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This programme aims to provide students with a solid foundation in a broad range of social science research methods as well as basic research skills. Read more
This programme aims to provide students with a solid foundation in a broad range of social science research methods as well as basic research skills.

Students will acquire a general overview of the philosophy of social research, and understand how this informs research design, methods of data collection and analysis. They will also develop an ability to use a range of research methods, to communicate research findings effectively and an understanding of the potential use of and impact of their research within and beyond academia.

Core Modules

Philosophy of Social Science Research

The module considers fundamental philosophical debates about what counts as ‘knowledge’ across the social sciences. Teaching addresses (natural) science as a method of obtaining knowledge and the interpretative tradition in the social sciences. Students explore fundamental philosophical debates about what counts as ‘knowledge’ across the social sciences and apply these discussions to their own disciplines and field of study.

Research Design, Practice and Ethics

The module introduces students to social science research designs and ethical issues in research practice. Learning supports students to be able to make strategic choices when developing their own projects, and to assess the design and research ethics decision making in others’ published research work.

Fundamentals in Quantitative Research Methods

Concepts, methods and skills central to quantitative research, including data collection approaches and concept operationalization, are core throughout this module. Building on a grounding in ideas relating to probability sampling, sampling error and statistical inference, coverage of techniques extends from comparisons of means and simple cross-tabular analyses to a discussion of multivariate analysis approaches, focusing on linear and logistic regression.

Foundations in Qualitative Research

Qualitative research is examined across a range of topics, from different approaches and methods including ethnographic and observational research, discourse and conversation analysis, documentary and archival analysis, participatory research and the use of interviews. Ethics in qualitative research is specifically considered, as is the evaluation of qualitative research.

Advanced Training Programme

Unless stated, all advanced training courses run as 2-day intensive workshops from 10–4pm with breaks. This list is updated regularly as new courses are approved so do check this website from time to time to see what is on offer.

These advanced training courses are open to all research students in the College (and some departments in other Colleges, such as Geography, subject to the discretion of the Programme Team). However, places on each course are limited and priority will be given to MA Social Research students.

These advanced training courses are also open to all staff in the University who may wish to attend without completing the assessments. However, all doctoral researchers and staff who wish to do so will be placed on a waiting list. Confirmation will be sent a week before the course dates.

Advanced Training courses run in Semester 3, unless otherwise stated:

Analysing Hierarchical Panel Data
An Approach To Research On Discourse
Case Study Research Design
Documentary Research In Education
Factor Analysis
Introduction To Econometric Software
Introduction To Time Series Regression
Narrative Research
Multivariate Linear To Logistic Regression
Policy Evalution
Q Methodology - A Systematic Approach For Interpretive Research Design
Questionnaire Design
Researching Disability
Role Of Thinking: Philosophy Of Social Science Research
Visual Research Methods

NB: some courses have pre-requisites, e.g. to register on Multiple Linear and Logistic Regression, Factor Analysis, or Narrative Research, you will need to have passed Social Research Methods II (20 credits module), or equivalent. You will need to provide evidence that you have passed a similar course on quantitative/qualitative data analysis where appropriate.

To register for the above advanced training courses, please e-mail: specifying which courses you are interested in. When registering for courses, please provide your name, student ID, department/programme you are affiliated to, and your e-mail address.

In addition, you will write a 12,000-word dissertation (60 credits).

About the School of Government and Society

The School of Government and Society is one of the leading UK and International centres for governance, politics, international development, sociology, public management, Russian and European studies.
Established in 2008, the School comprises three Departments: Politics and International Studies (POLSIS); International Development (IDD) and Local Government Studies (INLOGOV).

POLSIS: The Department of Political Science and International Studies (POLSIS), one of the largest and most academically vibrant departments of Political Science and International Studies in the UK. In the latest Research Excellence Framework (REF) Politics and International Studies at Birmingham was ranked the 6th best in the power rankings highlighting the large number of staff in POLSIS producing world-leading and internationally excellent research.

IDD: Be part of global effort to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. Contribute to conflict resolution and post-conflict reconstruction. Help build capacity of nations and communities to adapt to climate change. Study with us to gain the skills and knowledge essential for working in international development in the 21st Century.

INLOGOV: The Institute of Local Government Studies (INLOGOV) is the leading academic centre for research and teaching on local governance and strategic public management. We enrich the world of local public service with research evidence and innovative ideas, making a positive difference.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgfunding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgopendays

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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At the University of Hertfordshire we have been delivering distance-learning courses since 2004. We understand how people learn online, and you can as well with this Master's degree in e-Learning Technology. Read more
At the University of Hertfordshire we have been delivering distance-learning courses since 2004. We understand how people learn online, and you can as well with this Master's degree in e-Learning Technology. The online course focuses on e-Learning design and development, enabling you to develop applications that are learner-centred.

The MSc eLearning Technology draws on the University’s extensive experience in distance-learning, this online Master’s focuses on designing and developing e-Learning, equipping you to develop effective, learner-centred applications.

Why choose this course?

-Gain a master's degree in one year full-time or at a pace that suits you through online study
-Chose from two different routes depending on your qualifications: an advanced programme for Computer Science graduates - or a route for other graduates that combines foundation modules with options from the advanced modules
-Flexible online learning allows you to fit study around your other commitments, without travel and accommodation costs
-Gain an internationally-recognised master's degree from the UK's University of Hertfordshire
-Benefit from the same academic standards and quality control procedures as our equivalent on campus course
-We have an excellent track record in research, with over half of our outputs rated at world-leading or internationally excellent in REF 2014, the most recent national assessment.

Careers

Our online masters programme is designed to give graduates the up-to-date skills and knowledge sought after by employers, whether in business, industry, government or research.

There are many opportunities within the rapidly growing e-Learning industry for technical staff who are highly skilled in the application of advanced IT techniques to e-Learning design.

Typical roles could be those found in traditional IT development projects such as Business Analyst, Programmer, User-interface Designer, Quality Controller or Project Manager. Alternatively there are more specialist roles such as Instructional Designer or Learning Technologist.

Teaching methods

Our online degree programmes are taught 100% online when studied independently, or supplemented by tutorial support when studied at a local study centre run by one of our online partners. Find out more about Tutored eLearning. Assessment is by coursework and online tests.

You will participate in the learning experience through the University's on-line learning environment, StudyNet. You will receive learning materials, take part in discussions and submit your assignments online. Additionally, you will receive study resources such as e-books and any specialist software. You will have access to the University's extensive online library facilities, or be able to visit in person if you so choose.

The amount of study time required is no different from that needed for an on campus programme. You should expect to spend at least 30 hours per week if studying full-time, and in proportion if part-time.

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The MA in New Media, Governance and Democracy examines the developments that have occurred around the world in the provision of electronic government. Read more

Course aims

The MA in New Media, Governance and Democracy examines the developments that have occurred around the world in the provision of electronic government. You will examine the political, economic and social reasons for the establishment of e-government and study online government developments in the wider context of debates about e-democracy and the civic engagement of citizens.

You will consider the establishment of e-government against the rapid spread and adoption of new information and communication technologies. We will also discuss the importance of e-government in offsetting growing political alienation and distrust of politicians and governments.

The first year, which is common to all our Media and Communication distance learning courses, will provide you with a thorough grounding in the origins, theoretical development and research methods used in the study of media and communication

This degree will equip you with the critical and practical skills that will enable you to understand, analyse and produce advanced research assignments.

By choosing to study by Distance Learning, you will have the flexibility to fit your study around existing commitments and enhance your career prospects without having to leave employment.

If you have any questions about this course, join us for a live online chat with academic tutors and admissions staff.

Course modules

Key Issues and Approaches in Media Study
Media History and Social Regulation
Media in Global Context
Communications and Globalization
Investigating Media
Media Industries: Convergence, Divergence
Professional Practices
Audience and Reception
Political Communication
E-Governance and E-Democracy: Theory and Practice

Teaching and assessment methods

The course is studied by distance learning. In Year 1 there are five written assignments and one examination. In Year 2 there are four written assignments and a dissertation of 12,000-15,000 words.

(Please note: due to regular enhancement of the University’s courses, please refer to Leicester’s own website (http://www.le.ac.uk) or/and Terms and Conditions (http://www2.le.ac.uk/legal) for the most accurate and up-to-date course information. We recommend that you familiarise yourself with this information prior to submitting an application.)

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This course brings the areas of Information Governance and eDisclosure together to provide you with an understanding of these within a modern corporate environment. Read more
This course brings the areas of Information Governance and eDisclosure together to provide you with an understanding of these within a modern corporate environment. Information Governance and eDisclosure is a growing and evolving field that involves working in conjunction with a wide range of individuals such as digital forensic investigators, lawyers and representatives from corporate HR and IT departments.

Within this course you will be supported by academics, practitioners and experts in the field of information governance and eDisclosure by introducing you to key theoretical and practical aspects using real world scenarios and case studies. You will also be encouraged to question current approaches and process and investigate new approaches, processes and solutions in this fast moving environment.

For the first two years you will take taught modules, while in the final year you'll complete a research dissertation, supervised by an academic. This course will be delivered via distance learning and for some modules supported by block delivery to gain access to the specialist software required.

Upon leaving the course you will have developed technical skills to investigate a variety of information governance and e-discovery problems and issues and gain experience to conduct and support investigations as part of a team.

The course will allow graduates from a variety of undergraduate backgrounds and established professionals to enhance their career opportunities, producing highly skilled postgraduates with the relevant theoretical and practical skills to address these issues.

The information governance and eDisclosure industry continues to grow rapidly and graduates with these skills could lead to possible career paths within global law and information governance companies, corporate legal departments, e-discovery software companies, digital forensic or e-discovery private sector agencies and government organisations.

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The MA focuses on the use of rights discourse and tools within the human rights mainstream and in a range of related fields (development, humanitarianism, conflict transformation, the environment, public health etc.). Read more
The MA focuses on the use of rights discourse and tools within the human rights mainstream and in a range of related fields (development, humanitarianism, conflict transformation, the environment, public health etc.).

As such, it is designed for practitioners and would-be practitioners across this spectrum who wish to engage with applied human rights.

Overview

Our MA in Applied Human Rights is distinctive in five main ways:
-Tt is uniquely applied, exploring how human rights can advance social justice in law, policy and social activism
-It is interdisciplinary and holistic (integrating knowledge of human rights, development, conflict, and more)
-Students will acquire relevant knowledge but also skills that are vital for a career in human rights e.g. project management skills
-The lecturers are both academics and experienced practitioners, and the international human rights defenders hosted by the Centre will attend and lead classes
-An international field trip to South Africa takes place in the first term (student numbers permitting), enabling students to work alongside local NGOs and human rights defenders on concrete projects

Course content

The MA structure has two components: compulsory modules, and optional modules. In total, students need to complete five modules (two compulsory, in the first term; one compulsory, running over two terms; two options in the second term). A dissertation will fulfill the requirements for an MA. This structure has been chosen so as to maximize the choice available to students, but to guide the selection process in a constructive way eg: indicating where modules are practice-based and where they are not.

Continuous assessment of applied skills is a feature of the programme.

Compulsory modules
-Defending human rights (40 credits; terms 1-2)
-Social sciences and human rights practice (20 credits; term 1)
-International human rights law and advocacy (20 credits, term 1)
-Dissertation (60 credits, terms 3-4)

Optional modules
In the second term students will be able to take two options. Those offered by CAHR will share the characteristics of the MA (practice based and interdisciplinary) and will explore areas where rights are being used in new and innovative ways. Students may also select from optional modules listed below taught by other departments.
Optional modules taught at CAHR:
-Asylum, migration and trafficking
-Culture and protest
-Development Alternatives: Development, Rights, Security
-Truth, justice and reparations after violence

Optional modules taught in other departments
-Conflict and development (Politics)
-Globalisation and social policy (Social Policy and Social Work)
-Global social problems (Social Policy and Social Work)
-International organisations (Politics)
-New security challenges (Politics)
-Teaching and learning citizenship and global education (Education)
-Women, citizenship and conflict (Centre for Women's Studies)

*Please note that optional modules may not run if the lecturer is on leave or there is insufficient demand.

Careers

Our MA provides career advice, networking opportunities, hands-on experience, and personalised reference letters to help our graduates find good jobs with human rights NGOs, humanitarian and development organisations, policy think-tanks, national governments, and UN agencies.

Recent graduates have secured work with:
-Government departments, e.g. working on health equality and trafficking in the UK, Finnish Centre for Human Rights (NHRI)
-Human rights organisations, e.g. Freedom House, the Terrence Higgins Trust, the Afghanistan Human Rights and Democracy Organisation, the Gay & Lesbian Victory Institute (Washington, DC), Freedom from Torture (Yorkshire & Humberside), International Services and Brave New Films (USA)
-Development and humanitarian organisations, e.g. Norwegian People's Aid and Merlin
-Inter-governmental agencies, e.g. the Unrepresented Nations and Peoples Organisation in The Hague, UNDP in Bangladesh, UNRIC in Brussels and Quaker UN Office in Geneva
-Research posts, e.g. PhD positions and Research Assistant on Corporate Social Responsibility at the American University, Beirut
-Think-tanks, e.g. Involve, London
-Businesses, e.g. Ethical Trade Coordinator at New Look Retailers

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Terrorism, Security & Society is an interdisciplinary programme involving history, political science, international relations, sociology and social psychology and risk studies. Read more
Terrorism, Security & Society is an interdisciplinary programme involving history, political science, international relations, sociology and social psychology and risk studies. The focus will vary from a strong emphasis on security and counterterrorism issues through to a critical social science approach and analysis of societal response and adaptation

Key benefits

• Our unrivalled mix of ‘professional’ (e.g. Police, security, law, media) and ‘traditional’ (e.g. Psychology, Classics, War Studies, Geography) students creates an interactive, engaging and dynamic classroom experience.

• The potential to link your MA dissertation with Government and other professional departments in order to gain exclusive access and hands-on experience.

• Close links and regular speakers from Government and emergency response organisations gives students insights and up-to-the-minute knowledge of the subject area

• Adds a unique element to the way in which the issues of terrorism and security are understood by addressing the multi-dimensional and multi-disciplinary nature of the phenomenon.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/terrorism-security-and-society-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

Based on the multidimensional and multidisciplinary nature of the phenomenon, our programme provides an overview of the theories and paradigms related to the concepts of terrorism and counter terrorism in order to enable you to undertake further research or enter into careers targeted at understanding these issues.

Our programme adds a unique element to the way in which the issues of terrorism and security are understood by addressing the multidimensional and multidisciplinary nature of the phenomenon. You will learn how to combine and apply the well-honed multi-disciplinary approach that characterises the work of the Department of War Studies with social scientific approaches.

- Course purpose -

Our programme aims to provide an advanced foundation and comprehensive understanding of one of the most contested concepts in contemporary discourse, terrorism, and its relationship with relevant and related issues in the field of security studies. Based on the multi-dimensional and multi-disciplinary nature of the phenomenon, the programme provides an overview of the theories and paradigms related to the concepts of terrorism and counter terrorism in order to enable you to undertake further research or enter into a career targeted at understanding these issues.

- Course format and assessment -

Most of the 20-credit modules will be assessed by one 4,000-word essay or two 2000-word essays. However, some 20-credit modules will be assessed on class participation and attendance, oral vivas or exams, or a combination of these.

Most 40-credit modules are assessed through a combination of essays (3,000-6,000 words), class participation and attendance, oral vivas and exams.

The dissertation module assessment will be on the research proposal (10%) and the dissertation (up to 15,000 words) (90%) for some programmes or solely on the dissertation for others.

Career prospects

Our programme will be particularly attractive to traditional master's students hoping to move into government posts, consulting or research. Also government agencies, emergency responders and military employees and mature students considering such a career move as becoming a government consultant.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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Both geopolitics and security are defining issues of our era. As a global community, we face unprecedented challenges relating to environmental catastrophe, resource shortages, economic meltdown, terrorism and infrastructural failure. Read more
Both geopolitics and security are defining issues of our era. As a global community, we face unprecedented challenges relating to environmental catastrophe, resource shortages, economic meltdown, terrorism and infrastructural failure. We need to understand the conditions that make our daily lives vulnerable and to develop strategies to manage risk and mitigate the impact of crisis, whilst also fostering critical reflections on those very strategies and techniques which seek to keep us secure.

This course combines thematic elements which theorise geopolitics and security with specialist options, which allow you to follow your own interests, alongside a dissertation, which can be strongly connected to work-related/future career interests. Multiple methods of assessment and diverse research methods encourage skills development and employability. We will encourage students to network with relevant organizations and institutions, building on staff expertise and experience.

The course is designed for both ambitious young graduates and experienced professionals working in commercial or political organisations such as banking, energy, media, think tanks, NGOs and government, where risk (management), threat and insecurity are critical to strategic policy development.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/geography/coursefinder/mscgeopoliticsandsecurity.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The Departments of Geography and Politics and International Relations are top-ranked research-led departments.

- The course is taught by world-class scholars and informed by cutting-edge research and experience outside the academy.

- The course offers an advanced grounding in geopolitics and security while allowing you to specialize in issues and themes of interest to you.

- There is a strong emphasis on skills development especially communication.

- Highly focused on employability – invited outside speakers will provide networking opportunities.

Department research and industry highlights

- Leading researchers and research groups (e.g. Politics, Development and Sustainability Group in Geography) with established track record in grant awards (e.g. from the ESRC, AHRC, Leverhulme Trust, EPSRC, British Academy, British Council, Falkland Island Government and the EU Marie-Curie fund).

- External networking and public engagement (e.g. working with UK government departments including MOD (British Antarctic Survey); Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Civil Contingencies Secretariat; the Parliamentary Office for Science and Technology and the Canada-UK Colloquium.

- Networking and Knowledge Transfer (e.g. collaborative postgraduate projects with major institutions such as the British Library, Science Museum and Royal Geographical Society). We have also worked closely with the BBC and its world service contributing to programme development and televised broadcasting.

- Ongoing collaboration with leading think-tanks such as Royal United Services Institute (RUSI) and Chatham House.

On completion of the course graduates will have:

- A sophisticated knowledge and critical understanding of geopolitics and security including core debates, and case studies.

- A detailed appreciation of methods and sources used to investigate geopolitical and security related issues and themes

- High-level skills development especially in communication (including social media), report writing, briefing papers, political debate and critical thinking

- Opportunities to enhance employability through practical experience and exposure to relevant individuals and organizations in the geopolitical/security-related field

Assessment

Formal and informal assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, oral and group work presentations, policy, briefing and media reports, video and documentary production, and a dissertation. Field visits to important sites and organisations, including RUSI, will also be available, supporting collegial interaction between students and staff. Emphasis is placed on informal assessment (especially through group work) so that students have plenty of opportunities to receive formative support and guidance.

Employability & career opportunities

Geography and PIR graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many careers including working in government, media, non-governmental organizations and public organizations both in the UK and the wider world. This new course is intended for both experienced professionals seeking further academic training/reflection and also younger graduates eager to gain further skills development and relevant experience through study. Assessment and presentation opportunities as well as strategic field visits will help develop these skills, while a programme of external speakers will provide insight into the field. There will also be the potential for internships and work placements. The course will act as an ideal stepping-stone for PhD progression should this be chosen as a career pathway.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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Veterinary epidemiology is a key component in a number of the global grand challenges relating to disease control, food security and climate change. Read more

Programme description

Veterinary epidemiology is a key component in a number of the global grand challenges relating to disease control, food security and climate change. Consequently, there is a need to improve our ability to understand, predict and respond to patterns and dynamics of disease and to control outbreaks.

The R(D)SVS and SRUC partnership creates the greatest concentration of research power in veterinary and agricultural sciences in the UK. The MSc draws on this wealth of experience and research activity to provide scientific knowledge of the fundamental biological processes (e.g. behaviour, physiology, immunology, ecology) and environmental and farming management practices (e.g. husbandry, nutrition, livestock trade) driving disease transmission, persistence, prevalence and spread in livestock production systems. This enables in-depth understanding of complex environmental patterns of disease, which facilitates prediction of disease risk and control. This multidisciplinary systems approach will provide you with the skills to make significant contributions to tackling food security, climate change and disease control in your role as an animal health professional.

By the end of the programme you will not only have a detailed understanding of the biology driving disease persistence and prevalence, but also how the biology scales up from individuals to populations. You will understand how this interacts with agricultural management practices to determine the efficacy of disease control strategies and livestock production (i.e. interdisciplinary systems thinking and communication). Furthermore, the systems approach offers a way to frame disease challenges and problem solve disease risk at a range of scales (e.g. from veterinarians tackling specific outbreaks to the consequences of climate change on disease risk). To this end the programme provides training in methodological skills for the design, implementation, analysis, interpretation and communication of epidemiological studies, disease surveillance and disease control in animal populations and wider host communities.

Courses are delivered by active researchers presenting their own research, which is placed into context with global grand challenges. As such, you will be exposed to and taught skills appropriate for developing a research career.

Online learning

The programme will use the University’s award winning online learning environments, which includes video podcasts, web-based discussion forums and expert tuition.

Programme structure

The programme is delivered part-time by online learning over period of 3-6 years.

You may undertake the programme by intermittent study (flexible progression route), accruing credits within a time limit of:
- 1 years for the Certificate (maximum period 2 years)
- 2 years for the Diploma (maximum period 4 years)
- 3 years for the MSc (maximum period of 6 years including a maximum period of 12 months from the start of your written reflective element to it being completed)

The programme is modular in structure, offering a flexible student-centred approach to the choice of courses studied; other than the three core courses required for the certificate, students may choose to study individual courses, to complete a sufficient number of credits to be awarded the:
- Certificate (60 credits)
- Diploma (120 credits)
- MSc (180 credits)

Learning outcomes

- Acquire knowledge about disease systems in livestock production environments and the interactions between the biological and livestock management processes driving disease dynamics.
- Acquire specific skills to link individual farm environments and management practices to disease risk and production efficiency at farm and national scales.
- Be able to interpret, be critical of and communicate scientific results and information in research.

Career opportunities

The courses and programme as a whole will provide:

- general postgraduate training (e.g. for people in education, government, policy-making, agricultural and veterinary organisations) to enable promotion, further employment opportunities or personal fulfilment
- general postgraduate training for people considering a career in research (e.g. a precursor to a PhD)
- topic-specific postgraduate training (e.g. for veterinarians for continuing professional development) to enable promotion, further employment opportunities or personal fulfilment

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The MSW in Social Work is a 2-year, full-time, postgraduate degree course. The qualification is recognised throughout the UK and it’s expected that in due course it will meet the criteria for recognition in the EU and elsewhere overseas. Read more

Why this course?

The MSW in Social Work is a 2-year, full-time, postgraduate degree course.

The qualification is recognised throughout the UK and it’s expected that in due course it will meet the criteria for recognition in the EU and elsewhere overseas. The course is based on the Standards in Social Work Education (SiSWE) and is to be validated by social work's professional body in Scotland, the Scottish Social Services Council (SSSC).

The course provides a stimulating blend of university-based teaching and agency-based learning opportunities across both years.

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/socialwork/

You’ll study

You'll undertake a range of taught modules, a dissertation and assessed placements in a range of social work service settings.

Work towards the Masters dissertation is mostly scheduled for the period beyond Year 2 of the programme. You’ll be told of the arrangements during year 1.

Teaching staff

The School of Social Policy and Social Work has a long and rich tradition of education, research and consultancy in social work. It brings together a staff group with extensive experience in the varied areas of social work practice i.e. children and families, criminal justice social work and community care.

Facilities

The Centre for Excellence for Looked After Children in Scotland (a multi-million pound development funded by the Scottish Government to support research and training in residential child care), the Centre for the Child and Society, and Community Care Works are all based within the School and contribute to teaching in the course as well as to research and consultancy.

Relevant work experience

We normally expect you to have had at least six months full-time work experience, or its equivalent in part-time work, at the point of the application.

We’re more concerned with the quality of experience than whether or not it’s paid. It’s useful to think about experience in three dimensions - duration, range and depth. While longer and more diverse experience is of great value, depth (or quality) is perhaps more important since this is what allows learning and professional development. Often experience is "deeper" in contexts where supervision is offered regularly, allowing for in-depth discussion in practice issues and dilemmas. Undertaking relevant reading and training while working often helps people to "deepen" the quality of their work experience.

- Criteria for work experience
The following indicate the kinds of criteria we look at in considering the relevance and suitability of your work experience:
- does it involve direct contact with people either as service users e.g. individuals, families or groups where the focus is on helping them live with or manage major difficulties in their lives, or in stimulating collaborative ventures to seek social change?

- does it develop critical awareness of the range, depth and complexity of social and personal problems and the variety of individual and agency responses which can address these?

- does it develop basic knowledge of the functions of social work, social care and/or community development agencies?

- does it develop skills in helping other people in difficulty e.g. skills in identifying and assessing problems, jointly planning and supporting a response to them or coping with stress?

- does it provide opportunities to reflect on, and take action to combat, discrimination and oppression in people's lives?

- does it generate an awareness, and an ability to act in the light of the value dilemmas involved in both helping activities and social change activities e.g. reflecting on the tensions between individual rights and freedoms and collective social obligations?

- Relevant work settings:
- work may be undertaken in a wide variety of settings e.g. community-based offices, residential provision, day care services, community organisations.
- work may be carried out with a range of client groups. These will commonly be people who experience various forms of disadvantage.
- it should be supervised by a member of staff of the status and experience to provide a reference indicating suitability for entry to social work education.

Personal qualities

The kinds of personal qualities which we look for in an applicant include:
- the ability to convey genuine warmth and interest in people
- an ability to see strengths and potential in even the most difficult circumstances and people
- a genuine interest in difference and diversity and an obvious ability to adapt and change
- a willingness to question conformity and risk discomfort in challenging attitudes which encourage discrimination and complacency
- the ability to support people who live with difficult, sometimes worsening circumstances
- an ability to help people set and follow their own agendas while being capable of asserting your authority where their welfare requires it
- being level-headed and helpful in the face of people's distress, pain and anger, even when it's turned on you
- a quiet confidence in your own ability and the capacity to argue and defend your views in a constructive way
- satisfaction in helping manage and, where possible, resolve conflict, but never at the expense of sacrificing the interests of vulnerable people
- taking enjoyment from both using your own initiatives as well as working accountably as part of team
- the ability to accept constructive criticism and learn from your mistakes
- a passion to fight for the rights of disadvantaged people

Communication skills

The communication skills which we would expect all applicants to demonstrate would include the capacity to:
- engage appropriately with a wide range of people
- communicate expressively, fluently and convincingly in verbal and written form
- understand, calculate and present accurately, basic numerical and financial information
- possess at least a basic understanding of information and communication technology and be able to acquire sufficient competence by the end of year 1/level 1 of the course

Age

There are no specific age restrictions for undertaking the course although funding bodies may impose an upper limit. Employability on course completion is a factor in selection.

Professional suitability

All entrants must register with the Scottish Social Services Council (SSSC) and meet suitability criteria regarding offending history, employment record etc.

Overseas students

As with home students, overseas applicants should be able to demonstrate their motivation, aptitude and preparedness for social work training. You must have substantial relevant paid or voluntary work experience. In addition, you must have a recognised degree or an equivalent qualification.

Application for entry to the course must be made through UCAS. The subsequent selection process is broadly the same as for UK and EC applicants. However, in order to ensure that applications from out-with the UK are given full consideration it is advisable that in addition to applying to UCAS you should send additional information directly to us. This should include:
- detailed information about degrees held and the awarding institution(s)
- where English is a second language please provide information about your levels of proficiency in English
- details of work experience, with particular reference to the aspects referred to in the guidelines on work experience
- a statement about reasons for wanting to study in the UK
- financial arrangements for meeting the cost of tuition fees and living expenses during the two year course
- an indication that you would be available to come to the UK for interview. Applicants who are not able to come for interview may be asked to supply additional written material and/or references.

Learning & teaching

The teaching and learning approach is student-centred and aims to promote reflective learning. Our key approach is problem-based learning which is universally recognised as an effective way of developing the critical thinking and problem-solving skills needed by busy professionals.

The course is taught through lectures, seminar groups, simulations and individual skills rehearsal with a commitment to use interactive e-learning wherever relevant. At the heart of the course is practice learning in social work service agencies with formally assessed placements being undertaken in both years.

Assessment

Our assessment methods consist of regular feedback on specific tasks related to teaching and learning as you work through a module.

Modules are formally assessed in a range of different ways, including essay, report, presentations and peer group assessments.

Careers

Qualified social workers are increasingly valued. Promotion and career development opportunities are excellent. Social workers can be found in:
- Local authorities - from main-grade workers to directorate level. Social workers will be providing, managing, purchasing and organising services to people with very diverse needs across the life span in different settings

- Voluntary organisations - at all levels, usually working in relatively specialist ways with children and young people with particularly challenging needs, as well as vulnerable adults, especially those with learning disabilities and those affected by mental health issues. Settings and contexts vary as widely as in local authorities.

- Private sector - often at senior practitioner and management level with services focusing on home-based support to vulnerable adults and residential services to older people as well as foster care support and services to people with offending histories.

- Central government - experienced social work managers advise and support ministers in monitoring and developing social work services.

- Social work regulation - a range of independent bodies, like the Care Inspectorate and Scottish Social Services Council employ social workers at a senior level to lead and manage registration and inspection of social work services to ensure they meet appropriate standards.

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/index.jsp

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As populations grow and competition for space and resources increases, society’s most pressing issues will need to be addressed by those who can work in collaboration with cognitive, occupational and social psychologists, as well as architects, educationalists, environmental scientists, engineers, landscape architects and planners. Read more
As populations grow and competition for space and resources increases, society’s most pressing issues will need to be addressed by those who can work in collaboration with cognitive, occupational and social psychologists, as well as architects, educationalists, environmental scientists, engineers, landscape architects and planners.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

How do individuals and groups react to different environmental situations (home, office, hospital, street, shop, and so on)? What psychological processes are triggered by our environment, and how do they affect our perception, attitude and actions?

How can individuals and groups change their environment so that it provides a more stimulating, less stressful and more enabling setting in which to live? How are our identities tied up with place? How might sustainability in environmental policy be better informed by current research?

Our MSc Environmental Psychology programme will help you gain advanced knowledge and understanding of theory and practice in environmental psychology.

You will also acquire a range of research skills that will give you the confidence and ability to undertake environmental psychology research in a professional setting.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time over two academic years. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Ergonomics and Human Factors
-Inquiry and Design
-Dissertation
-Qualitative Research Methods
-Quantitative Research Methods
-Key Questions in Environmental Psychology: People and Place
-Psychology of Sustainable Development
-Preparation for Academic Research in Psychology
-Conducting Health Psychology Research
-Social Change and Influence
-Maintaining Health Throughout the Lifespan
-Psychological Neuroscience: Electrophysiology

FUNDING

Funding is now linked to continuation funding for a PhD – that is, successful applicants to the Economic and Social Research Council will be given a grant for the MSc year and then further support (subject to satisfactory progress) to enable them to undertake a PhD.

Occasionally students receive financial support from industry through sponsorship. This would involve students undertaking a piece of research for their dissertation which would be of interest and value to industry or commerce, in return for which they will be given a grant by the commissioning company.

In the past, this sponsorship has ranged from £500 to £6,000. This is mutually beneficial to both the student and sponsor, and allows the student to undertake a ‘real’ piece of research that has practical or policy implications, whilst receiving a sum of money to assist with fees and subsistence costs.

ENVIRONMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY AT SURREY

The School of Psychology at the University of Surrey was the first in the world to establish an MSc in Environmental Psychology, in 1973. Since then there have been well over 250 graduates of the programme from over 25 countries worldwide.

It remains one of a few such postgraduate programmes in the world and the only one in the UK.

The MSc Environmental Psychology programme is part of a larger modular programme, thereby providing a flexible teaching and learning structure. The School of Psychology has a reputation for developing professional and innovative programmes reflecting contemporary societal concerns and employment opportunities.

Environmental Psychology at Surrey has always sought to be a multidisciplinary research activity. We are driven by psychological theories and methodologies, but draw on other social sciences, as well as the environmental and design disciplines.

We investigate environment behaviour relationships at every spatial scale and environment, from personal space and office design, through neighbourhood renewal, to the public understanding of global climate change.

PSYCHOLOGY AT SURREY

The School of Psychology at the University of Surrey is one of the most active and highly regarded psychology departments in the country. We specialise in applied and policy-oriented teaching and research within a strong theoretical context. The international, interdisciplinary, policy and applied strengths of the School mean that students’ theoretical and methodological research puts them at the cutting edge of the discipline.

We are one of the highest ranked Schools in the country for graduates entering employment, and also one of the largest providers of postgraduate training in the UK.

The University of Surrey’s School of Psychology has been the centre for many cross-national studies and has attracted funding from research councils and local and national government departments, such as:
-ESF
-Defra
-The Ministry of Defence
-Home Office
-The Environment Agency
-The Countryside Agency
-Surrey County Council
-The EU

If you choose to study psychology at the University of Surrey, you will be provided with a combination of opportunities that would be hard to match elsewhere. We offer you a degree that provides a thorough grounding in the theories, methods and practice of contemporary psychology.

Our programmes lay particular emphasis on the application of psychology to real-world problems, and also consider issues related to professional practice in preparation for your career as a professional psychologist.

The basis of good postgraduate programmes is the research activity of staff, the incorporation of current research programmes in teaching material and a reciprocal relationship between theory development and applied research in everyday contemporary issues.

We believe in involving all postgraduate students in the research life of the School through active participation in one of the research groups, attendance at research seminars and, where possible, an attachment to ongoing research projects.

As a student of the School of Psychology, you will also have access to a number of conferences, seminars and workshops hosted throughout the year.

COLLABORATIONS

Environmental psychology researchers have always enjoyed collaboration with other disciplines.

Current and recent research collaborations include an EPSRC funded research project on energy technologies in homes (REDUCE) with colleagues of environmental sciences (CES) and communications technology (CCSR), a DEFRA/ESRC-funded research programme on lifestyles in transition (SLRG) and a major ESRC funded research program on sustainable lifestyles (RESOLVE: research on lifestyles, values and the environment) both with colleagues from sociology, economics and environmental sciences.

We have long-established links with national and international academic institutions including the Department of Architecture at the University of Strathclyde, the Centre for Transport Studies at the University of West England and the Department of Psychology at Bath University.

The environmental psychology community is strongly international and this is reflected in the long-term active teaching and research collaboration we enjoy with the universities of Groningen, Madrid, La Coruña, Umeå and Rome.

Students on the MSc programme are encouraged to take advantage of these links during their dissertations.

MSc students are actively encouraged to participate in ongoing research projects. Our recent research clients include:
-Building Research Establishment
-Surrey County Council
-Eden Project
-Defra
-Environment Agency
-Forestry Commission
-European Commission
-Rentokil Initial
-King Sturge

RESEARCH

The Environmental Psychology Research Group (EPRG), of which students on the MSc in Environmental Psychology are automatically members, has been undertaking research for more than 30 years and has gained an international reputation.

Research undertaken by the EPRG is both ‘fundamental’ (that is, contributing to the development of the discipline and our understanding ofpsychological processes) and ‘applied and policy-oriented’.

Both government and business are concerned with effective policy development and delivery, and it is increasingly recognised that these can only be successfully achieved by informed evidence.

Students on the MSc Environmental Psychology programme are encouraged to make their research not only useful, but useable.

CAREER PROSPECTS

Recent graduates have progressed into careers in central and local government, undertaking policy-oriented research on a variety of environment behaviour (E-B) issues. Many of our graduates have become practice consultants, using their E-B research skills.

This could be a specialist E-B practice or an architecture, planning, design or engineering practice where graduates with a sensitivity to people-environment issues and a training in E-B research can provide an important and unique set of skills and expertise.

Those who have a background in architecture, landscape architecture, planning or design often return to their profession, but with an enhanced range of skills.

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The aims of the programme are as follows:
-To provide students with theoretical and qualitative/quantitative methodological expertise to conduct environmental psychological research by training them in the informed and systematic conduct of basic and applied research involving the critical reading of theories and empirical findings
-To provide students with an in depth knowledge of contemporary theoretical and methodological approaches to the discipline
-To enable students to link theoretical and empirical questions to social and environmental issues and to provide them with an in depth understanding of the practical applications and action implications of environmental psychological theories and empirical findings
-To provide students with the skills to evaluate possible interventions in a variety of environmental domains
-To offer opportunities to develop the basic interpersonal, technical and creative skills required for the effective analysis and formulation of problems into research questions and, where appropriate, testable hypotheses

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:
Knowledge and understanding
-Contemporary theoretical and methodological approaches to environmental psychology
-The practical applications and action implications of environmental psychological theories and empirical findings
-The principles of research design
-Quantitative and qualitative techniques and strategies to manage and analyse psychological data
-Ethical considerations when undertaking research and framing interventions

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Critically assess and comment on sources of research relevant to environmental psychology
-Critically evaluate the contributions and limitations of environmental psychological theories and research methods in environmental behaviour issues
-Evaluate actual and potential psychologically informed interventions in a variety of environmental domains
-Design, conduct and evaluate environmental psychological research
-Apply insights from environmental psychological theory and research to other domains of psychology

Professional practical skills
-Communicate work in a professional manner for academic and non-academic audiences in written and verbal formats
-Apply problem solving techniques to environmental and psychological topics effectively
-Use effective learning strategies
-Analyse and interpret environmental psychological theoretical analyses and quantitative and qualitative empirical evidence in a competent and critical manner

Key / transferable skills
-Communicate theories and methods in relation to environmental psychology by oral and written means
-Use information technology effectively
-Manage own personal development

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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This course involves combining communication studies, applied linguistics, international management and intercultural communication. Read more
This course involves combining communication studies, applied linguistics, international management and intercultural communication.

Economic globalisation and rapid developments in ICT mean that many organisations now operate on an international scale, or at the very least interact with consumers, clients and/or partner organisations in other countries. Even ‘local’ companies and organisations may have a multicultural workforce, or offer their services or products abroad. As a result, communication has become increasingly international and intercultural.

Organisations seek to create communication strategies that support their overall strategy and objectives. In doing so, they need to interact with stakeholders who may have a variety of linguistic and cultural backgrounds. These stakeholders may include employees, customers, suppliers, financial backers or even local governments. In the Master’s specialisation in International Business Communication, you’ll learn about the all factors, including cultural and linguistic ones, that play a role in communication and need to be taken into account in order to create effective communication strategies.

In your future career as a business executive or communication specialist, you’ll need to be able to assess the quality, reliability and validity of the research that informs your practical decisions ‘on the job’. In other words, you’ll need to be able to judge whether existing research – as well as your own – complies with the ground rules of academic rigor. The programme therefore places emphasis not only on training your research skills but also on developing your awareness of what ‘good research’ entails.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ibc

Why study International Business Communication at Radboud University?

- This is one of very few programmes in Europe (and the only programme in the Netherlands) that also focuses on the cultural and linguistic dimensions of international business communication.

- The specialisation deals with theory and insights that are relevant to achieving effective communication in various organisational contexts; from interpersonal communication in a meeting with (multicultural) colleagues, to marketing communication aimed at reaching international target audiences.

- Students do a (group) internship in which they work towards solving a particular communication issue or answering a specific communication question for a company or organisation. This provides hands-on experience in a relevant organisational setting.

- This specialisation attracts students from different countries and because admission to the programme is selective (max. 50 students per year), you’ll be part of a small group of highly motivated Dutch and international students. This means that to a certain extent, your learning environment is international as well.

- Guest speakers are regularly invited to share their knowledge about current developments in business, management and organisational communication.

- Although the main focus is on international communication in larger, multinational companies, graduates of this programme will be able to apply what they’ve learned in a variety of organisations – for profit, non-profit or governmental institutes.

Language(s) and management perspective

Languages form the heart of communication and that is why this Master’s specialisation is taught within Radboud University’s Faculty of Arts. The programme places a strong focus on the role that languages play in effective corporate communication. Of course, the languages used are not the only factor to consider in a multicultural environment - which is why you will be encouraged to also consider communication issues and strategy from an international management perspective.

In short, you’ll explore the impact of globalisation on business communication, the role of linguistic and cultural diversity in corporate communication, and the human and operational consequences of organisations’ language policy or strategies. In doing so, you’ll also come to understand how such issues can shape and affect an organisation’s performance.

Career prospects

With a Master’s specialisation in International Business Communication, you could pursue a career in government, semi-government, business or academia. For example, our graduates work as internal or external communication managers or press spokespeople in companies, government departments, health institutions or non-profit organisations. Many work in marketing communications at multinational companies, as communication trainers for consultancies, as social media managers or as PR consultants.

- International perspectives
Since the programme focuses on communication in international contexts, and on communication with international target groups, a sizable number of graduates have found jobs outside the Netherlands or with international organisations operating from the Netherlands.

- Wide range of communication functions
Job openings for our graduates can cover a wide range of communication functions, organisational types and (business) sectors. This is because organisations have increasingly come to realise that effective communication is essential to all organisational functions (e.g. marketing, PR, HRM, R&D, finance), and have made a real effort over the past decades to professionalise communications, making (international) business communication an increasingly important discipline.

Our approach to this field

Corporate communication involves orchestrating internal and external communication instruments to support an organisation’s core activities and to manage its relationship with different types of stakeholders. Due to the internationalisation of markets and businesses, corporate communication has gone global in recent years. Organisations that operate internationally need to take different cultures and language backgrounds into account when designing their communication. Culture and language(s) may affect international communication at three levels:
- The management level: e.g. when CEOs communicate with internal or external audiences
- The organisational level: e.g. when a company communicates about its Corporate Social Responsibility policy
- The marketing level: e.g. when products or services are promoted to an international audience in (corporate) advertising.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ibc

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This programme is designed to equip students with a comprehensive and specialist education in a range of areas within International Intellectual Property Law. Read more
This programme is designed to equip students with a comprehensive and specialist education in a range of areas within International Intellectual Property Law. The course will enable students to master the basic principles of the four main ‘pillars’ of IP Law, namely, Copyright, Patents, Trade marks and Industrial Designs. The four main components of IP Law will be examined from three distinct perspectives: domestic (UK), EU and International (global treaties/conventions) and will encompass analysis of legislation, case law (common law and civil law) and specific legal concepts. Where possible, comparative analysis will be carried out as between for example, specific EU IP Law developments and those of third country States e.g. India, Pakistan and China. In addition, certain third countries with well-developed, mature IP systems (e.g. the U.S., Canada and Australia) will be examined for a comparative assessment. The distinct themes of how the Internet has brought about new thinking in the IP world and, possible overlapping forms of IP protection (e.g. copyright and patent protection of computer software) will be examined.

Through carefully designed course work and varied teaching approaches, students from both a common law and civil law background will acquire the intellectual open-ness, technical expertise and critical thinking abilities that are necessary for effectiveness in a globalising world. The programme will equip students to respond effectively to the wide range of intellectual and professional challenges facing contemporary intellectual property lawyers. The LLM in International Intellectual Property Law will equip them to deal with both case work and policy making.

Employment Opportunities
Employment opportunities for graduates of the programme will include work with international law firms, patent and trade mark attorneys, local Intellectual Property Offices (e.g. the UK Intellectual Property Office, Chinese Patent and Trade Mark Office and the Office of the Controller General of Patents, Designs and Trade Marks in India),international organisations such as the World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO), World Trade Organisation (WTO) and the United Nations and specialist bodies within the EU e.g. the Office for the Harmonisation of the Internal Market (OHIM) and the European Patent Office (EPO). Directorate-General Internal Market and Services of the European Commission deals with IP matters and is also a potential employer. Other potential employers include international courts and tribunals, think tanks and research centres (e.g. the specialist Max Planck Institute for Intellectual Property and Competition Law (Munich), non-governmental organisations and government (eg. Ministries of Justice; Business, Innovation and Skills and; Foreign Affairs). Having taken one of our programmes, there will, of course, also be possibilities for academically inclined students to pursue careers in teaching and research.

Compulsory Modules:

Legal Research Methods
Intellectual Property Law
Data Protection Law
Dissertation on any topic within International Intellectual Property Law
Optional Modules (choose 4)

International Criminal Law
International Human Rights Law
Children’s Rights in Domestic and International Law
European Human Rights Law
EU Internal Markets Law
Competition Law
Global Trade Law
Comparative Corporate Governance
International Banking Law
International Commercial Arbitration
International Law of Armed Conflict
Dealing with the Legacies of the Past
Structure
January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Teaching will mostly be seminar-based which will promote group and individual interaction, which also ensures that every individual student is encouraged to contribute to discussions. Seminar-based teaching enables lecturers and students to discuss issues and investigate topics in greater depth, and develops critical thinking and solution-based learning skills in students; whilst also allowing the course teachers to monitor closely each individual’s progress. Emphasis will be placed on the use of virtual learning through the mechanism of the Blackboard computer-assisted learning system and databases such as Westlaw and LexisNexis. Throughout all modules, comparative elements with other legal systems will be emphasised.

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Our MSc degree explores the theory and practice of how individuals, states, and political institutions manage conflict, and develop cooperation in international relations. Read more
Our MSc degree explores the theory and practice of how individuals, states, and political institutions manage conflict, and develop cooperation in international relations. The programme considers how political communities with different values, cultures, histories, and security conceptions can build trust in a global system.

You will gain a multidisciplinary understanding of key global security challenges (e.g. climate change, nuclear proliferation, transnational terrorism, and intractable conflicts inside and across state borders) and cover debates in International Relations, Political Psychology and Security Studies.

Topics and issues examined include:

The Security Dilemma.
Face-to-face diplomacy.
Peace building, alliances and institutions
Emotions in crises and conflicts
The psychology of radicalization, terrorism, and political violence
Identities of religion, gender, and nationalism
Game theory: the Prisoner’s Dilemma.
The risks of nuclear war during the Cold War.
US-Iran nuclear relations.
The possibilities for avoiding a new Cold War with China.

Our students explore cutting edge scholarship through three core modules: Fear, Cooperation and Trust in World Politics, Global Cooperation in Practice, and our exclusive training programme on Trust, Diplomacy and Conflict Transformation. In addition, our new module Political Psychology of Conflict and Cooperation examines the psychological determinants of political choices and behaviours. Our programme allows for a truly interdisciplinary training in understanding and tackling the challenges of complex international tensions.

Our MSc degree has one more distinctive feature: it is offered by the Institute for Conflict, Cooperation and Security (ICCS), a world-leading interdisciplinary research centre, in partnership with the Department of Political Science and International Studies. The ICCS has strong connections to high level practitioner networks, which offer summer internship opportunities. Our MSc students can also become members of the four ICCS Research Working Groups: Trust; Political Settlements; International Political Psychology; Unmanned and Remote-Piloted Systems.

Who is the programme for?

Our MSc degree is designed for students interested in international relations, political psychology and security studies. Our students share a common goal: to advance their academic training, establish a policy-related career, work in government, international organizations and NGOs, or serve as mediators, negotiators and diplomats to address intractable conflicts at all levels of world politics.

About the School of Government and Society

The School of Government and Society is one of the leading UK and International centres for governance, politics, international development, sociology, public management, Russian and European studies.

Established in 2008, the School comprises three Departments: Politics and International Studies (POLSIS); International Development (IDD) and Local Government Studies (INLOGOV).

POLSIS: The Department of Political Science and International Studies (POLSIS), one of the largest and most academically vibrant departments of Political Science and International Studies in the UK. In the latest Research Excellence Framework (REF) Politics and International Studies at Birmingham was ranked the 6th best in the power rankings highlighting the large number of staff in POLSIS producing world-leading and internationally excellent research.

IDD: Be part of global effort to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. Contribute to conflict resolution and post-conflict reconstruction. Help build capacity of nations and communities to adapt to climate change. Study with us to gain the skills and knowledge essential for working in international development in the 21st Century.

INLOGOV: The Institute of Local Government Studies (INLOGOV) is the leading academic centre for research and teaching on local governance and strategic public management. We enrich the world of local public service with research evidence and innovative ideas, making a positive difference.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgfunding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgopendays

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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This programme is run by the Centre for Environmental Strategy (CES), which is a leading centre for environmental and sustainability-related research and postgraduate teaching. Read more
This programme is run by the Centre for Environmental Strategy (CES), which is a leading centre for environmental and sustainability-related research and postgraduate teaching.

CES accommodates a wide range of disciplines dedicated to resolving environmental problems, and this Masters programme prepares future environmental and sustainability professionals for the challenges faced by the corporate world.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

This programme gives you a solid grounding in issues key to the sustainable development debate. The views of stakeholders such as business groups, environmentalists, government agencies and development institutions will be considered.

You will acquire the necessary skills to evaluate existing frameworks, inquire into environmental issues in organisations and industries, and develop sensitive business practices.

The programme provides excellent preparation for any corporate-focused environmental career. It provides a route to graduate membership of the Institute of Environmental Management & Assessment. We encourage you to read about the past and present student experiences of our environment and sustainability programmes.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over 12 months and part-time for up to 60 months. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation.

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Environmental Law
-Foundations of Sustainable Development
-Environmental Auditing and Management Systems
-Corporate, Social and Environmental Responsibility
-Life Cycle Thinking
-Ecological Economics
-Environmental Science and Society
-Industrial Placement
-Integrated Assessment
-Sustainable Development Applications
-Transitions to a Low Carbon Economy
-Life Cycle Assessment
-Psychology of Sustainable Development
-Energy Policies and Economic Dimensions
-Corporate Energy Management
-Energy-Consumer Goods in the Home
-The Energy Market from the Purchaser’s Perspective
-Energy in Industry and the Built Environment
-Renewable Energy and Sustainability
-Transport Energy and Emissions
-Emissions Trading
-Risk Management Optional
-Dissertation

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

-Provide participants with a solid grounding in the sustainable development debate from the wide-range of perspectives, i.e. business groups, environmentalists, government agencies, development institutions, etc.
-Equip participants to evaluate existing political, socio-economic, ethical, cultural and regulatory frameworks to inform decisions regarding environmental practice
-Equip participants to develop a sensitive business practice towards environmental and social issues
-To equip students with the necessary skills for critical inquiry related to environmental issues in organisations and industries

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:
Knowledge and understanding
-Intra and inter-organisational contexts in which corporate environmental strategies are developed
-Concepts of sustainable development and their usefulness to business ethics
-Evolving regulatory and policy framework as part of engendering an anticipatory view of environmental management
-Knowledge of a range of corporate environmental management strategies and control mechanisms
-Accessing and using environmental data

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Absorb complex environmental information and communicate them effectively through logically constructed argumentsCreatively formulate new ideas (MSc, PGDip and PGCert)
-Learn the value of teamwork to solve problems that require multi-disciplinary engagement
-Independent learning and study through self-directed assignments and dissertation
-Critical reading and analysis of environmental policy and regulation
-Inductive reasoning: using specific examples/observations and forming a more general principal
-Deductive reasoning: use stated general premise to reason about specific examples

Professional practical skills
-Comprehend how corporations build, implement and maintain an Environmental Management System (EMS)
-To perform an EMS Audit according to the ISO standards
-Give coherent presentations
-Lead discussions on complex subject areas
-See the other side of the argument given that there are varying and often conflicting perspectives in the environment field
-Competently handle environment information
-Self-motivation, self-regulation and self-assurance

Key / transferable skills
-Acquire knowledge and skills to prepare and deliver a structured and successful presentation
-Write effectively as a means of communicating important ideas
-Communication of findings and presentation of research to a non-specialist audience
-Lead discussion of small/large groups
-Organise and manage a research project
-Basic to advanced IT skills, depending on type of electives and dissertation topic
-Willingness to learn

ACADEMICS

Several high-profile guest lecturers have assisted with the delivery of some of the modules. CES modules make maximum use of guest lecturers, drawing on the practical skills and experience of key experts from government and industry to complement the theoretical components of the modules offered.

For example, Jonathon Porritt, former chairman of the Sustainable Development Commission, gives a guest lecture on the Sustainable Development Applications module, analysing the standing of sustainable development in business and policy making.

The extensive expertise of CES academics and researchers is also drawn upon in modules. Professor Tim Jackson, advisor to the government and international bodies and author of the seminal book, Prosperity without Growth – economics for a finite planet–also lectures on some CES modules.

INDUSTRIAL PLACEMENT

Full-time students are able to undertake an industrial placement module which enables them to spend six to twelve weeks working for a company or NGO, doing the type of work they will aim to find on graduation.

Examples of organisations at which recent industrial placements have taken place include:
-Minimise Solutions
-Portsmouth City Council
-GAP
-Diocese of London
-The Radisson
-LC Energy
-AECOM
-Solar Aid
-NUS
-CAREERS

Graduates go on to a diverse range of careers implementing sustainable development and dealing with the real environmental challenges facing humanity.

Recent examples include working as an energy efficiency officer for a local government, an environmental officer in multi-national chemical company, a sustainability advisor for a national television / radio station, an environmental consultant for an engineering consultancy, and a programme officer with a sustainability charity.

Other graduates use the research skills they developed to go on and do PhDs.

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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The MA/PGDip International Studies and Diplomacy (ISD) programme is designed for those engaged in, or planning to embark upon, a professional career requiring international expertise in government, not-for-profit, corporate or academic environments. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The MA/PGDip International Studies and Diplomacy (ISD) programme is designed for those engaged in, or planning to embark upon, a professional career requiring international expertise in government, not-for-profit, corporate or academic environments.

ISD aims to prepare students for a variety of roles, such as working within a Foreign Service or other government department; international civil service (such as the United Nations or European Union); international NGOs (working in fields such as development, humanitarian assistance and conflict resolution); multinational corporations and international media. The programme also suits those engaged in or considering research roles within a policy think tank, risk analysis organisation or doctoral programme and seeking to deepen their academic and practical understanding of international affairs and contemporary diplomatic practice.

The programme has a multi-disciplinary structure and draws on the teaching and research strengths of CISD and of the SOAS departments of International Politics, Law, Economics and area studies (especially of Asia, Africa and the Middle East) as well as a wide range of languages. Students choose a combination of modules to meet their specific professional needs and personal interests.

Students on this course will have the opportunity to participate in CISD's Study Tour of Geneva.

Programme Objectives

- Excellent inter-disciplinary understanding of key concepts, theories and debates in the study of international affairs

- Excellent knowledge of international policy debates and principle issues from perspectives of both the global North and South

- Ability to undertake critical analysis of contemporary international policy issues and challenges

- Development of module specific practical skills such as policy analysis and policy advocacy, negotiation, mediation, communication and media relations.

We welcome applications from academically strong individuals from a wide variety of fields and backgrounds; however, it is not necessary to have a first degree in a discipline directly related to the programme.

Each application is assessed on its individual merits and entry requirements may be modified in light of relevant professional experience and where the applicant can demonstrate a sustained practical interest in the international field.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/cisd/programmes/mapgdipisd/

Duration: MA: One calendar year (full time). Two or three years (part time). PGDip: One academic year (full time). Two academic years (part time).

Structure

Students take taught modules to the value of 3 full units plus 10,000 word dissertation

1. One unit (or two half units) from A
2. One unit (or two half units) from A or B
3. One unit (or two half units) from A, B or C
4. Dissertation (compulsory) on a topic related to the programme’s core themes

Postgraduate Diploma candidates take modules as the MA, excluding the dissertation.

A). International Studies and Diplomacy Modules
General Diplomatic Studies and Practice
International Politics of Transitional Justice
International Relations 1; Foundations of World Politics
International Relations 2; Contemporary World Politics
International Law 1; Foundation
International Economics
International Security
Sport and Diplomacy: "More than a Game"
History and Future of the United Nations
Global Advocacy

B). Additional modules available within CISD
Energy Policy in the Asia-Pacific
Global Energy and Climate Policy
Multinational Enterprises in a Globalising world – Economic and Legal Perspectives

C). Electives
Please note that acceptance onto an elective module is subject to availability of places, timetabling, and the approval of the convenor of that course.

Suggested electives for International Studies and Diplomacy students
Full Unit modules (1.0):
China and International Politics
Chinese Commercial Law
Comparative Politics of the Middle East
Economic Development of South East Asia
Economic Dynamics of the Asia-Pacific Region
Economic Problems and Policies in Modern China
Government and Politics in Africa
Government and Politics of Modern South Asia
Government and Politics of Modern South East Asia
International Politics of East Asia
Modern Chinese Law and Human Rights
State and Society in the Chinese Political Process
Taiwan's Politics and Cross-Strait Relations
Theory, Policy and Practice of Development

Half-Unit modules (0.5):
Economic Development of Modern Taiwan
International Political Communication
Japanese Modernity I
Japanese Modernity II
Power in World Politics
The Making of the Contemporary World
The Transnational News Environment: Production, Representation and Use
Topics in the Chinese Economy

Programme Specification 2012/2013 (pdf; 234kb) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cisd/programmes/mapgdipisd/file80889.pdf)

Teaching & Learning

The programme may be taken in one year (full time) or in two or three years part time (MA only), with the schedule designed to allow participation by those in full-time employment. Participants may choose a combination of modules to meet their professional needs and personal interests. The programme is convened on a multi-disciplinary basis, and teaching is through lectures, tutorials and workshops conducted by SOAS faculty and visiting specialists.

The Centre endeavours to make as many of the modules for International Studies and Diplomacy (ISD) accessible to part-time students. Where possible the majority of CISD lectures are at 18.00; however, lecture times will be rotated on a yearly basis for some modules (between evening and daytime slots) so that part-time students will have access to as many modules as possible over the duration of their degree. Associated tutorials are repeated in hourly slots with the latest taking place at 20.00. Students sign up for tutorial groups at the start of term and stay in the same group throughout the academic year. There is a minimum of two and a half hours formal teaching a week (lecture and tutorial) for each ISD module taken. Practical exercises may take place at weekends.

Teaching includes:
- Wide range of modules: Diplomatic Studies and Practice, International Relations, International Economics, International Law, and International Security
- Wide choice of electives: Global Energy and Climate Policy, Multinational Enterprises in a Globalising World or a module offered by other SOAS departments (e.g. Development Studies, Politics, Economics, Law, Languages)
- Interaction with diplomats, policy makers, NGO officials and other international practitioners.
- Training in negotiation, policy analysis, policy advocacy, communication and media and other skills through practical exercises including strategy, communication and media workshops, moots courts, and negotiation and mediation workshops.

Further activities:
Included in the degree programme:

- Week long study trip to United Nations organisations in Geneva
- Media and communication skills training by current and former BBC staff
- Guest lectures by leading scholars and senior practitioners, and policy conferences (visit the CISD website to listen to the podcasts)
- Opportunities to actively participate in Centre research programmes (http://www.cisd.soas.ac.uk/pg/research)

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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