• University of Glasgow Featured Masters Courses
  • Cardiff University Featured Masters Courses
  • Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
  • St Mary’s University, Twickenham Featured Masters Courses
  • Coventry University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
  • New College of the Humanities Featured Masters Courses
  • Goldsmiths, University of London Featured Masters Courses
University of the West of England, Bristol Featured Masters Courses
Ulster University Featured Masters Courses
Queen’s University Belfast Featured Masters Courses
Coventry University Featured Masters Courses
Bath Spa University Featured Masters Courses
"durham"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Durham)

  • "durham" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 201
Order by 
The Executive MBA - Durham and EBS, gives you the opportunity to benefit from the combined strengths of two highly respected institutions. Read more
The Executive MBA - Durham and EBS, gives you the opportunity to benefit from the combined strengths of two highly respected institutions: Durham University Business School and the European Business School (EBS) in Germany. This dual award draws on both UK-specific and European experience to give you an insight into today’s business world.

You will have the chance to explore how global markets operate and how to manage transnational business relations. You will have the opportunity to build an international network of contacts, working alongside a diverse group of experienced professionals from the UK, Germany and around the world.

The Executive MBA - Durham and EBS is a two-year part-time programme that pairs flexibility with a truly international outlook. The programme is made up of:
-Two residential weeks in Durham
-Seven core modules delivered in Germany or Durham
-Five three-day elective courses (Thursday to Saturday) in Germany, Durham or other international locations
-An optional international module

Note: Accommodation costs for residentials at the start of year one and year two are included in the course fee.

Because modules are delivered at both the EBS campus in Germany and Durham’s renowned business school, you’ll have the opportunity to benefit from ‘the best of both worlds’: the pioneering outlook and international spirit of Germany’s European Business School and the calibre and heritage of Durham.

You will study:
-Seven core modules
-Five electives
-Business Project (dissertation)
-Residential Induction Week

Seven core modules

These are the foundation of your programme, establishing the management knowledge, understanding and research skills every leader needs. These include:
-Managing in the Competitive Environment
-Managing in the Global Environment
-Managing Finance
-Managing People
-Improving Management Decision Making
-Strategic Management
-Methods of Inquiry

Five elective modules

You also select five elective modules. Choices change year on year, depending on current faculty and relevance to business.

Business project (dissertation)

The programme culminates in a 15,000-word Business Project. This is a great opportunity to apply your MBA skills in a practical context, helping an organisation tackle a current issue while developing your own experience, building your network and, in many instances, extending your international experience.

International study week

The Executive MBA is shaped by today's connected business world. Through our optional international modules we take this unique global dimension further, allowing you to immerse yourself in another country's business and culture. Locations may vary from year to year but in the past year have included San Francisco and China.

If you choose to participate in one of these optional modules, you will be expected to pay for travel to and from the destination, accommodation, some meals and incidental expenses.

Learning and Teaching

The Durham/EBS MBA Programme is normally delivered through a mixture of methods including lectures, seminars, case studies, individual and group presentations. Some sessions could be delivered by guest speakers who are practitioners in the field.

Students study 7 core modules, and select 5 elective modules which enables them to undertake more in-depth study of particular topics. This is followed by a 15,000 word dissertation or Business Project to allow students to carry out independent research and develop their skills in analysis and scholarly expression, using an appropriate theoretical framework. They are supported in writing their dissertation through the study of research methods, and attending individual meetings with an allocated supervisor, who monitors their progress and provides advice. The Business Project allows an opportunity to put new skills into practice in the real world, working on a live project with a regional, national or international company.

In addition, students have opportunities such as an International Study Week at an overseas location and a Boardroom Simulation Activity.

Academic Support:
Our MBA Careers Development Programme incorporates skills development, career management and the Durham Speaker Series and runs throughout the academic year. Students have the opportunity of individual meetings with a Career Consultant throughout the year and during induction they attend a Personal and Team Development residential activity and additional workshops, normally held over three days. Over the three terms students can attend various workshops to enhance their interpersonal skills and career development.

Learning Resource:
Outside of timetabled contact hours, students are expected to undertake a significant amount of independent study in preparation for teaching sessions, assignments and other forms of assessment including exams, and general background reading to broaden their subject knowledge. The Programme Director is able to provide students with general advice on academic matters. Teaching staff are also available to provide additional support on a one-to-one basis via weekly consultation hours.
Students also have access to the facilities available at Mill Hill Lane including an onsite library and IT helpdesk, when they are in Durham.

Residential induction opportunities

The Executive MBA: Durham and EBS programme begins in late January with a six-day residential induction where you’ll get to visit the Business School, and meet the MBA team and your fellow students. We also start teaching core modules during this time.

Read less
*Why do energy efficiency measures often fail?. *How will we transition into a post-carbon energy system?. *Why do some energy technologies spread, while others disappear?. Read more
*Why do energy efficiency measures often fail?
*How will we transition into a post-carbon energy system?
*Why do some energy technologies spread, while others disappear?
*How can people be persuaded to change their energy habits?

The MSc in Energy and Society investigates energy systems from all angles. On this course you will look at energy in practice, what it means to make an energy transition, what we mean by energy justice, and how energy practices change.

The programme brings in leading experts in energy studies at Durham from Anthropology, Engineering, Economics, Law, Geography, Geosciences and many other departments. It is taught through intensive block-teaching, field-study, original dissertation research and a range of optional modules that complement the core teaching. You will learn about current and new energy technologies, histories of energy, how to understand energy policy, and how to study energy practices.

A broad range of optional subjects enables you to tailor the course according to your particular interests – you can take modules in law, international politics, advanced engineering, geography, risk, development or resilience, depending on your prior qualifications. In your fully supported personal research project you will deepen your expertise in your chosen area.

The full-time course consists of two terms of teaching, during which students are introduced to the range of research questions and methods, and a dissertation, involving the design, development and implementation of an independent research project. Students work closely with academic staff, and have the opportunity to become involved in active research projects.

Compulsory modules

-Dissertation
-Energy in Practice (Field Study)
-Context and Challenges in Energy
-Energy Society and Energy Practices

Optional modules from across the University and have previously included:

-Academic and Professional Skills in Anthropology
-Fieldwork and Interpretation
-Group Renewable Energy Design Project
-Key Issues in Sociocultural Theory
-Society, Energy, Environment and Resilience
-Computational Methods for Social Sciences
-Anthropology and Development
-Negotiating the Human
-Statistical Analysis in Anthropology
-Energy, Markets and Risk
-Renewable Energy and the Environment
-Risk Frontiers

Please see http://www.durham.ac.uk/anthropology/postgraduatestudy/taughtprogrammes/mscenergyandsociety for further information on modules.

Dissertation

We place an emphasis on independent learning. This is supported by the University’s virtual learning environment, extensive library collections and informal contact with tutors and research staff. We consider the development of independent learning and research skills to be one of the key elements of our postgraduate taught curriculum and one which helps our students cultivate initiative, originality and critical thinking.

The dissertation is a significant piece of independent research that constitutes a synthesis of theory, method and practice in anthropology and is supported by an individual supervisor and the dissertation coordinator.

Previous dissertations and research projects as part of the course have been undertaken in partnership with DONG Energy UK, Haringey Borough of London, National Energy Action, Durham County Council, energy enterprises and community energy schemes.

Careers

This course attracts high quality applicants from all over the world and delivers highly-skilled graduates who are able to communicate across disciplines and countries to further environmental progress and energy justice. Graduates of the MSc will be in demand from industry, community organisations, Non-Governmental Organisations and governments around the world. Graduates have gone on to work in Energy justice organisations, local authorities, energy consultancies and further Doctoral study.

Student support

Throughout the programme, all students meet regularly with the degree tutor, who provides academic support and guidance. Furthermore, all members of teaching staff have weekly office hours when they are available to meet with students on a ‘drop-in’ basis. In term time, the department also has an extensive programme of departmental and research group seminars which postgraduate students are encouraged and expected to attend. The undergraduate Anthropology Society also organises its own visiting lecturer programme. We ensure that we advertise any other relevant seminars and lectures in Durham, Newcastle and further afield, and encourage students to attend relevant conferences.

Before the academic year starts, we provide information on preparation for the course. On arrival we have induction sessions and social events, headed by the Director of Postgraduate Studies and attended by both academic and administrative staff. Students also attend an “Introduction to Research Groups in Anthropology”.

Postgraduate study at Durham University

The MSc Energy and Society is based in Durham University’s Department of Anthropology in association with the Durham Energy Institute. Durham has one of the largest Anthropology departments in the world with 40 research active academic teaching staff working across the full range of the discipline. Our Anthropology department is ranked in the top 50 of the prestigious QS World University Subject Rankings. The overall QS rankings also placed Durham 54th in the world for citations, recognising the impact and influence of its research among other academics, and 31st globally for employer reputation, giving recognition to the quality of, and international demand for, Durham’s graduates.

Students on this course can become members of the Durham Energy Institute (DEI) community and can attend its wide range of seminars and events, benefitting from its extensive network of contacts in the energy sector. DEI ( http://www.durham.ac.uk/dei/ ) covers the spectrum of energy research from technological innovation, to the social, political and economic dimensions of energy. DEI addresses energy challenges collaboratively through strong partnerships with industry, international partners, governments, community groups and other academic institutions. This ensures our research is relevant, timely and effective.

Read less
The Durham Online MBA will enhance your key business and leadership capabilities to enable you to achieve your career aspirations whilst you continue in full-time employment, so you can apply what you learn directly into the organisation you work for. Read more
The Durham Online MBA will enhance your key business and leadership capabilities to enable you to achieve your career aspirations whilst you continue in full-time employment, so you can apply what you learn directly into the organisation you work for.
Flexibility is at the heart of the Durham Online MBA as you can personalise your programme to meet your career goals. You can study fully online, complete some of your learning at Durham, undertake relevant optional modules, or choose to follow a pathway.

The global spread of students, alumni and faculty will give you the ability to network virtually with people from across the world, and from a wide-range of business sectors.

Online MBA: in detail

Structured around a two year study calendar, you can choose to undertake the programme 100% online or take a blended approach where you combine your online learning with residential modules. Whichever way you choose, our comprehensive induction will equip you with an essential toolkit of study skills to help you prepare for your MBA.

Our virtual learning environment is at the heart of your Online MBA experience. Through this you will receive online lectures, podcasts and webinars, as well as participating in a range of e-learning activities, discussion boards and virtual group work. There is a virtual campus, complete with powerful social networking tools to keep you in touch with your fellow students wherever they are in the world.

This virtual campus is supported with an annual Summer School held here in Durham, which brings together students from around the world to provide support and inspiration to drive you forward.

You will be expected to devote around 15 hours per week to study, and if you choose to undertake core modules at Durham these will typically take place in April and October.

Your online personal career advancement service is also core to the programme, accelerating your leadership capabilities to realise your full potential. Gaining global business experience is also an option through the International Business in Context module, which will give you the ability to operate within an international business environment.

Course structure

-Five core modules
-Two optional modules
-Strategic Case Analysis

Core modules

These are the foundation of your programme – establishing the management knowledge, understanding and research skills every leader needs.

-Accounting, Finance and Economics
-Leading and Managing People
-Marketing
-Operations and Technology
-Strategic Management

Optional modules

Optional modules provide you with an opportunity to enhance and deepen knowledge and skills in areas of particular interest to you, and that are relevant to your future career.

Modules on offer are dependent on demand, but in previous years have included:

-Entrepreneurship
-New Venture Creation
-Management Consultancy
-Project Management
-Business Analytics
-Technology Innovation
-International Business in Context

You also have the option to take a structured pathway focusing on the area of entrepreneurship, consultancy or technology. To undertake a pathway you would need to complete the following modules:

-Entrepreneurship: Entrepreneurship and New Venture Creation,
-Consultancy: Management Consultancy and Project Management, or
-Technology: Business Analytics and Technology Innovation

Strategic Case Analysis

In this final project you will demonstrate your ability as an independent learner and researcher. This project will showcase your in-depth knowledge and understanding of topics covered in core modules.

The 12,000 word strategic case analysis will test your understanding of the case writing, analysis process and relevant research methodologies. It will also demonstrate your ability to apply and interpret what you have learned across your MBA to the analysis of a particular issue in depth.

Summer School

The Online MBA Summer School brings together students from around the world to provide support and inspiration to drive you forward.

This optional Summer School usually takes place during a week in July, and gives you the opportunity to study optional modules and take part in a rich menu of personal advancement workshops.

Hosted by the Business School, in the beautiful city of Durham, the Summer School also includes stimulating speaker events, a variety of social events, and a truly unique opportunity to taste the Durham experience.

Other admission requirements

This course includes online activities, so you will also need a computer with internet access. Almost all activities will be possible from a modern desktop or laptop computer (purchased since 2010). All resources will be accessible from a moderate broadband connection (0.5Mbps) but a greater bandwidth (up to 8Mbps) will provide a better experience for some resources and events.

You will need:
-A web browser (Resources are tested on the latest available versions of Internet Explorer, Firefox and Chrome)
-The ability to open and edit Microsoft Office documents (e.g. Microsoft Office, OpenOffice or access to Googledocs)
-Flash player
-JAVA
-Ability to open .pdf documents (e.g. Adobe Reader)
-A headset or headphones and microphone

To participate fully in some online events students should have a webcam and to access some tools and resources you may need the ability to install software.

Read less
Durham's MA in Modern History is a broad-ranging Master's programme which seeks to equip students with historical research techniques and approaches, advanced skills in critical analysis and independent study, as well as strong and effective communication skills. Read more
Durham's MA in Modern History is a broad-ranging Master's programme which seeks to equip students with historical research techniques and approaches, advanced skills in critical analysis and independent study, as well as strong and effective communication skills. The MA programme is designed to enable students with different career ambitions to succeed in their chosen area, and it caters for students of different backgrounds, previous training, and areas of specialisation. The breadth of research interests of the modern historians at Durham allows the department to offer supervision in topics about modern history from the nineteenth century through to contemporary history. The programme seeks to enable students to build an awareness of the contemporary boundaries of modern scholarship, to master advanced understanding of historical concepts and methods, and ultimately to make their own contributions to the field.

Durham's History Department is an international centre for the study of the Modern period, and is situated in the historic setting of the World Heritage Site, which includes Durham Cathedral, Durham Castle, and the surrounding area. Students of modern history at Durham benefit from the rich archival and manuscript resources in the collections of the University (at Palace Green Library - especially the Sudan Archive - and Ushaw College) and in the Cathedral Library, while the wider regional resources for study of the period are also highly significant: the landscape of industrial revolution and of post-industrial response, of globalisation and regional identity. Modern History at Durham is comprehensive and international in its reach, with specialists in the cultural and political history, visual culture and media studies, sports history, regional and international histories. Area specialisms include the British Isles, Continental Europe, Africa, North America, China and the Steppe regions.

Course Structure

The MA in Modern History is a one-year full-time programme (or two-years part-time). All students are allocated a supervisor at the beginning of the first term, and s/he guides each student through the year. The programme is structured as follows:

Michaelmas Term (October-December)
-Archives and Sources (15 credits)
-Issues in Modern History (30 credits)
-*Skill module (30 credits) - taken over Michaelmas and Epiphany Terms
Students may choose to take a skills module: these are mainly medieval/ancient languages (e.g. Old English, Old Norse, Latin, Greek), modern languages for reading (e.g. Academic French, Academic German), or research skills (e.g. palaeography). Students who take a skills module write a 60-credit dissertation instead of a 90-credit dissertation.

Epiphany Term (January-March)
-Critical Practice (15 credits)
-Option module (30 credits)
Option modules allow students the opportunity to learn about a particular topic or issue in modern history in depth, and to consider different historical approaches to this topic over a full term's study. In previous years, options for modern history included: The Wealth of Nations; Race in Modern America; 'Tribe' and Nation in Africa since 1800; Interpretations of Terror and Genocide in Modern Europe; Tradition, Change and Political Culture in Modern Britain; Gender, Nationalism and Modernity in East Asia; History, Knowledge and Visual Culture (a full list of MA option modules is available at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/history/postgraduate/ma_degrees/optionalmodules/). Option modules are taught in weekly two-hour seminars for a full term's study.

Easter Term (April-June), and the summer vacation (until early September)
-Dissertation (90 credits, or 60 credits if taking a *Skill module)

The formal requirements and structure of the programme can be found at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/courses/info/?id=9200&title=Modern+History&code=V1K707&type=MA&year=2016#essentials a full list of optional modules is available at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/history/postgraduate/ma_degrees/optionalmodules/

The MA can be taken part-time, over two years. In the first year the module combination consists of Archives and Sources, Critical Practice, Issues and in addition a Skills module OR Optional module. In the second year your work will consist of either a 90 credit, 20,000 word dissertation (if you took an Optional module in the first year) OR a 60 credit, 15,000 word dissertation, AND an Optional module (if you took a Skills module in the first year).

Additional courses can be taken on an audit-basis (not for credit), and can include language modules as well as optional modules. You will need to ask and receive the permission of the module leader before auditing a class. If the class is outside the department you will also need to inform the Director of Taught Postgraduates.

Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered primarily through small group seminar teaching with some larger classes, and lecture-style sessions. Termly division of contact hours between terms depends on student choice. Issues in Modern History has 16 contact hours, all classroom-based; this module is team-taught and exposes students to a wide variety of staff support and expertise. Archives and Sources has 8 contact hours, split between lectures, classes and seminars. Skills modules are taught through seminars or classes and are usually more contact-hour-intensive. Optional modules are taught in seminars and provide a total of 16 contact hours. Critical Practice involves lectures, a drama workshop, and oral presentation to a group (at a 'mini-conference'). Dissertation supervision involves 8 hours of directed supervision, individually with a dedicated supervisor.

Read less
Durham's MA in Social and Economic History at Durham provides training in research methods for historical topics in any aspect of social and economic history. Read more
Durham's MA in Social and Economic History at Durham provides training in research methods for historical topics in any aspect of social and economic history. The MA provides quantitative and qualitative research methods appropriate to a wide range of historical approaches. Accredited by the ESRC, this MA is part of our four year funding scheme offered by the North-East Doctoral Training Centre. Students can apply for 1+3 funding for this MA followed by a PhD in any aspect of social and economic history with expert supervision available within the Department – and with our partner institution in the NEDTC at Newcastle University. This includes African history, and aspects of governance, as well as traditional social and economic topics. For further information on funding see further below.

The MA programme is shared with the School of Applied Social Science and will help you to build an awareness of the contemporary boundaries of social and economic history and to master advanced understanding of the concepts and methods with which it may be interrogated. It seeks to equip you with a diverse portfolio of research techniques and approaches to enable you to undertake extended independent research in your dissertation, and to make your own contribution to the field. The skills provided by this MA are also transferrable to a wide range of careers.

Durham has a long tradition of economic and social history, on which this MA draws. The breadth of possible subjects for study mirrors the comprehensive and global nature of the department staff: from medieval Europe to modern-day Africa, and from north-east England to the global economy. Durham's History Department is situated in the historic setting of the World Heritage Site, which includes Durham Cathedral and Durham Castle. Students of social and economic history at Durham benefit from the rich archival and manuscript resources in the collections of the University (at Palace Green Library - especially the Sudan Archive - and Ushaw College) and in the Cathedral Library, while the wider regional resources for study of the period are also highly significant: the landscape of industrial revolution and of post-industrial response, of globalisation and regional identity.

Course Structure

The MA in Social and Economic History is a one-year full-time programme (or two-years part-time). All students are allocated a supervisor at the beginning of the first term, and s/he guides each student through the year.

Students take 30 credits of core modules from History: Archives and Sources (15 credits), and Critical Practice (15 credits); and 30 credits of core modules from the School of Applied Social Sciences: Perspectives on Social Research (15 credits) AND EITHER Qualitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits) OR Fieldwork and Interpretation (15 credits). They write a 60-credit dissertation (15,000 words) supervised by a member of academic staff in the History Department. They also choose a 30-credit optional module in History; AND 30 credits of optional modules from Social Sciences: EITHER Statistical Exploration and Reasoning (15 credits) and Quantitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits) OR Applied Stastics (30 credits).

The programme is structured as follows:
Michaelmas Term (October-December)
-Archives and Sources (15 credits)
-Perspectives on Social Research (15 credits)
-*Statistical Exploration and Reasoning (15 credits; OPTIONAL)
* Fieldwork and Interpretation (15 credits; OPTIONAL)
* Applied Statistics (30 credits; OPTIONAL; runs across Michaelmas and Epiphany Terms)

Epiphany Term (January-March)
-Critical Practice (15 credits)
-Option module (30 credits)
Option modules allow students the opportunity to learn about a particular topic or issue in medieval history in depth, and to consider different historical approaches to this topic over a full term's study. In previous years, options included: Power and Society in the Late Middle Ages; The Wealth of Nations; Race in Modern America; 'Tribe' and Nation in Africa since 1800; Tradition, Change and Political Culture in Modern Britain; Gender, Nationalism and Modernity in East Asia; History, Knowledge and Visual Culture (a full list of MA option modules is available at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/history/postgraduate/ma_degrees/optionalmodules/). Option modules are taught in weekly two-hour seminars for a full term's study.
-*Qualitative Research Methods (15 credits; OPTIONAL)
-*Quantitative Research Methods (15 credits; OPTIONAL)

Easter Term (April-June), and the summer vacation (until early September)
-Dissertation (60 credits)

The formal requirements and structure of the programme can be found at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/courses/info/?id=9202&title=Social+and+Economic+History+%28Research+Methods%29&code=V1KB07&type=MA&year=2016#coursecontent a full list of optional modules is available at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/history/postgraduate/ma_degrees/optionalmodules/

The MA can be taken part-time, over two years: please contact the Department if you are interested in exploring this option further.

Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered primarily through small group seminar teaching with some larger classes, and lecture-style sessions. Termly division of contact hours between terms depends on student choice. Archives and Sources has 8 contact hours, split between lectures, classes and seminars. Skills modules are taught through seminars or classes and are usually more contact-hour-intensive. Optional modules are taught in seminars and provide a total of 16 contact hours. Critical Practice involves lectures, a drama workshop, and oral presentation to a group (at a 'mini-conference'). Dissertation supervision involves 8 hours of directed supervision, individually with a dedicated supervisor. Social science modules are taught through lectures, seminars, workshops, and practical classes.

Read less
Durham's MA in Early Modern History is a broad-ranging Master's programme which seeks to equip students with historical research techniques and approaches, advanced skills in critical analysis and independent study, as well as strong and effective communication skills. Read more
Durham's MA in Early Modern History is a broad-ranging Master's programme which seeks to equip students with historical research techniques and approaches, advanced skills in critical analysis and independent study, as well as strong and effective communication skills. The MA programme is designed to enable students with different career ambitions to succeed in their chosen area, and it caters for students of different backgrounds, previous training, and areas of specialisation. The breadth of research interests of the early modernists at Durham allows the department to offer supervision in topics about the early modern world from the mid-fifteenth century through to the early nineteenth. The programme seeks to enable students to build an awareness of the contemporary boundaries of early modern scholarship, to master advanced understanding of historical concepts and methods, and ultimately to make their own contributions to the field.

Durham's History Department is an international centre for the study of the Early Modern period, and is situated in the historic setting of the World Heritage Site, which includes Durham Cathedral, Durham Castle, and the surrounding area. Students of early modern history at Durham benefit from the rich archival and manuscript resources in the collections of the University (at Palace Green Library and at Ushaw College) and in the Cathedral Library, while the wider regional resources for study of the period are also highly significant: these include the landscape of industrial revolution, of vernacular architecture and of early modern globalisation. Early Modern History at Durham is comprehensive and international in its reach, with specialists in the History of Medicine, consumer culture, print and information, court culture, ecclesiastical and intellectual history, and political thought. Area specialisms include the British Isles, Continental Europe, North America, China and the Steppe regions.

Course Structure

The MA in Early Modern History is a one-year full-time programme (or two-years part-time). All students are allocated a supervisor at the beginning of the first term, and s/he guides each student through the year. The programme is structured as follows:

Michaelmas Term (October-December)

Archives and Sources (15 credits)
Issues in Early Modern History (30 credits)
*Skill module (30 credits) - taken over Michaelmas and Epiphany Terms

Epiphany Term (January-March)

Critical Practice (15 credits)
Option module (30 credits)

Easter Term (April-June)

Dissertation (90 credits, or 60 credits if taking a *Skill module)

The formal requirements and structure of the programme can be found at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/courses/info/?id=9199&title=Early+Modern+History&code=V1K607&type=MA&year=2016#essentials; a full list of optional modules is available at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/history/postgraduate/ma_degrees/optionalmodules/

The MA can be taken part-time, over two years. In the first year the module combination consists of Archives and Sources, Critical Practice, Issues and in addition a Skills module OR Optional module. In the second year your work will consist of either a 90 credit, 20,000 word dissertation (if you took an Optional module in the first year) OR a 60 credit, 15,000 word dissertation, AND an Optional module (if you took a Skills module in the first year).

Additional courses can be taken on an audit-basis (not for credit), and can include language modules as well as optional modules. You will need to ask and receive the permission of the module leader before auditing a class. If the class is outside the department you will also need to inform the Director of Taught Postgraduates.

Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered primarily through small group seminar teaching with some larger classes, and lecture-style sessions. Termly division of contact hours between terms depends on student choice. Issues in Early Modern History has 16 contact hours, all classroom-based; this module is team-taught and exposes students to a wide variety of staff support and expertise. Archives and Sources has 8 contact hours, split between lectures, classes and seminars. Skills modules are taught through seminars or classes and are usually more contact-hour-intensive. Optional modules are taught in seminars and provide a total of 16 contact hours. Critical Practice involves lectures, a drama workshop, and oral presentation to a group (at a 'mini-conference'). Dissertation supervision involves 8 hours of directed supervision, individually with a dedicated supervisor.

Read less
Durham's MA in Medieval History is a broad-ranging Master's programme which seeks to equip students with historical research techniques and approaches, advanced skills in critical analysis and independent study, as well as strong and effective communication skills. Read more
Durham's MA in Medieval History is a broad-ranging Master's programme which seeks to equip students with historical research techniques and approaches, advanced skills in critical analysis and independent study, as well as strong and effective communication skills. The MA programme is designed to enable students with different career ambitions to succeed in their chosen area, and it caters for students of different backgrounds, previous training, and areas of specialisation. The breadth of research interests of the medievalists at Durham allows the department to offer supervision in topics about the medieval world from Late Antiquity through to the sixteenth century. The programme seeks to enable students to build an awareness of the contemporary boundaries of medieval scholarship, to master advanced understanding of historical concepts and methods, and ultimately to make their own contributions to the field.

Durham's History Department is an international centre for the study of the Middle Ages, and is situated in the historic setting of the World Heritage Site, which includes Durham Cathedral, Durham Castle and the surrounding area. Students of medieval history at Durham benefit from the rich archival and manuscript resources in the collections of the University (at Palace Green Library and at Ushaw College) and in the Cathedral Library, while the wider regional resources for study of the period are also highly significant: these include the landscape of Viking invasion, of Bede, of high medieval monasticism, of centuries of border warfare with their rich and distinctive legacy of castles, and of early industry and proto-capitalism.

Course Structure

The MA in Medieval History is a one-year full-time programme (or two-years part-time). All students are allocated a supervisor at the beginning of the first term, and s/he guides each student through the year. The programme is structured as follows:
Michaelmas Term (October-December)
-Archives and Sources (15 credits)
-Issues in Medieval History (30 credits)
-*Skill module (30 credits) - taken over Michaelmas and Epiphany Terms

Epiphany Term (January-March)
-Critical Practice (15 credits)
-Option module (30 credits)

Option modules allow students the opportunity to learn about a particular topic or issue in medieval history in depth, and to consider different historical approaches to this topic over a full term's study. In previous years, options for medieval history included The Anglo-Saxon World, AD 400-1100, Power and Society in the Late Middle Ages, and The Wealth of Nations. Option modules are taught in weekly two-hour seminars for a full term's study.

Easter Term (April-June), and the summer vacation (until early September)
-Dissertation (90 credits, or 60 credits if taking a *Skill module)

Students meet with their supervisors on an individual basis and will discuss the topic, direction and content of their dissertation, as well as the relevant medieval evidence and scholarship which they should explore. The dissertation is a substantial, independent piece of research: the 90-credit dissertation is 20,000 words, while the 60-credit dissertation is 15,000 words. You are not required to write your dissertation on a topic which is in the same period and area as your optional modules, but it is recommended that students discuss their individual programmes of work with their supervisors and/or with the Director of Taught Postgraduate Programmes.

The formal requirements and structure of the programme can be found at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/courses/info/?id=9187&title=Medieval+History&code=V1K107&type=MA&year=2016#essentials a full list of optional modules is available at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/history/postgraduate/ma_degrees/optionalmodules/

The MA can be taken part-time, over two years. In the first year the module combination consists of Archives and Sources, Critical Practice, Issues and in addition a Skills module OR Optional module. In the second year your work will consist of either a 90 credit, 20,000 word dissertation (if you took an Optional module in the first year) OR a 60 credit, 15,000 word dissertation, AND an Optional module (if you took a Skills module in the first year).

Additional courses can be taken on an audit-basis (not for credit), and can include language modules as well as optional modules. You will need to ask and receive the permission of the module leader before auditing a class. If the class is outside the department you will also need to inform the Director of Taught Postgraduates.

Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered primarily through small group seminar teaching with some larger classes, and lecture-style sessions. Termly division of contact hours between terms depends on student choice. Issues in Medieval History has 16 contact hours, all classroom-based; this module is team-taught and exposes students to a wide variety of staff support and expertise. Archives and Sources has 8 contact hours, split between lectures, classes and seminars. Skills modules are taught through seminars or classes and are usually more contact-hour-intensive. In previous years, optional modules were taught in seminars and provided a total of 16 contact hours. Critical Practice involves lectures, a drama workshop, and oral presentation to a group (at a 'mini-conference'). Dissertation supervision involves 8 hours of directed supervision, individually with a dedicated supervisor.

Read less
The MA in Visual Arts and Culture at Durham is a distinctive interdisciplinary programme that invites students to develop their knowledge and understanding of the visual arts and of visual culture. Read more
The MA in Visual Arts and Culture at Durham is a distinctive interdisciplinary programme that invites students to develop their knowledge and understanding of the visual arts and of visual culture. To study visual arts and culture is a way of paying attention to phenomena that are literally everywhere. The concept of ‘visual culture’ acknowledges the pervasive nature of visual phenomena, and signals openness towards both the breadth of objects and images, and the range of theoretical and methodological perspectives needed to understand them adequately. Drawing upon research strengths across the departments that contribute to the programme, the MA in Visual Arts and Culture encourages you to take a broad view of geographical and chronological scope, while allowing you to engage with a wide range of visual phenomena, including fine art, film, photography, architecture, and scientific and medical imaging practices.

The importance of critical visual literacy in the contemporary world cannot be exaggerated. ‘The illiterate of the future’, wrote the Bauhaus artist and theoretician László Moholy-Nagy, ‘will be the person ignorant of the camera as well as of the pen’. This observation was made in the 1920s, when photography was first used in the periodical press and in political propaganda. The rich visual world of the early twentieth century pales in comparison with the visual saturation that now characterises everyday experience throughout the developed societies and much of the developing world. But the study of visual culture is by no means limited to the twentieth century. Turning our attention to past cultures with a particular eye to the significance of visual objects of all kinds yields new forms of knowledge and understanding.

Our programme facilitates the development of critical visual literacy in three main ways. First, it attends to the specificity of visual objects, images and events, encouraging you to develop approaches that are sensitive to the individual works they encounter. Second, it investigates the nature of perception, asking how it is that we make meaning out of that which we see. Finally, it investigates how our relationships with other people, and with things, are bound up in the act of looking.

Course structure

The course consists of one core module, two optional modules and a dissertation. The core module sets out the intellectual framework for the programme, offering a broad overview of key conceptual debates in the field of Visual Culture, together with training in analysis of visual objects of different kinds, an advanced introduction to understanding museum practice, and key research skills in visual arts and culture. The optional modules provide further specialised areas of study in related topics of interest to individual students, and the 12,000-15,000 word dissertation involves detailed study of a particular aspect of a topic related to the broad area of visual culture.

Optional modules

Previously, optional modules have included:
-Critical Curatorship
-History, Knowledge and Visual Culture
-Representing Otherness
-Negotiating the Human
-Theorizing History and Historicising Theory: An Introduction to Photographic Studies
-Digital Imaging
-Cultural Heritage, Communities and Identities
-Current Issues in Aesthetics and Theory of Art
-Ethics of Cultural Heritage
-Monumental architecture of the Roman Empire in the Antonine and Severan periods
-Art in Ecological Perspective
-Texts and Cultures I: Visual and Verbal Cultures (Early Modern)
-Energy, Society and Energy Practices
-German Reading Skills for Research
-French Reading Skills for Research

The Centre for Visual Arts and Culture (CVAC) brings together scholars from across and beyond Durham University in order to provide a dynamic setting for wide-ranging interdisciplinary research and debates about visual culture, a field that entails the study of vision and perception, the analysis of the social significance of images and ways of seeing, and the attentive interpretation of a range of visual objects, from artworks to scientific images.

Centre for Visual Arts and Culture

The Centre brings together scholars from across and beyond Durham University in order to provide a vibrant and dynamic setting for wide-ranging interdisciplinary research and debates about visual culture. The Centre provides a focus for cutting-edge research on visual arts and cultures: it aspires to train new generations of scholars through innovative postgraduate programmes, it fosters informed debate both nationally and internationally, and it offers an engaging, open environment for researchers at all levels.

CVAC takes a generous view of what constitutes visual culture and it is broad in both geographical and chronological scope, encouraging debate about the range of approaches, methods and theories that are most generative for research on visual phenomena. Durham’s current visual culture research includes the study of word and image, art and religion, medicine and visual representation, film, the history of photography, architecture, urban culture, heritage and philosophical aesthetics. It also includes the development of pioneering visual research methods and the study of vision.

Durham’s location itself provides a rich and inspiring environment for this field of research. It is part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site that also includes Durham Cathedral; its acclaimed Oriental Museum is a significant asset which houses three Designated Collections, recognised by the Arts Council as nationally and internationally pre-eminent; alongside an outstanding collection of twentieth-century and contemporary art. CVAC has many established relationships with major national and international cultural organisations, and aims to develop further its links with museums, galleries and heritage sites.

Read less
Our part-time Masters in Management is a post-experience programme. It combines academic rigour with real-world business relevance to provide a qualification that is recognised and truly valued by employers. Read more
Our part-time Masters in Management is a post-experience programme. It combines academic rigour with real-world business relevance to provide a qualification that is recognised and truly valued by employers.

Over forty years’ experience working with private and public sector clients has taught us that, for true professional development, you have to do more than just learn. You have to apply your learning in the workplace. Durham University Business School combines the rich heritage of Durham University with a progressive, dynamic approach to executive education. This enables us to deliver immediate high-impact results for individuals and organisations.

Each module has been developed by leading members of the Durham faculty, so you will benefit from the most advanced management knowledge. During the course, you will be taught by our world-class researchers, using a combination of physical and virtual classrooms. To make sure you have all the support you need to gain immediate benefits, you will also be assigned a Personal Tutor.

In detail

As a blended-learning, modular programme, you will be taught through a combination of classroom and state-of-the-art virtual courses. You’ll also have the opportunity to carry out practical activities, including workshops, discussions, events and consultancy initiatives, designed to help you develop your personal skills and plan your future career strategy.

Your study programme will last for 30 months. You should normally attend two five-day Residential Workshops during the first two years (alternative online options may also be available), study six further modules online and complete a six-month individual project of 15,000 words.

The programme starts with a comprehensive induction, designed to refresh your study skills and to guide you through the requirements of the programme. As well as getting to know more about the Business School and meeting the MA team and fellow participants, you will learn about academic writing, referencing and how to access and use online study materials.

Classroom and virtual learning sessions are led by senior members of the Durham faculty. Experts in their field, they will share the very latest in business and management knowledge. What’s more, throughout your studies you will be given access to our careers support services, professional development activities and a Personal Tutor for each module.
-Seven core modules
-One elective
-Dissertation or business project

In year one you’ll study online or attend a five-day residential workshop in Durham:
-Induction
-Business Economics & Accounting

You’ll study three online modules:
-Strategy
-Strategic Marketing Management
-Organisational Behaviour

In year two, you’ll study online or attend one further three-day residential workshop:
-Leadership or Human Resource Management
-Professional Development Activities

You’ll study three further online modules:
-Operations & Supply Chain Management
-Research methods
-One elective module selected from a range of specialist options available

Please note: the order in which modules are studied is dependent upon when you enroll and therefore may vary with the above.

The programme culminates with a six-month 15,000 word dissertation/business project on an approved topic and is overseen by a dedicated dissertation supervisor. This is normally undertaken in your own organisation and is an opportunity to analyse a practical, relevant management issue in some depth, demonstrating a critical understanding of the relevant theory and its applications.

Other admission requirements

This course includes online activities, so you will also need a computer with internet access. Almost all activities will be possible from a modern desktop or laptop computer (purchased since 2010). All resources will be accessible from a moderate broadband connection (0.5Mbps) but a greater bandwidth (up to 8Mbps) will provide a better experience for some resources and events.

You will need:
-A web browser (Resources are tested on the latest available versions of Internet Explorer, Firefox and Chrome)
-The ability to open and edit Microsoft Office documents (e.g. Microsoft Office, OpenOffice or access to Googledocs)
-Flash player
-JAVA
-Ability to open .pdf documents (e.g. Adobe Reader)
-A headset or headphones and microphone
-To participate fully in some online events students should have a webcam and to access some tools and resources you may need the ability to install software.

Read less
Our part-time Masters in Management is a post-experience programme. With the flexible option of online or taught modules, the programme combines academic rigour with real-world business relevance to provide a qualification that is recognised and truly valued by employers. Read more

Description

Our part-time Masters in Management is a post-experience programme. With the flexible option of online or taught modules, the programme combines academic rigour with real-world business relevance to provide a qualification that is recognised and truly valued by employers.

Over forty years’ experience working with private and public sector clients has taught us that, for true professional development, you have to do more than just learn. You have to apply your learning in the workplace. Durham University Business School combines the rich heritage of Durham University with a progressive, dynamic approach to executive education. This enables us to deliver immediate high-impact results for individuals and organisations.

Each module has been developed by leading members of the Durham faculty, so you will benefit from the most advanced management knowledge. During the course, you will be taught by our world-class researchers, using a combination of physical and virtual classrooms. To make sure you have all the support you need to gain immediate benefits, you will also be assigned a Personal Tutor.

In detail

As a blended-learning, modular programme, you will be taught through a combination of classroom and state-of-the-art virtual courses. You’ll also have the opportunity to carry out practical activities, including workshops, discussions, events and consultancy initiatives, designed to help you develop your personal skills and plan your future career strategy.

Your study programme will last for 30 months. You should normally attend two five-day Residential Workshops during the first two years (alternative online options may also be available), study six further modules online and complete a six-month individual project of 15,000 words.

The programme starts with a comprehensive induction, designed to refresh your study skills and to guide you through the requirements of the programme. As well as getting to know more about the Business School and meeting the MA team and fellow participants, you will learn about academic writing, referencing and how to access and use online study materials.

Classroom and virtual learning sessions are led by senior members of the Durham faculty. Experts in their field, they will share the very latest in business and management knowledge. What’s more, throughout your studies you will be given access to our careers support services, professional development activities and a Personal Tutor for each module.

- Seven core modules
- One elective
- Dissertation or business project

In year one you’ll study online or attend a five-day residential workshop in Durham:

- Induction
- Business Economics & Accounting

You’ll study three online modules:

- Strategy
- Strategic Marketing Management
- Organisational Behaviour

In year two, you’ll study online or attend one further three-day residential workshop:

- Leadership or Human Resource Management
- Professional Development Activities

You’ll study three further online modules:

- Operations & Supply Chain Management
- Research methods
- One elective module selected from a range of specialist options available

Please note: the order in which modules are studied is dependent upon when you enrol and therefore may vary with the above.

The programme culminates with a six-month 15,000 word dissertation/business project on an approved topic and is overseen by a dedicated dissertation supervisor. This is normally undertaken in your own organisation and is an opportunity to analyse a practical, relevant management issue in some depth, demonstrating a critical understanding of the relevant theory and its applications.

Read less
This course provides students to with the skills to learn how anthropological ideas and approaches are vital for understanding the environmental, social and economic crises of the contemporary world. Read more
This course provides students to with the skills to learn how anthropological ideas and approaches are vital for understanding the environmental, social and economic crises of the contemporary world. It teaches how to engage with local knowledge and community-based approaches, rather than rely on global blueprints for sustainable development. The programme is taught by an active, interdisciplinary team involved in world-class research on development issues. We offer comparative knowledge about achieving environmental and social sustainability through participatory approaches and active collaborations with projects for empowerment in the Global South. Geographical areas of expertise include Sub-Saharan Africa, South America, South Asia, South-East Asia, the Middle East, Europe and Melanesia. Staff also help students connect with Durham’s excellent research communities such as the Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience, and the Durham Energy Institute.

The MSc is based around core modules focusing on the challenges of pro-poor transitions to sustainability, aided by culturally informed perspectives on new themes in development such as resilience, and energy justice. Options allow you to pursue subject interests with specialist guidance. The dissertation enables you to conduct independent research under the supervision of an expert, and become a master of your chosen topic.


Please see http://www.durham.ac.uk/anthropology/postgraduatestudy/taughtprogrammes/sustainability for further information on modules.

Course Learning and Teaching

The MSc in Sustainability, Culture and Development (full-time) consists of two terms of teaching, during which students are introduced to the range of research questions and methods, and a dissertation, involving the design, development and implementation of an independent research project. Students work closely with academic staff, and have the opportunity to become involved in active research networks and projects.

The programme is delivered through a mixture of interactive lectures, seminars, film showings and discussion, workshops, and optional fieldtrips, in addition to one-to-one dissertation supervision. Typically, lecture formats deliver key concepts and case study comparisons on progressively more advanced themes and topics. Seminars provide an opportunity to reflect in more depth upon material delivered in modules and gathered from independent study outside the programme’s formal contact hours. They give students an opportunity to engage with academic issues at the cutting-edge of research in Anthropology, in a learning environment focused on discussion and debate of current issues.

Full-time students have on average 6-8 hours of formal teaching and learning contact per week, and are also expected to attend weekly departmental research seminars, often given by prominent visiting speakers, as well as relevant seminars at the Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience and the Durham Energy Institute. Students also have the opportunity to present their work at the Department’s annual postgraduate conference. Outside timetabled contact hours, students are expected to devote significant amounts of time to reading, discussing and preparing for classes, assignments and project work.

Throughout the programme, all students meet fortnightly with the degree tutor, who provides academic support and guidance. Furthermore, all members of teaching staff have weekly office hours when they are available to meet with students on a ‘drop-in’ basis, or can be e-mailed to arrange a mutually agreeable time. Students work closely with leading academics to develop an original piece of research for their dissertation, and guidance on the dissertation is also provided by the dissertation leader

Before the academic year starts, we make contact with incoming students via the postgraduate office. On arrival we have induction sessions and social events, headed by the Director of Postgraduate Studies and attended by both academic and administrative staff.
The Programme Tutor will also lead local excursions, to orient students with important, beautiful, interesting and fun places around Durham. Students also attend an 'Introduction to Research Groups in Anthropology'.

Read less
By taking the one year programme you take a smaller commitment but still get to experience full academic life. Your research during this one year will be just as impacting on the academic world as anybody's first year of PhD. Read more
By taking the one year programme you take a smaller commitment but still get to experience full academic life. Your research during this one year will be just as impacting on the academic world as anybody's first year of PhD. The Masters programme allows you to dip your toe into your research field and, who knows, you might decide to go on to a PhD after all!

Not only can the MSc (Research) be ideal for you if you're not 100% sure that a PhD is for you, it can also be an ideal experience if you're interested in commercial or industrial research and development. Many Masters by Research students at Durham are supported by close connections with international companies that are looking to build strong industry-academia research links.

By joining us you would become part of a vibrant and supportive community of world renowned researchers, undertaking work that demonstrates both originality and relevance. Durham offers the opportunity to work with leading academic staff in state of the art facilities within a unique environment offered by the collegiate system.

Our community of postgraduate students contributes to a range of exciting projects at the cutting-edge of current research sponsored by both the public sector, third-party and industrial scholarships. This draws on the School's strong research collaborations and industrial links with a range of both UK and international funding organisations.

Part time or distance based study

Durham has many systems in place for supporting those students that want to or need to take their studies at a different rate to others. You may have a young family to look after or need to have a full-time job during your studies to support yourself. Unable to move to the wonderful city of Durham, the reasons are many. If you feel that part-time study or distance learning is the better option for you then keep looking at Durham. Your studies will be similar to a full-time student, except a lot more flexible and (obviously) you have twice the period to complete your research.

Read less
The School of Government and International Affairs has a vibrant research environment. All SGIA Masters students are welcome to the numerous events organised by the School's research centres. Read more
The School of Government and International Affairs has a vibrant research environment. All SGIA Masters students are welcome to the numerous events organised by the School's research centres. MA Politics & International Relations (Political Theory) students will particularly benefit from the activities of the Centre for Political Thought. The centre runs seminar series, workshops and reading group and actively involves Masters and PhD students in its work.

Student Profiles

Not only has the MA Politics and International Relations (Political Theory) programme allowed me to further pursue what I find to be the most interesting aspect of politics, but working so closely with such knowledgeable tutors on a weekly basis has truly opened my eyes and allowed me to delve into and examine the most fundamental concepts behind political theory. That along with the fascinating debates that I had with my classmates and the thought-provoking essays have contributed to what has been the most important step in my career in politics.” Tarek Abou-Jaoude, 2014/15

“Participating in the Politics and International Relations program at Durham University is the best academic decision I have ever made for two reasons. First, is the engaging learning environment created in the classroom by the professors who lead students in civic discussion and debate. The second reason is what makes Durham University so special, being an international student from the U.S going to school at Durham allowed me to learn international relations in the classroom, and its convenient location allowed me to travel to most places in Europe to gain practical application that cannot be taught by reading a book. You make lifelong friends from all over the world who share your core interests, and that is tailor made attribute of Durham University.” Nicholas Lennox, 2014/15

“Durham has been one of the best experiences of my life. This University teaches the meaning of community and friendship, in an environment that combines historic heritage with the latest trends. The MA in Politics and International Relations (Political Theory) was all I expected. A flexible programme that allowed me to interact both with our lecturers and fellow students of the School of Government and International Affairs. This open environment promoted what it felt a very complete learning experience.” Maria Lleras, 2014/15

Course Content

This programme provides students with systematic knowledge and the tools to critically review the complex relationships between government and society at a variety of levels and in different contexts. It also enables students to evaluate in a sophisticated and critical fashion, theories and paradigms within the broad field of politics and international relations, and to draw lessons from empirical studies involving both quantitative and qualitative investigations. It also aims to develop students' ability to deploy research strategies and methods in an appropriately advanced fashion to critically evaluate research at the current limits of theoretical understanding, and to equip students so that they have the ability to master complex political concepts and evaluate the significance of major developments in political thought in general as well as international relations theory.

Course Structure
Two core modules worth 30 credits, plus a Dissertation worth 75 credits, plus 5 optional modules to the value of 75 credits - 60 of which must be from the list A.

Core Modules:
-Methodology in the Social Sciences
-Research Methods and Dissertation Production

List A - In previous years these have included:
-Contemporary Socio-Political Issues in Muslim Religious Thought
-Issues in the Politics of Military Occupations
-International Relations Theory
-Political Ideology
-Human Rights
-Collective Identities and Political Thought in Britain since 1850
-Just War in Political Theory and Practice

List B
-European Institutions and the Policy Process
-European Security
-German Foreign Policy
-International Relations and Security in the Middle East
-Nationalism, Revolution and Reform in Contemporary China
-Political Economy and Development in Chinese Business
-The Contemporary Politics of the Middle East
-Strategic Asia: Policy and Analysis
-The European Union as a Global Actor
-The Political Economy of Development in the Middle East
-Model United Nations
-Region, Nation and Citizen in South East Asia
-A module offered by the School of Modern Languages and Cultures

Learning and Teaching

At the beginning of the academic year, students go through five-day induction events in which they are informed about University, the School, the MA/MSc programmes and the facilities available for their learning.

The 180 credits one-year MA degree programme is divided into two core and five optional modules of 15 credits each. Furthermore, students have to submit a dissertation of 75 credits of not more than 15,000 words. Most of the modules are delivered during the first two terms and students spend the remaining time to write the dissertation.

Usually a module has 18 contact hours spread over 9 weeks and 132 hours of self-directed learning. The modules are mainly delivered through weekly 2 hours sessions which can either take the form of seminars or one hour of lecture and one hour of tutorial. The form in which seminars are conducted can differ from one module to another. Typically modules would have elements of lectures, discussions, and presentations from students—the extent of each of these components would differ from one module to another.

All modules have written exercise for formative assessments. Upon getting feedback on these assignments, students can meet their lecturers to discuss their marks before then eventually completing a summative assessment. Typically summative assessments are 3000 word essays but some modules may be assessed by examination. Students can also meet their module coordinators during their weekly contact hours or by making an appointment. When students are working on their dissertations during the later half of the year, they meet their assigned supervisors for a minimum of 6 hours. Students also have access to the academic advisors whenever there is a need.

SGIA has a wide variety of resources available to students such as: computer room/work room with networked PC’s, printing facilities including scanner and photocopier, audio system, Wi-Fi and a relaxation area with satellite television system.

SGIA conducts weekly seminars and organises lectures and conferences which all postgraduate students can attend. These events provide students the opportunity to engage with, and debate, the most important issues in current political and international studies.

Towards the end of the programme students can contact the Careers Office of the University to get advice on available job prospects and get assistance on applying for these.

Read less
This programme provides you with the systematic knowledge and intellectual tools to critically review developments in the theory and practice of international relations. Read more
This programme provides you with the systematic knowledge and intellectual tools to critically review developments in the theory and practice of international relations. It enables you to evaluate in a sophisticated and critical fashion concepts, theories and paradigms within the broad field of international relations, drawing lessons from empirical studies involving both quantitative and qualitative investigations.

Students are able to develop their ability to deploy research strategies and methods in an appropriately advanced fashion to critically evaluate current research and advanced scholarship. Each study route aims to provide advanced knowledge and understanding of the dynamics, including cultural and local political and ideological factors, which shape the contemporary international relations of the area.

The course also provides an opportunity for studying international relations and in comparative and historical perspective taking account of regional specific political and economic factors.

Student Profiles

“Attending the Master in International Relations (European) at Durham University has been so far the best experience of my life. Indeed engaging in conversation with colleagues from different nationalities and professors willing to listen to your opinion has helped me analyse the world dynamics from different perspectives. Honestly I have learned more in the last year than throughout any of my academic experience. In sum living and studying at Durham has had a great impact on my life to the extent that it made me realize my real potential and what my future career could be like. Therefore I would certainly recommend studying this course at Durham University as it has positively changed my life and it might have the same effect on you.” Luca Marro, 2015/16

“Undertaking postgraduate study is a huge commitment. Not only is it a period of intensive academic study, it is a financial and time consuming one too. Therefore, I was naturally very thorough when deciding upon which university I wanted to attend. Ultimately, my decision to study at SGIA was based on two factors. Firstly, the reputation of Durham University ensures that I receive a degree which is highly valued and respected by employers. Secondly, by undertaking the MA in International Relations (Europe) I have been able to develop an area specialisation and study a topic which is of immense interest to me. These two points proved fruitful results, when, during my first term at Durham, I was able to secure graduate level employment for when I leave. A high point of this perhaps, was attending the assessment centre for the position only to find three other people from SGIA at the event - you can thus be confident that deciding to undertake an MA puts you in a very good position!” Thomas Knight, 2015/16

As a Master’s student in International Relations (Europe), I have benefitted from the vast knowledge of the academics who are specialised in the European Union. I learnt both technical and theoretical details about the EU. Therefore, as a EU-funded Jean Monnet Scholarship holder, MA in International Relations (Europe) met the aim of my scholarship to develop Turkey’s human resources with trained EU experts for the accession. Not only the vigour of academic staff of the SGIA but also the good research facilities as well as the extremely helpful team of the School Office have made this experience unforgettable and fruitful for me." Asli Kandemir, 2014/15

Course Content

Students will take five core modules to the value of 150 credits and optional modules to the value of 30 credits, 15 of which must be from the regional module list.

Core Modules:
-International Relations Theory
-Model United Nations
-Research Methods and Dissertation Production
-Dissertation

European Route Core Module:
-European Security

Regional Modules:
-European Institutions and the Policy Process
-The European Union as a Global Actor
-Collective Memory & Identity in Post War Europe

Non-regional Modules - In previous years these have included:
-German Foreign Policy
-Collective Identities and Political Thought in Britain
-Contemporary Socio-Political Issues in Muslim Religious Thought
-International Relations and Security in the Middle East
-The Political Economy of Development in the Middle East
-America and the World: The Making of the US Foreign Policy
-Human Rights
-Political Ideology
-Issues in the Politics of Military Occupations
-Just War in Political Theory and Practice
-Nationalism Revolution and Reform in Contemporary China
-Political Economy and Development of Chinese Business
-Political Ideology
-Region, Nation and Citizen in Southeast Asia
-Strategic Asia: Policy and Analysis
-The Contemporary Politics of the Middle East
-A module offered by the School of Modern Languages and Cultures

Learning and Teaching

At the beginning of the academic year, students go through five-day induction events in which they are informed about University, the School, the MA/MSc programmes and the facilities available for their learning.

The 180 credits one-year MA degree programme is divided into four core and two optional modules of 15 credits each. Furthermore, students have to submit a dissertation of 75 credits of not more than 15,000 words. Most of the modules are delivered during the first two terms and students spend the remaining time to write the dissertation.

Usually a module has 18 contact hours spread over 9 weeks and 132 hours of self-directed learning. The modules are mainly delivered through weekly 2 hours sessions which can either take the form of seminars or one hour of lecture and one hour of tutorial. The form in which seminars are conducted can differ from one module to another. Typically modules would have elements of lectures, discussions, and presentations from students—the extent of each of these components would differ from one module to another.

All modules have written exercise for formative assessments. Upon getting feedback on these assignments, students can meet their lecturers to discuss their marks before then eventually completing a summative assessment. Typically summative assessments are 3000 word essays but some modules may be assessed by examination. Students can also meet their module coordinators during their weekly contact hours or by making an appointment. When students are working on their dissertations during the later half of the year, they meet their assigned supervisors for a minimum of 6 hours. Students also have access to the academic advisors whenever there is a need.

SGIA has a wide variety of resources available to students such as: computer room/work room with networked PC’s, printing facilities including scanner and photocopier, audio system, Wi-Fi and a relaxation area with satellite television system.

SGIA conducts weekly seminars and organises lectures and conferences which all postgraduate students can attend. These events provide students the opportunity to engage with, and debate, the most important issues in current political and international studies.

Towards the end of the programme students can contact the Careers Office of the University to get advice on available job prospects and get assistance on applying for these.

Read less
The Durham DBA is an executive doctoral programme for motivated, high achievers who want to develop their research, analytical and critical thinking skills to the highest level. Read more
The Durham DBA is an executive doctoral programme for motivated, high achievers who want to develop their research, analytical and critical thinking skills to the highest level. The Doctorate in Business Administration is structured around a research project driven by the individual, with a focus on practical application in the business environment.

-Develop the highest level thinking and research
-Present your findings at conferences globally
-Contribute to your own professional practice

The programme is offered on a flexible part-time basis and takes from 4 to 6 years:

Years 1 and 2

YEARS 1 and 2 comprise five taught modules delivered at the School:
1. The Ecology of Organisations
2. Power, Control and Resistance in Organisations
3. Change in Organisations
4. Leadership in Organisations
5. Research Design Workshop: Part 1 / Theory into Practice: Part 2

-Assessment is by individual written assignment for Modules 1-4.

-Between Modules 4 and 5 you will develop your research proposal.

-The individual written assignment for Module 5 has a 10,000 maximum word count.

Years 3 to 6

YEARS 3 to 6 comprise individual supervised research and study.
-Qualitative and Quantitative Groups: You attend regular research visits to give you the opportunity to meet your supervisor/module leader for teaching, guidance and advice.
-Academic Progression Reviews: Formal progress reviews are scheduled to ensure you are making satisfactory academic progress. -There is no formally assessed work to be completed for a research visit; it is assumed you will be self-regulating by the time you reach this phase.
-The final thesis has a 60,000 maximum word count.

Throughout your studies you’ll develop your research, analytical, conceptual and critical thinking skills to the highest level. You’ll also gain a strategic focus that will enable you to contribute to your own professional practice and the wider subject area.

Research Seminar Programme

Throughout your studies you’ll have access to specialist training opportunities. These sessions provide the opportunity for you to meet with visiting researchers and work closely alongside Durham’s academic faculty. Additionally, you will be supported to present your research findings at other universities, research institutes and international conferences

Resources

In addition to Durham University’s libraries, the Business School library houses extensive specialist loan and reference collections of business, finance and management books; doctoral, MBA and Masters dissertations; a complete collection of Business School working papers and offers access to over 10,000 journals online.

You’ll be able to access up-to-date journal, financial and market research information, from sources such as FAME, Mintel, IMID, European Business asap and Pro-Quest. There’s also a wide range of information available via online databases, including: Emerald, FAME, Mintel, Lexis-Nexis, Reuter's Business Insight, and Datamonitor Business Information Centre.

Comprehensive IT facilities

Durham University’s IT service offers access to everything you’d expect to find in a leading business school including: Computer Centre open 24/7, fully IT-integrated classrooms, dedicated IT helpdesk and DUO – the University’s virtual learning environment.

Space to study

We’ve created an excellent setting for both individual and group study, including a dedicated doctoral research area.

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X