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Masters Degrees (Durham)

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You will study at two UNESCO World Heritage Sites - Durham in the UK and the Upper Middle Rhine region in Germany. Read more

You will study at two UNESCO World Heritage Sites - Durham in the UK and the Upper Middle Rhine region in Germany. As the Durham-EBS Executive EMBA is delivered entirely in English in a classroom setting, you can continue to work full-time whilst studying as most teaching is delivered once each month in three-day blocks (Thursday through to Saturday).

The programme’s strong international focus is also reflected in the core and elective modules, with the International Business in Context elective module delivered at a top business destination. The business and alumni connections you gain will also support you in furthering your career. 

This dual award draws on both UK-specific and European experience giving you an insight into leadership in today’s international business world.

Throughout the programme you will explore the operations of global markets, understand how to lead transnational business relations and further build your international network of contacts. You will also be working alongside a diverse group of experienced business professionals and academics from the UK, Germany and around the world.

The Durham-EBS Executive MBA programme commences each September with a seven-day residential stay in Durham, England. During the 18 month programme you will complete:

  1. Nine core modules; seven modules are delivered in Germany and two modules are delivered in Durham
  2. Three elective modules delivered in Germany, Durham or another international location
  3. A Strategic Business Project

Note: Module instruction in Germany is held once a month from Thursday to Saturday. The cost of accommodation and some meals for each one-week residential stay in Durham is included in the programme fee.

Core Modules

The nine core modules of the programme will establish your foundational knowledge, understanding and research skills:

  • Accounting
  • Economics for Global Business
  • Finance
  • Managing People
  • Marketing
  • Operations and Technology
  • Strategic Management
  • Sustainability and Ethics
  • The Boardroom Exercise

Elective Modules

You will then choose the three elective modules most aligned to your personal career aspirations and goals from the following list to complete:

  • Advanced Finance for Business
  • Business Analytics
  • International Business in Context
  • Leading Change
  • Negotiation
  • Project Management
  • Technology and Innovation

Note: Elective module choices may change year on year, depending on current faculty and relevance to business.

Strategic Business Project

Following the completion of your elective modules, you will undertake a research-based Strategic Business Project. You may choose to pursue the project in two ways, either by working with your own company or a host organisation, or through an issue-led investigation which is not focused on a particular organisation but instead examines a specific management issue.

You will receive training in academic writing, as well as qualitative and quantitative business research methods throughout the programme as part of this module.

This is a great opportunity for you to apply your MBA skills and knowledge to address a practical question and help your own or another organisation tackle a current issue or challenge. Whilst undertaking the project you will further develop your research and management skills, building your network and, and in many instances, extending your international experience.

Past projects have been undertaken across a wide variety of organisations, such as multinational corporations in the manufacturing, service and finance sectors, family-owned businesses, the public sector and non-profit organisations.

Two Residential Weeks

Your first residential is a seven-day induction in the UK at the start of your Durham-EBS Executive MBA journey, which will launch you into the programme. It’s a great way to introduce you to the EMBA and enhance your key capabilities including team building, group work, reading and academic writing skills (supporting those who may have been away from academic education for some time).

Not only will you spend time at Durham University Business School and have the chance to explore the city of Durham, you will go on to discover another area in the UK. In previous years this has been the Lake District, a charming region in the Northwest of England.

Your induction will start on a Sunday in Durham, where you will meet your fellow students and members of the EMBA Programme Management Team. You will receive personal introductions, be provided with information to navigate your way through the programme, and learn out about support and administrative services. 

On Monday you will familiarise yourself with Durham University and then on Tuesday you will receive academic writing training and attend your first module.

Following the completion of your module you will travel to another UK destination where you will engage in a variety of indoor and outdoor team-building experiences and develop various additional personal and team skills. This is a particularly memorable aspect of the EMBA and the relationships built here will last throughout the programme and beyond.

Your second residential week will take place the following year, probably in September. During this week you will complete another core module in Durham, UK, and experience further indoor and outdoor skills enhancement and team-building activities.

Careers, coaching and student support

You can choose to be mentored by a certified coach at EBS as you consider your life and career choices, and select the coach based on common interest. 

Career services support is available from EBS, and you can access the online careers platform provided by Durham University Business School which will provide you with supplementary skills to supporting you in advancing your career.

The Programme Director will keep in regular contact with you as well as tutors and programme teams at both sites.



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This Economic and Social Research Council approved MA provides training in research methods with a focus on methods used by researchers in anthropology. At the end of this course, you will be well-prepared to go on to do research in Anthropology or a related discipline. Read more

This Economic and Social Research Council approved MA provides training in research methods with a focus on methods used by researchers in anthropology. At the end of this course, you will be well-prepared to go on to do research in Anthropology or a related discipline. Most students expect to move on to a PhD. The course includes training in qualitative and quantitative methods needed by researchers in social sciences and draws on expertise within the Department of Anthropology to provide specialised training in either sociocultural anthropology, medical anthropology, the anthropology of development or cultural evolution (depending on your chosen pathway). It is affiliated to the Northern Ireland and North East Doctoral Training Partnership, which offers funding to British and European Union students interested in taking the course preparatory to moving on to a PhD at Durham.

The full-time course runs for a full year, from October to September. Students attend classes between October and December (Michaelmas Term) and January and March (Epiphany), with assessment in April and May (Easter Term), and then work, under the supervision of a specialist supervisor, to complete a dissertation in September. This is often a pilot project for a PhD project. 

Students take core modules on qualitative and quantitative methods. Further modules are chosen from within each specialist pathway.

Please see the website for further information on modules.

Course Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered through a mixture of interactive lectures, seminars and workshops, in addition to one-to-one dissertation supervision. Typically, lectures deliver key information on progressively more advanced themes and topics. Seminars provide an opportunity to reflect in more depth upon material delivered in lectures and gathered from independent study outside the programme’s formal contact hours. They give students an opportunity to engage with academic issues at the cutting-edge of research in Anthropology, in a learning environment focused on discussion and debate of current issues. 

Full-time students have on average 8 hours of formal teaching and learning contact per week and are also expected to attend weekly departmental seminars and research group seminars (hosted by our Social Anthropology Research Group http://www.durham.ac.uk/anthropology/research/socialanthropology, our Anthropology of Health Research Group http://www.durham.ac.uk/anthropology/research/health and our Evolutionary Anthropology Research Group http://www.durham.ac.uk/anthropology/research/evolutionary, depending on their particular interests. Outside timetabled contact hours, students are also expected to devote significant amounts of time to reading, discussing and preparing for classes, assignments and project work. Throughout the programme, all students meet fortnightly with their degree tutor, who provides academic support and guidance. Furthermore, all members of teaching staff have weekly office hours when they are available to meet with students on a ‘drop-in’ basis. Students work closely with leading academics (usually their expected PhD supervisors) to develop an original piece of research for their dissertation, and guidance on the dissertation is also provided by the dissertation leader. Before the academic year starts, we make provide information on preparation for the course. On arrival, we have induction sessions, including field trip, and social events, headed by the Director of Postgraduate Studies and the Degree Tutor for the MA. Students also attend an “Introduction to Research Groups in Anthropology”.

Career Opportunities

Students with a postgraduate qualification in Anthropology pursue a diverse array of careers in areas such as conservation, tourism, public health, health research and management, captive primate care and zoological research management, local government research and management, education (secondary, further and higher), social care, social research, in addition to academia.



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The MA in Visual Arts and Culture at Durham is a distinctive interdisciplinary programme that invites students to develop their knowledge and understanding of the visual arts and of visual culture. Read more

The MA in Visual Arts and Culture at Durham is a distinctive interdisciplinary programme that invites students to develop their knowledge and understanding of the visual arts and of visual culture. To study visual arts and culture is a way of paying attention to phenomena that are literally everywhere. The concept of ‘visual culture’ acknowledges the pervasive nature of visual phenomena, and signals openness towards both the breadth of objects and images, and the range of theoretical and methodological perspectives needed to understand them adequately. Drawing upon research strengths across the departments that contribute to the programme, the MA in Visual Arts and Culture encourages you to take a broad view of geographical and chronological scope, while allowing you to engage with a wide range of visual phenomena, including fine art, film, photography, architecture, and scientific and medical imaging practices.

The importance of critical visual literacy in the contemporary world cannot be exaggerated. ‘The illiterate of the future’, wrote the Bauhaus artist and theoretician László Moholy-Nagy, ‘will be the person ignorant of the camera as well as of the pen’. This observation was made in the 1920s, when photography was first used in the periodical press and in political propaganda. The rich visual world of the early twentieth century pales in comparison with the visual saturation that now characterises everyday experience throughout the developed societies and much of the developing world. But the study of visual culture is by no means limited to the twentieth century. Turning our attention to past cultures with a particular eye to the significance of visual objects of all kinds yields new forms of knowledge and understanding.

Our programme facilitates the development of critical visual literacy in three main ways. First, it attends to the specificity of visual objects, images and events, encouraging you to develop approaches that are sensitive to the individual works they encounter. Second, it investigates the nature of perception, asking how it is that we make meaning out of that which we see. Finally, it investigates how our relationships with other people, and with things, are bound up in the act of looking.

Course structure

The course consists of one core module, two optional modules and a dissertation. The core module sets out the intellectual framework for the programme, offering a broad overview of key conceptual debates in the field of Visual Culture, together with training in analysis of visual objects of different kinds, an advanced introduction to understanding museum practice, and key research skills in visual arts and culture. The optional modules provide further specialised areas of study in related topics of interest to individual students, and the 12,000-15,000 word dissertation involves detailed study of a particular aspect of a topic related to the broad area of visual culture.

Optional modules

Previously, optional modules have included:

  • Critical Curatorship
  • History, Knowledge and Visual Culture
  • Representing Otherness
  • Negotiating the Human
  • Digital Imaging
  • Cultural Heritage, Communities and Identities
  • Current Issues in Aesthetics and Theory of Art
  • Ethics of Cultural Heritage
  • Monumental architecture of the Roman Empire in the Antonine and Severan periods
  • Art in Ecological Perspective
  • Texts and Cultures I: Visual and Verbal Cultures (Early Modern)
  • Energy, Society and Energy Practices
  • German Reading Skills for Research
  • French Reading Skills for Research

The Centre for Visual Arts and Culture (CVAC) brings together scholars from across and beyond Durham University in order to provide a dynamic setting for wide-ranging interdisciplinary research and debates about visual culture, a field that entails the study of vision and perception, the analysis of the social significance of images and ways of seeing, and the attentive interpretation of a range of visual objects, from artworks to scientific images. 

Centre for Visual Arts and Culture

The Centre brings together scholars from across and beyond Durham University in order to provide a vibrant and dynamic setting for wide-ranging interdisciplinary research and debates about visual culture. The Centre provides a focus for cutting-edge research on visual arts and cultures: it aspires to train new generations of scholars through innovative postgraduate programmes, it fosters informed debate both nationally and internationally, and it offers an engaging, open environment for researchers at all levels.

CVAC takes a generous view of what constitutes visual culture and it is broad in both geographical and chronological scope, encouraging debate about the range of approaches, methods and theories that are most generative for research on visual phenomena. Durham’s current visual culture research includes the study of word and image, art and religion, medicine and visual representation, film, the history of photography, architecture, urban culture, heritage and philosophical aesthetics. It also includes the development of pioneering visual research methods and the study of vision.

Durham’s location itself provides a rich and inspiring environment for this field of research. It is part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site that also includes Durham Cathedral; its acclaimed Oriental Museum is a significant asset which houses three Designated Collections, recognised by the Arts Council as nationally and internationally pre-eminent; alongside an outstanding collection of twentieth-century and contemporary art. CVAC has many established relationships with major national and international cultural organisations, and aims to develop further its links with museums, galleries and heritage sites.

For further information on the Centre see http://www.durham.ac.uk/cvac



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Flexibility is at the heart of the Durham Online MBA programme as you can personalise your programme to meet your career goals. You can study fully online, complete some of your learning at Durham, and undertake relevant optional modules. Read more

Flexibility is at the heart of the Durham Online MBA programme as you can personalise your programme to meet your career goals. You can study fully online, complete some of your learning at Durham, and undertake relevant optional modules.

The global spread of students, alumni and faculty will give you the ability to network virtually with people from across the world, and from a wide-range of business sectors.

Online MBA in detail

Structured around a two year study calendar, you can choose to undertake the programme 100% online or take a blended approach where you combine your online learning with residential modules. Whichever way you choose, our comprehensive induction will equip you with an essential toolkit of study skills to help you prepare for your MBA.

Our virtual learning environment is at the heart of your Online MBA experience. Through this you will receive online lectures, podcasts and webinars, as well as participating in a range of e-learning activities, discussion boards and virtual group work. There is a virtual campus, complete with powerful social networking tools to keep you in touch with your fellow students wherever they are in the world.

This virtual campus is supported with an annual Summer School held here in Durham, which brings together students from around the world to provide support and inspiration to drive you forward.

You will be expected to devote around 15 hours per week to study, and if you choose to undertake core modules at Durham these will typically take place in April and October.

Your online personal career advancement service is also core to the Online MBA programme, accelerating your leadership capabilities to realise your full potential. Gaining global business experience is also an option through the International Business in Context module, which will give you the ability to operate within an international business environment.   

Course structure

You will complete:

  • Five core modules
  • Two optional modules
  • Strategic Case Analysis

Five core modules

These are the foundation of your programme – establishing the management knowledge, understanding and research skills every leader needs. 

  • Accounting, Finance and Economics
  • Leading and Managing People
  • Marketing
  • Operations and Technology
  • Strategic Management

Two optional modules

Depending on your career aspirations, you can either choose to study two optional modules that you find particularly interesting and most relevant to your future career.

Or alternatively, you can choose to study two modules within a structured pathway focusing on the area of entrepreneurship, consultancy or technology.

Modules on offer are dependent on demand, but in previous years have included:

  • Entrepreneurship
  • New Venture Creation
  • Management Consultancy
  • Project Management
  • Business Analytics
  • Technology Innovation
  • International Business in Context

Pathways

  • Entrepreneurship: Entrepreneurship Management and Corporate Entrepreneurship, and New Venture Creation,
  • Consultancy: Management Consulting and Project Management, or
  • Technology: Business Analytics and Technology Innovation

Strategic Case Analysis

The Strategic Case Analysis replaces the traditional university dissertation. It is an in-depth study of key organisational issues, which is more in keeping with the needs of business and management today. It is an opportunity to apply the knowledge you have acquired through core and optional modules to a project that is of relevance to you, for example in your own organisation, a supplier, a competitor or another organisation in the private, public or voluntary sector.

The Residential

The Durham Online MBA Residential brings together students from across the globe to provide support and inspiration to drive you forward in your studies. These optional sessions give you the opportunity to attend modules at our world-class business school facilities in Durham, where you will have access to the very latest IT and library services. The Residential also includes speaker events, a variety of social events, and a truly unique opportunity to enjoy the Durham experience.



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Durham's MA in Modern History is a broad-ranging Master's programme which seeks to equip students with historical research techniques and approaches, advanced skills in critical analysis and independent study, as well as strong and effective communication skills. Read more
Durham's MA in Modern History is a broad-ranging Master's programme which seeks to equip students with historical research techniques and approaches, advanced skills in critical analysis and independent study, as well as strong and effective communication skills. The MA programme is designed to enable students with different career ambitions to succeed in their chosen area, and it caters for students of different backgrounds, previous training, and areas of specialisation. The breadth of research interests of the modern historians at Durham allows the department to offer supervision in topics about modern history from the nineteenth century through to contemporary history. The programme seeks to enable students to build an awareness of the contemporary boundaries of modern scholarship, to master advanced understanding of historical concepts and methods, and ultimately to make their own contributions to the field.

Durham's History Department is an international centre for the study of the Modern period, and is situated in the historic setting of the World Heritage Site, which includes Durham Cathedral, Durham Castle, and the surrounding area. Students of modern history at Durham benefit from the rich archival and manuscript resources in the collections of the University (at Palace Green Library - especially the Sudan Archive - and Ushaw College) and in the Cathedral Library, while the wider regional resources for study of the period are also highly significant: the landscape of industrial revolution and of post-industrial response, of globalisation and regional identity. Modern History at Durham is comprehensive and international in its reach, with specialists in the cultural and political history, visual culture and media studies, sports history, regional and international histories. Area specialisms include the British Isles, Continental Europe, Africa, North America, China and the Steppe regions.

Course Structure

The MA in Modern History is a one-year full-time programme (or two-years part-time). All students are allocated a supervisor at the beginning of the first term, and s/he guides each student through the year. The programme is structured as follows:

Michaelmas Term (October-December)
-Archives and Sources (15 credits)
-Issues in Modern History (30 credits)
-*Skill module (30 credits) - taken over Michaelmas and Epiphany Terms
Students may choose to take a skills module: these are mainly medieval/ancient languages (e.g. Old English, Old Norse, Latin, Greek), modern languages for reading (e.g. Academic French, Academic German), or research skills (e.g. palaeography). Students who take a skills module write a 60-credit dissertation instead of a 90-credit dissertation.

Epiphany Term (January-March)
-Critical Practice (15 credits)
-Option module (30 credits)
Option modules allow students the opportunity to learn about a particular topic or issue in modern history in depth, and to consider different historical approaches to this topic over a full term's study. In previous years, options for modern history included: The Wealth of Nations; Race in Modern America; 'Tribe' and Nation in Africa since 1800; Interpretations of Terror and Genocide in Modern Europe; Tradition, Change and Political Culture in Modern Britain; Gender, Nationalism and Modernity in East Asia; History, Knowledge and Visual Culture (a full list of MA option modules is available at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/history/postgraduate/ma_degrees/optionalmodules/). Option modules are taught in weekly two-hour seminars for a full term's study.

Easter Term (April-June), and the summer vacation (until early September)
-Dissertation (90 credits, or 60 credits if taking a *Skill module)

The formal requirements and structure of the programme can be found at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/courses/info/?id=9200&title=Modern+History&code=V1K707&type=MA&year=2016#essentials a full list of optional modules is available at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/history/postgraduate/ma_degrees/optionalmodules/

The MA can be taken part-time, over two years. In the first year the module combination consists of Archives and Sources, Critical Practice, Issues and in addition a Skills module OR Optional module. In the second year your work will consist of either a 90 credit, 20,000 word dissertation (if you took an Optional module in the first year) OR a 60 credit, 15,000 word dissertation, AND an Optional module (if you took a Skills module in the first year).

Additional courses can be taken on an audit-basis (not for credit), and can include language modules as well as optional modules. You will need to ask and receive the permission of the module leader before auditing a class. If the class is outside the department you will also need to inform the Director of Taught Postgraduates.

Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered primarily through small group seminar teaching with some larger classes, and lecture-style sessions. Termly division of contact hours between terms depends on student choice. Issues in Modern History has 16 contact hours, all classroom-based; this module is team-taught and exposes students to a wide variety of staff support and expertise. Archives and Sources has 8 contact hours, split between lectures, classes and seminars. Skills modules are taught through seminars or classes and are usually more contact-hour-intensive. Optional modules are taught in seminars and provide a total of 16 contact hours. Critical Practice involves lectures, a drama workshop, and oral presentation to a group (at a 'mini-conference'). Dissertation supervision involves 8 hours of directed supervision, individually with a dedicated supervisor.

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Durham's MA in Social and Economic History at Durham provides training in research methods for historical topics in any aspect of social and economic history. Read more

Durham's MA in Social and Economic History at Durham provides training in research methods for historical topics in any aspect of social and economic history. The MA provides quantitative and qualitative research methods appropriate to a wide range of historical approaches. Accredited by the ESRC, this MA is part of our four year funding scheme offered by the North-East Doctoral Training Centre. You can apply for 1+3 funding for this MA followed by a PhD in any aspect of social and economic history with expert supervision available within the Department – and with our partner institution in the NEDTC at Newcastle University. This includes African history, and aspects of governance, as well as traditional social and economic topics. For further information on funding see further below.

The MA programme is shared with the School of Applied Social Science and will help you to build an awareness of the contemporary boundaries of social and economic history and to master advanced understanding of the concepts and methods with which it may be interrogated. It seeks to equip you with a diverse portfolio of research techniques and approaches to enable you to undertake extended independent research in your dissertation, and to make your own contribution to the field. The skills provided by this MA are also transferrable to a wide range of careers.

Durham has a long tradition of economic and social history, on which this MA draws. The breadth of possible subjects for study mirrors the comprehensive and global nature of the department staff: from medieval Europe to modern-day Africa, and from north-east England to the global economy. Durham's History Department is situated in the historic setting of the World Heritage Site, which includes Durham Cathedral and Durham Castle. Students of social and economic history at Durham benefit from the rich archival and manuscript resources in the collections of the University (at Palace Green Library - especially the Sudan Archive - and Ushaw College) and in the Cathedral Library, while the wider regional resources for study of the period are also highly significant: the landscape of industrial revolution and of post-industrial response, of globalisation and regional identity.

Course Structure

The MA in Social and Economic History is a one-year full-time programme (or two-years part-time). All students are allocated a supervisor at the beginning of the first term, and s/he guides each student through the year.

You will take 30 credits of core modules from History: Themes, Reading and Sources (30 credits); and 30 credits of core modules from the School of Applied Social Sciences: Perspectives on Social Research (15 credits) AND EITHER Qualitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits) OR Fieldwork and Interpretation (15 credits). You will write a 60-credit dissertation (15,000 words) supervised by a member of academic staff in the History Department. You will also choose a 30-credit optional module in History; AND 30 credits of optional modules from Social Sciences: EITHER Statistical Exploration and Reasoning (15 credits) and Quantitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits) OR Applied Statistics (30 credits).

The programme is structured as follows:

Michaelmas Term (October-December)

  • Themes, Reading and Sources (30 credits)
  • Perspectives on Social Research (15 credits)
  • Statistical Exploration and Reasoning (15 credits; OPTIONAL)
  • Fieldwork and Interpretation (15 credits; OPTIONAL)
  • Applied Statistics (30 credits; OPTIONAL; runs across Michaelmas and Epiphany Terms)

Epiphany Term (January-March)

  • Themes, Reading and Sources (30 credits) continued on from Themes, Reading and Sources module taken in Michaelmas Term.
  • Option module (30 credits)
  • Qualitative Research Methods (15 credits; OPTIONAL)
  • Quantitative Research Methods (15 credits; OPTIONAL)

Easter Term (April-June), and the summer vacation (until early September)

  • Dissertation (60 credits)

Course Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered primarily through small group seminar teaching with some larger classes, and lecture-style sessions. Termly division of contact hours between terms depends on student choice. Skills modules are taught through seminars or classes and are usually more contact-hour-intensive. Optional modules are taught in seminars and provide a total of 20 contact hours. Dissertation supervision involves 8 hours of directed supervision, individually with a dedicated supervisor. Social science modules are taught through lectures, seminars, workshops, and practical classes.



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The . MA in Medieval and Early Modern Studies.  is an interdisciplinary MA associated with Durham's . Institute of Medieval and Early Modern Studies. Read more

The MA in Medieval and Early Modern Studies is an interdisciplinary MA associated with Durham's Institute of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (IMEMS), and is currently run from the History Department. The programme is suitable for students whose undergraduate training is in Archaeology, Classics, History, Literature/Languages, Philosophy, Theology, or other related disciplines. The main aim of the programme is to prepare students for doctoral research in the study of the medieval and early modern past by offering outstanding interdisciplinary training to equip students with the skills they need for their future careers. It is taught by specialists who are members of IMEMS, primarily from the departments of ArchaeologyClassicsEnglishHistoryModern Languages and CulturesPhilosophy and Theology.

Students are incorporated into the vibrant research communities within departments, IMEMS, and the university. Durham has a large and extremely active postgraduate community, and IMEMS supports the Medieval and Early Modern Student Association (MEMSA), whose members organise regular seminars and conferences. IMEMS has more than fifty staff members from arts, humanities, social science and science departments across the University, all active researchers, and is one of the largest gatherings of scholars in this area in the world. IMEMS is situated in the historic setting of the World Heritage Site, which includes Durham CathedralDurham Castle, and the surrounding area. Students of medieval and early modern studies at Durham benefit from the rich archival and manuscript resources in the collections of the University (at Palace Green Library and at Ushaw College) and in the Cathedral Library, while the wider regional resources for study of the period are also highly significant.

All students on the MA in Medieval and Early Modern Studies take two core modules, Reading the Medieval and Early Modern Past, and Writing the Medieval and Early Modern Past (30 credits each); both of these run throughout Michaelmas and Epiphany Terms. Students also write a 15,000-word dissertation (60 credits), supervised by one of Durham's specialists, which allows them to focus on a specialist topic of their choice in the period AD 300-1700, which may be interdisciplinary or focused primarily on one of the individual disciplines which make up the programme. They also take two optional modules (30 credits each) which run either in Michaelmas or Epiphany or throughout both terms. These may be content, language or skills modules, and are drawn from the seven participating departments as well as Durham’s other centres and programmes. All elements of the programme have embedded within them a range of content, subject-specific skills, and key skills.

Core modules

The two team-taught core modules enable students to develop advanced skills in interpreting and usinga range of different kinds of source-material from the medieval and early modern periods, including textual, material and visual culture. They allow students to consider developments over the longue duree and enable a more rounded understanding of how a range of themes, ideas and institutions changed from the end of the classical world, through the Middle Ages and into the early modern era. These modules are intended to guide students whose backgrounds are in a range of disciplinary specialisms towards an understanding of how study of the medieval and early modern past can be nuanced and enhanced by approaches from multiple different disciplines used alongside each other. The modules also help students develop from a more tutor-led approach to independent learning, in order to support their work on their dissertations and their future careers. Reading the Medieval and Early Modern Past takes one key item or body of material (e.g. a text, a site, an archive) as a lens through which to explore different disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches to studying the period 300-1700. Students are assessed by a 5000-word essay on a topic of their choice connected with the themes of the module. Writing the Medieval and Early Modern Past focuses on major themes, movements and institutions which can best be examined across the whole medieval and early modern period, and which can best be explained by close study of change and continuity over a long period of time. A number of these themes will invite interdisciplinary or multidisciplinary approaches, and thus will allow students to develop their skills in bringing together different kinds of material for study of the past. Students are assessed for this module by a) a 4000-word essay on a topic of their choice, connected with the themes of the module, and b) a 15-minute presentation.

Optional modules

Students choose two optional modules offered by the departments participating in the programme. These modules are taught by subject specialists and usually involve a series of seminars with an emphasis on close study of original material from the medieval and early modern periods, and provide a ‘step up’ from the level of final-year undergraduate study. The breadth of modules available means that students can develop their skills and research interests according to their own tailored programme and with the advice of their dissertation supervisor, ensuring the best possible preparation for the future. There are also some modules focusing on particular skills-training such as medieval or modern languages or auxiliary skills (e.g. Latin; Ancient Greek; Old Norse; Old English; Academic French; Academic German; Palaeography).

The range of optional modules in each year varies according to staff availability and departmental provision, but as a representative sample optional modules may include the following:

  • Anglo-Saxon Societies and Cultures: interdisciplinary approaches to early medieval England
  • Archaeology of the Book
  • Christian Northumbria, 600-750
  • Contact and Conflict: Texts and Cultures
  • Courts and Power in Early Modern Europe and the New World
  • Latin for Research
  • Narrative Transformations: Medieval Romance to Renaissance Epic
  • Negotiating Life in the Early Modern World
  • Old English Language, Texts and Contexts
  • Old Norse
  • Palaeograpy: Scribes, Script and History from Antiquity to the Renaissance
  • Power and Society in the Late Middle Ages
  • Renaissance Humanism
  • Rewriting Empire: Eusebius of Caesarea and the First Christian History
  • Warrior Poets in Heroic Societies
  • Work and Play in Early Modern Europe


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Durham's MA in Early Modern History is a broad-ranging Master's programme which seeks to equip students with historical research techniques and approaches, advanced skills in critical analysis and independent study, as well as strong and effective communication skills. Read more
Durham's MA in Early Modern History is a broad-ranging Master's programme which seeks to equip students with historical research techniques and approaches, advanced skills in critical analysis and independent study, as well as strong and effective communication skills. The MA programme is designed to enable students with different career ambitions to succeed in their chosen area, and it caters for students of different backgrounds, previous training, and areas of specialisation. The breadth of research interests of the early modernists at Durham allows the department to offer supervision in topics about the early modern world from the mid-fifteenth century through to the early nineteenth. The programme seeks to enable students to build an awareness of the contemporary boundaries of early modern scholarship, to master advanced understanding of historical concepts and methods, and ultimately to make their own contributions to the field.

Durham's History Department is an international centre for the study of the Early Modern period, and is situated in the historic setting of the World Heritage Site, which includes Durham Cathedral, Durham Castle, and the surrounding area. Students of early modern history at Durham benefit from the rich archival and manuscript resources in the collections of the University (at Palace Green Library and at Ushaw College) and in the Cathedral Library, while the wider regional resources for study of the period are also highly significant: these include the landscape of industrial revolution, of vernacular architecture and of early modern globalisation. Early Modern History at Durham is comprehensive and international in its reach, with specialists in the History of Medicine, consumer culture, print and information, court culture, ecclesiastical and intellectual history, and political thought. Area specialisms include the British Isles, Continental Europe, North America, China and the Steppe regions.

Course Structure

The MA in Early Modern History is a one-year full-time programme (or two-years part-time). All students are allocated a supervisor at the beginning of the first term, and s/he guides each student through the year. The programme is structured as follows:

Michaelmas Term (October-December)

Archives and Sources (15 credits)
Issues in Early Modern History (30 credits)
*Skill module (30 credits) - taken over Michaelmas and Epiphany Terms

Epiphany Term (January-March)

Critical Practice (15 credits)
Option module (30 credits)

Easter Term (April-June)

Dissertation (90 credits, or 60 credits if taking a *Skill module)

The formal requirements and structure of the programme can be found at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/courses/info/?id=9199&title=Early+Modern+History&code=V1K607&type=MA&year=2016#essentials; a full list of optional modules is available at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/history/postgraduate/ma_degrees/optionalmodules/

The MA can be taken part-time, over two years. In the first year the module combination consists of Archives and Sources, Critical Practice, Issues and in addition a Skills module OR Optional module. In the second year your work will consist of either a 90 credit, 20,000 word dissertation (if you took an Optional module in the first year) OR a 60 credit, 15,000 word dissertation, AND an Optional module (if you took a Skills module in the first year).

Additional courses can be taken on an audit-basis (not for credit), and can include language modules as well as optional modules. You will need to ask and receive the permission of the module leader before auditing a class. If the class is outside the department you will also need to inform the Director of Taught Postgraduates.

Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered primarily through small group seminar teaching with some larger classes, and lecture-style sessions. Termly division of contact hours between terms depends on student choice. Issues in Early Modern History has 16 contact hours, all classroom-based; this module is team-taught and exposes students to a wide variety of staff support and expertise. Archives and Sources has 8 contact hours, split between lectures, classes and seminars. Skills modules are taught through seminars or classes and are usually more contact-hour-intensive. Optional modules are taught in seminars and provide a total of 16 contact hours. Critical Practice involves lectures, a drama workshop, and oral presentation to a group (at a 'mini-conference'). Dissertation supervision involves 8 hours of directed supervision, individually with a dedicated supervisor.

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Our part-time Masters in Management is a post-experience programme. With the flexible option of online or taught modules, the programme combines academic rigour with real-world business relevance to provide a qualification that is recognised and truly valued by employers. Read more

Our part-time Masters in Management is a post-experience programme. With the flexible option of online or taught modules, the programme combines academic rigour with real-world business relevance to provide a qualification that is recognised and truly valued by employers.

Over forty years’ experience working with private and public sector clients has taught us that, for true professional development, you have to do more than just learn. You have to apply your learning in the workplace. Durham University Business School combines the rich heritage of Durham University with a progressive, dynamic approach to executive education. This enables us to deliver immediate high-impact results for individuals and organisations.

Each module has been developed by leading members of the Durham faculty, so you will benefit from the most advanced management knowledge. During the course, you will be taught by our world-class researchers, using a combination of physical and virtual classrooms. To make sure you have all the support you need to gain immediate benefits, you will also be assigned a Personal Tutor.

In detail

As a blended-learning, modular programme, you will be taught through a combination of classroom and state-of-the-art virtual courses. You’ll also have the opportunity to carry out practical activities, including workshops, discussions, events and consultancy initiatives, designed to help you develop your personal skills and plan your future career strategy.

Your study programme will last for 30 months. You should normally attend two five-day Residential Workshops during the first two years (alternative online options may also be available), study six further modules online and complete a six-month individual project of 15,000 words.

The programme starts with a comprehensive induction, designed to refresh your study skills and to guide you through the requirements of the programme. As well as getting to know more about the Business School and meeting the MA team and fellow participants, you will learn about academic writing, referencing and how to access and use online study materials.

Classroom and virtual learning sessions are led by senior members of the Durham faculty. Experts in their field, they will share the very latest in business and management knowledge. What’s more, throughout your studies you will be given access to our careers support services, professional development activities and a Personal Tutor for each module.

  • Seven core modules
  • One elective
  • Dissertation or business project

In year one you’ll study online or attend a five-day residential workshop in Durham:

  • Induction
  • Business Economics & Accounting

You’ll study three online modules:

  • Strategy
  • Strategic Marketing Management
  • Organisational Behaviour

In year two, you’ll study online or attend one further three-day residential workshop:

  • Leadership or Human Resource Management
  • Professional Development Activities

You’ll study three further online modules:

  • Operations & Supply Chain Management
  • Research methods
  • One elective module selected from a range of specialist options available

Please note: the order in which modules are studied is dependent upon when you enrol and therefore may vary with the above.

The programme culminates with a six-month 15,000 word dissertation/business project on an approved topic and is overseen by a dedicated dissertation supervisor. This is normally undertaken in your own organisation and is an opportunity to analyse a practical, relevant management issue in some depth, demonstrating a critical understanding of the relevant theory and its applications.

Course Learning and Teaching

This blended-learning, modular programme is taught through a combination of classroom and virtual courses. Virtual learning is divided up into study weeks with specially produced resources within each week. Lectures provide key contents of a particular topic. . Resources vary according to the learning outcomes but normally include: video content, directed reading, reflection through activities, opportunities for self-assessment and peer-to-peer learning within a tutor-facilitated discussion board. The programme has some block taught modules which are taught at Mill Hill Lane over three or four days, learning outcomes are met through a combination of taught input, group work, case studies and discussion, supported by guided reading and specifically self-study material. Students can also attend the Durham Speaker Series, providing the opportunity to network with senior business leaders, staff and alumni when visiting the School.

Students study 6 core modules including the dissertation, and select 3 elective modules which enables them to undertake more in-depth study of particular topics. The 15,000 word dissertation allows students to carry out independent research and develop their skills in analysis and scholarly expression, using an appropriate theoretical framework. They are supported in writing their dissertation through the study of research methods, and individual consultations via Skype or telephone with an allocated supervisor who monitors their progress and provides advice.

Academic Support:

Throughout the year, students may have the opportunity to participate in extracurricular activities which include professional development activities, careers support and speaker events. 

Learning Resource:

Outside of contact hours, students are expected to undertake a significant amount of independent study in preparation for teaching sessions, assignments and other forms of assessment including exams, and general background reading to broaden their subject knowledge. The Programme Director is able to provide students with general advice on academic matters. Module Tutors are also available to provide additional support on a one-to-one basis via Skype, telephone and email.

Students also have access to the facilities available at Mill Hill Lane including dedicated postgraduate working spaces, an onsite library and IT helpdesk when they visit the School.



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Durham's MA in Medieval History is a broad-ranging Master's programme which seeks to equip students with historical research techniques and approaches, advanced skills in critical analysis and independent study, as well as strong and effective communication skills. Read more
Durham's MA in Medieval History is a broad-ranging Master's programme which seeks to equip students with historical research techniques and approaches, advanced skills in critical analysis and independent study, as well as strong and effective communication skills. The MA programme is designed to enable students with different career ambitions to succeed in their chosen area, and it caters for students of different backgrounds, previous training, and areas of specialisation. The breadth of research interests of the medievalists at Durham allows the department to offer supervision in topics about the medieval world from Late Antiquity through to the sixteenth century. The programme seeks to enable students to build an awareness of the contemporary boundaries of medieval scholarship, to master advanced understanding of historical concepts and methods, and ultimately to make their own contributions to the field.

Durham's History Department is an international centre for the study of the Middle Ages, and is situated in the historic setting of the World Heritage Site, which includes Durham Cathedral, Durham Castle and the surrounding area. Students of medieval history at Durham benefit from the rich archival and manuscript resources in the collections of the University (at Palace Green Library and at Ushaw College) and in the Cathedral Library, while the wider regional resources for study of the period are also highly significant: these include the landscape of Viking invasion, of Bede, of high medieval monasticism, of centuries of border warfare with their rich and distinctive legacy of castles, and of early industry and proto-capitalism.

Course Structure

The MA in Medieval History is a one-year full-time programme (or two-years part-time). All students are allocated a supervisor at the beginning of the first term, and s/he guides each student through the year. The programme is structured as follows:
Michaelmas Term (October-December)
-Archives and Sources (15 credits)
-Issues in Medieval History (30 credits)
-*Skill module (30 credits) - taken over Michaelmas and Epiphany Terms

Epiphany Term (January-March)
-Critical Practice (15 credits)
-Option module (30 credits)

Option modules allow students the opportunity to learn about a particular topic or issue in medieval history in depth, and to consider different historical approaches to this topic over a full term's study. In previous years, options for medieval history included The Anglo-Saxon World, AD 400-1100, Power and Society in the Late Middle Ages, and The Wealth of Nations. Option modules are taught in weekly two-hour seminars for a full term's study.

Easter Term (April-June), and the summer vacation (until early September)
-Dissertation (90 credits, or 60 credits if taking a *Skill module)

Students meet with their supervisors on an individual basis and will discuss the topic, direction and content of their dissertation, as well as the relevant medieval evidence and scholarship which they should explore. The dissertation is a substantial, independent piece of research: the 90-credit dissertation is 20,000 words, while the 60-credit dissertation is 15,000 words. You are not required to write your dissertation on a topic which is in the same period and area as your optional modules, but it is recommended that students discuss their individual programmes of work with their supervisors and/or with the Director of Taught Postgraduate Programmes.

The formal requirements and structure of the programme can be found at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/courses/info/?id=9187&title=Medieval+History&code=V1K107&type=MA&year=2016#essentials a full list of optional modules is available at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/history/postgraduate/ma_degrees/optionalmodules/

The MA can be taken part-time, over two years. In the first year the module combination consists of Archives and Sources, Critical Practice, Issues and in addition a Skills module OR Optional module. In the second year your work will consist of either a 90 credit, 20,000 word dissertation (if you took an Optional module in the first year) OR a 60 credit, 15,000 word dissertation, AND an Optional module (if you took a Skills module in the first year).

Additional courses can be taken on an audit-basis (not for credit), and can include language modules as well as optional modules. You will need to ask and receive the permission of the module leader before auditing a class. If the class is outside the department you will also need to inform the Director of Taught Postgraduates.

Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered primarily through small group seminar teaching with some larger classes, and lecture-style sessions. Termly division of contact hours between terms depends on student choice. Issues in Medieval History has 16 contact hours, all classroom-based; this module is team-taught and exposes students to a wide variety of staff support and expertise. Archives and Sources has 8 contact hours, split between lectures, classes and seminars. Skills modules are taught through seminars or classes and are usually more contact-hour-intensive. In previous years, optional modules were taught in seminars and provided a total of 16 contact hours. Critical Practice involves lectures, a drama workshop, and oral presentation to a group (at a 'mini-conference'). Dissertation supervision involves 8 hours of directed supervision, individually with a dedicated supervisor.

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Our part-time Masters in Management is a post-experience programme. It combines academic rigour with real-world business relevance to provide a qualification that is recognised and truly valued by employers. Read more
Our part-time Masters in Management is a post-experience programme. It combines academic rigour with real-world business relevance to provide a qualification that is recognised and truly valued by employers.

Over forty years’ experience working with private and public sector clients has taught us that, for true professional development, you have to do more than just learn. You have to apply your learning in the workplace. Durham University Business School combines the rich heritage of Durham University with a progressive, dynamic approach to executive education. This enables us to deliver immediate high-impact results for individuals and organisations.

Each module has been developed by leading members of the Durham faculty, so you will benefit from the most advanced management knowledge. During the course, you will be taught by our world-class researchers, using a combination of physical and virtual classrooms. To make sure you have all the support you need to gain immediate benefits, you will also be assigned a Personal Tutor.

In detail

As a blended-learning, modular programme, you will be taught through a combination of classroom and state-of-the-art virtual courses. You’ll also have the opportunity to carry out practical activities, including workshops, discussions, events and consultancy initiatives, designed to help you develop your personal skills and plan your future career strategy.

Your study programme will last for 30 months. You should normally attend two five-day Residential Workshops during the first two years (alternative online options may also be available), study six further modules online and complete a six-month individual project of 15,000 words.

The programme starts with a comprehensive induction, designed to refresh your study skills and to guide you through the requirements of the programme. As well as getting to know more about the Business School and meeting the MA team and fellow participants, you will learn about academic writing, referencing and how to access and use online study materials.

Classroom and virtual learning sessions are led by senior members of the Durham faculty. Experts in their field, they will share the very latest in business and management knowledge. What’s more, throughout your studies you will be given access to our careers support services, professional development activities and a Personal Tutor for each module.
-Seven core modules
-One elective
-Dissertation or business project

In year one you’ll study online or attend a five-day residential workshop in Durham:
-Induction
-Business Economics & Accounting

You’ll study three online modules:
-Strategy
-Strategic Marketing Management
-Organisational Behaviour

In year two, you’ll study online or attend one further three-day residential workshop:
-Leadership or Human Resource Management
-Professional Development Activities

You’ll study three further online modules:
-Operations & Supply Chain Management
-Research methods
-One elective module selected from a range of specialist options available

Please note: the order in which modules are studied is dependent upon when you enroll and therefore may vary with the above.

The programme culminates with a six-month 15,000 word dissertation/business project on an approved topic and is overseen by a dedicated dissertation supervisor. This is normally undertaken in your own organisation and is an opportunity to analyse a practical, relevant management issue in some depth, demonstrating a critical understanding of the relevant theory and its applications.

Other admission requirements

This course includes online activities, so you will also need a computer with internet access. Almost all activities will be possible from a modern desktop or laptop computer (purchased since 2010). All resources will be accessible from a moderate broadband connection (0.5Mbps) but a greater bandwidth (up to 8Mbps) will provide a better experience for some resources and events.

You will need:
-A web browser (Resources are tested on the latest available versions of Internet Explorer, Firefox and Chrome)
-The ability to open and edit Microsoft Office documents (e.g. Microsoft Office, OpenOffice or access to Googledocs)
-Flash player
-JAVA
-Ability to open .pdf documents (e.g. Adobe Reader)
-A headset or headphones and microphone
-To participate fully in some online events students should have a webcam and to access some tools and resources you may need the ability to install software.

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This course enables students to learn how anthropological ideas and approaches are vital for understanding the environmental, social and economic crises of the contemporary world. Read more

This course enables students to learn how anthropological ideas and approaches are vital for understanding the environmental, social and economic crises of the contemporary world. It teaches how to engage with local knowledge and community-based approaches, rather than rely on global blueprints for sustainable development. The programme is taught by an active, interdisciplinary team involved in world-class research on development issues. We offer comparative knowledge about achieving environmental and social sustainability through participatory approaches and active collaborations with projects for empowerment in the Global South. Geographical areas of expertise include Sub-Saharan Africa, South America, South Asia, South-East Asia, the Middle East, Europe and Melanesia. Staff also help students connect with Durham’s excellent research communities such as the Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience, and the Durham Energy Institute.

The MSc is based around core modules focusing on the challenges of pro-poor transitions to sustainability, aided by culturally informed perspectives on new themes in development such as resilience, and energy justice. Options allow you to pursue subject interests with specialist guidance. The dissertation enables you to conduct independent research under the supervision of an expert, and become a master of your chosen topic.

Please see the website for further information on modules.

Course Learning and Teaching

The MSc in Sustainability, Culture and Development (full-time) consists of two terms of teaching, during which students are introduced to the range of research questions and methods, and a dissertation, involving the design, development and implementation of an independent research project. Students work closely with academic staff, and have the opportunity to become involved in active research networks and projects.

The programme is delivered through a mixture of interactive lectures, seminars, film showings and discussion, workshops, and optional fieldtrips, in addition to one-to-one dissertation supervision. Typically, lecture formats deliver key concepts and case study comparisons on progressively more advanced themes and topics. Seminars provide an opportunity to reflect in more depth upon material delivered in modules and gathered from independent study outside the programme’s formal contact hours. They give students an opportunity to engage with academic issues at the cutting-edge of research in Anthropology, in a learning environment focused on discussion and debate of current issues.

Full-time students have on average 6-8 hours of formal teaching and learning contact per week, and are also expected to attend weekly departmental research seminars, often given by prominent visiting speakers, as well as relevant seminars at the Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience and the Durham Energy Institute. Students also have the opportunity to present their work at the Department’s annual postgraduate conference. Outside timetabled contact hours, students are expected to devote significant amounts of time to reading, discussing and preparing for classes, assignments and project work. Throughout the programme, all students meet fortnightly with the degree tutor, who provides academic support and guidance. Furthermore, all members of teaching staff have weekly office hours when they are available to meet with students on a ‘drop-in’ basis, or can be e-mailed to arrange a mutually agreeable time. Students work closely with leading academics to develop an original piece of research for their dissertation, and guidance on the dissertation is also provided by the dissertation leader. Before the academic year starts, we make contact with incoming students via the postgraduate office. On arrival, we have induction sessions and social events, headed by the Director of Postgraduate Studies and attended by both academic and administrative staff. The Programme Tutor will also lead local excursions, to orient students with important, beautiful, interesting and fun places around Durham. Students also attend an 'Introduction to Research Groups in Anthropology'.

Career Opportunities

Students with a postgraduate qualification in Anthropology pursue a diverse array of careers in areas such as conservation, tourism, public health, health research and management, captive primate care and zoological research management, local government research and management, education (secondary, further and higher), social care, social research, in addition to academia.



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By taking the one year programme you take a smaller commitment but still get to experience full academic life. Your research during this one year will be just as impacting on the academic world as anybody's first year of PhD. Read more
By taking the one year programme you take a smaller commitment but still get to experience full academic life. Your research during this one year will be just as impacting on the academic world as anybody's first year of PhD. The Masters programme allows you to dip your toe into your research field and, who knows, you might decide to go on to a PhD after all!

Not only can the MSc (Research) be ideal for you if you're not 100% sure that a PhD is for you, it can also be an ideal experience if you're interested in commercial or industrial research and development. Many Masters by Research students at Durham are supported by close connections with international companies that are looking to build strong industry-academia research links.

By joining us you would become part of a vibrant and supportive community of world renowned researchers, undertaking work that demonstrates both originality and relevance. Durham offers the opportunity to work with leading academic staff in state of the art facilities within a unique environment offered by the collegiate system.

Our community of postgraduate students contributes to a range of exciting projects at the cutting-edge of current research sponsored by both the public sector, third-party and industrial scholarships. This draws on the School's strong research collaborations and industrial links with a range of both UK and international funding organisations.

Part time or distance based study

Durham has many systems in place for supporting those students that want to or need to take their studies at a different rate to others. You may have a young family to look after or need to have a full-time job during your studies to support yourself. Unable to move to the wonderful city of Durham, the reasons are many. If you feel that part-time study or distance learning is the better option for you then keep looking at Durham. Your studies will be similar to a full-time student, except a lot more flexible and (obviously) you have twice the period to complete your research.

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This programme gives you the widest choice of modules. Modules can be selected from those available for students studying in International Trade and Commercial Law, and European Trade and Commercial Law, Corporate Law and International Law and Governance. Read more

This programme gives you the widest choice of modules. Modules can be selected from those available for students studying in International Trade and Commercial Law, and European Trade and Commercial Law, Corporate Law and International Law and Governance.

Having completed your taught modules, you will undertake an extended dissertation of 10,000, 15,000 or 20,000 words in length, under the supervision of a member of staff who is an expert in your chosen field of research. Teaching is by a mixture of lectures and smaller, student-led, seminars or tutorial groups. The dissertation is pursued by independent research.

Students attending the programme are drawn from a broad range of countries, and their previous academic or professional experiences enrich the programme. The Law School hosts a number of research centres, including the Institute for Commercial and Corporate Law, the Durham European Law Institute, the Centre for Criminal Law and Criminal Justice, Law and Global Justice at Durham and the Human Rights Centre. Students are encouraged to participate in all their activities.

Course Structure

Students must study one compulsory module in Applied Research Methods in Law. You must also choose a number of additional taught modules, from a large body of optional modules. Finally, a dissertation must be completed, on a topic chosen by you in consultation with your allotted supervisor.

Core Modules

  • Applied Research Methods in Law
  • Dissertation (of 10,000, 15,000 or 20,000 words).

Optional Modules

Please note: not all modules necessarily run every year, and we regularly introduce new modules. The list below provides an example of the type of modules which may be offered.

  • Advanced Issues in International Economic Law
  • Advanced Issues of International Intellectual Property Law
  • Advanced Law of Obligations
  • Commercial Fraud
  • Corporations in an EU Context
  • Current Issues in Company Law
  • Competition Law
  • Fundamentals of International Law
  • Fundamental Issues in International Legal Governance
  • Global Environmental Law
  • Global Institutions
  • International and Comparative Corporate Insolvency Law
  • International Co-operation in Criminal Matters in Europe
  • International Counter Terrorism: Theory and Practice
  • International Humanitarian Law
  • International Protection of Human Rights
  • International Trade Law & Policy
  • International Sales Law
  • Introduction to Corporate Governance
  • Introduction to EU Law
  • Introduction to Intellectual Property Law
  • Law of Oil and Gas Contracts
  • Law of the Sea
  • Mergers and Acquisitions
  • Takeover Regulation in the EU.

Course Learning and Teaching

This programme involves both taught modules and a substantial dissertation component. Taught modules are delivered by a mixture of lectures and seminars. Although most lectures do encourage student participation, they are used primarily to introduce chosen topics, identify relevant concepts, and introduce the student to the main debates and ideas relevant to the chosen topic. They give students a framework of knowledge that students can then develop, and reflect on, through their own reading and study.

Seminars are smaller-sized, student-led classes. Students are expected to carry out reading prior to classes, and are usually set questions or problems to which to apply the knowledge they have developed. Through class discussion, or the presentation of student papers, students are given the opportunity to test and refine their knowledge and understanding, in a relaxed and supportive environment.

The number of contact hours in each module will reflect that module’s credit weighting. 15-credit modules will have, in total, 15 contact hours (of either lectures or seminars); 30-credit modules will have 30 contact hours. Students must accumulate, in total, between 90 and 120 credits of taught modules for the programme (depending upon the length of their dissertation).

In addition to their taught modules, all students must produce a dissertation of between 10,000 and 20,000 words. This is intended to be the product of the student’s own independent research. Each student is allocated a dissertation supervisor, and will have a series of (usually four) one-to-one meetings with their supervisor over the course of the academic year.

Finally, all taught postgraduate students on this programme, are encouraged to attend the various events, including guest lectures and seminars, organised through the School’s research centres, including the Institute for Commercial and Corporate Law, the Human Rights Centre, Law and Global Justice at Durham, the Centre for Gender and Law at Durham, the Centre for Criminal Law and Criminal Justice, and the Durham European Law Institute.



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The School of Government and International Affairs has a vibrant research environment. All SGIA Masters students are welcome to the numerous events organised by the School's research centres. Read more
The School of Government and International Affairs has a vibrant research environment. All SGIA Masters students are welcome to the numerous events organised by the School's research centres. MA Politics & International Relations (Political Theory) students will particularly benefit from the activities of the Centre for Political Thought. The centre runs seminar series, workshops and reading group and actively involves Masters and PhD students in its work.

Student Profiles

Not only has the MA Politics and International Relations (Political Theory) programme allowed me to further pursue what I find to be the most interesting aspect of politics, but working so closely with such knowledgeable tutors on a weekly basis has truly opened my eyes and allowed me to delve into and examine the most fundamental concepts behind political theory. That along with the fascinating debates that I had with my classmates and the thought-provoking essays have contributed to what has been the most important step in my career in politics.” Tarek Abou-Jaoude, 2014/15

“Participating in the Politics and International Relations program at Durham University is the best academic decision I have ever made for two reasons. First, is the engaging learning environment created in the classroom by the professors who lead students in civic discussion and debate. The second reason is what makes Durham University so special, being an international student from the U.S going to school at Durham allowed me to learn international relations in the classroom, and its convenient location allowed me to travel to most places in Europe to gain practical application that cannot be taught by reading a book. You make lifelong friends from all over the world who share your core interests, and that is tailor made attribute of Durham University.” Nicholas Lennox, 2014/15

“Durham has been one of the best experiences of my life. This University teaches the meaning of community and friendship, in an environment that combines historic heritage with the latest trends. The MA in Politics and International Relations (Political Theory) was all I expected. A flexible programme that allowed me to interact both with our lecturers and fellow students of the School of Government and International Affairs. This open environment promoted what it felt a very complete learning experience.” Maria Lleras, 2014/15

Course Content

This programme provides students with systematic knowledge and the tools to critically review the complex relationships between government and society at a variety of levels and in different contexts. It also enables students to evaluate in a sophisticated and critical fashion, theories and paradigms within the broad field of politics and international relations, and to draw lessons from empirical studies involving both quantitative and qualitative investigations. It also aims to develop students' ability to deploy research strategies and methods in an appropriately advanced fashion to critically evaluate research at the current limits of theoretical understanding, and to equip students so that they have the ability to master complex political concepts and evaluate the significance of major developments in political thought in general as well as international relations theory.

Course Structure
Two core modules worth 30 credits, plus a Dissertation worth 75 credits, plus 5 optional modules to the value of 75 credits - 60 of which must be from the list A.

Core Modules:
-Methodology in the Social Sciences
-Research Methods and Dissertation Production

List A - In previous years these have included:
-Contemporary Socio-Political Issues in Muslim Religious Thought
-Issues in the Politics of Military Occupations
-International Relations Theory
-Political Ideology
-Human Rights
-Collective Identities and Political Thought in Britain since 1850
-Just War in Political Theory and Practice

List B
-European Institutions and the Policy Process
-European Security
-German Foreign Policy
-International Relations and Security in the Middle East
-Nationalism, Revolution and Reform in Contemporary China
-Political Economy and Development in Chinese Business
-The Contemporary Politics of the Middle East
-Strategic Asia: Policy and Analysis
-The European Union as a Global Actor
-The Political Economy of Development in the Middle East
-Model United Nations
-Region, Nation and Citizen in South East Asia
-A module offered by the School of Modern Languages and Cultures

Learning and Teaching

At the beginning of the academic year, students go through five-day induction events in which they are informed about University, the School, the MA/MSc programmes and the facilities available for their learning.

The 180 credits one-year MA degree programme is divided into two core and five optional modules of 15 credits each. Furthermore, students have to submit a dissertation of 75 credits of not more than 15,000 words. Most of the modules are delivered during the first two terms and students spend the remaining time to write the dissertation.

Usually a module has 18 contact hours spread over 9 weeks and 132 hours of self-directed learning. The modules are mainly delivered through weekly 2 hours sessions which can either take the form of seminars or one hour of lecture and one hour of tutorial. The form in which seminars are conducted can differ from one module to another. Typically modules would have elements of lectures, discussions, and presentations from students—the extent of each of these components would differ from one module to another.

All modules have written exercise for formative assessments. Upon getting feedback on these assignments, students can meet their lecturers to discuss their marks before then eventually completing a summative assessment. Typically summative assessments are 3000 word essays but some modules may be assessed by examination. Students can also meet their module coordinators during their weekly contact hours or by making an appointment. When students are working on their dissertations during the later half of the year, they meet their assigned supervisors for a minimum of 6 hours. Students also have access to the academic advisors whenever there is a need.

SGIA has a wide variety of resources available to students such as: computer room/work room with networked PC’s, printing facilities including scanner and photocopier, audio system, Wi-Fi and a relaxation area with satellite television system.

SGIA conducts weekly seminars and organises lectures and conferences which all postgraduate students can attend. These events provide students the opportunity to engage with, and debate, the most important issues in current political and international studies.

Towards the end of the programme students can contact the Careers Office of the University to get advice on available job prospects and get assistance on applying for these.

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