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Masters Degrees (Dress History)

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The Masters in Dress & Textile Histories provides you with the skills to research and interpret the history of dress and textiles. Read more
The Masters in Dress & Textile Histories provides you with the skills to research and interpret the history of dress and textiles. Drawing on the knowledge of interdisciplinary academic and curatorial experts, the programme combines taught and research components based on a combination of theoretical and object based approaches. Working with museum collections, archives and historic interiors you will also be given a unique insight into the curation, interpretation and preservation of historic dress and textile collections.

Why this programme

-The programme provides you with a unique opportunity within the UK to study historic dress and textiles, enabling you to develop knowledge and understanding of theory and practice in dress and textile histories in a critical and/or historical context
-Scotland has a rich textile heritage and Glasgow is the ideal city in which to study dress and textile history, as there are internationally significant object and archival collections in the city and close by, including the National Museums Scotland, Paisley Museum and Art Gallery, and the Scottish Business Archives at the University of Glasgow.
-You will have privileged access to primary source material, objects and archives, including at the University of Glasgow’s Hunterian Museum and Art Gallery and Glasgow Museums.
-The work placement option will enable you to develop your professional expertise within the heritage sector.

Programme structure

The taught component consists of three core courses and three optional courses running over two semesters. This is followed by a period of supervised research and writing of the dissertation which is submitted at the end of August. The dissertation is 15,000 words in length (including footnotes but excluding bibliography) and will be an in-depth critical exploration on a topic chosen in consultation with the tutors and the programme convenor.

A number of study visits are built into the programme, introducing important local collections. You will also undertake a four-day study trip to see relevant collections in another UK city.

Teaching is delivered by a combination of in-house specialist and visiting scholars and experts. The lectures are enhanced by seminar discussions, some based in museums and galleries, giving you the opportunity to present your ideas and discuss them with classmates in a supportive yet challenging environment.

Core courses
-Framing Dress and Textile Histories
-Research Methods in Practice
-Museums and the Making of Dress and Textile Histories

Optional courses
-The Birth of Modern Fashion? Textiles and Dress, 1680 - 1815
-Understanding Textiles
-Victorian Visions: Dress and Textiles c.1837-1901
-Material Cultures

You may also choose from the following options run by History of Art:
-Work placement
-Independent study

Or from the following options in the College of Arts:
-A Humanities Advanced Technology and Information Institution (HATII) course : 2D Digitisation (Theory and Practice)
-A course from elsewhere in the College of Arts, subject to the approval of the programme convenor.

Career prospects

The attributes you gain will be attractive to employers from museums, the heritage sector, art dealers and auction houses. You could also get into theatre, film and television production as a costume researcher/designer. The programme also offers an excellent foundation upon which to progress to PhD studies and an academic career.

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The distinctive emphasis of Goldsmiths' Department of History is a theorised, interdisciplinary and comparative approach to research- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-history/. Read more
The distinctive emphasis of Goldsmiths' Department of History is a theorised, interdisciplinary and comparative approach to research- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-history/

The culture of the Department of History is open, friendly and accessible, and research students are encouraged to be innovative in their use of sources and methodologies.

Our staff is young and we are on the cutting-edge of our fields and the student-teacher ratio allows us to devote an unmatched amount of time to individual supervision. Find out more about staff in the department.

MPhil and PhD topics in the department currently include:

The Song of the Pen: Penny Romantic Literature 1839-89
The Freak Show in Nineteenth-Century Britain
British Women and German Prisoners of War in the 1940s
Decoding Dress in Interwar Detective Fiction
The British Diaspora - Race Return Migration and Identity in 20th Century Britain
Atatürk and his Cult - A Visual History, 1918-1968
Another Balkan Myth? The Extreme Right Wing in Serbia: Indigenous Phenomenon or Foreign Adaptation?
London Schools and Children, 1870-1920
The Seekers Found: Radical Religion during the English Revolution
Find out more about research degrees at Goldsmiths.

The MPhil programme offers the opportunity for the student to continue their research to a PhD.

Assessment is by thesis and viva voce.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Professor Jan Plamper.

Department

History at Goldsmiths is ranked 11th in the UK for the quality of our research**

**Research Excellence Framework 2014, Times Higher Education research intensity subject rankings

From the occult to dictators, from war to revolution, from madness to medicine, and from the body to ideas – this is history at Goldsmiths.

As a department we have a wide range of expertise covering all these areas and more. So as a student here you’ll be able to explore how people in past societies lived, loved, worked and worshipped.

For us, history isn’t just a sequence of events. We study the past thematically as well as chronologically. You’ll be thinking about the way history is informed by a wide range of other subjects and how knowledge of the past can help you to understand the world we live in today.

Skills & Careers

Our students have taken up academic posts in history and related fields around the world; others are employed in the media and as researchers and teachers.

How to apply

Before you apply for a research programme, we advise you to get in touch with the programme contact, listed above. It may also be possible to arrange an advisory meeting.

Before you start at Goldsmiths, the actual topic of your research has to be agreed with your proposed supervisor, who will be a member of staff active in your general field of research. The choice of topic may be influenced by the current research in the department or the requirements of an external funding body.

If you wish to study on a part-time basis, you should also indicate how many hours a week you intend to devote to research, whether this will be at evenings or weekends, and for how many hours each day.

Research proposals

Along with your application and academic reference, you should also upload a research proposal at the point of application.

This should be in the form of a statement of the proposed area of research and should include:

delineation of the research topic
why it has been chosen
an initial hypothesis (if applicable)
a brief list of major secondary sources

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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The specific character of this programme lies in the way it unites the close study of objects and related images, with historical research and cultural theory. Read more
The specific character of this programme lies in the way it unites the close study of objects and related images, with historical research and cultural theory. Emphasis is placed on the design, production, diffusion and consumption of domestic goods - whether for elite markets or everyday use - rather than capital goods. Approaches to the history of the decorative arts and design are inter-disciplinary and make use of methodological developments in ethnography, gender studies, economic history and other academic fields. Students can either pick a specialist or generalist pathway on this programme to suit their own specific interests, depending upon their personal choice of essay and dissertation research directions.

The University of Brighton is recognised nationally and internationally as one of the leading institutions for the study of the history of decorative arts and design. This course is the only MA in the field based in a school which gained a grade 5 in the national Research Assessment Exercise, an indication of international excellence.

The course draws on the wide-ranging academic expertise of staff in the fields of the history of decorative arts and design, dress history, material culture, museology and social history. The department is based in a Regency building overlooking the famous Royal Pavilion of Brighton constructed in the late eighteenth-early nineteenth century period, close to Brighton's famous sea front and in the heart of the city.

Career and progression opportunities
The course has a healthy employment record, many graduates taking up careers in museums, galleries, arts administration, auction houses, journalism, publishing and education. Others study for further professional qualifications or postgraduate study.

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Inventing Modern Art enables you to understand how painting, design and architecture took new forms and meanings in an age of radical social, scientific and technological change. Read more
Inventing Modern Art enables you to understand how painting, design and architecture took new forms and meanings in an age of radical social, scientific and technological change. Working with leading experts, you will learn to interpret these from theoretical as well as object-based approaches.

Why this programme

-World-leading resources, from Charles Rennie Mackintosh’s School of Art to the Burrell Collection and The Hunterian, home to the world’s largest public Whistler display.
-State-of-the-art collections access at the new Kelvin Hall Study Centre, and tuition by specialists including the Mackintosh and European Modernism Academic Curator.

Programme structure

The programme offers a wide-ranging mix of taught and research components, and is taught by a team including the Academic Curator in Mackintosh studies and European Modernism, and experts in the Enlightenment, Whistler, Impressionism, the Vienna Secession, and dress history.

The 20-credit core course on 'Research Methods in Practice' is taken by all students in Semester 1, and provides an introduction to the key techniques and principles of advanced art-historical study and research. This provides a foundation for the programme's other components, which consist of:
-A compulsory dissertation (60 credits; 15-20,000 words, including footnotes and bibliography). This is submitted in August and written under the guidance of a specialist tutor. It provides opportunity for self-directed research on a topic chosen by the student in consultation with the programme convener and the tutor.
-Five individual option courses, each worth 20 credits. These enable you to study particular themes or artistic movements in depth, and, if desired, also to obtain work experience. They include opportunities for first-hand engagement with relevant work in local collections and the new Kelvin Hall Collections Study Centre, and are selected from the following list.

Some courses are taught in Semester 1 and some in Semester 2 (not all are available each year):
-Whistler, Impressionism, and European Avant-Gardes
-Impressionism: Innovation and Invention 1874-1926
-The Artistic House
-Reading International Art Nouveau
-Historicism: German Art, Architecture and Design 1850-1918
-The Birth of Modern Fashion? Textiles and Dress, 1680-1815
-Victorian Visions: Dress and Textiles c. 1837-1901
-Scottish Textile Histories
-Object-based research in the decorative arts
-Collecting East Asian Art
-Scientists, Antiquarians and Collectors
-Landscape Art and the Geography of 18th Century Britain
-Cultures of Collecting
-Provenance
-Work Placement
-Independent Study
-Student Exhibition
-Semester Abroad (Ecole du Louvre, Paris)
-Research Forum

One or more of your option courses may be chosen from those available in other College of Arts subjects, to create a distinctive interdisciplinary emphasis within your degree. The programme convener will give guidance on choices relevant to your personal goals and interests.

Career prospects

The programme provides a strong foundation for work in the museum, heritage, and education sectors, as well as in media, publishing, and arts administration. Its distinctive object-based study sessions and field trips introduce you to key professionals, whilst the placement option provides 'live' work experience - an essential first step in much arts employment. Our Art History Masters' graduates have secured curatorial posts at institutions including the Palace of Westminster, V&A Museum, Ironbridge Museum, and Thomas Jefferson's Monticello, as well as specialist positions with film and TV companies and auction houses. For those interested in an academic career, the dissertation component provides essential preparation for doctoral research.

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Investigate fashion, dress and style in culture and society. Examine the evolving relationship between fashion and film. MA Fashion Cultures offers a unique experience in fashion education at postgraduate level. Read more

Introduction

Investigate fashion, dress and style in culture and society. Examine the evolving relationship between fashion and film.

Content

MA Fashion Cultures offers a unique experience in fashion education at postgraduate level.

The course has two specific but interrelated pathways: History and Culture; and Fashion / Film. On this course you will have the opportunity to study fashion and dress within its historical, social and cultural contexts. A dynamic in-depth exploration of theoretical and methodological perspectives will give you a grounding in the history of fashion and an underpinning of social and cultural theory for both pathways. You will then undertake more specialised study on your chosen pathway. On the History and Culture pathway you will investigate fashion as object, representation and practice through an interdisciplinary approach from both historical and contemporary perspectives. On Fashion/Film you will investigate the ongoing changing relationship between fashion, costume and forms of film as well as the relationship between cinema and consumption within a global context. While you will choose one pathway, you will have the opportunity to attend the lectures for the other pathway if you wish to, so you can gain the fullest possible understanding of a variety of disciplines and their impact upon visual and material cultures.

The pathways are led by renowned experts in their respective fields, and they are supported by research fellows, professors, authors, curators and historians who contribute to the course. Based in one of fashion’s most important cities, our students benefit from access to the special collections and archives of many leading institutions in London, including the V and A, Museum of London and the British Film Institute. You will also have the opportunity to work with other graduate students from the Culture and Curation Programme on some units of the course.

We attract students from a wide variety of academic and industry backgrounds, some of whom have completed theory-based first degrees, while others come with practice-based backgrounds. After completing their Masters studies, some students from both former courses have progressed to higher level research degrees, and others have established themselves in a number of related fields including curation, visual merchandising, styling, archiving, fashion buying, lecturing and research.

Structure

Block One September to January

Social and Cultural Theories (20 credits) (both pathways)
Fashion Histories (20 credits) (both pathways)
Research Methods (20 credits) (both pathways)

Block Two February to May:

Cycles of Fashion (20 units) (History and Culture pathway), or
Fashion, Stardom and Celebrity Culture (20 credits) (Fashion / Film pathway), or
Sustainability and Fashion (20 credits) (either pathway)

Gendering Fashion (20 credits) (History and Culture pathway), or
Film Concepts, Global Cinema (20 credits) (Fashion / Film pathway), or
Consumer Behaviour and Psychology (20 credits) (either pathway); Collaborative Unit (20 credits) (both pathways)

Block Three May to September: Masters Project (60 credits) (both pathways)

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The Master offers a path of experience, research and projects, combining a teaching methodology rich in theory and technique with the practical contribution of companies and practitioners that support the student at all stages of training and testing. Read more
The Master offers a path of experience, research and projects, combining a teaching methodology rich in theory and technique with the practical contribution of companies and practitioners that support the student at all stages of training and testing.

The course covers three main key areas: the history of fashion and applied arts, fashion design and production, marketing and communication strategies, with an increasing level of complexity. Evaluation of results is based on their consistency with the objectives and on the social, cultural, ethical and economic impact towards stakeholders and the reference system, even on a long-term basis, in relation to contemporary trends of taste, style and market.

In addition to the experimental stage that introduce students to the development of creative ideas and knowledge of the technical and technological tools useful for their representation and realization, the course covers all the aspects related to the history of fashion, applied arts, design and different features of contemporary creative expression.

Laboratory activities and innovative project teaching methodology related to the design and production (from the formulation of an idea of fashion products to its formal, functional, ethical, social evaluation) involve students through individual or group projects, workshops, tutorials, case studies, use of simulative techniques and role playing. The workshops are followed by distinguished designers, ambassadors of excellence in the fashion industry.

After examining the main types of fashion product, from accessories to dress, in all their expressions, students will investigate all the aspects of the industrial production such as phases, time, materials, resources, economic factors of the whole implementation process, even retailing and visual merchandising.

The trends of global markets in the fashion industry and the different business models have now reached revered status throughout design management, marketing strategies and communication. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to business strategies, analysis of different types of consumer – that is today both final receiver and business partner - its taste and its evolving needs. The impact of the brand on the target audience and the different aspects of traditional communication and web based fashion collections on the market will be examined, evaluating new tools and perspectives, such as the environmental impact.

The postgraduate course culminates in a dissertation, a final project aimed at checking the skills acquired by the students during the Masters programme. This project involves the launch of a new product or a new collection, where the students highlight the processes and define communication, image and style strategies.

The course is recognised by MIUR (Ministry for Education, University and Research) as an Academic Master Level I.

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This fascinating course examines many different aspects of the ancient Greek and Roman worlds – their literature, history, philosophy, archaeology, languages and material cultures – through a scholarly tradition that is both fast-moving and long-standing. Read more

MA in Classical Studies

This fascinating course examines many different aspects of the ancient Greek and Roman worlds – their literature, history, philosophy, archaeology, languages and material cultures – through a scholarly tradition that is both fast-moving and long-standing. You will investigate the different disciplinary fields of Classical Studies, bringing you into direct contact with a wide range of fragmentary evidence from classical antiquity such as surviving texts and artefacts, which you’ll examine from multiple theoretical and methodological perspectives. You will also acquire and develop research skills that will enhance your knowledge of the ancient Graeco-Roman world and prepare you for independent study, culminating in a dissertation.

Key features of the course

•Explores the question of ‘how we know what we know’ about the ancient civilisations of Greece and Rome
•Takes an interdisciplinary approach to the study of ‘the ancient body’, including birth, death, ancient medicine, dress and beauty
•Draws on cutting-edge research by members of the Classical Studies department
•Concludes with a substantial piece of independent research on a topic of your choice.

This qualification is eligible for a Postgraduate Loan available from Student Finance England.

Modules

To gain this qualification you require 180 credits as follows:

Compulsory modules

• MA Classical Studies part 1 (A863)
• MA Classical Studies part 2 (A864)

The modules quoted in this description are currently available for study. However, as we review the curriculum on a regular basis, the exact selection may change over time.

Credit transfer

If you’ve successfully completed some relevant postgraduate study elsewhere, you might be able to count it towards this qualification, reducing the number of modules you need to study. You should apply for credit transfer as soon as possible, before you register for your first module. For more details and an application form, visit our Credit Transfer website.

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