resolve conflict, but never at the expense of sacrificing the interests of vulnerable people
- taking enjoyment from both using your own initiatives as well as working accountably as part of team
- the ability to accept constructive criticism and learn from your mistakes
- a passion to fight for the rights of disadvantaged people

Communication skills

The communication skills which we would expect all applicants to demonstrate would include the capacity to:
- engage appropriately with a wide range of people
- communicate expressively, fluently and convincingly in verbal and written form
- understand, calculate and present accurately, basic numerical and financial information
- possess at least a basic understanding of information and communication technology and be able to acquire sufficient competence by the end of year 1/level 1 of the course

Age

There are no specific age restrictions for undertaking the course although funding bodies may impose an upper limit. Employability on course completion is a factor in selection.

Professional suitability

All entrants must register with the Scottish Social Services Council (SSSC) and meet suitability criteria regarding offending history, employment record etc.

Overseas students

As with home students, overseas applicants should be able to demonstrate their motivation, aptitude and preparedness for social work training. You must have substantial relevant paid or voluntary work experience. In addition, you must have a recognised degree or an equivalent qualification.

Application for entry to the course must be made through UCAS. The subsequent selection process is broadly the same as for UK and EC applicants. However, in order to ensure that applications from out-with the UK are given full consideration it is advisable that in addition to applying to UCAS you should send additional information directly to us. This should include:
- detailed information about degrees held and the awarding institution(s)
- where English is a second language please provide information about your levels of proficiency in English
- details of work experience, with particular reference to the aspects referred to in the guidelines on work experience
- a statement about reasons for wanting to study in the UK
- financial arrangements for meeting the cost of tuition fees and living expenses during the two year course
- an indication that you would be available to come to the UK for interview. Applicants who are not able to come for interview may be asked to supply additional written material and/or references.

Learning & teaching

The teaching and learning approach is student-centred and aims to promote reflective learning. Our key approach is problem-based learning which is universally recognised as an effective way of developing the critical thinking and problem-solving skills needed by busy professionals.

The course is taught through lectures, seminar groups, simulations and individual skills rehearsal with a commitment to use interactive e-learning wherever relevant. At the heart of the course is practice learning in social work service agencies with formally assessed placements being undertaken in both years.

Assessment

Our assessment methods consist of regular feedback on specific tasks related to teaching and learning as you work through a module.

Modules are formally assessed in a range of different ways, including essay, report, presentations and peer group assessments.

Careers

Qualified social workers are increasingly valued. Promotion and career development opportunities are excellent. Social workers can be found in:
- Local authorities - from main-grade workers to directorate level. Social workers will be providing, managing, purchasing and organising services to people with very diverse needs across the life span in different settings

- Voluntary organisations - at all levels, usually working in relatively specialist ways with children and young people with particularly challenging needs, as well as vulnerable adults, especially those with learning disabilities and those affected by mental health issues. Settings and contexts vary as widely as in local authorities.

- Private sector - often at senior practitioner and management level with services focusing on home-based support to vulnerable adults and residential services to older people as well as foster care support and services to people with offending histories.

- Central government - experienced social work managers advise and support ministers in monitoring and developing social work services.

- Social work regulation - a range of independent bodies, like the Care Inspectorate and Scottish Social Services Council employ social workers at a senior level to lead and manage registration and inspection of social work services to ensure they meet appropriate standards.

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/index.jsp

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Your path to contribute to effective solutions in health care. Read more

Your path to contribute to effective solutions in health care

Are you intrigued by topics like health insurance, costs, benefits and reforms and health disparities? Does contributing to economic solutions in this atypical sector sound like the challenge for you? The Health Economics programme provides you with the concepts and quantitative skills necessary to face the 21st Century health sector challenges.

This programme teaches you to apply economic knowledge and econometric analysis to pressing issues in health care. You will address problems caused by rising costs, population aging and rapid advances in medical technology. All this, in a sector with atypical agents (after all, doctors do not maximise profits) where even the value of the main good itself, health, is subject of debate. 

Get educated by the best in Rotterdam

Health Economics? Rotterdam is where you should be. As global frontrunners in research and training our researchers frequently publish in top journals in the field and are regularly consulted by international bodies from all over the world. It’s these researchers of the Health Economics Group of Erasmus School of Economics and the Health Economics and Health Systems and Insurance groups of the Institute for Health Policy and Management who will shape your education.

Careers

The Master specialisation in Health Economics at Erasmus School of Economics has an outstanding reputation in the health business community. It has everything to prepare you for a bright future as a health economist at for example:

  • consulting firms (e.g. KPMG, IMS Health, SiRM)
  • the pharmaceutical industry (e.g. Pfizer, Glaxo Smith Kline)
  • health insurance companies (e.g. Achmea, Delta Lloyd)
  • academia (e.g. EUR, University of Birmingham)
  • international organisations (e.g. WHO, World Bank)
  • regional health authorities and government institutions (e.g. RIVM, Ministry of Health)
  • hospitals (e.g. Erasmus MC)

"Addressing topical healthcare issues is inspirational in and of itself"

Far from an average sector, complex and far-reaching economic issues and as topical as science gets: Health Economics is truly unique. Do you want to combine quantitative skills with economics in this sector? Meet your fellow students!

Download the brochure here.



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Information systems are spreading into every sphere of business and non-business organisations. Read more
Information systems are spreading into every sphere of business and non-business organisations. They herald the dawn of a new 'Information Age' in which information, information systems and information technology are recognised as key organisational resources and in which management activities become more information-intensive. Yet the majority of information systems - including e-government, e-commerce, and e-development systems - are under-performing or are failures.

A key cause of this problem is the gap of knowledge, of skills, of culture and of language that exists between functional managers and information systems professionals.

The aim of this Masters degree is to close that gap by training individual staff to become 'hybrid managers'. Hybrid managers are those who understand both the job of management in its organisational setting and the role, management and jargon of information, information systems and information technology. These individuals will be in a strong position to lead the successful development and implementation of new information systems in their organisations.

At the end of the programme, participants will have been provided with:
-Conceptual frameworks to understand the role of management of information, of information technology and of information systems in organisations.
-New knowledge and skills to help in the effective planning, development implementation and management of information systems.
-New knowledge and skills to help in the effective management and change of organisations.

Special features

An overseas field visit is an integral part of the programme. The cost of the visit is included in the programme fee. In addition, participants may undertake research visits to organisations applying information systems in practice in the UK. Field courses may be scheduled at any point during the twelve-month period of the degree programme and this may include during University vacations. Successful applicants are expected to be available to attend.

Countries to be visited may change their immigration and visa regulations at short notice. The Global Development Institute (GDI) cannot guarantee that where visas are required for the field course, they will be granted. GDI will ensure that, in the unlikely event this occurs, affected students are not academically disadvantaged.

Teaching and learning

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over 24 months. There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme, therefore if you are considering taking a programme on a part-time basis, you should discuss the requirements with the Programme Director first and seek approval from your employer to have the relevant time off. Timetabling information is normally available from late August from the Programme Administrator and you will have the opportunity to discuss course unit choices during induction week with the Programme Director.

Career opportunities

This programme is designed to develop two groups: functional managers who wish to take greater control over, and make a more direct contribution to, change in their organisations via the development and implementation of information systems; and information systems professionals who wish to improve the success rate of the information systems they develop or use, and who may also wish to upgrade their management skills and knowledge.

It will be relevant to those with career trajectories in the private, public, and NGO sectors, and it is particularly appropriate for those working in or with newly developed, transitional and developing countries. Our graduates have an impressive career record in the UK or in their home countries.

GDI has a large and diverse postgraduate population, with 85% of our students drawn from outside the UK, particularly from Africa, Asia and Western Europe, but also reaching out to Latin America, the Middle East, North America and the Pacific. Graduates from the MSc M&IS programme have gone on to careers that typically incorporate a mix of management, information systems and information technology responsibilities such as business analysis, change management, and e-business and e-government roles with public, private and NGO sector organisations. Others have pursued further academic study leading to a PhD and academic/research consulting careers. Since its foundation, GDI has trained over 7000 individuals from 170 different countries.

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This course involves combining communication studies, applied linguistics, international management and intercultural communication. Read more
This course involves combining communication studies, applied linguistics, international management and intercultural communication.

Economic globalisation and rapid developments in ICT mean that many organisations now operate on an international scale, or at the very least interact with consumers, clients and/or partner organisations in other countries. Even ‘local’ companies and organisations may have a multicultural workforce, or offer their services or products abroad. As a result, communication has become increasingly international and intercultural.

Organisations seek to create communication strategies that support their overall strategy and objectives. In doing so, they need to interact with stakeholders who may have a variety of linguistic and cultural backgrounds. These stakeholders may include employees, customers, suppliers, financial backers or even local governments. In the Master’s specialisation in International Business Communication, you’ll learn about the all factors, including cultural and linguistic ones, that play a role in communication and need to be taken into account in order to create effective communication strategies.

In your future career as a business executive or communication specialist, you’ll need to be able to assess the quality, reliability and validity of the research that informs your practical decisions ‘on the job’. In other words, you’ll need to be able to judge whether existing research – as well as your own – complies with the ground rules of academic rigor. The programme therefore places emphasis not only on training your research skills but also on developing your awareness of what ‘good research’ entails.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ibc

Why study International Business Communication at Radboud University?

- This is one of very few programmes in Europe (and the only programme in the Netherlands) that also focuses on the cultural and linguistic dimensions of international business communication.

- The specialisation deals with theory and insights that are relevant to achieving effective communication in various organisational contexts; from interpersonal communication in a meeting with (multicultural) colleagues, to marketing communication aimed at reaching international target audiences.

- Students do a (group) internship in which they work towards solving a particular communication issue or answering a specific communication question for a company or organisation. This provides hands-on experience in a relevant organisational setting.

- This specialisation attracts students from different countries and because admission to the programme is selective (max. 50 students per year), you’ll be part of a small group of highly motivated Dutch and international students. This means that to a certain extent, your learning environment is international as well.

- Guest speakers are regularly invited to share their knowledge about current developments in business, management and organisational communication.

- Although the main focus is on international communication in larger, multinational companies, graduates of this programme will be able to apply what they’ve learned in a variety of organisations – for profit, non-profit or governmental institutes.

Language(s) and management perspective

Languages form the heart of communication and that is why this Master’s specialisation is taught within Radboud University’s Faculty of Arts. The programme places a strong focus on the role that languages play in effective corporate communication. Of course, the languages used are not the only factor to consider in a multicultural environment - which is why you will be encouraged to also consider communication issues and strategy from an international management perspective.

In short, you’ll explore the impact of globalisation on business communication, the role of linguistic and cultural diversity in corporate communication, and the human and operational consequences of organisations’ language policy or strategies. In doing so, you’ll also come to understand how such issues can shape and affect an organisation’s performance.

Career prospects

With a Master’s specialisation in International Business Communication, you could pursue a career in government, semi-government, business or academia. For example, our graduates work as internal or external communication managers or press spokespeople in companies, government departments, health institutions or non-profit organisations. Many work in marketing communications at multinational companies, as communication trainers for consultancies, as social media managers or as PR consultants.

- International perspectives
Since the programme focuses on communication in international contexts, and on communication with international target groups, a sizable number of graduates have found jobs outside the Netherlands or with international organisations operating from the Netherlands.

- Wide range of communication functions
Job openings for our graduates can cover a wide range of communication functions, organisational types and (business) sectors. This is because organisations have increasingly come to realise that effective communication is essential to all organisational functions (e.g. marketing, PR, HRM, R&D, finance), and have made a real effort over the past decades to professionalise communications, making (international) business communication an increasingly important discipline.

Our approach to this field

Corporate communication involves orchestrating internal and external communication instruments to support an organisation’s core activities and to manage its relationship with different types of stakeholders. Due to the internationalisation of markets and businesses, corporate communication has gone global in recent years. Organisations that operate internationally need to take different cultures and language backgrounds into account when designing their communication. Culture and language(s) may affect international communication at three levels:
- The management level: e.g. when CEOs communicate with internal or external audiences
- The organisational level: e.g. when a company communicates about its Corporate Social Responsibility policy
- The marketing level: e.g. when products or services are promoted to an international audience in (corporate) advertising.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ibc

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