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The postgraduate certificate in palliative care looks at the development of effective palliative and end-of-life care, which is a major priority for health providers both nationally and internationally. Read more
The postgraduate certificate in palliative care looks at the development of effective palliative and end-of-life care, which is a major priority for health providers both nationally and internationally.

This palliative care nursing course addresses the complex challenges end-of-life care creates for societies and health professionals, including a range of ethical, social, professional and cultural issues that need careful analysis.

This online palliative care nursing course is designed to develop and enhance the knowledge and skills you require to promote, lead and drive high quality care for the palliative patient and their families in their care setting. Your studies will centre on current philosophies that underpin palliative care, bringing together a range of clinical and academic experts from this field.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/313-postgraduate-certificate-palliative-care-distance-learning

What you will study

Modules:
- Therapeutic Management of Life Limiting Illness in Palliative Care: Assessment and management of complex symptoms

The assessment and management of complex symptoms including pain, nausea and vomiting, anxiety, depression, fatigue and agitation will be explored and appropriate interventions critically discussed. Consideration through the module will be given to psychosocial issues, such as, anxiety and depression within patients who have a life limiting illness and the communication strategies used in relation to managing difficult symptoms.

- Nature and Scope of Palliative Care: Specific issues pertinent to the delivery of effective palliative care

This will explore issues pertaining to palliative care via case studies and a narrative approach. These can include euthanasia, the right to die, and the use of advanced directives while considering the issue of capacity and choice.

- End of Life Care: Role of the professional in the care of an individual at the end of life, including perspectives from the individual and family

You will critically explore the role of the professional in the care of an individual at the end of their life. It will include exploring the impact of death and dying from a holistic perspective on the individual and family. The themes of loss, grief and bereavement will be central within this module. Professional, legal and ethical issues related to death and dying will also be considered through the module.

Learning and teaching methods

You will be taught through online discussion forums via the University’ learning portal Blackboard.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

This course will enable students to demonstrate clear evidence of ongoing professional development in line with national strategic plans.

Assessment methods

Assessment involves written assignments and achievement of clinical competencies. You will receive key learning materials and be supported throughout the course by the module team and your contact with other students.

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The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas. Read more
The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas.

This specialisation examines the role of law within contemporary health care, providing a sound introduction to the institutions and organisations associated with medical law and the inter-relationships between them. It explores the practical context within which medical law operates in order to develop an understanding of the theoretical and ethical issues that underpin it. A foundation module introduces students who are new to the study of law to the key principles and institutions associated with the legal system, core medico-legal concepts and research methods.

Studying for a Master's in Law (LLM) at Kent means having the certainty of gaining an LLM in a specialist area of Law. The Kent LLM gives you the freedom to leave your choice of specialism open until after you arrive, your specialism being determined by the modules you choose.

About Kent Law School

Kent Law School (KLS) is the UK's leading critical law school. A cosmopolitan centre of world-class critical legal research, it offers a supportive and intellectually stimulating place to study postgraduate taught and research degrees.

In addition to learning the detail of the law, students at Kent are taught to think about the law with regard to its history, development and relationship with wider society. This approach allows students to fully understand the law. Our critical approach not only makes the study of law more interesting, it helps to develop crucial skills and abilities required for a career in legal practice.

The Law School offers its flagship Kent LLM at the University’s Canterbury campus (and two defined LLM programmes at the University’s Brussels campus). The KLS programmes enable you to gain expertise in a wide range of international and domestic subjects and to develop advanced, transferable research, writing and oral communication skills. All of our LLM and Diploma programmes allow you to broaden and deepen your understanding and knowledge of law.

Our programmes attract excellent law graduates from around the world and are also open to non-law graduates with an appropriate academic or professional background who wish to develop an advanced understanding of law in their field. You study within a close-knit, supportive and intellectually stimulating environment, working closely with academic staff. KLS uses critical research-led teaching throughout our programmes to ensure that you benefit from the Law School’s world-class research.

National ratings

In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, research by Kent Law School was ranked 8th in the UK for research intensity. We were also ranked 7th for research power and in the top 20 for research output, research quality and research impact.

An impressive 99% of our research was judged to be of international quality and the School’s environment was judged to be conducive to supporting the development of world-leading research.

Course structure

You can tailor your studies to your particular needs and interests to obtain an LLM or Diploma in a single specialisation, in two specialisations jointly, or by choosing a broad range of modules in different areas of law to obtain a general LLM or Diploma in Law.

As a student on the LLM at Canterbury, your choice of specialisation will be shaped by the modules you take and your dissertation topic. To be awarded an LLM in a single specialisation, at least three of your six modules must be chosen from those associated with that specialisation with your dissertation also focusing on that area of law. The other three modules can be chosen from any offered in the Law School. All students are also required to take the Legal Research and Writing Skills module. To be awarded a major/minor specialisation you will need to choose three modules associated with one specialisation, and three from another specialisation, with the dissertation determining which is your 'major' specialisation.

For example, a student who completes at least three modules in International Commercial Law and completes a dissertation in this area would graduate with an LLM in International Commercial Law; a student who completes three Criminal Justice modules and three Environmental Law modules and then undertakes a dissertation which engages with Criminal Justice would graduate with an LLM in Criminal Justice and Environmental Law.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of this specialisation stream. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation and student demand. Most specialisation streams will require you to study a combination of subject specialisation modules and modules from other specialisation streams so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

LW862 Death and Dying

LW864 Foundations of the English Legal System

LW921 Privacy and Data Protection Law

LW863 Consent to Treatment

LW866 Medical Practice and Malpractice

LW867 Reproduction and the Beginning of Life

Assessment

The postgraduate programmes offered within the Law School are usually taught in seminar format. Students on the Diploma and LLM programmes study three modules in each of the autumn and spring terms. The modules normally are assessed by a 4-5,000-word essay. Students undertaking an LLM degree must write a dissertation of 15-20,000 words.

Programme aims

This programme aims to provide:

1. LLM: The opportunity to develop (a) expert knowledge and a sophisticated understanding of particular areas of law; (b) advanced research, writing and oral communication skills of general value to postgraduate employment.
PGDip: The opportunity to develop (a) expert knowledge and a sophisticated understanding of particular areas of law; (b) written and oral communication skills of general value to postgraduate employment.

2. LLM: A sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy and influential ideas, theories, assumptions and paradigms of particular areas of law.
PGDip: A sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy and influential ideas, theories, assumptions and paradigms of the subjects studied.

3. LLM & PGDip: A degree of specialisation in areas of law and policy chosen from the LLM option streams available and an opportunity for students to engage with academic work at the frontiers of scholarship.

4. LLM & PGDip: A critical awareness of the operation of law and policy, particularly in contexts that are perceived to be controversial or in a state of evolution.

5. LLM: The skills to undertake supervised research on an agreed topic in their specialisation and to encourage the production of original, evaluative analysis that meets high standards of scholarship.

6. LLM & PGDip: Critical, analytical and problem-solving skills that can be applied to a wide range of contexts.

7. LLM & PGDip: The skills of academic legal research and writing.

8. LLM: A sophisticated grounding in research methods.

Careers

Employability is a key focus throughout the University and at Kent Law School you have the support of a dedicated Employability and Career Development Officer together with a broad choice of work placement opportunities, employability events and careers talks. Details of graduate internship schemes with NGOs, charities and other professional organisations are made available to postgraduate students via the School’s Employability Blog.

Many students at our Brussels centre who undertake internships are offered contracts in Brussels immediately after graduation. Others have joined their home country’s diplomatic service, entered international organisations, or have chosen to undertake a ‘stage’ at the European Commission, or another EU institution.

Law graduates have gone on to careers in finance, international commerce, government and law or have joined, or started, an NGO or charity.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Information about the internship programme for LLM students can be found on the Kent Law School Employability blog - http://blogs.kent.ac.uk/klsemployability/postgraduates/llm-internships/

Learn more about Kent

Visit us -https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/visit/openday/pgevents.html

International Students - https://www.kent.ac.uk/internationalstudent/

Why study at Kent? - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

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In this course, the focus is on religion in its anthropological and sociological perspectives. Read more
In this course, the focus is on religion in its anthropological and sociological perspectives. Durham has particular strengths in the study of Mormonism; death, dying and disposal; shamanism; religion and emotion; religion/faith and globalisation; religion and politics; contemporary evangelicalism and post-evangelicalism; and religion and generational change. It also boasts the Centre for Death and Life Studies and the Project for Spirituality, Theology and Health.

Course Structure

Social Scientific Methods in the Study of Religion core module, Three option modules, Dissertation.

Core Modules

-Social Scientific Methods in the Study of Religion
-Dissertation

Optional Modules

Optional Modules in previous years have included:
2-3 choices from:
-Ritual, Symbolism and Belief in the Anthropology of Religion
-Theology, Ethics and Medicine
-Literature and Religion
-Christian Northumbria 600-750
-Ecclesiology and Ethnography

Plus up to 1 choice from:
-Advanced Hebrew Texts
-Advanced Aramaic
-Middle Egyptian
-The Bible and Hermeneutics
-The Old Testament Pseudepigrapha and the New Testament
-Paul and his Interpreters
-Gospels and Canon
-Patristic Exegesis
-Patristic Ecclesiology
-The Anglican Theological Vision
-Liturgy and Sacramentality
-Classic Texts in Christian Theology
-Conceiving Change in Contemporary Catholicism
-Christian Gender
-Principles of Theological Ethics
-Catholic Social Thought
-Doctrine of Creation
-Selected modules from the MA in Theology and Ministry programme
-Level 3 undergraduate module, or any Level 1 – 2 language module offered by the Department of Theology and Religion, taken in conjunction with the Extended Study in Theology & Religion module
-30 credits from another Board of Studies (including appropriate credit-bearing language modules offered by the University’s Centre for Foreign Language Study)

Learning and Teaching

Most MA teaching is delivered through small group seminars and tutorials. These exemplify and encourage the various skills and practices required for independent scholarly engagement with texts and issues. Teaching in the Department of Theology & Religion is ‘research led’ at both BA and MA levels, but particularly at MA level. Research led teaching is informed by staff research, but more importantly it aims to develop students as independent researchers themselves, able to pursue and explore their own research interests and questions. This is why the independently researched MA dissertation is the culmination of the MA programme. Such engagement with texts and issues is not only an excellent preparation for doctoral research, it also develops those skills of critical analysis, synthesis and presentation sought and required by employers.

Many MA classes will contain a ‘lecture’ element, conveying information and exemplifying an approach to the subject-matter that will enable students to develop a clear understanding of the subject and improve their own ability to analyse and evaluate information and arguments. Seminars enhance knowledge and understanding through preparation and interaction with other students and staff, promoting awareness of and respect for different viewpoints and approaches, and developing skills of articulacy, advocacy and interrogation. Through small group discussions and tutorials, feedback is provided on student work, with the opportunity to discuss specific issues in detail, enhancing student knowledge and writing skills.

The Dissertation module includes training in generic research skills, from the use of the Library to issues in referencing and bibliography. The subject specific core module introduces students to questions of interpretation and argument in the disciplines encompassed by theology and religion, and helps them to develop their own interests and questions that will issue in the MA dissertation. The latter is a piece of independent research, but it is fostered and guided through individual tutorials with a supervisor, with whom students meet throughout the academic year.

Other admission requirements

When applying, please ensure that your two chosen referees send their confidential academic references (using the reference form [Word]) to us in a timely manner. Please note that we are unable to accept ‘open’ references submitted by yourself. The referees may send the references by email directly from their institutional email addresses to provided they are signed, or by post to the address provided on the reference form.

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The University of Stirling is committed to world class education and research, with a pioneering spirit and a passion for innovation and excellence. Read more

Introduction

The University of Stirling is committed to world class education and research, with a pioneering spirit and a passion for innovation and excellence.
Applied Social Science is at the forefront of developing new e-learning opportunities. In 2003, we offered the first online MSc in Dementia Studies in the UK. In following person-centred care principles, this course places the person with dementia at the very centre of our understanding.
In joining our distance learning postgraduate course in Dementia Studies, you will become part of an international, multi-disciplinary community of students and academics, committed to creating change and improving dementia practice and the experiences of living with dementia.
Our course takes a theory-based and practice-oriented approach to consider the diversity of living and dying with dementia. It encourages collaborative, inter-disciplinary, critical and reflexive learning and it seeks to produce leaders of change in the dementia field.

Key information

- Degree type: Postgraduate Diploma, MSc, Postgraduate Certificate
- Study methods: Online, Part-time
- Duration: MSc - 3 years (36 months) Diploma - 2 years (24 months) Certificate - 1 year (12 months)
- Start date: September and January
- Course Director: Dr Louise McCabe

Course objectives

The objectives of the MSc are to:
- develop an advanced understanding of multidisciplinary perspectives about dementia and approaches to dementia care
- address critical issues in dementia care and service delivery
- foster improved multidisciplinary and collaborative practice
- compare and contrast national and international research
- identify and debate current practice developments
- develop critical thinking to promote reflective practice
- develop knowledge and skills of social research processes

The course has been developed to provide students with an in-depth, research-based knowledge of dementia, including theory, innovative and best practice, policy drivers and initiatives studies and a grounding in academic and research skills.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Delivery and assessment

Each module commences with a one day introductory session at the University. For international students, or those unable to attend the introductory session in person, there is the option to join in virtually, and we can set you up with our online system called Collaborate so you can take part in the session remotely. Learning then consists of 300 hours study over a 14-week period.
Apart from an introductory session, all teaching uses text and web-based distance-learning materials. The specially designed interactive website enables student interaction and tutorial support as well as providing online access to the course materials and much of the reading material required. Special emphasis is placed on a collaborative and problem-solving approach to learning and on encouraging reflective practice.
All modules are assessed through coursework and you experience a range of assessment including essays, evaluation reports, research proposals and literature reviews.
Students will require access to a computer with an internet connection; broadband or a link to a powerful LAN (such as in a college or University) is the preferred option, although dial-up with a minimum of a 56K modem will also work.

Why Stirling?

REF2014
In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

Study abroad opportunities

The course is international and online. You can complete international study from the comfort of your own home and interact with students from all over the world.

Careers and employability

- Career opportunities
This course has enabled students to develop practice within their existing posts, while some previous students have moved to more specialised or promoted posts. It has also encouraged some students to continue with research on completion of their studies. Other students have become involved in training initiatives.

- Employability
The Postgraduate Dementia Studies course is intended for experienced professionals from all relevant disciplines. Our students learn great transferable skills that enable them to impart knowledge to colleagues and other students, transfer awareness and implement action in the community, and provide training to family members and carers. The course also enhances employability within the broad field of dementia care enabling students to move to more specialised and promoted posts within health and social care settings.

- Industry connections
All of the students on the course are working within the dementia field and, as such, the course engages with a wide range of organisations across statutory, private and not-for-profit sectors in different countries within the UK, Europe and worldwide.

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The Philosophy, Politics and Economics of Health MA aims to equip students with the skills necessary to play an informed role in debates concerning distributive justice and health. Read more
The Philosophy, Politics and Economics of Health MA aims to equip students with the skills necessary to play an informed role in debates concerning distributive justice and health. It explores the central ethical, economic and political problems facing health policy in the UK and globally, especially in relation to social justice.

Degree information

The programme covers relevant areas of moral and political theory, comparative policy analysis, and health economics, to allow students to come to a wide understanding of background issues, history and constraints, in order to be able to make a positive contribution to current debates in this field.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (45 credits), five optional modules (75 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma of 120 credits is available, consisting of three core modules (45 credits), and five optional modules (75 credits).

Core modules
-Philosophy Politics and Economics of Health
-Health Policy and Reform
-Key Principles of Health Economics

Optional modules
-Bioethics Governance
-Comparative Human Rights Law
-Law and Governance of Global Health
-Global Justice and Health
-Illness
-Madness
-Conflict, Humanitarianism and Health
-Ethics and Regulation of Research
-Contemporary Political Philosophy
-Normative Ethics
-Public Ethics
-Health Inequalities over the Life-course
-From Imperial Medicine to Global Health, 1860s to Present
-Death, Dying and Consequences
-Disability and Development
-Introduction to Deafhood
-Global Health and Development
-Anthropology and Psychiatry
-Medical Anthropology
-Modules from other UCL Master's-level programmes, subject to approval from the Course Director and timetabling constraints.
-Or any other suitable module from other UCL Master's-level programmes, subject to approval from the course Director and timetabling constraints

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of up to 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is taught through a combination of lectures, seminars and tutorials. Student performance is assessed through examinations, presentations and coursework (depending on the options chosen), and the dissertation.

Careers

Graduates have gone on to funded research in bioethics and in health policy, and to jobs in the health service, law, journalism, as well as medical education.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Journal development manager, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine
-Doctorate of Medicine, Harvard Medical School
-Health Policy Adviser, Doctors of the World UK
-PhD Critical Theory, University of Brighton
-Policy Officer, WHO (World Health Organization) and studying Medicine, The University of Western Australia

Employability
The programme gives students the ability to think precisely and rigorously about complex problems in health systems and beyond; to work with others to explore solutions; and to write cogently and concisely. Public and private sector health employers and NGOs particularly prize these skills in graduates. The skills that the course teaches also provide an ideal springboard to further academic study.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This MA is the only Master's programme in the world of its type. The compulsory modules provide necessary core skills, while the wide range of options enables students to further their own particular interests.

UCL is at the forefront of research in interdisciplinary research and teaching in philosophy, health humanities and global health through units such as the Health Humanities Centre, the Institute for Global Health and the Institute of Health Equity. The programme draws on highly regarded researchers in a range of UCL departments, and students benefit by instruction from some of the leaders in their fields.

Students further benefit from UCL's location in London, which is one of the world centres of philosophical activity, home of a number of internationally renowned journals - Philosophy; Mind & Language; Mind - and which enjoys regular visiting speakers from across the world. London has over 60 active philosophers making it one of the largest and most varied philosophical communities in the world.

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The MA Cinematography course builds essential and practical skills to prepare you for a role as Cinematographer/Director of Photography (DOP). Read more
The MA Cinematography course builds essential and practical skills to prepare you for a role as Cinematographer/Director of Photography (DOP).

Cinematography is about understanding how to use camera and lighting techniques to tell a story, whether it is screened at the cinema, on TV, or through an iPhone. As technology continues to evolve at an ever increasing rate, the aim of this programme is about more than how to operate a particular piece of equipment – it’s about a deeper understanding of storytelling and the moving image to communicate something meaningful and entertaining to an audience.

- Through hands-on practical exercises, workshops, seminars, masterclasses and screenings you will gain the practical skills and knowledge required to work with cameras and lighting to industry standards and practices enabling you to demonstrate a range of industry-relevant skills upon graduation.

- Opportunities to gain wide range of skills across projects such as a short filmed project that you write and direct, Art Gallery field visits including the National Gallery, 35mm workshop and shooting exercise, location and night shooting with large sensor camera, greenscreen and VFX exercises, working collaboratively and learning the functions of each camera departmental role.

- Gain skills vital for look design and rushes management through creative and technical training in grading and processing software to enhance the visual aesthetics of your productions. Prepare for the world of VFX shooting with theory and practice in a range of techniques and experiences such as green screen shooting and VFX integration.

- You will get the chance to work as a director of photography alongside other MA students on short video content for external clients during the industry project, giving you the opportunity to further showcase your talents and build a competitive showreel.

- Learn from award-winning tutors with extensive professional experience as cinematographers, camera operators, focus pullers and gaffers in film, TV, documentary/factual programming and commercials. We’ve been recently visited by a legendary cinematographer Chung Chung-Hoon (Old Boy, Stoker, Me and Earl and the Dying Girl)

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The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas. Read more
The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas.

The LLM in Law (Erasmus-Europe) provides an exciting opportunity for students to obtain an LLM by studying both at Kent and at one of our partner universities in continental Europe (currently including the Université de Cergy-Pontoise in France) with all of the teaching conducted in English.

The programme gives you the opportunity to study at two high-quality law schools and also lets you experience two countries, their cultures and their legal systems.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/136/law-erasmus-europe

About Kent Law School

Kent Law School (KLS) is the UK's leading critical law school. A cosmopolitan centre of world-class critical legal research, it offers a supportive and intellectually stimulating place to study postgraduate taught and research degrees.

In addition to learning the detail of the law, students at Kent are taught to think about the law with regard to its history, development and relationship with wider society. This approach allows students to fully understand the law. Our critical approach not only makes the study of law more interesting, it helps to develop crucial skills and abilities required for a career in legal practice.

The Law School offers its flagship Kent LLM at the University’s Canterbury campus (and three defined LLM programmes at the University’s Brussels centre). Our programmes are open to non-law graduates with an appropriate academic or professional background who wish to develop an advanced understanding of law in their field.

You study within a close-knit, supportive and intellectually stimulating environment, working closely with academic staff. KLS uses critical research-led teaching throughout our programmes to ensure that you benefit from the Law School’s world-class research.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

LW915 - 'Reading' Murder Cases, 1860 - 1960 (20 credits)
LW801 - Intellectual Property (20 credits)
LW802 - International Business Transactions (20 credits)
LW810 - International Law on Foreign Investment (20 credits)
LW814 - Public International Law (20 credits)
LW815 - EU Constitutional and Institutional Law (20 credits)
LW827 - Banking Law I (20 credits)
LW839 - Environmental Quality Law (20 credits)
LW844 - Legal Aspects of Contemporary International Problems (20 credits)
LW847 - World Trade Organisation (WTO) Law and Practice I (20 credits)
LW852 - European Environmental Law and Policy (20 credits)
LW862 - Death and Dying (20 credits)
LW864 - The Foundations of the English Legal System (20 credits)
LW865 - Issues in Medical Law (20 credits)
LW870 - Introduction to the Criminal Justice System (20 credits)
LW871 - Policing (20 credits)
LW906 - International Enviromental Law - Legal Foundations (20 credits)
LW908 - International and Comparative Consumer Law and Policy (20 credits)
LW919 - Legal Research and Writing Skills (5 credits)

Assessment

The postgraduate programmes offered within the Law School are usually taught in seminar format. Students on the Diploma and LLM programmes study three modules in each of the autumn and spring terms. The modules normally are assessed by a 4-5,000-word essay. Students undertaking an LLM degree must write a dissertation of 15-20,000 words.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- offer you a rigorous programme of study that includes the experience of studying and living in another European country as well as the UK. This experience will allow you to develop your personal/professional skills of flexibility, adaptability, problem-solving and resourcefulness, to strengthen language skills and cross-cultural literacy, to broaden horizons and develop your networking skills in an internationalised setting

- increase the opportunities for you to engage in comparative study of two distinct legal systems at postgraduate Master’s level

- provide a sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures and policy environments for the operation of English law and the law of an Erasmus-Europe LLM partner institution

- foster the development of critical and analytical skills that can be applied in a wide range of settings, particularly settings where comparative methods and approaches offer useful analytical perspectives on contested legal questions

- provide a postgraduate qualification of value to those intending to play a leading role in any field of law

- provide opportunities to develop expertise in subject areas offered by the University of Kent and an Erasmus-Europe LLM partner institution

- provide training in research, analytical, written and oral communication skills of general value to those seeking postgraduate employment

- encourage you to develop a critical awareness of the operation of law and policy, particularly in contexts which are perceived to be controversial or in a state of evolution

- provide you with the skills to undertake supervised research in law and to encourage the production of original and evaluative commentary that meets high standards of scholarship

- develop your skills of academic legal research, particularly by the written presentation of arguments in a manner which meets relevant academic conventions

- assist those students who are minded to pursue academic research at a higher level in acquiring a sophisticated grounding in the essential techniques involved by following specialised modules in research methods

- contribute to widening participation in higher education by taking account of the past experience of applicants in determining admissions whilst ensuring that all students that are admitted possess the potential to complete the programme successfully.

Careers

Employability is a key focus throughout the University and at Kent Law School you have the support of a dedicated Employability and Career Development Officer together with a broad choice of work placement opportunities, employability events and careers talks. Details of graduate internship schemes with NGOs, charities and other professional organisations are made available to postgraduate students via the School’s Employability Blog.

Many students at our Brussels centre who undertake internships are offered contracts in Brussels immediately after graduation. Others have joined their home country’s diplomatic service, entered international organisations, or have chosen to undertake a ‘stage’ at the European Commission, or another EU institution.

Law graduates have gone on to careers in finance, international commerce, government and law or have joined, or started, an NGO or charity.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Information about the internship programme for LLM students can be found on the Kent Law School Employability blog (http://blogs.kent.ac.uk/klsemployability/llm-internships/).

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This programme explores the richness and complexity of artistic invention from the late thirteenth to the seventeenth centuries. Read more
This programme explores the richness and complexity of artistic invention from the late thirteenth to the seventeenth centuries. You will have the opportunity for deep engagement with art-making both in Italy and northern Europe (France, Germany, Low Countries, England and Scotland) and be encouraged to challenge orthodoxies about the influence of one upon the other.

Why this programme

-You will learn from world-leading researchers and develop expert knowledge in this specialised area within History of Art.
-Glasgow’s civic and university collections are some of the richest and most diverse in Europe and are of international standing.
-You will have hands-on access to Renaissance collections of international significance in the University’s own Hunterian Art Gallery (paintings, woodcuts and engravings) and Special Collections (illuminated manuscripts, early printed books, emblem books), and Glasgow’s Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum (Italian, Dutch and Flemish Old Master paintings) , Burrell Collection (Renaissance art in many media, including tapestries and sculpture) and Museums Resource Centre (paintings, glass and ceramics). The city is also an excellent base from which to explore Scotland’s rich architectural heritage, including some of the most complete Renaissance palaces and noble houses in Europe.

Programme structure

The programme is comprised of a core course designed to give you an overview of methods and approaches as well as seminar opportunities to engage directly with original works of art; and optional courses, enabling you to create your own Masters programme.

It also allows you to work in an interdisciplinary capacity, selecting courses from across the College of Arts, according to personal interests. Language and renaissance palaeography study are among the optional courses available. The programme convenor will work with you to ensure a sensible portfolio of courses is constructed, according to your personal aims and objectives.

Core teaching and research training are delivered during the first semester. Optional courses may be taken during the first and second semesters, followed by dissertation research. The dissertation provides an opportunity for you to identify an area of interest and to create a research project that allows in-depth critical exploration of it.

Core Courses
-Defining the Renaissance: Objects, Theories, Categories
-Research Methods in Practice

Optional Courses
-Death and the Art of Dying in the Renaissance North
-Masters of the Venetian Renaissance: Titian, Tintoretto, Veronese
-From Gothic to Renaissance in Northern Europe
-The Renaissance Palace as Portrait
-Work Placement

Career prospects

Object-based study sessions and field trips will introduce you to professionals working in museums and the heritage industry and you will have the opportunity to gain further experience of these sectors through a work placement. The dissertation will foster essential independent research skills and prepare you for doctoral research should you wish to pursue an academic career.

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Medicine is one of the great human activities. The changes that medicine has undergone, and the problems and opportunities it raises, should be of interest to everyone. Read more
Medicine is one of the great human activities. The changes that medicine has undergone, and the problems and opportunities it raises, should be of interest to everyone.

In this MA programme, you are introduced to many questions asked about medicine from within the humanities. For example, you have the opportunity to examine the history of Western medicine and to consider how medical practice is presented in, and shaped by, literature and the arts. You have the chance to reflect on what is involved in classifying something as a disease or an abnormal mental state, and to explore various ethical and legal problems that arise within medicine.

As a interdisciplinary programme, the MA is taught by scholars from many different disciplines across the University, including the Departments of Philosophy, Classical & Archaeological Studies, Comparative Literature and Religious Studies and the Schools of Arts, English, History and Law.

https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/3/medical-humanities

You take four modules across the autumn and spring terms, including one core module and from a variety optional modules, before undertaking a supervised 12-15,000-word dissertation over the summer.

The programme is aimed primarily at people with a humanities background, but we also welcome healthcare practitioners or those with medical backgrounds who are interested in the growing field of the medical humanities.

National ratings

In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, philosophy was ranked 12th for research impact in the UK. We were also ranked 16th for research intensity and in the top 20 for research power.

An impressive 100% of our research-active staff submitted to the REF and 97% of our research was judged to be of international quality. The School’s environment was judged to be conducive to supporting the development of world-leading research.

Course structure

Modules -

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

PL821 - Medical Humanities: An Introduction (30 credits)
CL821 - Ancient Greek Science: Astronomy and Medicine (30 credits)
CP813 - Literature and Medicine (30 credits)
EN835 - Dickens, The Victorians and the Body (30 credits)
HI817 - Deformed, Deranged and Deviant (30 credits)
HI866 - History of Science and Communication (30 credits)
LW862 - Death and Dying (20 credits)
LW863 - Consent to Treatment (20 credits)
LW866 - Medical Practice and Malpractice (20 credits)
Show more... https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/3/medical-humanities#!structure

Assessment

Assessments vary across the modules. Typically the main assessment is a 5-6,000 word essay and a dissertation of 12-20,000 words.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- introduce you to a variety of ways in which medical science and practice can be examined within the humanities and social sciences, and to a range of questions and issues that it raises. In doing so, part of the richness of medical science will be revealed, as well as its problems. The relevant disciplines include history, literature, philosophy and law
- place the study of various materials (such as texts, images, data, legal judgments, etc) at the centre of student learning and analysis
- expose you to a variety of methods, writing styles, researching styles, concepts (etc) that are used across a range of academic disciplines in relation to specific topics and questions in medical science and practice
- expose you to some of the various possibilities and problems that medical science and practice has raised and continues to raise
- develop your capacities to think critically about past and present events and experiences in relation to medicine
- encourage you to relate the academic study of medical science and practice to questions of public debate and concern
vpromote a curriculum supported by scholarship, staff development and a research culture that promotes breadth and depth of intellectual enquiry and debate from different Humanities and related disciplines
- assist you to develop cognitive and transferable skills relevant to their vocational and personal development.

Careers

A postgraduate degree in philosophy is a valuable and flexible qualification, which allows you to develop skills in logical thinking, critical evaluation, persuasion, writing and independent thought.

Graduates have gone on to positions in journalism, administration in the civil service, education, advertising and a range of managerial positions. Some go on to pursue research in the area, many continuing with PhDs at Kent or other higher education institutions.

Learn more about Kent

Visit us - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/visit/openday/pgevents.html

International Students - https://www.kent.ac.uk/internationalstudent/

Why study at Kent? - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

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The course is designed for students who wish to pursue a career in biomedical research, whether it be in academia, industry or goverment. Read more
The course is designed for students who wish to pursue a career in biomedical research, whether it be in academia, industry or goverment. To date, of the students who wanted to, the overwhelming majority have gone on to study for a PhD . We will equip you with the key skills needed to plan, conduct, publish and obtain funding for successful research.

The course comprises two 5-month research projects and a core programme including grant writing, technical workshops, journal clubs and transferrable skills. Please note that Postgraduate Diplomas and Certificates for part-completion are not available for this course.

The

Respiratory and Cardiovascular Science Stream

covers the main areas of respiratory physiology and cellular and molecular biology, and introduces the major disease-causing conditions, giving you a broad base of understanding of the heart and lungs.

The Global Burden of Disease Study predicts that by 2020 the top ten leading causes of disability-adjusted life years has ischaemic heart disease at number 1, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) at number 5, and lower respiratory tract infections at number 6. COPD is predicted to quickly rise ‘up the charts’ after 2020 because it is unique in being currently untreatable, with four people a minute worldwide dying of this condition.

Consequently, study of respiratory and cardiovascular science is essential to improving our future health prospects. To that end, the Respiratory and Cardiovascular Science (RCVS) stream combines lectures and journal clubs covering the physiology and pathophysiology of the heart and lungs to provide a solid grounding on how dysfunction in physiology can lead to pathophysiology and clinical manifestations of severe heart or lung disease.

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Individuals and institutions in healthcare are increasingly called to account for their decisions. Bioethics is relevant to all our lives. Read more
Individuals and institutions in healthcare are increasingly called to account for their decisions.

Bioethics is relevant to all our lives. Even if we never work in healthcare it touches us when we are most vulnerable - when we or those we care for are unwell.

Whether assisted dying, stem cell therapies or three-parent IVF, bioethics is also often in the news and having a greater understanding of the issues involved can enable more in-depth public engagement.

Reflection on the ethical principles that underlie medical and allied practice is an important part of continuing career development for healthcare professionals. Almost every day, it seems some new ethical dilemma appears in the news; whether to do with stem cell research, assisted suicide, resource allocation, nanotechnologies, human cloning or health and climate change.

Why St Mary's?

It is often said, "bioethics is moral philosophy done badly".

At St Mary's our multidisciplinary team of ethics experts with backgrounds in law, medicine, philosophy and theology ensure that every student has a chance to gain a thorough understanding of the grounding of ethical principles and their application.

The success of our students - in completing PhDs, getting papers published and advancing their careers in biomedical ethics and related fields - bears out the effectiveness of this approach.

Please note: this programme is subject to revalidation.

Course Content

[What you will study
The MA in Bioethics and Medical Law is offered both part-time (normally over two or three years) and full-time (over one year). In the onsite mode of delivery, teaching is conducted through evening seminars. This involves one seminar a week in the case of part-time students and two a week for full-time students. Both onsite and online students attend eight (full time) or four (part-time) Saturday day conferences and participate in online discussions.

The course has one entry point but three possible exit points. After successfully completing 60 credits worth of modules (at least 30 credits of which must be core) it is possible to gain a Postgraduate Certificate in Bioethics and Medical Law . After successfully completing 120 credits, it is possible to gain a Postgraduate Diploma in Bioethics and Medical Law . The full Master's' in Bioethics and Medical Law is awarded on successful completion of 180 credits, that is six taught modules plus a 15,000-word dissertation of the requisite quality.

This structure has the great benefit of flexibility. It may be that a student initially intends to study for a Master's, but his or her circumstances change, making it impossible to complete the full quota of modules. Such a student may still be able to obtain a Certificate or a Diploma, and thus receive credit for the work he or she has done. Another student may wish to start with the Certificate before deciding whether to progress to the Diploma or the Master's.

Programme Structure:

Postgraduate Certificate in Bioethics
Core modules (30 credits each)
› Human Beings and Human Action
› Bioethics and Medical Law

Postgraduate Diploma in Bioethics
Core modules (30 credits each)
› Human Beings and Human Action
› Bioethics and Medical Law

Optional modules (20 credits each)
› Ethical Issues at the Beginning of Life
› Ethical Issues at the End of Life
› Patients, Professionals and Society
› Religious Bioethics

MA in Bioethics
Compulsory modules
› Human Beings and Human Action (30 credits)
› Bioethics and Medical Law (30 credits)
› Research Methods and Dissertation (60 credits)

Optional modules (20 credits each)
› Ethical Issues at the Beginning of Life
› Ethical Issues at the End of Life
› Patients, Professionals and Society
› Religious Bioethics

Career Prospects

Our students find the course not only interesting in itself, but also a unique distinguishing asset when applying for jobs in medicine, nursing and allied health care professions as well as in education and law.

The study of a contemporary and universally relevant subject such as medical ethics and law is an excellent preparation for any profession that requires graduates with high levels of human understanding, critical skills and knowledge of current affairs.

Institutions are increasingly being called to account for their decisions and procedures, and reflection on the ethical principles that underlie practice is an important part of continuing professional development for healthcare professionals. An MA in Bioethics and Medical Law is therefore a very flexible and useful qualification to have.

The MA also provides strong foundation for those wishing to pursue further postgraduate research at PhD level. Previous MA graduates have gone on to study for doctorates at St Mary’s and other universities in the UK and internationally. Several past students are currently on the national bioethics bodies for their home countries.

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Health humanities seeks novel ways of understanding health and illness in society, and how methods from the humanities and social studies may be brought to bear on biomedicine, clinical practice, and the politics of healthcare. Read more
Health humanities seeks novel ways of understanding health and illness in society, and how methods from the humanities and social studies may be brought to bear on biomedicine, clinical practice, and the politics of healthcare. Experiences and portrayals of health and illness in literature, film and contemporary culture are also studied.

Degree information

The programme enables students to approach issues relating to health and illness from both a historical and contemporary perspective and from a variety of a disciplines, including anthropology, history, philosophy, sociology, science and technology studies, global health, literature and film studies. Students will also learn to work in an interdisciplinary manner.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (60 credits), elective modules of 15 or 30 credits each (up to a total of 60 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits), two core modules (60 credits) and two electives (60 credits) is also offered. A Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits), two core modules is also offered.

Core modules
-Illness
-Madness

Optional modules - students may choose from the list of recommended modules below, or other relevant modules in UCL, with the approval of the convenors.
-Anthropology and Psychiatry
-Classical Chinese Medicine
-Clinically Applied Cultural Psychiatry
-Conflict, Humanitarianism and Health
-Cultural Memory
-Death, Dying and Consequences
-Disease in History
-German Literature and Psychology
-Global Health and Development: Emerging Policy Debates
-Global Justice and Health
-Health Inequalities Over the Lifecourse
-Health Policy and Reform
-Medical Anthropology
-Medieval Science and Medicine in Global Perspective
-Science, Technology, and Identity
-Social Value and Public Policy, Health and the Environment
-From Imperial Medicine to Global Health, 1860s to present
-Medicine on Screen

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000-12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures and seminars. Assessment is through essays and a dissertation. There is no unseen examination.

Careers

This MA provides an exceptional foundation for those hoping to undertake PhD research and pursue an academic career, ranging from interdisciplinary work in the health humanities to a broad spectrum of more specialised disciplines, such as medicine, the philosophy of medicine, history of medicine, medical sociology or medical anthropology, among others. It is also a suitable preparation for a range of careers including science and medical journalism, bioethics, healthcare policy, NGOs and museum and heritage.

Employability
The programme gives students the opportunities to work in an interdisciplinary manner, and to engage in debate and develop their presentation skills. Students will gain experience of writing essays and training in conducting original research and applying the appropriate methodology. There are many additional activities available, both within the UCl Health Humanities Centre and the Institute of Advanced Studies, and the wider UCL community, to help students develop employability skills.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Health Humanities MA is based in UCL's new Health Humanities Centre which draws together world-leading researchers from different disciplines including medicine and health in history, philosophy, sociology, anthropology, and cultural and film studies.

Leading clinicians at UCL's acclaimed Medical School and Division of Psychiatry, who are engaged in humanities and social science research, are also actively involved with the centre. The centre was formed through the merger of the Centre for Philosophy, Justice and Health and the Centre for the History of Psychological Disciplines.

UCL Health Humanities Centre forms part of the new UCL Institute of Advanced Studies, which showcases and fosters multidisciplinary research within the humanities and the social sciences, with an active programme of events and visiting international scholars.

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The Global Burden of Disease Study predicts that by 2020 the top ten leading causes of disability-adjusted life years has ischaemic heart disease at number 1, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) at number 5, and lower respiratory tract infections at number 6. Read more
The Global Burden of Disease Study predicts that by 2020 the top ten leading causes of disability-adjusted life years has ischaemic heart disease at number 1, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) at number 5, and lower respiratory tract infections at number 6. COPD is predicted to quickly rise ‘up the charts’ after 2020 because it is unique in being currently untreatable, with four people a minute worldwide dying of this condition.

Consequently, study of respiratory and cardiovascular science is essential to improving our future health prospects. To that end, the Respiratory and Cardiovascular Science (RCVS) stream combines lectures and journal clubs covering the physiology and pathophysiology of the heart and lungs to provide a solid grounding on how dysfunction in physiology can lead to pathophysiology and clinical manifestations of severe heart or lung disease. The RCVS stream covers the main areas of respiratory physiology and cellular and molecular biology, and introduces the major disease-causing conditions, giving you a broad base of understanding of the heart and lungs.

Laboratory-based research projects will be directly related to advancing our understanding of heart and lung function and/or dysfunction. Dedicated RCVS sessions on data interpretation are designed to facilitate and complement the project experience.

Most of the tutors on the RCVS stream work at the National Heart & Lung Institute, and represent the largest ‘critical mass’ of research-active, respiratory or cardiovascular science academics in Europe. For example, Professor Peter Barnes (FRS) is the most cited published author for COPD in the world. Consequently, students will be in a premier, cutting-edge environment of respiratory and cardiovascular teaching and research.

After completion of the RCVS stream the student will be able to:

-Describe the basic physiology of cardiac function
-Describe the pathophysiology of the major cardiovascular diseases (for example, cardiac ischaemia)
-Describe the pathophysiology of the major respiratory diseases, including asthma, COPD and cystic fibrosis
-Understand the advantages and limitations of animal models of respiratory and cardiovascular disease
-Understand the rationale behind the design of novel treatments for respiratory and cardiovascular disease
-Use library and other research sources effectively
-Design laboratory-based experiments to effectively test a specified hypothesis, incorporating use of appropriate controls
-Interpret data sets, depict data in an appropriate graphic format and apply appropriate statistical analysis
-Understand and be able to use bioinformatic approaches
-Be able to write a grant proposal for a research project
-Be able to present research project data in various formats, including as a poster, an oral presentation, a PhD-style write-up and a journal-based research paper write-up
-Be able to read, understand and critically evaluate research papers in peer-review journals

Please note that Postgraduate Diplomas and Certificates for part-completion are not available for this course.

A wide range of research projects is made available to students twice a year. The range of projects available to each student is determined by their stream. Students may have access to projects from other streams, but have priority only on projects offered by their own stream.

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This exciting and innovative course is designed to ensure that as a nursing professional you are well placed to deal with the globalised challenges arising in current and future practice. Read more
This exciting and innovative course is designed to ensure that as a nursing professional you are well placed to deal with the globalised challenges arising in current and future practice. These include changes in population and demographic trends, shifts in patterns of health/illness and wellbeing, and political, professional and organisational working cultures. Currently specialist fields exist within learning disabilities, mental health and adult nursing.

Course details

The course adopts an evidence-informed nursing approach by reviewing, synthesising and incorporating contemporary professional and political drivers to ensure that the profession remains dynamic, proactive and responsive in delivering safe, confident, competent and compassionate quality care and excellence in nursing practice. This course offers you the opportunity to develop your personal and professional autonomy within your areas of practice.

The course develops:
-Leadership skills to promote the professional voice of nursing and to disseminate new knowledge and skills to enhance patient/client care
-Advanced knowledge and skills to facilitate person-centred care and to enhance the patient/client experience
-Advanced decision-making skills and application of nursing practice in complex, demanding and unpredictable environments
-Intellectual and professional independence associated with mastery
-Knowledge and skills to inform and advance nursing practice
-A critical understanding of research methodologies and evidence-based practice to contribute to the generation of knowledge for advanced nursing practice

What you study

The course consists of 100 credits of core modules and 80 credits of designated/option modules. The option modules can be a mixture of either 20 or 40 credit modules. There is an induction period to help meet your needs in relation to the demands of master’s-level study.

Core modules
-Advanced Inquiry in Nursing
-Conceptualisation of Nursing through Person-centred Care
-Enhancing the User/Carer Experience Through Evidence-based Nursing (Dissertation)

Option modules - Adult nurse working in acute medicine
-Advanced Acute Cardiology
-Advanced Respiratory Disease Management
-Supportive Care for Patients with Long-term Conditions

Designated/Option modules - Learning disabilities nurse working in their specialist field
-Advancing Health Facilitation with Learning Difficulties
-Applied Behavioral Analysis and Supportive Interventions
-Principles of Risk Assessment

Designated/Option modules - Mental health nurse working in their specialist field
-Contemporary Law and Ethics and Mental Health
-Critical and Alterative Discourses in Mental Health Illness and Mental Health
-Negotiated Learning

Designated/Option modules - Adult nurse working in palliative care
-End-of-life Care
-Psychosocial Dimensions of Death and Dying

Modules offered may vary.

Teaching

We use a range of assessment strategies depend on the module. Examples include presentations, assignments, vivas and objective structured clinical examinations.

This programme uses e-learning as a key resource to enhance your learning and support. You use the virtual learning environment, [email protected] for all the modules. We provide links to other useful online resources and web-based interactive activities related to autism. You also learn through discussion boards as well as attending keynote lectures, seminars, case study and scenario-based discussions. There is a virtual ethics committee group to enhance your learning on the second-year core module. We use debate and argument to stimulate you as active participants in your reflective and learning process. Because the programme allows you to select option modules, the different modules use resources appropriate to the topic of study. For example, if you study Advanced Clinical Skills, you have the opportunity to practice skills in preparation for the objective structured clinical examinations assessment.

Employability

The MSc Nursing (Specialist Field) award should help employers to recognise your expertise and study at master’s level.

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