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The Postgraduate Certificate in Vigiling with the Dying at Winchester allows students to reflect on their own professional practice in writing and performing ritual for the dying through a critical and self-reflective engagement with ritual and performance studies theories. Read more
The Postgraduate Certificate in Vigiling with the Dying at Winchester allows students to reflect on their own professional practice in writing and performing ritual for the dying through a critical and self-reflective engagement with ritual and performance studies theories.

Programme Content

The programme is specifically designed for those who vigil with the dying who are looking to reflect critically on, and develop, their professional practice, especially in regard to creating rituals. It is also designed for those who wish to explore academically historical and current approaches to death, dying, and pastoral care in a variety of world religions.

See the website http://www.winchester.ac.uk/Studyhere/Pages/pgcert-vigiling-with-the-dying.aspx

Modules

- Contemporary Approaches to Death and Dying
- Death, Dying and Pastoral Care in World Religions
- Performing Rituals: Creative and Critical Methodologies in Vigiling with the Dying

Learning and Teaching

Students undertake structured discussion and debate through electronic forums and are provided with guided course readings and access to the e-resources held in the University library in order to complete assessments. A visit to a local crematorium, cemetery, mortuary and/or funeral home is an essential aspect of the programme. Reflection on current practice with peers also forms an essential part of the course.

The programme is taught by a team of highly qualified and enthusiastic staff who include internationally renowned scholars.

Assessment

Assessments include weekly study skills tasks, a field report, a dossier, self-reflections document, essays and constructing a vigiling ritual with a critical rationale.

At the University of Winchester validated programmes may adopt a range of means of assessing your learning. An indicative, and not necessarily comprehensive, list of assessment types you might encounter includes essays, portfolios, supervised independent work, presentations, written exams, or practical performances. The University is committed to ensuring that all students have an equal opportunity to achieve module learning outcomes. As such, where appropriate and necessary, students with recognised disabilities may have alternative assignments set that continue to test how successfully they have met the module's learning outcomes. Further details on assessment types used in the programme you are interested in can be found on the course page, by attending an Open Day/Evening, or contacting our teaching staff.

Careers

Graduates vigil with the dying.

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COURSE OVERVIEW. Examine historical and current approaches to death and dying. Understand bereavement rituals in different cultural and religious contexts. Read more

COURSE OVERVIEW

  • Examine historical and current approaches to death and dying
  • Understand bereavement rituals in different cultural and religious contexts
  • Useful preparation for a range of careers serving the dying and bereaved

Death, Religion and Culture at Winchester is a distance learning course that explores the universal reality of death. You examine the ways in which death and dying are understood differently by various cultures and religious traditions, and how those understandings are played out in rituals of death, dying and bereavement.

The programme attracts a diverse range of students including funeral directors, clergy from a variety of traditions, teachers, nurses and those preparing for a research degree, as well as a range of people who are simply fascinated by the subject. This dynamic group ensures that your debates and discussions are lively and informed by a breath of interests and experiences.

Modules include Contemporary Approaches to Death and Dying, Death in World Religions, The Theology, Philosophy and Ethics of Death, Pastoral Care of the Dying and Bereaved, and Philosophical Approaches to Mourning and Eulogy. You also complete a dissertation of 15,000 to 20,000 words on a relevant topic of your choice.

The programme is taught by a team of highly qualified and enthusiastic staff who include internationally renowned scholars. You take part in structured discussion and debate through electronic forums, and are provided with guided course readings and access to the digital resources held in the University library in order to complete assessments. A visit to a local crematorium, cemetery, mortuary and/or funeral home is an essential aspect of the course.

Graduates of the course pursue a range of careers including bereavement counselling, work in funeral homes, teaching and church ministries.

Careers

Graduates have gone on to work within bereavement counselling, funeral homes, teaching and the church.

ABOUT THIS COURSE

Suitable for applicants from:

UK, EU, World

Learning and teaching

Start date: September

Distance learning available: This course is offered as distance learning only

Teaching takes place: There are e-seminars in the evenings, with full tutorial and study skills support

Students undertake structured discussion and debate through electronic forums and are provided with guided course readings and access to the e-resources held in the University library in order to complete assessments.

A visit to a local crematorium, cemetery, mortuary and/or funeral home is an essential aspect of the programme.

The programme is taught by a team of highly qualified and enthusiastic staff who include internationally renowned scholars.

Assessment

Our validated courses may adopt a range of means of assessing your learning. An indicative, and not necessarily comprehensive, list of assessment types you might encounter includes essays, portfolios, supervised independent work, presentations, written exams, or practical performances.

We ensure all students have an equal opportunity to achieve module learning outcomes. As such, where appropriate and necessary, students with recognised disabilities may have alternative assignments set that continue to test how successfully they have met the module's learning outcomes. Further details on assessment types used on the course you are interested in can be found on the course page, by attending an Open Day or Open Evening, or contacting our teaching staff.

Feedback

We are committed to providing timely and appropriate feedback to you on your academic progress and achievement in order to enable you to reflect on your progress and plan your academic and skills development effectively. You are also encouraged to seek additional feedback from your course tutors.

Further information

For more information about our regulations for this course, please see our Academic Regulations, Policies and Procedures



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The postgraduate certificate in palliative care looks at the development of effective palliative and end-of-life care, which is a major priority for health providers both nationally and internationally. Read more
The postgraduate certificate in palliative care looks at the development of effective palliative and end-of-life care, which is a major priority for health providers both nationally and internationally.

This palliative care nursing course addresses the complex challenges end-of-life care creates for societies and health professionals, including a range of ethical, social, professional and cultural issues that need careful analysis.

This online palliative care nursing course is designed to develop and enhance the knowledge and skills you require to promote, lead and drive high quality care for the palliative patient and their families in their care setting. Your studies will centre on current philosophies that underpin palliative care, bringing together a range of clinical and academic experts from this field.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/313-postgraduate-certificate-palliative-care-distance-learning

What you will study

Modules:
- Therapeutic Management of Life Limiting Illness in Palliative Care: Assessment and management of complex symptoms

The assessment and management of complex symptoms including pain, nausea and vomiting, anxiety, depression, fatigue and agitation will be explored and appropriate interventions critically discussed. Consideration through the module will be given to psychosocial issues, such as, anxiety and depression within patients who have a life limiting illness and the communication strategies used in relation to managing difficult symptoms.

- Nature and Scope of Palliative Care: Specific issues pertinent to the delivery of effective palliative care

This will explore issues pertaining to palliative care via case studies and a narrative approach. These can include euthanasia, the right to die, and the use of advanced directives while considering the issue of capacity and choice.

- End of Life Care: Role of the professional in the care of an individual at the end of life, including perspectives from the individual and family

You will critically explore the role of the professional in the care of an individual at the end of their life. It will include exploring the impact of death and dying from a holistic perspective on the individual and family. The themes of loss, grief and bereavement will be central within this module. Professional, legal and ethical issues related to death and dying will also be considered through the module.

Learning and teaching methods

You will be taught through online discussion forums via the University’ learning portal Blackboard.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

This course will enable students to demonstrate clear evidence of ongoing professional development in line with national strategic plans.

Assessment methods

Assessment involves written assignments and achievement of clinical competencies. You will receive key learning materials and be supported throughout the course by the module team and your contact with other students.

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PgCert Funeral Celebrancy at Winchester enables students to reflect on their existing professional practice as a Funeral Celebrant/ Officiant. Read more
PgCert Funeral Celebrancy at Winchester enables students to reflect on their existing professional practice as a Funeral Celebrant/ Officiant. Students develop existing creative and critical professional practice through an engagement with theories and methodologies from the academic disciplines of death studies, religious studies, ritual and performance studies, and creative writing.

Programme Content

This Postgraduate Certificate relates a wide range of religious and cultural approaches to death and dying, disposal and bereavement rituals, and the work of a funeral celebrant.

Students explore sociological, anthropological, philosophical and theological methodologies; look at creative writing through an academic lens; and explore ritual and performance studies theories.

With a strong focus on self-reflection and professional development, this programme is only suitable for individuals already working as Funeral Celebrants/Officiants.

See the website http://www.winchester.ac.uk/Studyhere/Pages/pgcert-funeral-celebrancy.aspx

Modules

- Approaches to Studying Death
- Death, Dying and Pastoral Care in World Religions
- Performing Rituals: Creative and Critical Methodologies in Constructing and Performing a Eulogy

Learning and Teaching

Students undertake structured guided reading and engage in online discussion and debate. A visit to a local crematorium, cemetery or natural burial site is an essential aspect of the programme.

The programme is taught by a team of highly qualified and enthusiastic staff who include internationally renowned scholars.

Assessment

Types of assessment used include reflecting on writing and performing eulogies, exploring professional practice in light of a site visit and more traditional methods of assessment such as essays. There are no examinations. An introduction to academic study skills is embedded into the first module.

At the University of Winchester validated programmes may adopt a range of means of assessing your learning. An indicative, and not necessarily comprehensive, list of assessment types you might encounter includes essays, portfolios, supervised independent work, presentations, written exams, or practical performances. The University is committed to ensuring that all students have an equal opportunity to achieve module learning outcomes. As such, where appropriate and necessary, students with recognised disabilities may have alternative assignments set that continue to test how successfully they have met the module's learning outcomes. Further details on assessment types used in the programme you are interested in can be found on the course page, by attending an Open Day/Evening, or contacting our teaching staff.

Careers

This Postgraduate Certificate is designed for those already working as Funeral Celebrants/Officiants. It offers a valuable professional development opportunity and a firm foundation for postgraduate research.

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This course looks at religion from anthropological and sociological perspectives. Read more

This course looks at religion from anthropological and sociological perspectives. Durham has particular strengths in the study of Mormonism; death, dying and disposal; religion and emotion; religion/faith and globalisation; religion and politics; contemporary evangelicalism and post-evangelicalism; and religion and generational change. It also boasts the Centre for Death and Life Studies and the Project for Spirituality, Theology and Health.

Course Structure

  • Social Scientific Methods in the Study of Religion core module
  • Three option modules
  • Dissertation.

Core Modules

  • Social Scientific Methods in the Study of Religion 
  • Dissertation.

Optional Modules

Optional modules in previous years have included:

2-3 choices from:

  • Ritual, Symbolism and Belief in the Anthropology of Religion
  • Theology, Ethics and Medicine
  • Literature and Religion
  • Christian Northumbria 600-750
  • Ecclesiology and Ethnography

Plus up to 1 choice from:

  • Advanced Hebrew Texts
  • Advanced Aramaic
  • Middle Egyptian
  • The Bible and Hermeneutics
  • The Old Testament Pseudepigrapha and the New Testament
  • Paul and his Interpreters
  • Gospels and Canon
  • Patristic Exegesis
  • Patristic Ecclesiology
  • The Anglican Theological Vision
  • Liturgy and Sacramentality
  • Classic Texts in Christian Theology
  • Conceiving Change in Contemporary Catholicism
  • Christian Gender
  • Principles of Theological Ethics
  • Catholic Social Thought
  • Doctrine of Creation
  • Selected modules from the MA in Theology and Ministry programme
  • Level 3 undergraduate module, or any Level 1 – 2 language module offered by the Department of Theology and Religion, taken in conjunction with the Extended Study in Theology & Religion module
  • 30 credits from another Board of Studies (including appropriate credit-bearing language modules offered by the University’s Centre for Foreign Language Study)

Course Learning and Teaching

Most MA teaching is delivered through small group seminars and tutorials. These exemplify and encourage the various skills and practices required for independent scholarly engagement with texts and issues. Teaching in the Department of Theology & Religion is ‘research led’ at both BA and MA levels, but particularly at MA level. Research led teaching is informed by staff research, but more importantly it aims to develop students as independent researchers themselves, able to pursue and explore their own research interests and questions. This is why the independently researched MA dissertation is the culmination of the MA programme. Such engagement with texts and issues is not only an excellent preparation for doctoral research, it also develops those skills of critical analysis, synthesis and presentation sought and required by employers.

Many MA classes will contain a ‘lecture’ element, conveying information and exemplifying an approach to the subject-matter that will enable students to develop a clear understanding of the subject and improve their own ability to analyse and evaluate information and arguments. Seminars enhance knowledge and understanding through preparation and interaction with other students and staff, promoting awareness of and respect for different viewpoints and approaches, and developing skills of articulacy, advocacy and interrogation. Through small group discussions and tutorials, feedback is provided on student work, with the opportunity to discuss specific issues in detail, enhancing student knowledge and writing skills.

The Dissertation module includes training in generic research skills, from the use of the Library to issues in referencing and bibliography. The subject specific core module introduces students to questions of interpretation and argument in the disciplines encompassed by theology and religion, and helps them to develop their own interests and questions that will issue in the MA dissertation. The latter is a piece of independent research, but it is fostered and guided through individual tutorials with a supervisor, with whom students meet throughout the academic year.

Career Opportunities

A significant number of our graduates find employment in academic institutions (universities and seminaries) around the world.

Others go into teaching, church ministry, the caring professions, and many other professional fields.



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The University of Stirling is committed to world class education and research, with a pioneering spirit and a passion for innovation and excellence. Read more

Introduction

The University of Stirling is committed to world class education and research, with a pioneering spirit and a passion for innovation and excellence.
Applied Social Science is at the forefront of developing new e-learning opportunities. In 2003, we offered the first online MSc in Dementia Studies in the UK. In following person-centred care principles, this course places the person with dementia at the very centre of our understanding.
In joining our distance learning postgraduate course in Dementia Studies, you will become part of an international, multi-disciplinary community of students and academics, committed to creating change and improving dementia practice and the experiences of living with dementia.
Our course takes a theory-based and practice-oriented approach to consider the diversity of living and dying with dementia. It encourages collaborative, inter-disciplinary, critical and reflexive learning and it seeks to produce leaders of change in the dementia field.

Key information

- Degree type: Postgraduate Diploma, MSc, Postgraduate Certificate
- Study methods: Online, Part-time
- Duration: MSc - 3 years (36 months) Diploma - 2 years (24 months) Certificate - 1 year (12 months)
- Start date: September and January
- Course Director: Dr Louise McCabe

Course objectives

The objectives of the MSc are to:
- develop an advanced understanding of multidisciplinary perspectives about dementia and approaches to dementia care
- address critical issues in dementia care and service delivery
- foster improved multidisciplinary and collaborative practice
- compare and contrast national and international research
- identify and debate current practice developments
- develop critical thinking to promote reflective practice
- develop knowledge and skills of social research processes

The course has been developed to provide students with an in-depth, research-based knowledge of dementia, including theory, innovative and best practice, policy drivers and initiatives studies and a grounding in academic and research skills.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Delivery and assessment

Each module commences with a one day introductory session at the University. For international students, or those unable to attend the introductory session in person, there is the option to join in virtually, and we can set you up with our online system called Collaborate so you can take part in the session remotely. Learning then consists of 300 hours study over a 14-week period.
Apart from an introductory session, all teaching uses text and web-based distance-learning materials. The specially designed interactive website enables student interaction and tutorial support as well as providing online access to the course materials and much of the reading material required. Special emphasis is placed on a collaborative and problem-solving approach to learning and on encouraging reflective practice.
All modules are assessed through coursework and you experience a range of assessment including essays, evaluation reports, research proposals and literature reviews.
Students will require access to a computer with an internet connection; broadband or a link to a powerful LAN (such as in a college or University) is the preferred option, although dial-up with a minimum of a 56K modem will also work.

Why Stirling?

REF2014
In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

Study abroad opportunities

The course is international and online. You can complete international study from the comfort of your own home and interact with students from all over the world.

Careers and employability

- Career opportunities
This course has enabled students to develop practice within their existing posts, while some previous students have moved to more specialised or promoted posts. It has also encouraged some students to continue with research on completion of their studies. Other students have become involved in training initiatives.

- Employability
The Postgraduate Dementia Studies course is intended for experienced professionals from all relevant disciplines. Our students learn great transferable skills that enable them to impart knowledge to colleagues and other students, transfer awareness and implement action in the community, and provide training to family members and carers. The course also enhances employability within the broad field of dementia care enabling students to move to more specialised and promoted posts within health and social care settings.

- Industry connections
All of the students on the course are working within the dementia field and, as such, the course engages with a wide range of organisations across statutory, private and not-for-profit sectors in different countries within the UK, Europe and worldwide.

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Globally health is changing rapidly and in many countries millions of people are dying from preventable diseases. Read more

Globally health is changing rapidly and in many countries millions of people are dying from preventable diseases. The World Health Organization calculates that two thirds of an estimated annual 56 million deaths are due to non-communicable diseases including cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes and chronic lung diseases.

Obesity is a key determinant of these diseases and yet, at the other extreme, over 7.5 million preschool children die each year from malnutrition. Cardiovascular diseases alone represented 30 per cent of global deaths in 2012. About three quarters of the global NCD deaths occur in low-and middle-income countries, and infectious diseases including AIDS/HIV and other immunisable diseases, still affect many people in developing and developed countries alike.

Supporting people to stay well is the essence of public health. Practitioners advise and develop programmes to make a difference in areas such as nutrition, immunisation, tobacco and alcohol, drug addiction recovery, sexual health, pregnancy and children’s health. They are also concerned with issues such as health inequality, health care service equity, population programmes and disease surveillance.

What does our MSc provide?

We offer a challenging and rewarding masters programme in all aspects of public health with optional pathways specialising in nutrition, intelligence (working with information) and global health. Our modules cover a broad range of subjects taught by expert academic staff with a focus on professional practice. They will equip you for a successful career in the public or private sector, or a role as an academic researcher.

Who should study?

Our programme will suit graduates or experienced health professionals who want to develop their knowledge of public health or learn new skills.

Introducing your course

Our MSc Public Health degree will prepare you for a challenging rewarding career to improve the health of individuals and communities. You will develop essential skills in epidemiology, quantitative and qualitative research methods, medical statistics, health improvement and in devising effective public health programmes. This masters degree course offers pathways in intelligence, global health and nutrition to equip you for professional practice in these specialisms.

Overview

Public health professionals apply core competences from epidemiology and social sciences to develop, implement and evaluate evidence-based programmes to improve health and wellbeing. They are also concerned with equity, quality, effectiveness, cost effectiveness and accessibility of health care and will become involved in policy and strategy development, particularly where this impacts on community health and wellbeing.

Comprehensive programme

Our comprehensive MSc provides a broad public health learning experience and supports the development of relevant expertise. We offer three pathways in nutrition, intelligence and global healthwith specialist modules to equip you for a career in these specialisms.

We will provide you with thorough training and support to develop essential skills in epidemiology, and quantitative and qualitative competencies, which you will need to analyse healthcare data and develop your own campaigns.

During the programme you will have the opportunity to debate contemporary issues with leading public health experts. You will also meet international researchers in lifecourse epidemiology, geographical aspects of health, health inequalities, maternal and child health and nutrition.

You will learn with and from other students, sharing your experiences from a range of health systems around the world.

Professional skills

Our programme aims to develop your intellectual and practical skills in the core areas of public health to maximise your opportunities for employment as a practitioner or researcher. It will:

  • Provide opportunities for you to develop mastery in public health through advancing your analytical skills, communication skills and knowledge.
  • Prepare you to lead teams and individuals, build healthy alliances, develop capacity and capability and work in partnership to improve health and wellbeing.
  • Enable you to promote the health of populations by influencing the lifestyles of populations, communities and individuals.
  • Enable you to prevent ill-health through risk assessment and the promotion and implementation of evidence-based interventions.
  • Enable you to use or evaluate research using sound methodological principles.
  • Provide you with relevant tools, skills and understanding of concepts and terms, which will support effective public health practice.

We support the careers of aspiring public health researchers and actively encourage applications for further study at PhD level.

This programme is offered by the Faculty of Medicine and as such you will receive most of your teaching in the Faculty of Medicine located in Southampton General Hospital.

View the programme specification document for this course.

View the programme specification document for the PG Certificate in Public Health

View the programme specification document for the PG Diploma in Public Health

Pathways

View the different pathways for this programme here.



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Working across the disciplines of architecture, art and cultural geography, our Architectural and Urban Design MA combines critical debate and creative practice to help you develop as a designer who will plan the urban environments of the future. Read more
Working across the disciplines of architecture, art and cultural geography, our Architectural and Urban Design MA combines critical debate and creative practice to help you develop as a designer who will plan the urban environments of the future.

You will benefit from a supportive studio environment, two field trips and a variety of workshops and seminars, taught by active practitioners in architecture and urban design. You will engage with research on the analysis of cities and lead your own projects, speculating as to how cities will evolve and be used in the future.

The course is highly experimental and aims to stretch your imagination and critical ability. You will produce innovative portfolios and learn about the issues of global urban environments, expanding your knowledge beyond the usual subject boundaries.

Academic context

Urbanism and urban design are ambiguous terms that surround and reflect both the physical and mental attributes applied to the built environment.

The material of roads, pavements, buildings, railways, bridges and so on represents the physical. The mental is represented by narratives, histories, personal perceptions and anticipations.

The two sensibilities combine to form a layered knowledge of the city, which could be compared to a mature palimpsest or to semi-obscured archaeology. In this context, we study the city with emphasis on the space of the private realm and its seamless engagement with the public domain.

Why study with us?

• Experimental course that stretches your imagination and critical ability.

• Focus on the urban realm: the experiential aspect of cities and the gap between planned and lived.

• Field trips to cities including London, Berlin, Marseille, Glasgow and Edinburgh.

• Teaching staff who are also practitioners in architecture and urban design.

• Guest lectures from leading figures such as Anthony McCall, Stefano Rabolli Pansera, Katy Beinart and Peter Clash.

• Alumni network of professional architects, academics and urban designers.

Areas of study

The course is taught over 3 semesters over 12 months.

Design 1: Urban Strategies
This module introduces you to design strategies, methods and issues pertinent to your design studio, helping you to explore the potential of different approaches to design. There is a strong emphasis on the development of conceptual ideas and their correlation with the development of design strategy, helping you to articulate your individual position as a design practitioner.

Design 2
Design 2 aims to consolidate and extend the priorities, ideas and strategies established in Design 1. You will explore architectural and urban ideas in more depth and complexity. The emphasis here is on curiosity and speculation, supporting the development of methods to help with enquiry, reflection and debate.

Independent Project
The independent project runs concurrently and is concerned with your identification of places of ‘conflict’ and negotiations of space. The module encourages experimentation in a specific field of study. Students have developed projects in fields of architectural and artistic practice, creative design, techniques of communication or new technologies.

Critical Readings
The Critical Readings module will develop your skills in critical practice through an analysis of cultural, historical, theoretical and practical issues in architecture. It provides the opportunity to carry out initial investigations into the ideas that will drive your Masterwork project.

Research Skills and Training
Research Skills and Training introduces you to the challenges involved in designing, implementing and disseminating a research project. You will develop a written proposal that can inform the development of your Masterwork project, encouraging you to consider how your investigations contribute to the academic knowledge in your field.

Masterwork
The Masterwork is the final stage of study, requiring you to perform as a self-reflective critical researcher and lay down the foundations for innovation in your future practice. You will develop your project from an agreed research proposal, which may be either a text-based dissertation or a design-led research project with critical reflection. You will be asked to focus the areas of interest that have developed in your previous practice and studies, identify research questions and develop research methods, bringing critical investigation and creative responses together.

Facilities

• You will benefit from a new Masters Centre including studio space, tutorial areas and shared creative spaces.

• Modelling and construction workshops: timber and metal, dedicated 'wet' modelling bay, plastic dying facility, drill press, spray booth, vacuum former, strip bender, plastics oven, hot wire cutter and spot welder; further workshops available by arrangement with rapid prototyping and laser cutter.

• IT facilities include 3D paper and printer, plotters, scanners and a reprographics suite.

• Software includes Adobe suite (Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, Acrobat Professional), VW2010, Cinem 4D, Premiere, Blender, AutoCAD, Maya and Rhino.

• Library facilities include additional computing equipment, digital and hard copy specialist library facilities, and specialist collections.

Careers and employability

The Architectural and Urban Design MA gives you a deep understanding of the issues involved in contemporary practice. As you evolve your own specialist work, you will discover ways to reimagine and reshape the contemporary urban environment.

Our graduates have gone on to be professional architects, academics and urban designers in the UK, Vietnam, Russia, Palestine, Japan, Taiwan, Kenya, Turkey, Lithuania and other countries. Among our alumni are award-winning architects Wei Jiang and Quang Nguyen, who are based in Shanghai and London respectively.

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This course is aimed at graduates from a wide range of design-related backgrounds. Interdisciplinary research and practice is promoted throughout the course, and creative collaborations are developed between designers, fine artists, architects and thinkers wanting to follow an advanced course in interior design. Read more
This course is aimed at graduates from a wide range of design-related backgrounds.

Interdisciplinary research and practice is promoted throughout the course, and creative collaborations are developed between designers, fine artists, architects and thinkers wanting to follow an advanced course in interior design.

Students share spacious top-lit studios and have their own individual working spaces. There are also dedicated computer suites as well as photographic and workshop facilities.

Staff bringing their expertise to this course include:

• full-time academics who combine teaching with research and consultancy
• part-time tutors who are also practising designers
• eminent visiting specialists, critics and consultants.

Course structure

During semester 1, the projects set for the Preliminary Design module provide an opportunity for students returning to education to take stock of their position, evaluate their strengths and weaknesses, and identify ambitions for future study. Lecture courses in Technology and Material Practices, Critical Readings and Research Methods run in parallel.

In semester 2, you consolidate and extend the priorities, ideas and strategies established in the preliminary design. Lecture series in Technology and Critical Readings continue. A proposal for the final research project is developed and submitted, which then takes up the whole of semester 3.

The course explores both the intellectual idea and the spatial language of interior environments. Students develop new skills while extending existing design practices to precisely articulate spatial design proposals.

We offer at least one study trip each year. It might be related to the design studio or a trip that offers you direct exposure to and experience of some of the most contemporary spatial design projects in Britain and mainland Europe.

Syllabus

Our Interior Design MA is designed to promote interdisciplinary research and practice: we are looking to develop creative collaborations between fine artists, designers, architects and thinkers. Our starting point is to acknowledge the complexities and paradoxes inherent in orthodox architectural documentation in order to unearth the dubious simplifications and missed opportunities that result from the tendency to privilege the visual at the expense of our other senses.

In anticipation of 'the creative user', all our proposals originate from a close focus on the existing condition, paying particular attention to local takeovers, autonomous occupations and the blurring of boundaries of ownership and programme. In considering issues of technology, we are concerned as much with intuition, desire and chance as with precedent, economy and established practice.

Modules:

Preliminary Design
Technology and Material Practices
Optional Module
Main Design
Research Methods
Masterwork

Please visit the website to find out more about these modules:

https://www.brighton.ac.uk/courses/study/interior-design-ma-pgcert-pgdip.aspx

Facilities

• Benefit from the new Masters Centre including studio space, tutorial areas and shared creative spaces

• Modelling and construction workshops: timber and metal, dedicated 'wet' modelling bay, plastic dying facility, drill press, spray booth, vacuum former, strip bender, plastics oven, hot wire cutter and spot welder; further workshops available by arrangement with rapid prototyping and laser cutter

• IT facilities include 3D paper and printer, plotters, scanners and a reprographics suite

• Software includes Adobe suite (Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, Acrobat Professional), VW2010, Cinem 4D, Premiere, Blender, AutoCAD, Maya and Rhino

• Library facilities include additional computing equipment, digital and hard copy specialist library facilities, and specialist collections

Careers and employability

Our graduates generally succeed in finding challenging and rewarding work in the public and private sectors, nationally and internationally. Brighton graduates enjoy a reputation for being creative and innovative designers, responsive to the needs of people and places. In addition, this postgraduate programme offers opportunities for experimental and exploratory work in spatial design both within and beyond the limits of professional practice.

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The Philosophy, Politics and Economics of Health MA aims to equip students with the skills necessary to play an informed role in debates concerning distributive justice and health. Read more

The Philosophy, Politics and Economics of Health MA aims to equip students with the skills necessary to play an informed role in debates concerning distributive justice and health. It explores the central ethical, economic and political problems facing health policy in the UK and globally, especially in relation to social justice.

About this degree

The programme covers relevant areas of moral and political theory, comparative policy analysis, and health economics, to allow students to come to a wide understanding of background issues, history and constraints, in order to be able to make a positive contribution to current debates in this field.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (45 credits), five optional modules (75 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma of 120 credits is available, consisting of three core modules (45 credits), and five optional modules (75 credits).

Core modules

  • Philosophy Politics and Economics of Health
  • Health Policy and Reform
  • Key Principles of Health Economics

Optional modules

Students may choose from the list of recommended modules below, or other relevant modules in UCL, with the approval of the convenors. Please note that some modules fill up very quickly, so places cannot be guaranteed.

  • Bioethics Governance
  • Comparative Human Rights Law
  • Law and Governance of Global Health
  • Global Justice and Health
  • Illness
  • Madness
  • Conflict, Humanitarianism and Health
  • Ethics and Regulation of Research
  • Contemporary Political Philosophy
  • Normative Ethics
  • Politics and Ethics
  • Health Inequalities over the Life-course
  • From Imperial Medicine to Global Health, 1860s to Present
  • Death, Dying and Consequences
  • Disability and Development
  • Introduction to Deafhood
  • Global Health and Development
  • Anthropology and Psychiatry
  • Medical Anthropology

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of up to 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is taught through a combination of lectures, seminars and tutorials. Student performance is assessed through examinations, presentations and coursework (depending on the options chosen), and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Philosophy, Politics and Economics of Health MA

Funding

Applicants for this programme may be eligible for a number of funding opportunities including UCL graduate scholarships. The Health Humanities Centre can nominate one candidate to apply for a Wellcome Trust Master's Award.

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

Graduates have gone on to funded research in bioethics and in health policy, and to jobs in the health service, law, journalism, as well as medical education.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Public Health Doctor, NHS (National Health Service)
  • MBBS Medicine (Graduate Entry Programme), Newcastle University
  • Health Policy Adviser, Doctors of the World UK
  • PhD in Critical Theory, University of Brighton
  • Policy Officer, WHO (World Health Organization) and studying Medicine, The University of Western Australia

Employability

The programme equips students with an ability to think precisely and rigorously about complex problems in health systems and beyond; to work with others to explore solutions; and to write cogently and concisely. Public and private sector health employers and NGOs particularly prize these skills in graduates. The skills that the programme teaches also provide an ideal springboard to further academic study.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This MA is the only Master's programme in the world of its type. The compulsory modules provide necessary core skills, while the wide range of options enables students to further their own particular interests.

UCL is at the forefront of research in interdisciplinary research and teaching in philosophy, health humanities and global health through units such as the Health Humanities Centre, the Institute for Global Health and the Institute of Health Equity. The programme draws on highly regarded researchers in a range of UCL departments, and students benefit by instruction from some of the leaders in their fields.

Students further benefit from UCL's location in London, which is one of the world centres of philosophical activity, home of a number of internationally renowned journals - Philosophy; Mind & Language; Mind - and which enjoys regular visiting speakers from across the world. London has over 60 active philosophers making it one of the largest and most varied philosophical communities in the world.



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The MA Cinematography course builds essential and practical skills to prepare you for a role as Cinematographer/Director of Photography (DOP). Read more
The MA Cinematography course builds essential and practical skills to prepare you for a role as Cinematographer/Director of Photography (DOP).

Cinematography is about understanding how to use camera and lighting techniques to tell a story, whether it is screened at the cinema, on TV, or through an iPhone. As technology continues to evolve at an ever increasing rate, the aim of this programme is about more than how to operate a particular piece of equipment – it’s about a deeper understanding of storytelling and the moving image to communicate something meaningful and entertaining to an audience.

- Through hands-on practical exercises, workshops, seminars, masterclasses and screenings you will gain the practical skills and knowledge required to work with cameras and lighting to industry standards and practices enabling you to demonstrate a range of industry-relevant skills upon graduation.

- Opportunities to gain wide range of skills across projects such as a short filmed project that you write and direct, Art Gallery field visits including the National Gallery, 35mm workshop and shooting exercise, location and night shooting with large sensor camera, greenscreen and VFX exercises, working collaboratively and learning the functions of each camera departmental role.

- Gain skills vital for look design and rushes management through creative and technical training in grading and processing software to enhance the visual aesthetics of your productions. Prepare for the world of VFX shooting with theory and practice in a range of techniques and experiences such as green screen shooting and VFX integration.

- You will get the chance to work as a director of photography alongside other MA students on short video content for external clients during the industry project, giving you the opportunity to further showcase your talents and build a competitive showreel.

- Learn from award-winning tutors with extensive professional experience as cinematographers, camera operators, focus pullers and gaffers in film, TV, documentary/factual programming and commercials. We’ve been recently visited by a legendary cinematographer Chung Chung-Hoon (Old Boy, Stoker, Me and Earl and the Dying Girl)

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This programme explores the richness and complexity of artistic invention from the late thirteenth to the seventeenth centuries. Read more

This programme explores the richness and complexity of artistic invention from the late thirteenth to the seventeenth centuries. You will have the opportunity for deep engagement with art-making both in Italy and northern Europe (France, Germany, Low Countries, England and Scotland) and be encouraged to challenge orthodoxies about the influence of one upon the other.

Why this programme

  • You will learn from world-leading researchers and develop expert knowledge in this specialised area within History of Art.
  • Glasgow’s civic and university collections are some of the richest and most diverse in Europe and are of international standing.
  • You will have hands-on access to Renaissance collections of international significance in the University’s own Hunterian Art Gallery (paintings, woodcuts and engravings) and Special Collections (illuminated manuscripts, early printed books, emblem books), and Glasgow’s Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum (Italian, Dutch and Flemish Old Master paintings) , Burrell Collection (Renaissance art in many media, including tapestries and sculpture) and Museums Resource Centre (paintings, glass and ceramics). The city is also an excellent base from which to explore Scotland’s rich architectural heritage, including some of the most complete Renaissance palaces and noble houses in Europe.

Programme structure

The programme is comprised of a core course designed to give you an overview of methods and approaches as well as seminar opportunities to engage directly with original works of art; and optional courses, enabling you to create your own Masters programme.

It also allows you to work in an interdisciplinary capacity, selecting courses from across the College of Arts, according to personal interests. Language and renaissance palaeography study are among the optional courses available. The programme convenor will work with you to ensure a sensible portfolio of courses is constructed, according to your personal aims and objectives.

Core teaching and research training are delivered during the first semester. Optional courses may be taken during the first and second semesters, followed by dissertation research. The dissertation provides an opportunity for you to identify an area of interest and to create a research project that allows in-depth critical exploration of it.

Core Courses

  • Defining the Renaissance: Objects, Theories, Categories
  • Research Methods in Practice

Optional Courses

  • Death and the Art of Dying in the Renaissance North
  • Masters of the Venetian Renaissance: Titian, Tintoretto, Veronese
  • From Gothic to Renaissance in Northern Europe
  • The Renaissance Palace as Portrait
  • Work Placement

Who will you work with?

You will be taught by a team of experts in different aspects of Renaissance art history based at the University of Glasgow:

  • Dr Debra Strickland – illuminated manuscripts, early printed books, monsters, images of non-Christians in Christian art, and the painting of Hieronymus Bosch.
  • Dr Tom Nichols - Venetian Renaissance art and the imagery of social outcasts
  • Dr John Richards – Humanism and the visual arts; ‘Gothic’/’Renaissance’ interface.
  • Dr Sally Rush - the visual and material culture of the Renaissance court

Career prospects

Object-based study sessions and field trips will introduce you to professionals working in museums and the heritage industry and you will have the opportunity to gain further experience of these sectors through a work placement. The dissertation will foster essential independent research skills and prepare you for doctoral research should you wish to pursue an academic career.



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The course is designed for students who wish to pursue a career in biomedical research, whether it be in academia, industry or goverment. Read more
The course is designed for students who wish to pursue a career in biomedical research, whether it be in academia, industry or goverment. To date, of the students who wanted to, the overwhelming majority have gone on to study for a PhD . We will equip you with the key skills needed to plan, conduct, publish and obtain funding for successful research.

The course comprises two 5-month research projects and a core programme including grant writing, technical workshops, journal clubs and transferrable skills. Please note that Postgraduate Diplomas and Certificates for part-completion are not available for this course.

The

Respiratory and Cardiovascular Science Stream

covers the main areas of respiratory physiology and cellular and molecular biology, and introduces the major disease-causing conditions, giving you a broad base of understanding of the heart and lungs.

The Global Burden of Disease Study predicts that by 2020 the top ten leading causes of disability-adjusted life years has ischaemic heart disease at number 1, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) at number 5, and lower respiratory tract infections at number 6. COPD is predicted to quickly rise ‘up the charts’ after 2020 because it is unique in being currently untreatable, with four people a minute worldwide dying of this condition.

Consequently, study of respiratory and cardiovascular science is essential to improving our future health prospects. To that end, the Respiratory and Cardiovascular Science (RCVS) stream combines lectures and journal clubs covering the physiology and pathophysiology of the heart and lungs to provide a solid grounding on how dysfunction in physiology can lead to pathophysiology and clinical manifestations of severe heart or lung disease.

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Individuals and institutions in healthcare are increasingly called to account for their decisions. Bioethics is relevant to all our lives. Read more
Individuals and institutions in healthcare are increasingly called to account for their decisions.

Bioethics is relevant to all our lives. Even if we never work in healthcare it touches us when we are most vulnerable - when we or those we care for are unwell.

Whether assisted dying, stem cell therapies or three-parent IVF, bioethics is also often in the news and having a greater understanding of the issues involved can enable more in-depth public engagement.

Reflection on the ethical principles that underlie medical and allied practice is an important part of continuing career development for healthcare professionals. Almost every day, it seems some new ethical dilemma appears in the news; whether to do with stem cell research, assisted suicide, resource allocation, nanotechnologies, human cloning or health and climate change.

Why St Mary's?

It is often said, "bioethics is moral philosophy done badly".

At St Mary's our multidisciplinary team of ethics experts with backgrounds in law, medicine, philosophy and theology ensure that every student has a chance to gain a thorough understanding of the grounding of ethical principles and their application.

The success of our students - in completing PhDs, getting papers published and advancing their careers in biomedical ethics and related fields - bears out the effectiveness of this approach.

Course Content

All modules for this degree can be found on our website:
https://www.stmarys.ac.uk/postgraduate-courses-london/bioethics-and-medical-law

Career Prospects

Our students find the course not only interesting in itself, but also a unique distinguishing asset when applying for jobs in medicine, nursing and allied health care professions as well as in education and law.

The study of a contemporary and universally relevant subject such as medical ethics and law is an excellent preparation for any profession that requires graduates with high levels of human understanding, critical skills and knowledge of current affairs.

Institutions are increasingly being called to account for their decisions and procedures, and reflection on the ethical principles that underlie practice is an important part of continuing professional development for healthcare professionals. An MA in Bioethics and Medical Law is therefore a very flexible and useful qualification to have.

The MA also provides strong foundation for those wishing to pursue further postgraduate research at PhD level. Previous MA graduates have gone on to study for doctorates at St Mary’s and other universities in the UK and internationally. Several past students are currently on the national bioethics bodies for their home countries.

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Health humanities seeks novel ways of understanding health and illness in society, and how methods from the humanities and social studies may be brought to bear on biomedicine, clinical practice, and the politics of healthcare. Read more

Health humanities seeks novel ways of understanding health and illness in society, and how methods from the humanities and social studies may be brought to bear on biomedicine, clinical practice, and the politics of healthcare. Experiences and portrayals of health and illness in literature, film and contemporary culture are also studied.

About this degree

The programme enables students to approach issues relating to health and illness from both a historical and contemporary perspective and from a variety of a disciplines, including anthropology, history, philosophy, sociology, science and technology studies, global health, literature and film studies. Students will also learn to work in an interdisciplinary manner.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (60 credits), elective modules of 15 or 30 credits each (up to a total of 60 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits), two core modules (60 credits) and two electives (60 credits) is also offered.

A Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits) is also offered.

Core modules

  • Illness
  • Madness

Optional modules

Students may choose from the list of recommended modules below, or other relevant modules in UCL, with the approval of the convenors. Please note that some modules fill up very quickly, so places cannot be guaranteed.

  • Anthropology and Psychiatry
  • Classical Chinese Medicine
  • Clinically Applied Cultural Psychiatry
  • Conflict, Humanitarianism and Health
  • Cultural Memory
  • Death, Dying and Consequences
  • Disease in History
  • German Literature and Psychology
  • Global Health and Development: Emerging Policy Debates
  • Global Justice and Health
  • Health Inequalities Over the Lifecourse
  • Health Policy and Reform
  • Medical Anthropology
  • Medieval Science and Medicine in Global Perspective
  • Science, Technology, and Identity
  • Social Value and Public Policy, Health and the Environment
  • From Imperial Medicine to Global Health, 1860s to present
  • Medicine on Screen
  • Politics and Ethics

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000-12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures and seminars. Assessment is through essays and a dissertation. There is no unseen examination.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Health Humanities MA

Careers

This MA provides an exceptional foundation for those hoping to undertake PhD research and pursue an academic career, ranging from interdisciplinary work in the health humanities to a broad spectrum of more specialised disciplines, such as medicine, the philosophy of medicine, history of medicine, medical sociology or medical anthropology, among others. It is also a suitable preparation for a range of careers including science and medical journalism, bioethics, healthcare policy, NGOs and museum and heritage.

Employability

The programme gives students opportunities to work in an interdisciplinary manner, and to engage in debate and develop their presentation skills. Students will gain experience of writing essays and training in conducting original research and applying the appropriate methodology. There are many additional activities available, both within the UCl Health Humanities Centre and the Institute of Advanced Studies, and the wider UCL community, to help students develop employability skills.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Health Humanities MA is based in UCL's Health Humanities Centre which draws together world-leading researchers from different disciplines including medicine and health in history, philosophy, sociology, anthropology, and cultural and film studies.

Leading clinicians at UCL's acclaimed Medical School and Division of Psychiatry, who are engaged in humanities and social science research, are also actively involved with the centre. The centre was formed through the merger of the Centre for Philosophy, Justice and Health and the Centre for the History of Psychological Disciplines.

UCL Health Humanities Centre forms part of the new UCL Institute of Advanced Studies, which showcases and fosters multidisciplinary research within the humanities and the social sciences, with an active programme of events and visiting international scholars.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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