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- https://www.kent.ac.uk/locations/medway/. Postgraduate programmes in journalism at Kent offer you the opportunity to research and learn in an environment that combines excellence in the practice of convergent, multimedia journalism with intellectual leadership in the history, ethics and future of the news industry. Read more

This course will be held at the Medway Campus

- https://www.kent.ac.uk/locations/medway/

Postgraduate programmes in journalism at Kent offer you the opportunity to research and learn in an environment that combines excellence in the practice of convergent, multimedia journalism with intellectual leadership in the history, ethics and future of the news industry.

Research programmes are best suited to students who have a clear and original idea of a topic that they would like to investigate in detail. The MA by Research entails producing a 40,000 word thesis; the MPhil programme demands a high level of research and analysis resulting in a dissertation of 50,000 words (MPhil).

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/111/journalism

About the Centre for Journalism

The Centre for Journalism is leading the development of journalism as an academic discipline rooted in professional newsroom practice. It was established in 2008 to achieve top standards in teaching and research.

A lively and welcoming community spirit exists within the Centre. There are regular social events, seminars and masterclasses. Recent visitors have included: Allan Little, BBC correspondent; Sarah Ivens founding Editor-in-Chief of OK! Magazine USA; Gavin Esler, former presenter of Newsnight; Jon Snow, presenter of Channel 4 News, Mark Thompson, former Director General of the BBC, Alex Crawford three times RTS TV journalist of the year, Stephanie Flanders former Economics Editor BBC and Stuart Ramsay Sky News chief Correspondent. Thanks to the range of research and professional interests in the Centre, we can offer wide scope for research supervision.

The Centre enjoys strong links with other academic departments including the School of History, Kent Law School and the School of Politics and International Relations. It encourages collaborative and interdisciplinary research and joint supervision.

Course structure

All first-year research students attend a Methodologies and Research Skills seminar. Through the Faculty of Social Sciences, the Centre provides training in methods of using sources and can assist in funding applications.

We welcome research applications across the range of expertise in the Centre and from all over the world.

Research areas

History of journalism, political reporting, environmental journalism, conflict reporting, journalism technology, democracy

Study support

Postgraduate resources
The Centre is based in state-of-the-art multimedia newsrooms equipped with the latest audio and video-editing technology, a radio studio and broadcast-quality television facilities. A dedicated postgraduate newsroom opened in September 2010. Newsroom computers offer a wide range of software for teaching and research support. Students have access to Press Association news wires, Sky News Radio and Reuters World Television News feeds. They use the Centre’s dedicated multimedia website, http://www.centreforjournalism.co.uk which offers live publishing facilities in text, audio and video. The site is a forum for debate about issues in journalism and the news industry involving students and practitioners in Britain and abroad.

The resources for journalism research at Kent are led by the Drill Hall Library at Medway. The journalism collection includes a comprehensive range of texts on the history, principles and practice of journalism. Specialist resources include a complete microfiche archive of popular newspapers of the Second World War. Students have access to online full-text journals plus extensive online newspaper resources. The Centre subscribes to all relevant UK journals. Research students have access to the SCONUL access scheme to visit and borrow from other UK libraries. The Drill Hall Library contains more than 250 study spaces, 370 computers and more than 150,000 items.

Dynamic publishing culture
Staff regularly contribute to newspapers, magazines, journals and books. These have included: This is Today – a Biography of the Today Programme, The Phone Hacking Scandal: Journalism on Trial, Mirage in the Desert? Reporting the Arab Spring, Face the Future: Tools for the Modern Media Age and Afghanistan, War and the Media (Tim Luckhurst); The Media, Politics and Public Life, Slow Living, Informing Voters? Politics, Media and the New Zealand Election 2008, Politics and the Media (Geoffrey Craig); What do We Mean by Local? (Ian Reeves), Specialist Journalism: Journalism Studies; Journalism: Theory, Practice & Criticism; Ethical Space; British Journalism Review; Parliamentary Affairs; Journal of Language and Politics; Environmental Communication; The Guardian; Media History; Political Quarterly; The Daily Telegraph; Independent; The Times; Sunday Telegraph; Toronto Globe and Mail; Los Angeles Times; The New Republic; The Word; Prospect.

Researcher Development Programme
Kent's Graduate School co-ordinates the Researcher Development Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/tstindex.html) for research students, which includes workshops focused on research, specialist and transferable skills. The programme is mapped to the national Researcher Development Framework and covers a diverse range of topics, including subjectspecific research skills, research management, personal effectiveness, communication skills, networking and teamworking, and career management skills

Careers

A postgraduate research degree in Journalism provides you with qualifications for a teaching career in Journalism or a related discipline. It can also provide you with expertise that can assist in a journalism career in a particular area of reportage. Other career options include public policy research, media promotions and public affairs.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Study International Politics to get behind the headlines as you discover structures and ideas that shape global affairs. The International Politics MA programme is for students who want to explore international politics more widely and then drill down to follow their unique interests and specialise their knowledge. Read more
Study International Politics to get behind the headlines as you discover structures and ideas that shape global affairs.

Who is it for?

The International Politics MA programme is for students who want to explore international politics more widely and then drill down to follow their unique interests and specialise their knowledge. The MA is designed to give you the chance to pursue your own questions about the way the world works – and to shape arguments where you feel it doesn’t.

Objectives

This is a course where you will challenge your own point of view. We probe the ideas that structure the way we think about the world and examine the institutions that determine events. We then focus on how you can use this new understanding to judge global affairs for yourself.

International Politics is an expansive and ever-changing subject so you learn about the broad contours of the field while developing specialisms backed by real-world research. The department’s academics are actively shaping policy, sitting on the advisory board for the Corbyn shadow cabinet, hosting talks on the human right to housing in London, and engaging in study groups around the Obama presidency. This keeps the content of the course effective and current, giving students a contemporary lens from which to view rapid political change.

These are some of the questions the course poses:
-Is the USA a benevolent global leader or a neo-imperial power?
-How does the shift in power from the West to the Rest reshape international politics in the 21st century?
-Can states act effectively in a world increasingly shaped by international institutions and global economic actors?

Placements

You may have the opportunity to undertake a placement, but it is not a formal requirement of the course. We encourage students to create their own, by fostering connections offered by the Careers Service. There is also the International Politics Careers Day, which explores career opportunities with international politics degrees and includes:
-Talks by speakers within the field (including alumni now working within the UK Department for International Development, the UK Ministry of Justice), UNESCO and the EU Commission.
-Talks by careers consultants and volunteering coordinators.
-Drop-in sessions with careers professionals focusing on CV writing, applications and volunteering.

Academic facilities

As part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

Teaching and learning

The course is taught by academics within the department with industry professionals offering insight in the form of talks for the Practitioner Series. This is a programme of talks from visiting speakers and alumni working within organisations such as The Refugee Council and Amnesty International.

The staff within our Department of International Politics are research active, enthusiastic and passionate about their work. Often this research and influence leads to policy change and many media appearances. Find out more about International Politics staff.
You can follow our staff’s activity through their Twitter feed: @cityintpolitics

Assessment

Each taught module is assessed by an essay, either a 5,000-word essay for 30 credit modules or a 3,000-word essay for 15 credit modules. Your final MA marks are derived from a combination of your essay and dissertation grades.

You are required to submit a dissertation of 15,000 words in an area linked to the MA degree. Your dissertation topic will be agreed with your personal tutor/supervisor.

Your work will be assessed by coursework alone, there are no exams. Many students develop their key interest first when they choose their elective modules, then when they write their essays, and finally when they write their dissertation over the summer term.

Modules

The structure of this MA means you can design your own degree. The core module 'Theories of International Politics' is taught in the first term. Throughout the year you can choose elective modules that suit your interests. You can also opt to study across departments with optional modules from the Department of Sociology and The City Law School.

Core modules
-Theories of International Politics (30 credits)
-International Politics Research Workshop
-International Politics Dissertation (60 credits)

Elective modules - choose 60 credits
Typical modules offered by the Department of International Politics:
-Understanding security in the 21st century (15 credits)
-International organisations in global politics (15 credits)
-Development and international politics (15 credits)
-Religion in global politics (15 credits)
-Global capitalism: past, present and future (30 credits)
-Global political economy (30 credits)
-Political economy of global finance (15 credits)
-The politics of forced displacement and resettlement (15 credits)
-Global governance (15 credits)
-International politics of the Middle East (15 credits)
-Global financial governance (15 credits)
-Strategy, diplomacy and decision-making (30 credits)
-US foreign policy (15 credits)
-Foreign policy analysis (15 credits)
-Economic diplomacy (15 credits)

Typical modules offered by the Sociology Department:
-Developments in communication policy (30 credits)
-Transnational media and communication (30 credits)
-Criminal minds (15 credits)
-Crime news (15 credits)

Typical modules offered by The City Law School:
-International human rights in law and practice (30 credits)
-Human rights in the EU (30 credits)
-International criminal law: crimes & institutions (30 credits)
-Law and war (30 credits)
-Minorities and indigenous people in international law (30 credits)
-International law & the use of force (30 credits)

Career prospects

The skills you will take away from this programme – those of research, analysis and presentation – are highly valued by employers. In 2014-15, 87.5% of City's International Politics graduates were in employment or further study six months after graduation. Current graduates now work within the following organisations:
-Amnesty International
-European External Action Service
-International Crisis Group
-Ministry of Economy and Finance
-The Open Rights Group
-The Grass Roots Group
-The United Nations
-UNESCO
-US Embassy

From government agencies to NGOs and human rights organisations, the course gives you the perfect foundation to prepare for a career in a wide range of fields. You will graduate with the ability to undertake in-depth research, challenge received explanations of topics in social and political life and to examine and critically evaluate the complex structure of relationships between governments, transnational actors, transnational networks and intergovernmental or governmental organisations.

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Study International Politics and Human Rights at City, and discover why you will never read international news in the same way again. Read more
Study International Politics and Human Rights at City, and discover why you will never read international news in the same way again.

Who is it for?

The International Politics and Human Rights programme is for students who want to explore international politics and human rights more widely and then drill down to specialise their knowledge. The MA is designed to give you the chance to create your own questions about the way the world works – and to shape arguments where you feel it doesn’t. These are some of the questions the course poses:
-Do human rights offer universal protections, or do they provide ideological cover for neo-imperialist powers?
-Can human rights provide protection to individuals in a way that supersedes the nation-state, or do they serve the interests of powerful states?
-Should human rights be concerned with the minimalist needs of security and subsistence, or should they aspire to grander visions of global justice?

Objectives

This is a course where you will challenge your own point of view. We unpick the ideas that structure the way we understand the world, so we can identify how those understandings shape global events. We then focus on how the way we view things may, in itself, be ethically problematic.

International Politics and Human Rights is an evolving subject so you explore unique specialisms backed by real-world research. The department’s academics are actively shaping policy, sitting on the advisory board for the Corbyn shadow cabinet, hosting talks on the human right to housing in London, and engaging in study groups around the Obama presidency. This keeps the content of the course effective and current, giving students a contemporary lens from which to view rapid political change.

Placements

You have the opportunity to undertake a placement, but it is not a formal requirement of the course. We encourage students to create their own, by fostering connections offered by the Careers Service. There is also the International Politics Careers Day, which explores career opportunities with international politics degrees and includes:
-Talks by speakers within the field (including alumni now working within the UK Department for International Development, the UK Ministry of Justice), UNESCO and the EU Commission.
-Talks by careers consultants and volunteering coordinators.
-Drop-in sessions with careers professionals focusing on CV writing, applications and volunteering.

Academic facilities

As part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

Teaching and learning

The course is taught by academics within the department with industry professionals offering insight in the form of talks for the Practitioner Series. This is a programme of talks from visiting speakers and alumni working within organisations such as The Refugee Council and Amnesty International.

Academic staff

The staff within our Department of International Politics are research active, enthusiastic and passionate about their work. Often this research and influence leads to policy change and many media appearances. Find out more about International Politics staff.
You can follow our staff’s activity through their Twitter feed: @cityintpolitics

Assessment

Each taught module is assessed by an essay, either a 5,000-word essay for 30 credit modules or a 3,000-word essay for 15 credit modules. Your final MA marks are derived from a combination of your essay and dissertation grades.

You are required to submit a dissertation of 15,000 words in an area linked to the MA degree. Your dissertation topic will be agreed with your personal tutor/supervisor.

Your work will be assessed by coursework alone, there are no exams.Many students develop their key interest first when they choose their elective modules, then when they write their essays, and finally when they write their dissertation over the summer term.

Modules

The structure of this MA means you can design your own degree. The first core module Human Rights and the Transformation of World Politics l is taught in the first term and Global Ethics: Principles, Power and Politics, is taught in the second term. Throughout the year you can choose elective modules that suit your interests. You can also opt to study across departments with optional modules from the Department of Sociology and The City Law School.

You take two 30-credit core modules, one in each term, totalling 60 credits. You will then take elective modules totalling 60 credits, which include 15 and 30 credit options, and complete your 60 credit dissertation in the third term as a student on the full-time programme (with submission in September of that year). You must also attend the dissertation workshops that are offered by the department, as it is a compulsory and important part of the MA programme.

Core modules
-Human Rights and the Transformation of World Politics IPM118 (30 credits)
-Global Ethics: Principles, Power and Politics IPM117 (30 credits)
-International Politics dissertation IPM111 (60 credits)

Elective modules - choose 60 credits
Typical modules offered by the Department of International Politics:
-Understanding Security in the 21st Century (15 credits)
-International Organisations in Global Politics (15 credits)
-Theories of International Politics (30 credits)
-Development and International Politics (15 credits)
-Religion in Global Politics (15 credits)
-Global Capitalism: Past, Present and Future (30 credits)
-Political Economy of Global Finance (15 credits)
-The Politics of Forced Migration (15 credits)
-Global Governance (15 credits)
-International Politics of the Middle East (15 credits)
-Global Financial Governance (15 credits)
-Strategy, Diplomacy and Decision-making (30 credits)
-US Foreign Policy (15 credits)
-Foreign Policy Analysis (15 credits)
-Economic Diplomacy (15 credits)
-Global Political Economy: Contemporary Approaches (30 credits)

Typical modules offered by the Department of Sociology:
-Developments in Communication Policy (30 credits)
-Transnational Media and Communication (30 credits)
-Criminal Minds (15 credits)
-Crime News (15 credits)

Typical modules offered by The City Law School:
-International Human Rights in Law and Practice (30 credits)
-Human Rights in the EU (30 credits)
-International Criminal Law: Crimes & Institutions (30 credits)
-Law and War (30 credits)
-Minorities and Indigenous People in International Law (30 credits)
-International Law & The Use of Force (30 credits)

*MA International Politics and Human Rights students have access to additional LLM options with The City Law School.

Career prospects

The skills you will take away from this programme – those of research, analysis and presentation – are highly valued by employers. In 2016 70% of City's International Politics graduates were in employment or further study six months after graduation. Current graduates now work within the following organisations:
-UNESCO
-Amnesty International
-The Open Rights Group
-The Grass Roots Group
-The United Nations
-US Embassy
-International Crisis Groupp
-Ministry of Economy and Finance
-European External Action Service

From human rights organisations to NGOs and government agencies, the course gives you the perfect foundation to prepare for a career in a wide range of fields. You will graduate with the ability to undertake in-depth research, challenge received explanations of topics in social and political life and to examine and critically evaluate the complex structure of relationships between governments, transnational actors, transnational networks and intergovernmental or governmental organisations.

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Welfare states everywhere face enormous challenges from population ageing, changes in family life and work-patterns, migration and the economic crisis. Read more
Welfare states everywhere face enormous challenges from population ageing, changes in family life and work-patterns, migration and the economic crisis. In a globalised and interdependent world, these issues can only be understood from an international perspective which accounts for these common pressures and processes, but which also recognises and engages with the diversity of national traditions and institutions for delivering welfare.

The International Social Policy programme takes a policy analytic approach to provide you with an advanced understanding of current debates, theories and concepts relevant to international social policy. You learn about the common features of social policy arrangements internationally and the variety and differences that characterise welfare across the countries and regions of the world. Drawing on the research-based expertise available at SSPSSR which relates to countries ranging from China, South Korea and Singapore in South East Asia to the UK, Germany and Sweden in Western Europe, you are equipped to understand how national and global forces interact to shape trajectories of welfare system development.

The programme enables you to apply theories and methods of social policy in exploring enduring cross cutting themes in social policy, including the prioritisation of equality and capabilities, as well as to drill down to how and why policy unfolds in key welfare fields. You develop policy analytic skills in relation to such areas as health, migration, pensions, education, social care, and children & family related policy. You acquire expertise in the use of primary and secondary data collection in areas pertaining to all these aspects of social policy, and are thus equipped to think critically about the development of social welfare systems in a global age across the full range of national contexts and policy situations.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/118/international-social-policy

About the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research

SSPSSR has a long and distinguished history, and is one of the largest and most successful social science research communities in Europe.

Academic staff specialise in research of international, comparative and theoretical significance, and we have collective strengths in the following areas: civil society, NGOs and the third sector; cross-national and European social policy; health, social care and health studies; work, employment and economic life; risk, ‘risk society’ and risk management; race, ethnicity and religion; social and public policy; sociology and the body; crime, culture and control; sociological theory and the culture of modernity.

Course structure

We place considerable emphasis on structured, interactive seminars with a high degree of student participation. You also join the staff/graduate seminars which allow MA and research students to become involved in a professional research culture.

The programme gives you a clear and confident grasp of social policy in developed and developing countries. You gain an advanced understanding of the relevant debates, theories and concepts of international issues alongside skills in research design and data collection.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. Current compulsory modules for this programme are: Critical Social Research: Truth, Ethics and Power; Design of Social Research; Key Issues in Comparative Social Policy.

You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

SO832 - Using Research-Advanced Critical Skills (20 credits)
SO833 - Design of Social research (20 credits)
SO877 - Key Issues in Comparative Social Policy (20 credits)
SO872 - Comparative Social Policy (20 credits)
SO876 - Organised Civil Society and the Third Sector (20 credits)
SO884 - Race, Difference and Belonging (20 credits)
SO894 - The Family, Parenting Culture and Parenting Policy (20 credits)
SO938 - Governing Science, Technology and Society in the 21st Century (20 credits)
SO838 - The Idea of Civil Society (20 credits)
SO839 - Fundraising and Philanthropy (20 credits)
SO867 - Foundations of Sociology (20 credits)
SA803 - Politics and Sociology of the Environment (20 credits)
SO813 - Sociology of health, illness and medicine (20 credits)
SO817 - Qualitative Research (20 credits)
SO819 - Quantitative Data Analysis (20 credits)
SO825 - Terrorism and Modern Society (20 credits)
SO998 - Dissertation (60 credits)

Assessment

Modules combine various forms of coursework; a research dissertation also acts as a modular component of the course in its own right.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide you with an advanced understanding of current debates, theories and concepts relevant to international social policy

- impart country-specific as well as cross-national empirical and theoretical knowledge of current challenges and processes of transformation of welfare systems

- enable you to apply theories and methods of social policy in exploring specific policy fields such as health, migration, pensions, education, social care, poverty and social exclusion, urban development, and family policy

- develop your skills in research design and data collection in areas pertaining to social policy

- familiarise you with using primary and secondary data to develop cutting-edge research in the field of international social policy.

Careers

Building on Kent’s success as the region’s leading institution for student employability, we place considerable emphasis on you gaining specialist knowledge in your chosen subject alongside core transferable skills.

We ensure that you develop the skills and competences that employers are looking for including: research and analysis; policy development and interpretation; independent thought; writing and presentation, as well as time management and leadership skills.

You also become fully involved in the professional research culture of the School. A postgraduate degree in the area of social and public policy is a particularly flexible and valuable qualification that can lead to many exciting opportunities and professions.

SSPSSR consistently ranks highly for student satisfaction and teaching quality, ranking 6th in the UK for our Social Policy students' employment prospects (2015 Complete University Guide).

Recent graduates have pursued careers in academia, journalism, local and central government, charities and NGOs in roles which utilise their wide range of skills and are often found in managerial positions.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Long Term and Chronic Conditions Management at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Long Term and Chronic Conditions Management at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The Master's degree in Long Term and Chronic Conditions Management aims to equip health and social care professionals and others, including new and recent graduates who contribute or plan to contribute to the strategically important area of long term and chronic conditions management.

Key Features of Long Term and Chronic Conditions Management

Performance:

- Since its inception in 2007, the programme has consistently produced successful, high achieving postgraduates

Teaching and Employability:

- Taught by experienced academics many of whom are also qualified teachers, research active and have a wealth of professional experience in chronic conditions
- Students have the opportunity to develop a bespoke programme relevant to their particular interest and/or speciality
- Students have a choice for their dissertation option, including the novel opportunity to draft a paper to be submitted for publication
- Students can take advantage of inter-professional learning in small groups and the opportunity to study with international students and those enrolled on other Masters programmes

The increasing burden of chronic illness is one of the greatest challenges facing health systems globally. In the UK, approximately 18 million people live with a long term or chronic condition and this number is expected to double by 2030. Approximately 80% of GP consultations, 60% of days spent in hospital and two thirds of all emergency hospital admissions are associated with chronic conditions (Department of Health 2004).

Managing long term and chronic conditions currently accounts for almost 70% of the NHS budget and these costs are projected to increase significantly given the ageing population and escalating risk factors such as obesity and inactivity.

Long term and chronic conditions can have profound and far reaching implications on all aspects of peoples’ lives and can present patients (and families) with a spectrum of needs.

People living with a long term or chronic condition require support, care and rehabilitation from a wide range of professionals in health, social and voluntary care sectors. In addition, effective health promotion, prevention, self-care and self-management will help ensure that chronic illnesses are avoided wherever possible and that people are more informed to safely and effectively manage their health and wellbeing.

This requires complex responses over extended periods of time, coordinated, proactive and collaborative input from the health, social care and voluntary sectors, patients, carers and lay personnel (as in the Expert Patient Programme). These need to be optimally embedded with systems which actively promote and support sustainable stakeholder collaboration and patient empowerment.

Modules

Modules on the Long Term and Chronic Conditions Management programme typically include:

• Theory and Practice of Long Term and Chronic Conditions Management
• Foundations in Health Promotion
• Foundations in Research
• Health Psychology of Long Term and Chronic Illness
• Social Aspects of Long Term and Chronic Illness
• The Management of Parkinson's Disease-Related Conditions
• Foundations in Public Health and Primary Health Care
• Partnerships, Public Health and Epidemiology
• Public Health Practice
• Chronic Condition Management: Diabetes
• Advancing Practice in End of Life Care
• Assistive Technology in Health and Social Care
• Politics and Policies
• Theory and Practice of Leadership and Management in Health and Social Care
• Applied Anatomy and Pathophysiology for Long Term Chronic Conditions Management
• Chronic Pain Management

Long Term and Chronic Conditions Management Course Structure

The MSc Long Term and Chronic Conditions is designed to be both multi-disciplinary and inter-professional and thereby mirror long term and chronic condition management within the National Health Service (NHS) and government initiatives.

This course is structured as either a one year full-time or three year part-time modular taught Master's degree. The core structure is based around a holistic approach to long term and chronic conditions management, coupled with research.

The Long Term and Chronic Conditions Management programme offer students the flexibility to choose a “bespoke” path that enables them to develop personally and professionally relevant qualifications with a range of optional modules on offer.

Long Term and Chronic Conditions Management students can ‘drill down’ within their specialist area, for example, health promotion, leadership or cancer rehabilitation.

Career Prospects

Current and previous Long Term and Chronic Conditions Management students have roles as nurses, physiotherapists, podiatrists, Occupational Therapists, chiropractors, physicians and health science graduates.

Many have secured new roles in healthcare whilst studying or on completion of the programme, and others have or are considering progressing to doctoral level studies or further professional qualifications.

Long Term and Chronic Conditions Management students have presented work at national conferences and have published work or are in the process of doing so.

Staff Expertise

Programme Director, Dr Tessa Watts, has expertise in supporting self-management and has completed the Health Foundation’s Advanced Development Programme for Practitioners. Tessa is also co-chair of the Chronic Conditions Research group in the College of Human and Health Sciences at Swansea University, and publishes primarily in the areas of cancer, palliative care and healthcare education.

Dr Sherrill Snelgrove has expertise in chronic pain management. Sherrill is co-chair of the Chronic Conditions Research group, alongside Tessa, and publishes in the area of chronic pain management.

Dr Jaynie Rance is a chartered Health Psychologist with particular expertise in lifestyle behaviour change.

Postgraduate Community

The College of Human and Health Sciences has a vibrant postgraduate community with students drawn from a variety of backgrounds and nationalities. The College is known for its friendly, welcoming and supportive environment, which combined with its extensive facilities, state-of-the-art technology and superb beachside location, helps to ensure that students benefit from an exceptional student experience.

In addition, students have access to a wide range of excellent facilities and equipment for realistic workplace experiences.

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Oil and gas remains one of our major energy resources and the recovery of these resources is increasingly important, just as it was in the last century. Read more

Overview

Oil and gas remains one of our major energy resources and the recovery of these resources is increasingly important, just as it was in the last century. What has changed with time is the need to recover more of the reservoir, operating in harsher environments both physically and economically. Equally there are challenges due to changes in knowledge and the relative lack of experience from engineers in the market. Traditionally in the UK, the vast majority of engineers entering the industry do so through two routes; first as facilities or surface engineers - chemical and process, mechanical and electrical engineering working on the processing systems to stabilise fluid from the reservoir. The second route is through the petroleum engineering or sub-surface engineering route which sees engineers develop knowledge and skills necessary to locate, drill and extract oil and gas reserves.

This programme (See http://www.postgraduate.hw.ac.uk/prog/msc-oilandgas-technology/ ) was been designed with the help of the industry to provide a cross over between surface and sub-surface engineering functions with the intent that future oil and gas operations can be better optimised to enhance recovery of the reserves. In order to maximise recovery, surface engineers in an operating company must communicate effectively with the reservoir and production engineers within their own company as well as develop relationships with and assess the work of contractors and vendors when designing and constructing facilities. Therefore, surface engineers need to be competent not only in the areas of process design, pipeline engineering, but also be familiar with reservoir engineering, production technology and a variety of other engineering and management subjects, such as safety and control, management of projects, economics and planning, etc.

The programme contains 8 taught courses covering key topics in surface and sub-surface engineering. Two projects towards the end of the programme provide opportunities for participants to demonstrate their knowledge in the design of a surface facility, and to study a specific topic of interest.

Scholarships available

We have a number of fully funded Scottish Funding Council (SFC) scholarships available for students resident in Scotland applying for Oil and Gas Technology. Find out more about this scholarship and how to apply http://www.hw.ac.uk/student-life/scholarships/postgraduate-funded-places.htm .

Programme content

For the MSc and PGDip degrees, students are required to take eight taught courses. MSc students then complete the programme by undertaking two 30 credit projects.

Find more information on programme content here http://www.postgraduate.hw.ac.uk/prog/msc-oilandgas-technology/

English language requirements

If you are not from a UKBA recognised English speaking country, we will need to see evidence of your English language ability. If your first degree was taught in English a letter from them confirming this will be sufficient. Otherwise the minimum requirement for English language is IELTS 6.5 or equivalent, with a minimum of 5.5 in each skill.

The University offers a range English language courses (See http://www.hw.ac.uk/study/english.htm ) to help you meet the English language requirement prior to starting your masters programme:
- 14 weeks English (for IELTS of 5.5 with no more than one skill at 4.5);
- 10 weeks English (for IELTS of 5.5 with minimum of 5.0 in all skills);
- 6 weeks English (for IELTS 5.5 with minimum of 5.5 in reading & writing and minimum of 5.0 in speaking & listening)
- 3 weeks English refreshers course (for students who meet the English condition for the MSc but wish to refresh their English skills prior to starting).

Find information on Fees and Scholarships here http://www.postgraduate.hw.ac.uk/prog/msc-oilandgas-technology/

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Petroleum geology (oil and gas geology) is a large sector which employs 1000s of graduates every year. Read more
Petroleum geology (oil and gas geology) is a large sector which employs 1000s of graduates every year. Globally there is an increasing demand for skilled petroleum geoscientists who can provide the quantitative, reservoir-focused geoscience skills needed by the hydrocarbon industry to maximize the rate of production and optimize recovery (total oil/gas) from a field. This MSc reflects the slow change of emphasis from exploration to production geoscience in mature basins such as the North Sea and Europe's Atlantic Margin.

The MSc in Petroleum Reservoir Geoscience at Liverpool is unique in the UK and links in closely with oil and gas industry professionals to develop graduates with specific knowledge and focus on the reservoir side of Petroleum Geoscience. This new MSc develops Geology, Geophysics and general Geoscience knowledge and skills, giving you the opportunity to gain expertise and experience to prepare you for your future career.

This MSc will explore the basinal context of petroleum reservoirs and introduce you to petroleum economics and risk & uncertainty analysis. You will gain in depth knowledge of how to define the shape, structure, stratigraphy and volume of reservoirs using remote sensing and geological models, as well as how to define rock properties with advanced seismic techniques. You will work with petrophysical data acquired from wells, to develop your understanding of structure and stratigraphy of the reservoir and incorporate data from drill-core.

In addition, you will develop your knowledge of reservoir sedimentology, fluid geochemistry and dynamic data analysis and simulation to refine the geological model. You will also use learn about using appropriate outcrop analogues and correlation techniques.

Outcrop studies and field work will include visits to rural and coastal locations around the UK (from northern Scotland to southern England) at sites where many of the reservoirs in the North Sea and other UK basins outcrop at the surface.

Guest lectures from world leading experts in academia and industry will be held throughout the course and give you the opportunity to incorporate the latest techniques, challenges and requirements for petroleum reservoir geoscience into your studies.

The 12-month course runs from September and consists of a taught component and a dissertation, totaling 180 credits.

The taught component represents 120 credits and is organised into two 12-week semesters with assessment or examinations at the end of each semester in January and May. The remaining 60 credits are allocated to the research project.

Assessment is by a combination of: examinations, coursework, teamwork, assessed field work and presentations and an individual dissertation.

Why Earth and Ocean Sciences?

Leaders in our field

Our staff are leaders in their fields and we're well-funded for both research and teaching.

We'll encourage and train you to publish academic papers

It's not unusual for our students to leave with two to three papers published in international peer-reviewed journals.

Career prospects

The MSc in Petroleum Reservoir Geoscience at Liverpool has been designed following detailed discussions with senior industry professionals in major oil and gas companies and with senior figures in some of the UK's largest consultancy companies who provide services to the oil and gas industry. Together, they have helped shape the MSc in order to provide successful graduates from this course with the maximum chance of obtaining well-paid, fulfilling careers.

Taken together, the course leader (programme director) and course teachers have wide experience of applied studies and research work joint with the oil and gas industry and are acknowledged leaders in their fields. They have worked with companies including: BP, Shell, ExxonMobil, Chevron, ConocoPhillips, Eni, Statoil, Saudi Aramco, Petrobras, BG, Woodside, Nexen, Total, BHP, EnQuest, Taqa, Fairfield, CNR, Dana, as well as a range of companies that provide services to the oil industry. They have undertaken joint oil and gas industry projects in many parts of the world including: UK, Norway, Ireland, France, the Netherlands, Belgium, Germany, USA, Canada, Brazil, Equador, Turkey, Greece, Egypt, Morocco, the Sudan, Yemen, Saudi Arabia, Abu Dhabi, Azerbaijan, Russia, Indonesia, India, Columbia and the Philippines. This breadth of experience and contacts demonstrate the international relevance of this MSc.

It is expected that graduates from this MSc will be in high demand from the petroleum industry but its graduates may seek to continue their studies towards a PhD in this area.

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Because you’ll be stretched, pushed and, ultimately, transformed. Our challenging, flexible program – driven by the best minds in business education – unleashes your potential, giving you the confidence and skills to lead anywhere in the world. Read more

Why Wharton?

Because you’ll be stretched, pushed and, ultimately, transformed. Our challenging, flexible program – driven by the best minds in business education – unleashes your potential, giving you the confidence and skills to lead anywhere in the world.

Curriculum Structure

https://mba.wharton.upenn.edu/curriculum-structure/

Wharton’s MBA curriculum offers depth, breadth, and options. The curriculum emphasizes an intensive, flexible core in general management, plus the depth of 19 majors and breadth of more than 200 electives.

You will customize your learning by selecting a course pathway through content areas based on your education, career experience, and goals — not just through selection of your electives and majors, but through choices in the core.

- Core
Offered as quarter- or semester-long courses, the core curriculum covers traditional management disciplines- with an emphasis on analytical rigor — accounting, finance, marketing, management, operations, statistics, and microeconomics — as well as the leadership, ethics, and communication skills necessary for leadership. This series of courses provides a rigorous grounding for the individualized coursework that follows.

Wharton’s core includes 9.5 credit units, distributed in two parts:
- Fixed Core: 3.25 credit units fixed in the first semester
- Flexible Core: 6.25 credit units in the first semester or anytime thereafter

- Elective Curriculum
Wharton’s elective curriculum, 10 credit units, provides depth and breadth across traditional and nontraditional areas of management education.

- Majors: Choose from 19 majors.
- Electives: Choose among 200+ electives across 10 academic departments, or take courses in others of Penn’s 11 world-leading schools.

Pre-term

Your Wharton MBA begins with Pre-Term. With a three-week immersion, Pre-Term sets you up for a strong academic experience and ensures that everyone in your diverse incoming class begins from a common knowledge base. Pre-Term also provides the platform upon which you will develop your curriculum plan while bonding with new classmates and building your own sense of community and school pride.

Pre-Term is required. It includes coursework, a Learning Team experience, and the chance to explore Philadelphia and build relationships with your cluster and other classmates.

You will be introduced to your Learning Team at a Learning Team Retreat in an environment free of distraction. This initiates the process of strong team formation. The Teams complete the Management 610: Foundations of Teamwork and Leadership course, and continue the collaboration throughout the fixed core.

Other elements of Pre-Term include MBA Convocation, International Student Orientation, and an Accelerated Corporate Finance Prep Course for students who need it.

Year One

The first year is intense. You will begin by moving through key courses with your learning team — a group of five or six classmates with whom you will work closely on projects. Then, you’ll select from many options as you branch out in the second half of First Year and beyond. You’ll have a choice of content areas for some core courses and will start to pick your electives. In addition, you will become involved in co-curricular and extracurricular activities that tie into the courses you choose.

Year Two

You will take any remaining core requirements, drill deeper within the wide range of electives, and develop one or more areas of expertise. For customized interests, students often partner with faculty and businesses on individual advanced student projects.

Your Career

Your Career

Wharton MBA Career

Tat-Seng Chiam, WG’14, is using his dual MPA/MBA degree to meld traditional business and social impact.
Wharton MBA Careers

Devangi Nishar, WG’14, identifies experiences within Wharton to set herself on a path to fulfill her passion for retailing.
Wharton MBA Careers

Tom Baldwin, WG’13, parlayed a background in investment banking and Brazilian start-ups into a dream job in venture capital.
Be idealistic. Be ambitious. When you graduate, you’ll have the knowledge and leadership skills to be successful in the global workplace. Employers tell us that they value Wharton graduates for their strategic thinking, breadth of core competencies, and ability to hit the ground running in any industry.

Throughout your Wharton experience, skilled advisors with industry-specific knowledge and experience will support you through every stage of the job search – from self-assessment to offer management. Through a combination of state-of-the art career services, strong relationships with employers worldwide, and one of the largest global networks of alumni of any business school, achieving your career goals, both immediately after graduation and throughout your career, is within your reach.

- MBA Career Management

Wharton’s career management team, comprised of professional career coaches with a wide range of industry experience, will provide you with practical and actionable advice throughout your job search as well as important insights into your industry of interest. The office is recognized as one of the most responsive to both recruiter and student needs. Some of the services the Career Management office provides include:

- Coaching throughout the job search process‒partnering with students to develop and hone job search skills
- Connections with a wide recruiting base across a diverse range of industries and functions.
- Commitment to international corporate outreach and the needs of the international student population.
- Dedication to bringing leading companies and executives to campus and organize successful events.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.applyweb.com/upennw/index.ftl

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Petroleum engineering is key to the functioning of the modern world, providing both energy and materials for industry. Teesside is a major European centre for the chemical and petroleum processing sector, making it an ideal location for individuals seeking to study for an MSc with industrial relevance. Read more
Petroleum engineering is key to the functioning of the modern world, providing both energy and materials for industry. Teesside is a major European centre for the chemical and petroleum processing sector, making it an ideal location for individuals seeking to study for an MSc with industrial relevance.

Course details

The programme of lectures and project work, encompasses a wide range of petroleum fundamentals, pertinent to the modern petroleum industry. Project work provides an opportunity for ideas and methods, assimilated through lectures and tutorials, to be applied to real field evaluation and development design problems. The course is applied in nature and has been designed so that on completion, you are technically well prepared for a career in industry.

Professional accreditation

Our MSc Petroleum Engineering is accredited by the Energy Institute, under licence from the Engineering Council. This means that it meets the requirements for further learning for Chartered Engineer (CEng) under the provisions of UK-SPEC.

By completing this professionally accredited MSc you could benefit from an easier route to professional membership or chartered status, and it can help improve your job prospects and enhance your career. Some companies show preference for graduates who have a professionally accredited qualification, and the earning potential of chartered petroleum engineers can exceed £100,000 a year.

Our Society of Petroleum Engineering (SPE) student chapter is one of only nine in the UK. SPE is the largest individual member organisation serving managers, engineers, scientists and other professionals worldwide in the upstream segment of the oil and gas industry. Through our SPE chapter we can invite professional speakers from industry, and increase the industrial networking opportunities for students.

What you study

For the Postgraduate Diploma (PgDip) award you must successfully complete 120 credits of taught modules. For an MSc award you must successfully complete 120 credits of taught modules and a 60-credit master's research project.

You select your master’s research projects from titles suggested by either industry or our academic staff, but you may also, with your supervisor’s agreement, suggest your own titles.

Core modules
-Drill Engineering and Well Completion
-Hydrocarbon Production Engineering
-Material Balance and Recovery Mechanisms
-Petroleum Chemistry
-Petroleum Economics and Simulation
-Petroleum Reservoir Engineering
-Practical Health and Safety Skills
-Research and Study Skills

MSc candidates
-Research Project

Modules offered may vary.

Teaching

The course is delivered using a series of lectures, tutorials and laboratory sessions.

Our MSc Petroleum Engineering is supported by excellent laboratory and engineering machine workshop facilities including fluid flow measurement, computer modelling laboratories, other laboratories and workshops, an excellent library and computing facilities. We have invested around £150,000 in laboratory equipment particularly in within core analysis and enhanced oil recovery.

We have several computer laboratories equipped with specialised and general-purpose software. This generous computing provision gives you extended access to industry-standard software – it allows you to develop skills and techniques using important applications. For upstream processes, Teesside University has access to educational software packages like Petrel, Eclipse, CMG, PIPESIM and Ecrin to simulate the behaviour of oil reservoirs, calculating oil in situ, and oil and gas production optimisation. As for downstream processes, you can use HYSYS to test different scenarios to optimise plant designs.

Facilities include:
Enhanced oil recovery and core analysis laboratory
The flow through porous media, enhanced oil recovery techniques and core analysis is done in the core flooding lab. The lab is equipped with core plugging and trimming, core preparation and conventional core properties measurement equipment. At a higher level, the lab is also equipped to perform some special core analysis measurements such as fluid relative permeabilities as well as rock surface wetting quantification.

Petrophysics laboratory
The petrophysics lab allows you to study the properties of rocks, particularly the measurement of porosity and evaluation of permeability. The lab is equipped with sieve analysis equipment to investigate grain sorting and its effect on permeability and the porosity of rocks. You are able to gauge saturation and fluid flow through porous media.

Surface characterisation laboratory
The rock surface characterisation lab is equipped with a zeta analyser to measure the rock surface electric charge. You study the rock surface wetting state, adsorption and desorption potential using digitised contact angle apparatus and thermos-gravimetric apparatus respectively.

Drilling laboratory
The drilling lab is equipped with mud measurement equipment including mud density, mud rheology and mud filtration systems to enable you to measure mud cake and formation damage. The lab highlights the importance of oilfield drilling fluids.

Assessment varies from module to module. The assessment methodology could include in-course assignments, design exercises, technical reports, presentations or formal examinations. For your MSc project you prepare a dissertation.

Employability

These courses provide specialist education tailored to the requirements of both the upstream and downstream petroleum industry. The relevance of this education combined with careful selection of candidates has encouraged oil and gas companies to target our graduates for recruitment over the years.

The petroleum industry is subject to dramatic changes of fortune over time, with the oil price capable of very rapid rates of change in either direction. Petroleum, however, remains the dominant source of energy, with current world production of oil and gas at record rates. In this environment, companies face increasing technological and commercial challenges to keep their wells flowing and are increasingly dependent on input from petroleum engineers and geoscientists.

It is widely recognised that a steady influx of fresh people and ideas is vital for the longer-term success and stability of an organisation, and it is therefore expected that recruitment will continue, especially for those with motivation and the appropriate qualifications.

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