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This course is for people who are working as physiotherapists, who wish to develop themselves and their profession. Read more
This course is for people who are working as physiotherapists, who wish to develop themselves and their profession. The MSc in Advancing Physiotherapy Practice aims to help you thrive in health and social contexts where the pace of change is high and professionals need to be dynamic and proactive to meet the needs of the people they work with.

The programme of study aims to be:

-Clinical: with a focus on highly topical subjects, ability to learn in and from the workplace, practical experience, and ability to take specialist clinical and practice routes: for example, musculoskeletal physiotherapy, neurological physiotherapy, cardiorespiratory physiotherapy, paediatric physiotherapy, leadership and management, and education.

- Flexible: with a determination to enable study for students who have a variety of circumstances, and who live in different countries. Two paces of study are available (full-time and part-time) and two modes of study (distance learning, and blended learning which requires attendance). The standard full-time pace is 18 months, which can be accelerated to 12 months where relevant requirements are met. Please see the section on study routes for further details.

- Supportive: with a focus on helping you to adjust to master’s level study at the start of the programme, to stay engaged with your profession throughout the course, and to increase your employability as you progress towards completion. Alongside modules you will be involved in a ‘Learning in Community Programme,’ which includes study skills training, social events, CPD opportunities such as Master Classes, and opportunities and guidance to increase your employability, including guidance on professional registration.

The knowledge and skills developed over the course are intended to enable you to lead and implement innovative change within physiotherapy workplaces in the UK and internationally.

Study routes

-Full-time with attendance (12-18 months): The full-time study route makes use of blended mode of learning which includes face-to-face contact supported by online resources. This is designed with international students in mind and offers attractive practical modules as well as opportunities to learn in clinical settings (see modules). The standard duration of the full-time route is 18 months. This is valuable if your priority is to use all opportunities to develop your professional standing and employability. If you wish to prioritise quick completion of your MSc Advancing Physiotherapy Practice, and meet requirements, you can accelerate it to 12 months duration.

-Part-time with attendance (3-7 years): You can study the MSc Advancing Physiotherapy Practice part-time, with a minimum duration of 3 years, and maximum duration of 7 years. If you study this route you can select modules that involve some attendance and some online study. For example, some modules are delivered with blocks of attendance and online study between these blocks. If you study part-time you can also choose to complete distance learning modules as part of your programme.

-Distance learning (part-time or full-time) (1-7 years): You can choose modules that enable you to complete your MSc Advancing Physiotherapy Practice entirely as distance learning . You can study distance learning at a full-time pace (12-18 months duration) or at a part-time pace (3-7 years).

Teaching, learning and assessment

We use a range of student-centred learning methods, including tutorials, seminars and practical classes, with facilitation of work-based learning and recognition of prior learning. Further specific strategies are used to enable distance learning.
Your performance will be assessed by coursework (assignments), presentations and practical examinations, and you are provided with structured support in learning how to develop and demonstrate your academic skills at a master’s level. Class sizes are usually 5-10 students.

Teaching hours and attendance

Each module that is studied on-campus will require you to attend classes and carry out independent work. Your attendance requirements at QMU will vary between semesters of study, but contact time might average about six hours per week over one academic year; this would be higher during taught modules. Whether you are studying distance learning or through a mixture of face-to-face contact and online work (blended learning), each 30-credit module will entail around 300 hours of student work. This includes contact with tutors (online or face-to-face), supported by independent learning. When thinking about the total amount of learning, for the full-time pace of study, you will undertake 120 credits of study over two 15-week semesters, followed by your dissertation. This suggests up to 40 hours per week of study. A student who chooses to study part-time may be undertaking, for example, 60 credits of study, which would equate to about 20 hours per week of study. The distance learning route can be studied part-time or full-time.

Links with industry/professional bodies

In order to design a flexible, clinical and supportive programme, we talked with current students, ex-students and employers internationally. We collaborate with many physiotherapists and managers locally to create opportunities for our students to contribute to the development of physiotherapy services during their programmes. This ensures the relevance of their studies, their professional development, and advancement of the physiotherapy profession. The MSc Physiotherapy is accredited by the UK’s Chartered Society of Physiotherapy (to be confirmed following recent revalidation). This course does not lead to HCPC registration. However, advice is given to assist the process of registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). Course material will also help the student to develop knowledge and skills recognised by the HCPC.

MODULES

Please visit the QMU website for information.

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Creative research in humanities has become an important part of postgraduate study at Masters and Doctoral level. It has helped performers and practitioners remediate their work as research, and allowed practitioners to reflect on the processes of practice as much as its ramifications. Read more
Creative research in humanities has become an important part of postgraduate study at Masters and Doctoral level. It has helped performers and practitioners remediate their work as research, and allowed practitioners to reflect on the processes of practice as much as its ramifications. Like all our courses, the DMus reflects the mission and values of University of West London. It enhances progression and quality in education, and encourages widening participation.

Its emphasis on creative research, and its 'submission pathway' attracts recently qualified postgraduates and professional musicians who want doctoral recognition of their skills and experience - and this is sympathetic with the School's academic plan to attract mature and part-time students, together with the University's vision to reach out to students of all ages through flexible education.

The DMus extends the rich and eclectic musical experience our students enjoy at undergraduate and Masters level, to doctoral level, and enhances the London College of Music's growing postgraduate community. The DMus also maximises our research strengths in composition, performance and music technology.

MPhil

After a year of full-time study or two years of part-time study, you will have completed:
• a 30 to 90 minute performance accompanied by performance notes and a biography
• a critical commentary of at least 5,000 words.

The MPhil portfolio may comprise several contrasting pieces, or just one longer, structurally ambitious piece. The nature of your performance will determine its duration. For example, most romantic and modern concerts are between 30 and 40 minutes, while a solo piano recital might last between 50 and 90 minutes, depending on whether it is a daytime or evening performance. The supervisor must approve your repertoire and total performance duration, and will then notify the principal assessor in cases where that role is taken by another academic.

Your portfolio piece should be innovative, and show a new technique within, or an extension to, an existing practice. Examiners will attend the performance.

DMus

After approximately three years of full-time study or six years' part-time study, you will have completed:
• five performances, each between 30 and 90 minutes long, accompanied by programme notes and a biography, of which the first performance can be your work from the MPhil requirement
• a critical commentary of at least 20,000 words, of which the first 5,000 words can be from your MPhil requirement.

As with the MPhil, your DMus portfolio performances may comprise several contrasting pieces, or just one longer, structurally ambitious piece. You may wish to explore a range of roles and repertoire, or stick with just one concerto performance. The nature of your performance will determine its duration. For example, most romantic and modern concerts are between 30 and 40 minutes, while a solo piano recital might last between 50 and 90 minutes, depending on whether it is a daytime or evening performance. The supervisor must approve your repertoire and total performance duration, and will then notify the principal assessor in cases where that role is taken by another academic.

Your portfolio piece should be innovative, and show a new technique within, or an extension to, an existing practice. Examiners will attend the performance.

Proposal

Your proposal must not exceed 4,500 words. Unless you are studying for your DMus by Direct Entry or Submission, you will complete this proposal as part of the assessment regime for the Level 7 Research Methods module.

The proposal for the MPhil/DMus in Music Production is different from a proposal for a PhD. The core of the proposal will be a list of works you intend for portfolio submission. It should also include the anticipated duration of, and instrumentation for, each piece. Proposals for DMus by Submission should also append the compositions. You should explain in your proposal the current musical and extra-musical influences on your work, and how your portfolio constitutes an original and substantial contribution to the area of practice. For this, you should include:
• a 'literature review' of contemporary practice in the same field
• an analysis and explanation of existing techniques in the field
• an explanation of how the creative work represents an extension of, or reaction to, contemporary practice.

Your proposal should also include a timescale for each part of the project, and append an outline bibliography.

Full-time and part-time candidates - you may also identify areas of technical development, analysing how your portfolio pieces might enable this transition. You must indicate in your proposal any pieces you intend to include through backdated registration.

You may also include a CV.

Assessment

This will involve an oral examination, conducted in much the same way as a traditional PhD. A viva voce will also be necessary when you ‘exit’ with the MPhil qualification.

Career and study progression

The DMus may lead to a career in teaching and research in higher education.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/how-apply

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/scholarships-and-bursaries

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Are you keen to learn from widely published academics who are recognised as thought-leaders in their areas of specialism?. Read more
Are you keen to learn from widely published academics who are recognised as thought-leaders in their areas of specialism?

The History MRes course incorporates taught modules that explore key subjects such as historical contexts and digital history, whilst examining the critical and theoretical practices that are fundamental to research. In addition to core modules, you are able to tailor your learning to your own areas of interest and career aspirations.

To demonstrate your understanding and skills you will undertake an in-depth dissertation project under the guidance of our teaching team. You will also have the unique opportunity to organise your own one-day research conference, offering you and an opportunity to share your work with staff and students within a supportive environment.

Northumbria University’s Humanities department boasts strong links with a range of cultural partners and we aim to provide you with direct industry exposure and live project opportunities throughout the duration of your course.

You will learn in state-of-the-art facilities, including our new Institute for the Humanities.

Northumbria has just launched its first MOOC (Massive Online Open Course) exploring the fascinating history and culture of the American South from colonial times to the 21st century.

Experience for free Northumbria's excellence in teaching and research with the University's Institute of Humanities, all from your own home.

This course can also be taken part time - for more information, please view this web-page: https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/history-dtphtr7/

Learn From The Best

Our History department’s teaching team is made up of a large number of experts, each with their own specialist area of interest, and throughout the duration of this course you will have unprecedented access to their knowledge and expertise.

When undertaking your dissertation you will be assigned a dedicated supervisor with specialist knowledge of your chosen subject area. They will guide you through your project with the help of our team of support staff.

Our academics are not only teaching their specialist subjects but also writing textbooks and adding new knowledge and perspectives to our understanding of the past. Boasting doctorates and extensive academic knowledge in their particular specialism, you can rest assured you are learning from the best.

Teaching And Assessment

The History MRes course allows you to embark on a closely supervised research project, whilst participating in taught modules that will further your knowledge and understanding of this subject.

With a key focus on research, you will acquire generic research skills that are applicable not just to history, but a broad range of other subjects.

The taught aspect of this course will be primarily delivered by group seminars, which will be assessed via a mix of oral and written presentations, critical reviews and portfolios of work.

Your dissertation will form a large part of the assessment process and learning will be delivered by one-to-one tutorials with an expert supervisor.

In addition to the mandatory modules of this course, you will have the option to choose a pathway subject and two discipline-specific modules to allow your learning to be focused around your own areas of interest.

Module Overview
EF0126 - E.S.A.P. in FADSS Level 7 (Optional, 0 Credits)
EL7028 - MRes Dissertation (Core, 90 Credits)
HI7001 - Historical Contexts (Core, 30 Credits)
HI7005 - Digital History and Research Methods (Core, 30 Credits)
HI7011 - Research Development (Core, 30 Credits)

Learning Environment

Throughout the duration of your course you will have access to state-of-the-art facilities to support your learning experience.

Further facilities are available at the Institute for the Humanities, a special research space in the University’s Lipman Building. These include a resource room, specialist computing equipment and interview rooms. You will also have access to a designated Humanities Student Hub, providing space for self-study, group work or a rest in between teaching sessions.

You will receive support at every step of your learning journey through our on-campus facilities and innovative e-Learning Portal, Blackboard, which will allow you to access electronic versions of your course’s supporting documentation.

We provide a supportive and informal learning environment, offering feedback at all key stages of your course.

Research-Rich Learning

The History MRes course is centred around research-rich learning and delivery.

Delivered by our team of renowned academics, you will be learning from research-active experts who boast specialisms in all aspects of history.

Our staff are actively involved in research, often through funded projects and awards, and participate in a diverse range of research groups within the department. Several staff members are also engaged in collaborative research projects, many of which are part of national or international research networks.

Northumbria is ranked among the top 20 universities in the UK for research power in history, according to the 2014 Research Excellence Framework. Our academics were also recently ranked in the UK’s top 20 for the quality of their history publications (REF 2014).

Give Your Career An Edge

On completion of this course you will possess a broad understanding of research methods and contemporary digital literacies, in addition to expert professional skills in communication, self-management, and project planning.

In-line with the UK Research Council’s training requirements for research students, you will leave equipped with the necessary skills to progress to the next level of your career.

Throughout the duration of your course you will be encouraged to build relationships and experience with cultural partners such as New Writing North, the co-operative movement, Tyne and Wear Archives and Museums, and Handy Hall to further enhance your career edge.

Your Future

Your previous qualifications and the specialist nature of this course will provide a strong foundation for your future work and study.

The History MRes course has been designed to form the basis for those wishing to progress to PhD level and we offer advice in writing PhD and funding applications should you decide to take this route.

Northumbria is part of the UK’s only Centre for Doctoral Training (CDT) in Heritage, led by Hull and consisting of a consortium of universities in the North of England.

The broad range of skills and knowledge acquired on this course can help to enhance promotion prospects in many professions, most notably teaching, professional research, museums or archives, public policy and project management. It should also enhance your prospects of employment should you wish to move into such vocations.

You will also leave prepared for a career as a researcher or employment within a broader business environment.

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This excellent course enables you to gain the wide range of counselling psychology competencies needed to be eligible to apply for chartered status with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). Read more
This excellent course enables you to gain the wide range of counselling psychology competencies needed to be eligible to apply for chartered status with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC).

In the most recent (2014-15) Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 100% of graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

More about this course

The Professional Doctorate in Counselling Psychology is a three-year full-time, four-year part-time taught doctoral programme leading to a doctoral qualification that automatically confers professional registration with the Health Care Professions Council (HCPC), accreditation as a fully qualified chartered counselling psychologist with the British Psychological Society (BPS), and recognition within the UK and the EU as a chartered counselling psychologist eligible to practice.

The programme offers a sound and marketable model, combining in-depth competency in cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), strong humanistic values, and psychodynamic awareness. The course was re-accredited by the HCPC and the BPS in 2012. It was commended for the depth and breadth of the modules offered; a number of our modules were described as cutting-edge and very well suited to the current zeitgeist and employment market. These modules include a first-year module devoted to working with difference and diversity, and a third-year service evaluation research exercise.

Run by a dedicated team of HCPC registered and BPS accredited chartered counselling and clinical psychologists, this course offers wide-ranging and high quality clinical and research expertise to trainees. Course team members have between one and 11 years of post-qualification clinical experience, and two thirds hold PhD or professional doctoral titles. Two thirds of the staff are academically published authors.

While student numbers are growing, the team prides itself on retaining a small cohort each year of no more than 20 students. This enables us to offer you a relatively high volume of individual attention from staff. All students are assigned a personal tutor and two research supervisors. You are offered a relatively high proportion of research supervision (10 hours in Year 1 and 20 hours each year in Years 2 and 3); safe spaces for clinical group supervision and skills practice; and an experiential and workshop style of teaching and learning. Trainees and staff develop collaborative relationships in relation to learning and personal development.

The programme has a dedicated placements coordinator, and an extensive online placement provider database, accessible prior to training commencement. We offer a comprehensive placements induction in the first week of training, and we encourage and support you to be in placement or at interview stage with placement providers by the beginning of your training.

The first year of training is the equivalent of a Master’s year. Students who exit at the end of Year 1 are eligible for an MSc in Psychological Therapies. This MSc offers eligibility to register with the British Association of Counselling and Psychotherapy (BACP), leading to clinical practice in either in public, private or third sector organisations. However, the course has high student retention rates, with the majority of students continuing from the MSc level into the doctoral level of training in Years 2 and 3. Student satisfaction within the programme is very high; feedback forms regularly comment on the high quality and breadth of teaching, the clinical and research expertise of the lecturers, and the dedication of the staff, both at a personal and professional level. Our students feel valued and attended to by the teaching team because the size of each cohort allows for a more tailored experience for each student.

Through postgraduate teaching and workshops across the wider applied psychology subject area, London Met counselling psychology trainees develop advanced levels of knowledge and skills in a broad range of qualitative and quantitative psychological research methods. The course emphasises criticality, epistemological critique and reflexivity across all research teaching and learning. Extensive support in the form of individual and group supervision and teaching is offered, alongside methodology learning, to support trainees in undertaking a piece of doctoral level research that will make an original contribution to the professional practice of counselling psychology, and more widely.

As trainees you will develop a wide range of intellectual and practical skills and knowledge. The training has a solid track record of trainees emerging as robust, sophisticated, and highly employable practitioners of counselling psychology. In recent years, we are proud that a number of our trainees have won BPS Division of Counselling Psychology trainee prizes for written assignments and research poster presentations.

The principle aims and achievements of the course are to produce graduates who are:
-Competent, informed, reflective, ethical and professionally sound practitioners of counselling psychology who are able to work in a range of settings and are committed to their own on-going personal and professional development
-Able to understand, develop and apply models of advanced psychological inquiry and research that enable the creation of new knowledge and which recognise the complex nature of human experience and relationships
-Able to adopt a questioning and evaluative approach to the philosophy, practice, research and theory that constitutes counselling psychology and aware of the wider social, cultural and political domains within which counselling psychology operates
-In possession of a set of skills and competencies that are transferable to a wide variety of professional contexts and which enhance employability
-Able to demonstrate the range of counselling psychology competencies needed to be eligible to apply for chartered status with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC)

Many students are conducting research in collaboration with National Health Service (NHS) Trusts or non-governmental organisations (NGOs). Graduates find permanent employment within a few months post-qualification, with many trainees holding part-time clinical employment whilst they are in the final year of the training because their clinical skills and knowledge are of such a high standard. Other graduates from the programme find work in academia in visiting or permanent teaching posts or as research fellows.

The course is involved in on-going in-house events and conferences such as CultureShock, and in research and clinical collaborations with five NHS trusts. The programme is also involved in research and in the training of clinical staff with the Freedom from Torture Foundation and Khulisa, both community based organisations close to the Holloway Campus. The programme is also collaborating with the School of Social Sciences and School of Social Professions to link interpreters with clinicians and to establish training inside and outside the University on working with interpreters in mental health settings.

Assessment

A wide range of assessment methods is used on the programme. In Year 1 you'll complete seven master's level assignments, including a reflective essay, case formulation, process report, examination and two short research assignments using qualitative and quantitative methodologies.

You'll also complete a 7,000-word reflexive critical literature review and a 3,000-word proposal towards the end of Year 1. Your proposal must demonstrate an adequate basis for a doctoral level research project for you to proceed into Year 2 of the programme. Year 1 is the most intensive period of assessment on the programme.

If you progress to Year 2 you'll complete an extended clinical case study, integrative process analysis and theoretical essay at the end of the year, reflecting cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and psychodynamic learning. At the end of Year 3 a similar assignment is completed, reflecting a trans-theoretical, pluralistic perspective. You should complete your research project by the end of Year 3, submitting a 25,000 word thesis and subsequently participating in a viva voce examination.

You'll receive research supervision to guide your research throughout the programme. Research progress is formally monitored and evaluated through the submission of annual reports to the Research and Postgraduate Office in Years 2 and 3.

You are required to complete a minimum of 450 clinical hours in a range of placements under supervision over the duration of the programme, as well as a minimum of 60 hours of your own personal therapy.

Supervisors complete six-monthly practice competency evaluations, which enable bidirectional feedback and reflection on your progress and continuing professional development in your practice placements. Your personal and professional development is individually monitored and supported throughout the programme via annual reviews and appraisals with a tutor from the programme team.

Professional accreditation

The Professional Doctorate in Counselling Psychology leads to a doctoral qualification that automatically confers professional registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and accreditation as a fully qualified chartered counselling psychologist with the British Psychological Society.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Advanced Research Design and Analysis for Psychology (core, 20 credits)
-Counselling Psychology Practice and Development (core, 20 credits)
-Professional and Ethical Issues (core, 20 credits)
-Psychological Knowledge and Models of Therapy (core, 20 credits)
-Research Project and Critical Skills (core, 60 credits)
-Therapeutic and Reflective Skills (core, 20 credits)
-Working with Difference and Diversity (core, 20 credits)

Year 2 modules include:
-Advanced Psychological Research (core, 160 credits)
-Advanced Psychological Theory and Practice 1 (core, 100 credits)
-Advanced Psychological Theory and Practice 2 (core, 100 credits)

After the course

Career opportunities for counselling psychologists include posts in a variety of areas. These include National Health Service (NHS) settings such as primary care, Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) services, community mental health, drug and alcohol, rehabilitation, eating and personality disorder services, as well as the prison service, voluntary sector, private practice, academia, training, supervision, management and consultancy.

Graduates from the programme frequently go on work in one or more of these areas. Some have gone on to provide practice placements or to supervise or teach students on the programme. The range of advanced clinical and research skills and abilities gained through the course prepare graduates to undertake work in a variety of fields of activity.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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The emphasis of this course is on the application of engineering and the physical sciences to forensic problems. The course is designed to give a broad introduction to the subject, rapidly advancing into the understanding of the cutting-edge research and latest techniques. Read more

Course Description

The emphasis of this course is on the application of engineering and the physical sciences to forensic problems. The course is designed to give a broad introduction to the subject, rapidly advancing into the understanding of the cutting-edge research and latest techniques.

The course is highly practical and hands-on, aiming to produce forensic experts capable of giving an expert opinion in a courtroom situation and elsewhere.

The course consists of a two-week period of introductory studies followed by academic instruction in modular form. Most modules are of five days' duration, interspersed with weeks devoted to private study and visits to forensic science establishments.

The Forensic Engineering and Science MSc is part of the Forensic MSc Programme which has been formally accredited by the Forensic Science Society.

Course overview

The course consists of a one-week period of introductory studies followed by academic instruction in modular form. Most modules are of five days' duration, interspersed with weeks devoted to private study. Students are required to take four core modules, four role specific modules and choose three elective modules based on their particular background, future requirements or interests. This is followed by a four-month research project and either a thesis or literature review and paper.

Duration: Full-time MSc - one year, Part-time MSc - up to three years, Full-time PgDip - one year, Part-time PgDip - two years

English Language Requirements

Students whose first language is not English must attain an IELTS score of 7

Individual Project

The individual project takes four months from April to July. The student selects from a range of titles, or may propose their own topic. Most are practically or experimentally based using Cranfield’s unique facilities.

Assessment

By written and practical examinations, continuous assessment, project presentation and viva voce.

Career opportunities

Takes you on a career opportunities in forensic engineering and science with, for example, forensic laboratories, government bodies, police departments and independent consultants working for insurance companies.

For further information

On this course, please visit our course webpage - http://www.cranfield.ac.uk/courses/masters/forensic-engineering-and-science.html

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The course is a professionally accredited programme leading to eligibilty to apply to become a registered social worker with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). Read more
The course is a professionally accredited programme leading to eligibilty to apply to become a registered social worker with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). You'll be joining a social work programme that has its history rooted in the principles of equality and social justice.

More about this course

The Social Work MSc course is a professionally accredited programme leading to eligibility to apply to become a registered social worker with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). It has been designed to provide you with the opportunities to achieve the professional standards and capabilities as set out by the HCPC. A key aspect is to develop as a reflective and resilient practitioner.

Our graduates are equipped with the knowledge, skills and a critical understanding of different theoretical perspectives as applied to social work. You'll be joining a social work programme that has its history rooted in the principles of equality and social justice.

Students who successfully complete all modules but not the dissertation module, can be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma in Social Work which also allows for registration with the HCPC.

You are assessed via a variety of methods including essays; presentations; video and project work; examinations and work based practice assessment. A key aspect is acquisition of the necessary practice skills in a diverse range of practice settings relevant to social work.

You will undertake supervised practice within at least two different practice settings over a minimum of 170 days during the course. Your previous learning and experience may exempt you from some modules, but not any part of the 170 days assessed practice.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Assessment Planning and Professional Ethics (core, 10 credits)
-Communication, Skills and Values in Social Work (core, 10 credits)
-Critical Aspects of Human Growth and Development (core, 10 credits)
-Practice Learning 1 (core, 20 credits)
-Professional Law for Social Work (core, 10 credits)
-Safeguarding Children and Adults (core, 10 credits)
-Social Contexts and Professional Perspectives in Social Work (core, 10 credits)

Year 2 modules include:
-Evaluating Research (core, 10 credits)
-Practice Learning 2 (core, 20 credits)
-Protecting Children and Adults (core, 10 credits)
-Social Work Dissertation (core, 60 credits)

After the course

You will have qualifying status to practice social work (subject to the requirements of registration with the HCPC) and be eligible to become a member of the British Association of Social Workers. Further study opportunities are available through a number of post-qualifying and MA/MSc courses (for example, in practice teaching, childcare and management).

As the course prepares you to be a generic social worker you are not limited to any particular field of social work and our students take up posts in a variety of settings and care groups for example: children and families, adult care to include, mental health, working with older people and learning disabilities.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

Read less
This course is designed to give a broad introduction to the subject, rapidly advancing into the understanding of cutting-edge research and the latest methodologies. Read more

Course Description

This course is designed to give a broad introduction to the subject, rapidly advancing into the understanding of cutting-edge research and the latest methodologies. The course is highly practical and hands-on, aiming to produce forensic experts capable of giving expert witness testimonies in a courtroom situation and elsewhere.

The course consists of a two-week period of introductory studies followed by academic instruction in modular form. Most modules are of five days' duration, interspersed with weeks devoted to private study and visits to forensic science establishments.

The Forensic Archaeology and Anthropology MSc is part of the Forensic MSc Programme which has been formally accredited by the Forensic Science Society.

Course overview

The course consists of a one-week period of introductory studies followed by academic instruction in modular form. Most modules are of five days' duration, interspersed with weeks devoted to private study. Students are required to take four core modules, four role specific modules and choose three elective modules based on their particular background, future requirements or interests. This is followed by a four-month research project and either a thesis or literature review and paper.

Duration: Full-time MSc - one year, Part-time MSc - up to three years, Full-time PgDip - one year, Part-time PgDip - two years

English Language Requirements

Students whose first language is not English must attain an IELTS score of 7

Individual Project

The individual project takes four months from April to July. The student selects from a range of titles, or may propose their own topic. Most are practically or experimentally based using Cranfield’s unique facilities.

Assessment

By written and practical examinations, continuous assessment, project presentation and viva voce.

Career opportunities

Takes you on to opportunities to work in the field of forensic archaeology or anthropology within forensic laboratories, police departments, government bodies and non-governmental organisations. It is also a necessary introduction that could lead into conducting research at PhD level in the subject.

For further information

On this course, please visit our course webpage - http://www.cranfield.ac.uk/courses/masters/forensic-archaeology-and-anthropology.html

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The Education MA course enables you to develop a theoretical framework within which you can analyse educational issues and, where appropriate, develop your own professional practice. Read more
The Education MA course enables you to develop a theoretical framework within which you can analyse educational issues and, where appropriate, develop your own professional practice. In the most recent (2014-15) Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 100% of graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

More about this course

This modular course is designed for people working in education in all sectors and others with an interest in education. It offers you the chance to plan an individual course of study, either by selecting particular modules within the MA or by taking modules that may lead to a PG Diploma or PG Certificate in Education.

The programme of study provides an introduction to higher study and to the intellectual and academic discourses associated with education as a core university discipline. It is closely linked to the actuality and educational challenges associated with the meshing of local and global in London as a world city; in consequence there is a vital and critical engagement with professional practices and with the empirical realities that attend and shape them.

You are assessed via coursework (one essay of 6,000 words or two essays of 3,000 words) or presentations, as well as the dissertation.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Critical Theory and Education (core, 20 credits)
-Curriculum Leadership (core, 20 credits)
-Curriculum, Pedagogy and Assessment (core, 20 credits)
-Education Dissertation (core, 60 credits)
-Research Methods in Education (core, 20 credits)
-Applying Learning Technologies (option, 20 credits)
-Specialist Study Module (option, 20 credits)
-Web-based Learning and Teaching (option, 20 credits)

After the course

The course will be of benefit to anyone with an interest in education, whether as a parent, teacher, researcher, community worker or education administrator. Recent graduates have gone on to careers in the education sector as deputy head teachers, special needs teachers, and behaviour management co-ordinators.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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The MA Learning and Teaching in Higher Education is an integrated and supported course that enables you to. -Take a lead in the development of the teaching of your subject. Read more
The MA Learning and Teaching in Higher Education is an integrated and supported course that enables you to:
-Take a lead in the development of the teaching of your subject
-Critically engage with theories of learning and teaching in higher education
-Engage in research in learning and teaching in higher education

In the most recent (2014-15) Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 100% of graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

More about this course

The MA Learning and Teaching in Higher Education is an integrated and supported course that enables you to:
-Take a lead in the development of the teaching of your subject
-Critically engage with theories of learning and teaching in higher education
-Engage in research in learning and teaching in higher education

The HE Academy-accredited option within the course leads to the award of Postgraduate Certificate. This engages with the course’s aims at the level of the subject, developing practitioners who are able to take a role in the development of teaching within their subject, and who are informed by theory, research and engagement with research related to their practice. The full MA option develops practitioners with a broader view of the teaching and learning process through additional modules focusing on the wider context. These practitioners are expected to engage with national debates about the development of learning and teaching, both within their subject and in general, and to enhance knowledge of the processes of learning and teaching through their dissertation/project.

You will be assessed by a variety of methods including essays, portfolios, presentations and project reports, as well as assessment and evaluation by your peers.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Facilitating Student Learning (core, 20 credits)
-Learning and Teaching Dissertation / Project (core, 60 credits)
-Theoretical Perspectives on Learning and Teaching in Higher Education (core, 20 credits)
-Applying Learning Technologies (option, 20 credits)
-Curriculum Evaluation and Development (option, 20 credits)
-Facilitating Online Learning and Collaboration (option, 20 credits)
-Managing the Assessment and Feedback Process (option, 20 credits)
-Negotiated Study Module (option, 20 credits)
-Researching Higher Education (option, 20 credits)
-Web-based Learning and Teaching (option, 20 credits)

After the course

This course is a professional development programme for those currently engaged in teaching and/or support of learning at higher education level. Successful participants are encouraged to go on to leadership roles, and/or to undertake further research and publication, in the field of learning and teaching in higher education.

PGCert LTHE provides eligibility for Fellowship of the Higher Education Academy (FHEA); eLearning modules are accredited by the Staff & Educational Development Association (SEDA).

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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This course allows you to develop an advanced knowledge of crime and offenders, as well as to assess contemporary trends and concepts in criminal justice policy and community safety. Read more
This course allows you to develop an advanced knowledge of crime and offenders, as well as to assess contemporary trends and concepts in criminal justice policy and community safety. In the most recent (2014-15) Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 100% of graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

More about this course

It will incorporate approaches to crime control within the community and penal institutions. You will also gain the methodological and analytic skills required to conduct research within the field of crime and criminal justice; this level of knowledge and skill can prepare you for doctoral study or research posts within the criminal justice arena, or can consolidate your professional experience.

You are assessed via essays, projects, examinations and a dissertation between 12,000 and 15,000 words in length. The dissertation forms a key element of the MSc. It allows you to pursue in depth a topic of your choosing and is to be completed over the summer study period.

Modular structure

The course consists of four core modules, and a dissertation of no more than 15,000 words.

Core modules:
-Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice
-Crime Control and Community Safety
-Criminological Research Methods
-Crime and Offender Patterns

Students also select one 'designate' module per semester, and these include (subject to availability):
-Community Development
-Sexual Violence: causes, consequences, and interventions
-Psychology and Criminal Behaviour
-Intelligence Analysis
-Urban Patterns and Spatial Analysis

After the course

The aim of the course is to prepare you for employment or further study in the criminal justice sector.

The curriculum will equip you for a range of careers in the criminal justice system and related professions, all with excellent recruitment prospects. Key career paths include the Metropolitan Police Service, Probation Service, Foreign Office, Prison Service, youth offending and community safety departments, as well as academic or government research posts.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

Read less
Train to teach Modern Languages to 11 to 16-year-olds with London Metropolitan University and begin your fulfilling career in secondary schools. Read more
Train to teach Modern Languages to 11 to 16-year-olds with London Metropolitan University and begin your fulfilling career in secondary schools. You’ll learn the principles of effective Modern Languages teaching and how to develop school childrens’ love of the foreign word. Your placements at our partnership schools will back up what you have learnt with hands-on practical experience. Attendees of our National College for Teaching and Leadership (NCTL) accredited PGCE Secondary courses attain high results, with 95% achieving an Ofsted good or outstanding grade by the end of the course and 96% going on to obtain employment, often with their placement schools.

More about this course

This NCTL accredited PGCE Secondary Modern Languages course leads to Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) and prepares you to teach 11 to 16-year-olds (Key Stages 3 and 4) in a secondary school environment. It also gives you the opportunity to teach the 16-18 age range.

The modern languages included are French, Spanish and German, and you will be developing pupils’ skills in speaking, reading, listening and writing the language they choose to learn.

If you only speak German or Spanish, we offer a 12-week Subject Knowledge Enhancement (SKE) in French, enabling you to teach French up to Key Stage 3. The SKE is fully funded and bursaries are available to eligible applicants.

At the University, you’ll study teaching methodology, pupil assessment and how children learn. There will also be collaborative and school-based projects with other trainees.

Based in London, this PGCE course will broaden your understanding of teaching in multicultural urban environments. Through your two school placements, you’ll learn how to help 11-16-year-olds develop their foreign languages effectively and fluently.

This commitment to high standards has led to positive reviews from Ofsted:

"Headteachers are particularly complimentary about the fact that the trainees and Newly Qualified Teachers are well prepared to meet the specific challenges of teaching pupils in the London environment."
Ofsted 2015

Your assessment will consist of four elements:
-School placement A
-School placement B, where your teaching ability will be assessed in relation to the standard for Qualified Teacher Status
-A Professional Practice Portfolio which is compiled throughout the year, detailing personal experiences and reflections on your development as a teacher, largely in relation to your practical teaching experience
-The Educational Research Assignment which allows you to explore an educational issue

There are no examinations.

You'll share feedback with your peers and colleagues on the placement, completing weekly reflections and contributing to online discussions in order to further develop your understanding of the secondary teacher role.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Curriculum Studies (core, 30 credits)
-Professionalism and Inclusive Practice (core, 30 credits)
-School Experience to Progress Point 2 (core, 15 credits)
-School Experience to Progress Point 5 (core, 45 credits)

What our students say

"I personally believe that London Met is an excellent PGCE course provider and the Modern Languages course prepares students very well for a teaching career in this subject. What I appreciated the most was the tutors and the relationships they were able to build with the students. The PGCE year can be a stressful one and it is very important for student teachers to feel supported. The tutors at London Met do this. They teach that in order to be a good teacher you have to encourage pupils and they do it with their student teachers as well. Excellent!" Former PGCE Secondary Modern Languages trainee

After the course

This intensive PGCE leads to Qualified Teacher Status (QTS), which enables you to teach Modern Languages to 11 to 16-year-olds. Our trainees have gone on to secure secondary teacher roles at schools including Ark Academy, Ralph Allen School, Bushey Academy and more.

Funding

Funding is available for many postgraduate courses leading to Qualified Teacher Status (QTS). Depending on your teachng subject and degree classification, you may be eligible for a bursary or scholarship of up to £30,000 through the teacher training bursary.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

Read less
Learn how to teach science and biology to 11 to16 -year-olds with these National College for Teaching and Leadership (NCTL)-accredited academic sessions at London Met and hands-on practical experience at our partnership schools. Read more
Learn how to teach science and biology to 11 to16 -year-olds with these National College for Teaching and Leadership (NCTL)-accredited academic sessions at London Met and hands-on practical experience at our partnership schools. You’ll explore the principles of teaching biology the most up-to-date methods of how to develop pupils’ love of this scientific field. Trainees on our PGCE Secondary courses attain high results, with 95% achieving an Ofsted good or outstanding grade by the end of the course and 96% going on to obtain employment, often with their placement schools.

More about this course

This NCTL-accredited PGCE Secondary Science with Biology course will help you gain the skills to become a competent teacher of science for students up to 14 years old, biology for 15 to 16-year-olds and achieve Qualified Teacher Status (QTS). You’ll also have the opportunity to work with the 16 to 18 age range.

In the sessions at London Met you’ll develop your teaching strategies and pedagogical techniques, as well as discovering the fundamentals of how children learn. These sessions include collaborative projects and school-based projects with other trainees, as well as learning the principles of teaching and pupil assessment.

This PGCE School Direct course takes advantage of its London location to broaden your understanding of teaching in multicultural and diverse urban environments. Through your two placements at one of our partnership schools, you’ll help develop lesson plans and contribute to the development of pupils’ scientific skills and knowledge. London Met also provides you with the opportunity for post-16-year-old teaching experience where possible.

Our commitment to high standards that has lead to high quality reviews from Ofsted:

"Headteachers are particularly complimentary about the fact that the trainees and Newly Qualified Teachers are well prepared to meet the specific challenges of teaching pupils in the context of London schools."
Ofsted 2015.

There are four formal elements:
-School placement A
-School placement B, where your teaching ability is assessed in relation to the Standards for Qualified Teacher Status
-The Educational Research Assignment, which allows you to explore an educational issue
-The Professional Practice Portfolio, which is compiled throughout the year, detailing personal experiences and reflections on your development as a teacher, largely in relation to your practical teaching experience

There are no examinations.

We place great emphasis on feedback from your peers and colleagues on the placement. You’ll complete a weekly reflection and contribute to discussions online in order to further develop your understanding of the role of a secondary teacher.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Curriculum Studies (core, 30 credits)
-Professionalism and Inclusive Practice (core, 30 credits)
-School Experience to Progress Point 2 (core, 15 credits)
-School Experience to Progress Point 5 (core, 45 credits)

What our students say

“I get so much support from my tutor, colleagues and the London Met team. The University itself has a great vibe, is highly social and very welcoming. I’m grateful to everyone at the University for all their help.” Zeinab Al-Ali, PGCE Secondary Science with Biology trainee

After the course

This intensive PGCE leads to Qualified Teacher Status (QTS), which enables you to teach biology to 11 to 16-year-olds. Our trainees have gone on to secure secondary teacher roles at schools including Ark Academy, Harris Girls Academy and more. Whether you have applied through London Met or School Direct, you’ll have the same opportunities for employment upon successful completion of the course.

Funding

Funding is available for many postgraduate courses leading to Qualified Teacher Status (QTS). Depending on your teaching subject and degree classification, you may be eligible for a bursary or scholarship of up to £30,000 through the teacher training bursary.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

Read less
The Professional Diploma is a design-driven course that will enable you to focus your skills and develop excellence in your work. Read more
The Professional Diploma is a design-driven course that will enable you to focus your skills and develop excellence in your work. In the most recent (2014-15) Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 96.9% of graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

More about this course

In an increasingly competitive profession we distinguish ourselves as an academic forum engaged responsibly and directly with the world around us. We are committed to expanding the creative possibilities through courageous and ambitious engagement with the world around us. Design drives the speculation within the school, used as both tool and intention.

The Professional Diploma is a design-based course that will enable you to focus your skills and develop excellence in your work. The main areas of study are in design, technology and practice, and history and theory. Each area is taught through a wide choice of tutors, studios and interest groups with a strong emphasis on self-directed study and ambitious agendas. You are encouraged to explore particular lines of interest and develop ideas in depth.

The course as a whole encourages fresh thinking, experiment and risk. You will also be encouraged to understand and engage with the society you are part of and serve; and to engage with social, political and economic infrastructures that predetermine built form. Our students have had considerable successes in the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) President's medals, winning the RIBA Silver Medal in 2012, 2003 and 2002, and the Bronze in 2004.

The architecture subject area is housed in a purpose designed building on Whitechapel High Street, created by our own architects, ARU, and has access to the Graduate Centre, designed by renowned architect, Daniel Libeskind. Students benefit from the course's central London location and its close proximity to its internationally renowned creative and industry hubs. The School's extensive networks encourage graduates of the course to expand their knowledge and skills through lectures, events and careers advice, leaving them with excellent career prospects.

Assessment

Your design projects will be assessed via your portfolio and a presentation at the end of the course. The history, theory and practice coursework is assessed through seminar papers and an essay. The technology studies are examined in portfolio and through a technology dissertation, coursework and professional reports.

Professional accreditation

Our course is fully accredited by the RIBA and ARB. Upon graduation you will receive your RIBA part 2 qualification, the second stage of three in the professional qualification of an Architect in the UK.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Advocacy: Practice Beyond Aesthetics (core, 20 credits)
-Applied Technology in Architecture (core, 40 credits)
-Design Level 4 Process and Proposal (core, 20 credits)
-Design Level 4 Subject and Context (core, 20 credits)
-Cinema and the City (option, 20 credits)
-Concepts of Space (option, 20 credits)
-Economics of Place (option, 20 credits)
-Forgetting of Air (option, 20 credits)
-Poetry and Architecture (option, 20 credits)
-Research for Spatial Planning and Specialism (option, 20 credits)
-Sustainable Communities and Governance of Place (option, 20 credits)
-The Problem of Irony (option, 20 credits)
-The Question of Technology (option, 20 credits)
-The Soundscape of Modernity (option, 20 credits)
-Urban Design (option, 20 credits)
-Writing About Architecture (option, 20 credits)

Year 2 modules include:
-Design Thesis Project: Resolution (core, 40 credits)
-Design Thesis Project: Specialisation and Proposition (core, 40 credits)
-Integrated Design Study (core, 20 credits)
-Advanced Digital Design Techniques (option, 20 credits)
-Changing Places (option, 20 credits)
-Critical Transformations (option, 20 credits)
-Digital Design Techniques (option, 20 credits)
-Energy Comfort and Buildings (option, 20 credits)
-Histories (option, 20 credits)
-Interpretation (option, 20 credits)
-Planning and Urban Practice (option, 20 credits)
-Planning and Urban Theory (option, 20 credits)
-Theories (option, 20 credits)

After the course

After securing a Professional Diploma in Architecture (RIBA 2), many students decide to study the Examination in Professional Practice (RIBA 3), following a period of practical experience. RIBA 2 also enables you to progress to a specialised Masters course.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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This practice-based course will prepare you for managing architectural projects and is the final step toward registration as an architect in the UK. Read more
This practice-based course will prepare you for managing architectural projects and is the final step toward registration as an architect in the UK. In the most recent (2014-15) Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 100% of graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

More about this course

The course is designed to ensure high standards in the professional practice of architecture and to give you the opportunity to extend your area of competence. It focuses on the design process but tempers this concern with the knowledge and experience needed for ideas to become reality in a way that is ethical, economical, efficient and legal.

Students are recruited from a wide range of design professions in the construction industry, and the teaching will examine critical events in your own work experience, that of other course members and of the profession at large. The course will also encourage you to feel confident with higher levels of professional responsibility. Our students have had considerable successes in the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) President's medals.

You'll benefit from the course's central London location and its close proximity to its internationally renowned creative and industry hubs. The School's extensive networks encourage graduates of the course to expand their knowledge and skills through lectures, events and careers advice, leaving them with excellent career prospects.

The course is assessed in four ways. There are three elements of coursework and documentation related to practical experience and its assimilation, in the form of a case study, a completed RIBA Practical Training Record or its equivalent and a critical self-evaluation. The fourth part of the assessment consists of two unseen examinations. A final viva voce examination assesses all four elements in a summative context.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-RIBA 3 (core, 60 credits)

After the course

RIBA Part 3 and subsequent registration with the Architects Registration Board (ARB) allow you to practice with the title of architect in the United Kingdom and European community.

The RIBA Visiting Board wrote a report about the University in January 2012.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

Read less
Taught by legal experts, this is an opportunity for LPC graduates to extend their research further in an area of interest within legal practice, through a research module and a dissertation. Read more
Taught by legal experts, this is an opportunity for LPC graduates to extend their research further in an area of interest within legal practice, through a research module and a dissertation. In the most recent (2014-15) Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 100% of graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

More about this course

You will be learning to apply academic understanding and research techniques to the analysis of law, policy and practice within your chosen area. We also aim to help you produce analytical, creative and original research that demonstrates the relationships between substantive law, policy, socio-economic context and legal practice.

This additional qualification is designed to enhance your career prospects, demonstrate your research capabilities and knowledge of a particular legal area, whatever branch of law you intend to follow.

We aim to find students appropriately linked vocational activity during their degree. We are fortunate to have a full time placement and employability officer dedicated to Law students.

Assessment will be through coursework and a dissertation.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Legal Practice Dissertation (core, 60 credits)
-Legal Research Methodology (core, 20 credits)

After the course

An LLM can enhance the LPC which qualifies you to enter into Work-Based Learning with a firm of solicitors or an in-house legal department. The LPC also provides a good grounding for practice as a paralegal, in local or health authorities, in local or central government, in commerce either in company secretarial/governance/ regulatory areas or if you aspire to being on a board of directors.

There are many regulatory roles, not just in commerce/ financial services but also for example in the environmental field. A background in housing/employment could be a route into local government or the voluntary sector.

Organisations our legal graduates have gone on to work for include the BBC, John Lewis PLC, the Crown Prosecution Service, the Citizens Advice Bureau, numerous local councils and many firms of solicitors.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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