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MA Drawing at Wimbledon College of Arts is aimed at students who want to explore and interrogate the practice of drawing. What students can expect from the course. Read more

Introduction

MA Drawing at Wimbledon College of Arts is aimed at students who want to explore and interrogate the practice of drawing.

Content

What students can expect from the course:

- A course that promotes drawing for a purpose, focusing on process and cross-disciplinary dialogues that centre on communicating ideas to an audience, client or user

- To develop their drawing, discursive skills and agendas through a re-orientation of their practice

- Collaborations across and between diverse disciplines and courses at the College

- To have access to rich research sources such as Wimbledon’s Jocelyn Herbert Archive, the Stanley Kubrick Archives and University of the Arts London Centre for Drawing

- To benefit from the College’s established relationships we have with Tate Britain, The British Museum, Ashmolean Museum, The Royal Academy, The Sir John Soane Museum and the V&A drawing collections

- To explore a range of practices and disciplines where new languages and methodologies can be developed, including: architecture,
art, cartography, dance, design, engineering, performance, the sciences and writing

Structure

Unit One:

This will comprise of input from a range of practitioners from diverse disciplines, encouraging discussion of drawings purpose, its currency and potential for communicating and problem solving. This may include input from scientists, architects, writers and performers exploring the boundaries of drawing.



Unit Two:

This unit will focus on defining and developing themes from Unit One via individual or collaborative research questions. The unit will allow students to set up identifiable internal or external collaborations, and establish specific targets. The collaborative process can be used to resolve issues across and between disciplines.



Unit Three:

Will allow students to further develop their individual research questions, and explore and define practical methodologies to articulate drawing for a purpose.

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The MSc Latin American Development integrates a thorough grounding in development theory with the in-depth study of Latin America. Read more
The MSc Latin American Development integrates a thorough grounding in development theory with the in-depth study of Latin America. By exploring the contemporary and historical experiences of this region students will develop an understanding of the deep roots of social change and the background to current development challenges and policy debates. Students may take a wide range of optional taught modules drawing on King’s college-wide expertise with particular emphasis on King’s Global Institutes. We accept students from a wide range of academic backgrounds and mid-career professionals.

Key benefits

- Our programme provides a multidisciplinary social scientific framework for understanding the development experiences of Latin American countries, including approaches from economics, political science, history, sociology and management studies.

- By drawing on the broader expertise within King’s Global Institutes, our MSc explores how the issues facing Latin America are illuminated by the experiences of emerging economies around the world.

- You may take a wide range of optional taught modules drawing on expertise across King’s with particular emphasis on its Global Institutes.

- We accept students from a wide range of academic backgrounds and mid-career professionals.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/latin-american-development-msc.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

The MSc Latin American Development integrates a thorough grounding in development theory with the in-depth study of Latin America. By exploring the contemporary and historical experiences of this region you will develop an understanding of the deep roots of social change and the background to current development challenges and policy debates.

Our programme highlights the importance of Latin America’s position in the global order, as well as the relationships between countries of the region, in shaping countries’ policy options and development outcomes. Drawing on the broader expertise within King’s Global Institutes, our MSc will also explore how the issues facing Latin America are illuminated by the experiences of emerging economies around the world. The emphasis is on understanding the ways Latin America is trying to overcome long-standing barriers to stability and prosperity.

The focus on integrating theory, data and history will foster your critical and analytical skills as you examine how Latin American countries are promoting growth and economic, social and political development in new and often innovative ways.

- Course purpose -

Our focus throughout the programme on integrating theory, data and history will foster your critical and analytical skills as you examine how Latin American countries are promoting growth and economic, social and political development in new and often innovative ways.

- Course format and assessment -

The majority of International Development Institute modules are assessed by a 4,000-word essay; other optional modules may differ. The dissertation module is assessed by a 10-12,000-word essay.

Career prospects

Our programme provides you with high-quality graduate research training for seeking employment in the development sector in the UK and Latin American countries, consultancy organisations, private sector companies with global operations and government offices. It is ideal if you are an international student seeking specialist training and/or government employment.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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Created to challenge and inspire the next generation of theatre designers, the Theatre Design MA course at Bristol Old Vic Theatre School delivers intensive vocational training, enabling talented designers to develop their creative and technical ability in set and costume design for performance. Read more
Created to challenge and inspire the next generation of theatre designers, the Theatre Design MA course at Bristol Old Vic Theatre School delivers intensive vocational training, enabling talented designers to develop their creative and technical ability in set and costume design for performance.

The Theatre Design MA course has just four places on offer in each intake, students receive focused individual mentoring and support from the BOVTS team and high-profile visiting professionals, all set in the environment of an integrated company staging fourteen productions a year.

The course duration is four terms; starting in April the course runs until July the following year.

The full time course is aimed at multi-skilled postgraduate level students. We encourage applicants with a range of experience and previous training in Theatre, Art and Design, (Architecture, Costume, Graphics, Interiors, Film Design, Painting, Sculpture, Drama and Theatre). We do not limit entry to students with previous training, although the majority of applicants come from degree courses. A comprehensive portfolio of artwork is required at interview.

Collaborative working with students from a range of disciplines at BOVTS, design students are offered at least three leading design positions on public productions at a variety of respected venues – from The Bristol Old Vic Theatre to the Brewery Theatre.

Master-classes and workshops with visiting professional practitioners help build a thorough understanding of the subject, these include script analysis, life and figure drawing, model making, technical drawing, CAD, Photoshop and model photography. Specialist lectures cover theatre design and costume history. Research and practical work are supported by site and production visits including trips to theatre design events and exhibitions.

An extensive portfolio of industry-standard work can be achieved over the course of four terms, including staged productions and theoretical projects. Students leave BOVTS with the skills, knowledge and confidence to build careers as professional designers. There are end of year exhibitions at the Royal West Academy of Art in Bristol and in London.

Inspiring leadership by Head of Design Angela Davies, who is an award-winning theatre designer with high-level industry links. The course equips its graduates for entry into prestigious Theatre Design competitions such as the Linbury Prize for Stage Design and the RSC’s trainee scheme. BOVTS graduates held 5 out of the 12 final places in the Linbury Prize 2013.

Applications are accepted at least one year in advance of the course start date. The four-term course starts at the beginning of the summer term and completes at the end of the summer term of the following academic year.

Recent graduates have held design positions at the RSC, Pilmlico Opera, Bristol Old Vic, The Brewery Theatre and the Tobacco Factory, The Finsborough Theatre The Vault Festival and with Kneehigh Theatre Company.

To receive more information on course structure and highlights, please contact

Course Outline

Term 1
- Intensive skills-based classes from professional practitioners, including model-making and technical drawing
- Theatre script analysis and period research workshops
- Exploration of the collaborative creative process with a professional director and the MA Directors at BOVTS on the Theatre and Short Play Project
- Master-classes in advanced model-making techniques, technical drawing, an introduction to Photoshop and model photography
- Production and site visits.

Term 2
- Continued exploration of the design process through to presentation with meetings with a visiting professional on the Opera Project
- Regular design tutorials with additional workshops and classes to extend understanding.
- Theory is put into practice by designing the set or costumes for a BOVTS Spring production
- Collaborative working with a staff or visiting director and the BOVTS production teams for professional theatre venues

Term 3
- Design presentations and exploration of the production process through to full stage realisation.
- Close collaboration with actors, stage managers, technicians and scenic artists
- Work with the BOVTS MA Directors to complete production designs for the Brewery Theatre
- Skills classes and support in CAD and Photoshop and an introduction to portfolio design.

Term 4
- Series of small-scale productions for the Brewery Theatre
- Work begins on summer productions, exploring the role of set or costume designer in-depth
- More independent working with mentoring and support through the process
- Development of CV and professional portfolio
- Preparations for the end of year exhibitions at the Royal West Academy of Art, Bristol and London
- Exhibitions and Industry interviews with professional practitioners from a range of theatre disciplines, providing networking opportunities and pathways to work

PLEASE NOTE THAT APPLICATIONS ARE FOR APRIL 2016 ENTRY AND WILL CLOSE ON 27TH FEBRUARY 2015 AT 4PM.

Offline Applications
Please contact:The Admissions Office, 1-2 Downside Road, Bristol BS8 2XF.

Tel: 0117 973 3535.
Email: .

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Do you have a strong drawing ability and want to study concept art and develop a range of specialist skills?. This course focuses on games and animation but is also suitable for students interested in related areas such as film, comics and illustration. Read more
Do you have a strong drawing ability and want to study concept art and develop a range of specialist skills?

Course details

This course focuses on games and animation but is also suitable for students interested in related areas such as film, comics and illustration. You will undertake project based course work supported by dedicated staff with a wealth of practical experience of both the commercial and academic worlds.

Your teaching is supported by close links to industry. In previous years we have had a range of visiting lecturers – a senior concept artist from Double Negative, an art director from Ubisoft, the director of Atomhawk and representatives from Dreamworks and Microsoft. We have also had visits from a range of freelancers specialising in areas such as character design, storyboarding and matte painting. Industry experts are actively involved in setting you tasks and providing feedback.

What you study

The postgraduate course covers specialist areas – character design, environment design and storytelling. You also focus on core drawing skills including regular life drawing classes. The course concludes with a final project – we support you to create a brief that enables you to specialise in your chosen area of interest.

You develop the cognitive and technical skills to equip you for enterprise, employment and further academic research. As a graduate, practising artist and designer or mid-career professional, you can engage in reflective creative practice at an advanced level.

Modules
-Character and Environment Design
-Concept Art Practice
-Drawing for Concept Artists
-Master's Project: Concept Art for Games and Animation
-Visual Storytelling

Modules offered may vary.

Teaching

You experience a number of different approaches to learning and teaching including:
-Lecture sessions
-Tutorial and practical sessions
-Workshops and studio sessions
-Freelance sessions and workshops
-Online and blended delivery
-Self-directed study

Critical reflection is key to successful problem solving and essential to the creative process. To develop your own reflective practice at an advanced level, you test and assess your solutions against criteria that you develop in the light of your research.

You are assessed through the production of a portfolio of creative work and a written report. Feedback is given during lectures and tutorials, and using online methods.

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NUA’s MA Fine Art is an exciting and ambitious programme of study and one that will accelerate your practical, technical and conceptual understanding of your practice. Read more
NUA’s MA Fine Art is an exciting and ambitious programme of study and one that will accelerate your practical, technical and conceptual understanding of your practice. Practice-led investigation is fundamental to the course, supported by critical dialogue and research. Founded in 1845 the University has a strong reputation as one of the leading art schools in the UK. From our campus in the heart of Norwich’s cultural quarter you will have access to industry standard resources and exceptional workshop and studio space facilities.

You will join a community of tutors, researchers, visiting industry guests and fellow students and be part of a stimulating and active research environment. Guided by expert tuition you will be supported to extend or challenge your existing knowledge and methodologies. You may elect to specialise in or combine areas including painting, drawing, printmaking, sculpture and installation.

Strong links with regional and national galleries provide platforms for dialogue around contemporary practice, supported by visiting artists and the Fine Art lecture series. The Gallery at NUA provides a showcase for high quality public exhibitions that augment the MA Fine Art experience. Eastinternational was staged here between 1991-2009, and more recently The Gallery has showcased work by artists including: Grayson Perry, Gilbert and George, Jake and Dinos Chapman, Damien Hirst, Jeremy Deller and Rachel Whiteread. The annual Fine Art symposium ‘Dialogues’ supports your professional understanding of contemporary Fine Art practice.

Creative thinking and innovation are at the core of the MA philosophy and you will engage with students from across the postgraduate community to share opportunities and debate contemporary issues. Your curriculum will include professional guest speakers, industry focused projects, collaborations and study visits. These complement the core studio, workshop and taught sessions on research methods, theoretical approaches and business and professional skills.

MA Fine Art staff are all established practising artists who regularly exhibit their practice, and/or contribute to conferences and publications and will support you in promoting your work within the creative sector. Paul Fieldsend-Danks is the MA Course Leader at NUA, contributing to the taught delivery of MA Fine Art and Research Into Practice units. Paul is an artist and academic, with a particular research interest in the study of landscape within contemporary drawing and painting contexts. He is a co-director of the international online drawing research journal Tracey, and a member of Land2, a practice-led research network concerned with landscape and place-oriented art practice.

Sarah Horton, Senior Lecturer and Unit Leader for MA Fine Art, is a fine artist and educator. Her art practice is multi-disciplinary and has included painting, print, video, stage design, projection and site-specific commissions. She brings her knowledge and experience to bear within her teaching providing a supportive base from which students are encouraged to take risks within their own practice. Sarah has exhibited widely including Tokyo, California, Koblenz and London.

Scholarship and funding information is available. Norwich will be taken over by a festival of contemporary art in key venues across the city in the summer of 2016, as one of four host cities for the 8th edition of the British Art Show. The biggest touring exhibition of contemporary art in the UK has selected Norwich University of the Arts (NUA) as its lead partner in Norwich. See NUA website for details: http://www.nua.ac.uk

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We want to attract people whose art, ideas and ambitions create diversity of thinking and purpose. The interdisciplinary opportunities we offer create an engaging professional experience investigating the practice and discourse of fine art. Read more
We want to attract people whose art, ideas and ambitions create diversity of thinking and purpose. The interdisciplinary opportunities we offer create an engaging professional experience investigating the practice and discourse of fine art. You can choose areas of specialism in drawing from the archive, art in space and place and curating art, alongside your own studio work.

Full-time students use our purpose-built studio space. You have access to a wide range of workshops and technical expertise from all areas of media and fabrication. These include: sculpture; painting; live art; drawing; computer programming; metalwork; video editing; dark rooms; sound studios; film production equipment; printmaking.

Our teaching staff are experts in fine art and art education who not only exhibit their work but also contribute to conferences, journals and publications at national and international levels.

For more information, see the website: https://www.shu.ac.uk/study-here/find-a-course/mamfa-fine-art

Vibrant and supportive learning environment

The course offers a supportive community to foster your practice and your ambitions as a fine art professional. It is particularly suitable if you are: open-minded; ambitious; keen to experience new personal challenges that expand your creative development; interested in understanding all areas of the fine art discipline.

You are encouraged to create experimental and innovative works and to engage with the critical context of art in our time. Dialogue with peers, practicing artists and structured teaching throughout the course enables you to identify your practice within the wider field of fine art to achieve new goals, develop networks and find new inspirations to enrich your creative ambitions.

Excellent creative resources

We have a comprehensive range of technical resources and an excellent programme of high profile guest artists from across the visual arts spectrum to stimulate debates on issues of art and culture.

Dynamic and creative art community

Fine art students work and exhibit in the heart of Sheffield's Cultural Industries Quarter. The course has links with:
-Sheffield Contemporary Arts Forum
-Studio groups such as S1 and Bloc
-Yorkshire Art Space Society
-The Showroom Cinema
-Site Gallery

Sheffield has a dynamic and vibrant creative community. We work collaboratively with artists and curators, as well as researchers and students in other areas. You have access to a network of public galleries, art organisations and artist-run spaces. Opportunities for exhibiting and publishing take place throughout the year.

MA and MFA study

MA and MFA students complete the same modules during the course except that MFA students complete an extra project module. The MFA project encourages you to develop professional skills that help you to identify, instigate, and deliver projects with external partners, such as communities, galleries or businesses. You find a project partner, agree a brief and then deliver the project to a professional standard.

Course structure

MA: full time – 16 months including a summer break, part-time – typically 3 years.
MFA: full time – typically 2 years, part-time – typically 4 years. When studying part-time, you share teaching with full-time students.
Starts September.

Core modules
-Research directions and critical studies
-Advanced art practice
-Art

Optional modules
Art contexts that include:
-Art writing
-Curating art
-Art in space and place
-Drawing from the archive
-Gallery – public realm: making art inside and out

MFA core module – MFA students only
-Studio methods
-Art and its publics

Assessment: self-negotiated models of examination enable students to present agreed bodies of work for self and peer group assessment as well as evaluation by tutors.

Other admission requirements

An IELTS score of 6.0 with 5.5 in all skills (or equivalent) is the standard for non-native speakers of English. If your English language skill is currently below an IELTS score of 6.0 with a minimum of 5.5 in all skills we recommend you consider a Sheffield Hallam University Pre-sessional English course which will enable you to achieve an equivalent English level.

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Our School of Hospitality and Tourism Management offers a fresh, dynamic outlook, unsurpassed industry connections, a leading international reputation and a remarkable track record in graduate employment. Read more
Our School of Hospitality and Tourism Management offers a fresh, dynamic outlook, unsurpassed industry connections, a leading international reputation and a remarkable track record in graduate employment.

Drawing on our research expertise and industry connections in this field, this programme will encourage you to confront and manage the strategic issues and challenges facing the modern international hotel industry.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

This programme is designed exclusively for students who already have qualifications or experience in hotel management to enhance and deepen their existing knowledge, understanding and skills.

The Masters in Strategic Hotel Management is an intellectually rigorous programme, drawing on a range of our subject and industry experts, that is relevant to the needs of future senior managers, executives and professionals in the hotel industry.

An integrated approach gives you a truly international perspective on the strategic aspects of hotel management. The programme also offers you the opportunity to pursue specialisation through optional modules that reflect your interests.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Research Methods
-Strategic Marketing and Brand Management
-Hotel Investment and Finance
-Hotel Operations Analysis
-Strategic Human Resource Management
-Strategic Management Of International Hotel Companies
-Revenue Management
-Project Management
-Business Plan for Hospitality and Tourism
-Asset Management
-Event Operations
-Innovation and New Product Development
-Research Dissertation
-Applied Dissertation
-Business Planning Dissertation

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

-An in-depth exploration of the strategic management approaches, techniques and skills required for senior management positions in the hotel industry that builds on the underpinning knowledge of operational management that has been obtained by study at an undergraduate level. This will involve the study of national, international and global hotel chain operations in their various forms
-A high quality education, which is intellectually rigorous and up-to- date, as well as relevant to the needs of future managers, executives and professionals in the hotel industry
-A business management orientation related to the hotel business drawing on a range of cognate areas of study to explain and analyse this particular sector
-An integrated approach so as to provide a coherent view that explores the interrelationships between the various components of the programme, but at the same time by way of optional modules to permit students to pursue an extra element of specialisation relevant to their backgrounds, interests and/or career aspirations
-An international perspective both in scope and coverage
-Up to date information that draws on the stimulus of the school’s recent research activities
-Students with the basis for developing their own approach to learning and personal development

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

Following completion of the programme, students should be able to:
-Critically evaluate the development, characteristics, issues and influences relevant to strategic hotel management
-Analyse and debate theoretical and applied knowledge in the management, operation, organisation and provision of hotels
-Evaluate critically a wide range of approaches and techniques relevant to the strategic management of hotels
-Evaluate outcomes and accurately assess/report on their own/others work with justification and relate them to existing knowledge structures and methodologies
-Demonstrate high level learning and problem solving skills
-Conduct research and produce a high quality report: this includes the ability to select, define and focus upon and issue at an appropriate level; to develop and apply relevant and sound methodologies; to analyse the issue; to develop recommendations and logical conclusions; to be aware of the limitations of research work
-Identify modifications to existing knowledge structures and theoretical frameworks and to propose new areas for investigations/ new problems / new or alternative applications and methodological approaches
-Display a range of skills relevant to the needs of existing and future managers, executives and professionals irrespective of their sector of operation, particularly in the areas of analysis and synthesis, communication and presentation skills, computing skills, critical reasoning, data analysis, organisation and planning, report and essay writing skills, interactive and group skills, research skills
-Handle ethical dilemmas likely to arise in management, research and professional practice and to formulate solutions in dialogue with peers, clients, mentors and others

Knowledge and understanding
-Critically evaluate the development, characteristics, issues and influences relevant to strategic hotel management
-Analyse and debate theoretical and applied knowledge in the management, operation, organisation and provision of hotel
-Evaluate critically a wide range of approaches and techniques relevant to the strategic management of hotels
-Evaluate outcomes and accurately assess/report on their own/others work with justification and relate them to existing knowledge structures and methodologies

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Demonstrate high level learning and problem solving skills
-Conduct research and produce a high quality report: this includes the ability to select, define and focus upon and issue at an appropriate level; to develop and apply relevant and sound methodologies; to analyse the issue; to develop recommendations and logical conclusions; to be aware of the limitations of research work
-Identify modifications to existing knowledge structures and theoretical frameworks and to propose new areas for investigations/ new problems / new or alternative applications and methodological approaches

Professional practical skills
-Handle ethical dilemmas likely to arise in management, research and professional practice and to formulate solutions in dialogue with peers, clients, mentors and others

Key / transferable skills
-Display a range of skills relevant to the needs of existing and future managers, executives and professionals irrespective of their sector of operation, particularly in the areas of analysis and synthesis, communication and presentation skills, computing skills, critical reasoning, data analysis, organisation and planning, report and essay writing skills, interactive and group skills, researchskills.

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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We are living through an era of tumultuous change in how politics is conducted and communicated. The great digital disruption of the early 21st century continues to work its way through media systems around the world, forcing change, adaptation, and renewal across a whole range of areas. Read more
We are living through an era of tumultuous change in how politics is conducted and communicated. The great digital disruption of the early 21st century continues to work its way through media systems around the world, forcing change, adaptation, and renewal across a whole range of areas: political parties and campaigns, interest groups, social movements, activist organisations, news and journalism, the communication industries, governments, and international relations.

In the New Political Communication Unit at Royal Holloway, University of London, we believe the key to making sense of these chaotic developments is the idea of power—how it is generated, how it is used, and how it shapes the diverse information and communication flows that affect all our lives.

This unique new Masters degree, which replaces the MSc in New Political Communication, is for critically-minded, free-thinking individuals who want to engage with the exciting intellectual ferment that is being generated by these unprecedented times. The curriculum integrates rigorous study of the very best academic research with an emphasis on making sense of political communication as it is practiced in the real world, in both "old" and "new" media settings.

While not a practice-based course, the MSc Media, Power, and Public Affairs is perfect for those who wish to build a career in the growing range of professions that require deep and critical insight into the relationship between media and politics and public communication more generally. These include advocacy, campaign management, political communication consultancy, journalism, government communication, policy analysis, public opinion and semantic polling, and public diplomacy, to name but a few. Plus, due to its strong emphasis on scholarly rigour, the MSc in Media, Power, and Public Affairs is also the perfect foundation for a PhD in political communication.

You will study a mixture of core and elective units, including a generous choice of free options, and write a supervised dissertation over the summer. Teaching is conducted primarily in small group seminars that meet weekly for two hours, supplemented by individual tuition for the dissertation.

This course is also offered at Postgraduate Diploma level for those who do not have the academic background necessary to begin an advanced Masters degree. The structure of the Diploma is identical except that you will not write a dissertation. If you are successful on the Diploma you may transfer to the MSc, subject to academic approval.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/politicsandir/coursefinder/mscpgdipmediapowerandpublicaffairs.aspx

Why choose this course?

- be taught by internationally-leading scholars in the field of political communication

- the curriculum integrates rigorous study of the very best academic research with an emphasis on making sense of political communication as it is practiced in the real world, in both "old" and "new" media settings

- perfect for those who wish to build a career in the growing range of professions that require deep and critical insight into the relationship between media and politics and public communication more generally

- a unique focus on the question of power and influence in today’s radically networked societies.

On completion of the programme, you will have:
- advanced knowledge and critical understanding of key concepts, theoretical debates, and developments in the field of political communication

- advanced knowledge of the texts, theories, and methods used to enhance understanding of the issues, processes, and phenomena in the field of political communication

- advanced knowledge and critical understanding of research methods in the social sciences

- a solid foundation for a career in the growing range of professions that require deep and critical insight into the relationship between media and politics and public communication more generally, or for a PhD in any area of media and politics.

Department research and industry highlights

- The New Political Communication Unit’s research agenda focuses on the impact of new media and communication technologies on politics, policy and governance. Core staff include Professor Andrew Chadwick, Professor Ben O’Loughlin, Dr Alister Miskimmon, and Dr Cristian Vaccari. Recent books include Andrew Chadwick’s The Hybrid Media System: Politics and Power (Oxford University Press, 2013), Cristian Vaccari’s Digital Politics in Western Democracies: A Comparative Study (Johns Hopkins University Press), and Alister Miskimmon, Ben O’Loughlin, and Laura Roselle’s, Strategic Narratives: Communication Power and the New World Order (Routledge, 2013). Andrew Chadwick edits the Oxford University Press book series Oxford Studies in Digital Politics and Ben O’Loughlin is co-editor of the journal Media, War and Conflict. The Unit hosts a large number of PhD students working in the field of new political communication.

Course content and structure

You will study four core course units (chosen from a total of six options), two elective units, and write a dissertation over the summer. Course units include one of three disciplinary training pathway courses, a course in research design, analysing international politics, and specialist options in international relations.

Students studying for the Postgraduate Diploma do not undertake the dissertation.

Core course units:
Media, Power, and Public Affairs: You will examine the relationship between media, politics and power in contemporary political life. This unit focuses on a number of important foundational themes, including theories of media effects, the construction of political news, election campaigning, government communications and spin, media regulation, the emergence of digital media, the globalisation of media, agenda setting, and propaganda and the role of media in international affairs. The overarching rationale is that we live in an era in which the massive diversity of media, new technologies, and new methodologies demands new forms of analysis. The approach will be comparative and international.

Internet and New Media Politics:
 Drawing predominantly, though not exclusively, upon specialist academic journal literatures, this course focuses on a number of important contemporary debates about the role and influence of new technologies on the values, processes and outcomes of: global governance institutions; public bureaucracies; journalism and news production; representative institutions including political parties and legislatures; pressure groups and social movements. It also examines persistent and controversial policy problems generated by digital media, such as privacy and surveillance, the nature of contemporary media systems, and the balance of power between older and newer media logics in social and political life. By the end of the course students will have an understanding of the key issues thrown up by the internet and new media, as well as a critical perspective on what these terms actually mean. The approach will be comparative, drawing on examples from around the world, including the developing world, but the principal focus will be on the politics of the United States and Britain.

Social Media and Politics: This course addresses the various ways in which social media are changing the relationships between politicians, citizens, and the media. The course will start by laying out broad arguments and debates about the democratic implications of social media that are ongoing not just in academic circles but also in public commentary, political circles, and policy networks—do social media expand or narrow civic engagement? Do they lead to cross-cutting relationships or self-reinforcing echo chambers? Do they hinder or promote political participation? Are they useful in campaigns or just the latest fashion? Do they foster effective direct communication between politicians and citizens? Are they best understood as technologies of freedom or as surveillance tools? These debates will be addressed throughout the course by drawing on recent empirical research published in the most highly rated academic journals in the field. The course will thus enable students to understand how social media are used by citizens, politicians, and media professionals to access, distribute, and co-produce contents that are relevant to politics and public affairs and establish opportunities for political and civic engagement.

Media, War and Conflict:
The post-9/11 global security situation and the 2003 Iraq war have prompted a marked increase in interest in questions concerning media, war and conflict. This unit examines the relationships between media, governments, military, and audiences/publics, in light of old, new, and potential future security events.

Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods in Politics and International Relations:
 You will be provided with an introduction to core theories and qualitative approaches in politics and international relations. You will examine a number of explanatory/theoretical frameworks, their basic assumptions, strengths and weaknesses, and concrete research applications. You will consider the various qualitative techniques available for conducting research, the range of decisions qualitative researchers face, and the trade-offs researchers must consider when designing qualitative research.

Dissertation (MSc only): The dissertation gives you the opportunity to study an aspect of Media, Power, and Public Affairs in depth. You will be assigned a dissertation supervisor and the length of the piece will be 12,000 words.

Elective course units:
Note: not all course units are available every year, but may include:
- Politics of Democracy
- Elections and Parties
- United States Foreign Policy
- Human Rights: From Theory to Practice
- Theories and Concepts in International Public Policy
- Contemporary Anglo-American Political Theory
- Transnational Security Studies
- Conflict and Conflict Resolution in the Middle East
- The Law of Cyber Warfare
- Comparative Political Executives
- European Union Politics and Policy
- International Public Policy in Practice
- Sovereignty, Rights and Justice
- Theories of Globalisation
- Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods in Politics and International Relations

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by coursework and an individually-supervised dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Advocacy, campaign management, political communication consultancy, journalism, government communication, policy analysis, public opinion and semantic polling, public diplomacy, PhD research.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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This is an intensive, vocational course with strong professional links to the industry, offering a maximum of four students, with high levels of painting and drawing skills, the opportunity to develop their careers as scenic artists. Read more
This is an intensive, vocational course with strong professional links to the industry, offering a maximum of four students, with high levels of painting and drawing skills, the opportunity to develop their careers as scenic artists. The skills and techniques acquired on this course are to the level necessary for theatre, television, film and animation industries..

During the year students acquire an understanding of professional practice and standards, and gain in-depth skills and experience in scenic art techniques and their application, combined with the practice of managing a scenic art department.

The Course has 3 very intensive terms during which students paint the sets for the School’s six main house public productions, offering them the opportunity to see their finished work used on stage in a wide range of public performances and venues. Teaching is led by the School’s Head of Scenic Art in collaboration with visiting industry professionals who provide master-classes in a range of skills and techniques that include; life drawing, portraiture, perspective, marbling, wood-graining, polystyrene carving and painting for animation. The scenic art students work collaboratively with the School’s other production departments, and most especially with design students. Furthering their introduction to the industry, work placements with principal companies are arranged during the course; particular attention is placed on students developing their own professional portfolio. Upon graduation students will showcase their work in a public exhibition and be interviewed by some of the UK’s leading industry practitioners. In a freelance industry most of our graduates begin working as assistants for scenic artists, scenic workshops and large theatre companies, eventually becoming supervising scenic artists themselves.

Recent graduate employment; The Royal Opera House, The Royal Shakespeare Company, Cardiff Theatrical Services, The Royal National Theatre, Northern Ballet, TR2 Plymouth, Richard Nutbourne - Cool Flight Ltd, Cameron Macintosh's National Tour of ‘Mary Poppins’, Disney's ‘Aladdin’, ‘Charlie and the Chocolate Factory’ for Warner Brothers. Film work includes; Wes Anderson's ‘Fantastic Mr Fox’ and ‘Isle of Dogs’ (still in production) Tim Burton's ‘Frankenweenie’, Aardman Animations' ‘Shaun the Sheep’, ‘Pirates’ and ‘Early Man’ (still in production). TV work includes 'Will' for TNT and ‘Crazy Face’ for Netflix.

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On this unique illustration course - the only one of its kind with a specific academic focus on authorial practice - you'll develop your own voice. Read more
On this unique illustration course - the only one of its kind with a specific academic focus on authorial practice - you'll develop your own voice. You'll learn to see your work as an evolving practice rather than as a response to an already defined concept or brief, as you challenge and re-evaluate your work with the help of teaching staff who are experienced practitioners.

As your authorial voice develops and you learn to identify your audience, you'll also be encouraged to take an entrepreneurial approach, thinking creatively about the outlets and options for your work. This professionalism is aided by the course's close relationship with independent publisher Atlantic Press, offering you opportunities to gain direct experience in the many aspects of producing and publishing graphic literature.

At the heart of this studio-based course is a belief that there is a need to reassert the characteristics of personal origination, ownership, storytelling and literary ideas within the medium of illustration. We'll help you gain the confidence to take ownership of your work, you'll develop new ideas and concepts driven by your desire to create a distinct, original, authorial voice.

You'll explore narrative and storytelling as defined by your developing voice, working on longer-term projects across a variety of mediums that suit your interests – including children's books, graphic novels, digital work and screen-based production. The course will also engage you with current ideas and thinking related to notions of authorship, encouraging you to draw inspiration from a diverse range of influences, providing further personal insight and direction for your practice.

Visit the website https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/illustrationma

Building professional experience

A unique feature of our MA is our relationship with Atlantic Press (http://www.atlanticpressbooks.com/). The specialist publishing house, based in Penryn, was founded 15 years ago by course leader Steve Braund. The partnership enables you to learn about the whole publishing process, from concept to realisation – as well as the practical aspects of printing, distribution and marketing. The close proximity of a publishing press also means that internships to students on the course are offered on a regular basis.

The course will give you a grounding in all aspects of professional practice related to the work of an authorial illustrator. You'll also be encouraged to consider entrepreneurial approaches to your practice. At the end of the course, you'll mount a professional presentation of work from your negotiated MA project.

How the course is taught

Teaching takes place in the form of lectures, seminars, group critiques and workshops, supported by high-profile guest speakers. The Illustration Discourses lecture series considers authorial positions, related theories and their contexts. Both lectures and seminars will help inform your negotiated practical projects, whilst recording your studio practice in a research journal will aid self-reflection.

- Typical workshops

Research Journals
Creative Writing
Screen Printing
Life Drawing
Listening to Images
Book Art
Printmaking & Collography
Etching
Composition
Professional Practice
Table Top Book Binding
Visual Thinking
InDesign I
What are Archives?
Professional Practice, Networking & Entrepreneurship
Visual Narrative
Perspective
Book Design, Layout & InDesign
Bookbinding
Graphic Design

Course outline

This is a one-year course delivered over 45 weeks and divided into three 15-week study blocks. Alternatively, you can study part-time over two years, totalling 90 weeks.

Over the course of the year you'll be required to produce a sequence of three negotiated practical projects based on personal authorial illustration work.

The lecture and seminar series Illustration Discourses supports the practical work, running concurrently with a research journal, which builds connections and the opportunity to reflect on practice. You'll be expected to demonstrate progression; indicating the research, analysis, reflection and investigation necessary for the development of a successful and distinctive authorial illustration practice.

You'll also produce two analytical essays and deliver a presentation exploring areas of personal interest within the authorial context relating to your practice. These will show a consideration of audience awareness and the processes and development of your practice. In order to develop self-reliance the course allows you a good deal of freedom to develop your projects.

Facilities

- Individual studio space
- Full IT facilities
- Print room
- Comprehensive library facilities
- Access to specialist equipment

Assessment

- Assessment takes place at the end of each module
- Combination of visual, verbal and written assignments
- Final assessment takes place in September

Careers

Potential careers include:

- Commissioned or self-published illustrator
- Art director or creative director
- Illustration residencies
- Curatorial roles
- Teaching
- Further study

Interview and selection process

When you apply to join the course, we'll ask you to send us a study proposal and either samples of work or a link to your website or blog, if you have one. At interview we'll look for authorial illustration potential or capabilities, illustration ability, graphic skills, drawing skills, creative writing/storytelling potential, ideas and concepts. We really value meeting you in person but we can hold a telephone or Skype interview if this is not possible.

Falmouth Illustration Forum

Our respected annual Falmouth Illustration Forum recently celebrated its tenth anniversary with the publication of the world's first book devoted to the subject, The Authorial Illustrator (available from atlanticpressbooks.com (http://www.atlanticpressbooks.com/)). Each annual forum explores different aspects of authorial illustration and includes internationally renowned guest speakers.

View information about our forums here - https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/content/ma-illustration-open-forum-2014-witness-reportage-documentary

Find out how to apply here - https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/apply

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A good MBA can really make you stand out for the top jobs in any type of business in fast paced major growth, transformation, innovation and operational change in any country and business discipline area. Read more

Your programme of study

A good MBA can really make you stand out for the top jobs in any type of business in fast paced major growth, transformation, innovation and operational change in any country and business discipline area. You develop insights across the top discipline functions such as finance, strategy, economics and project management, marketing, leading and managing people, supply chain and new business creation. These are all disciplines within themselves which you rapidly acquire skills and knowledge to manage successfully. These are essential disciplines to many known high street brands, service industries, online businesses and high growth start ups which ensure that if you start a business using existing skills or a new team that you are likely to provide a high growth enterprise very quickly. Alternatively you may have been employed within a sector undergoing a real threat to business existence which involves you in making changes very quickly at operational level using the range of disciplines you learn.

In this situation you can overcome the threats quickly to ensure long term viability whilst managing short term risks to business and you can be a very sought after individual due to your ability to quickly assess what needs to be done with minimum impact to allow long term profitability. Many brands have recently been disrupted by mass communications and the rapid rise in online trading, some were able to quickly re-organise their business model to avoid going out of business, some were able to innovate and others relied on a wide variety of techniques to allow them to reinvent themselves. MBA positions are normally fast paced but very rewarding in terms of achievements and business satisfaction.

Aberdeen MBA - On Campus

The Aberdeen University MBA is a one year full-time management programme which covers all the main disciplines of business management. You take leading edge modules during our intensive summer school, which is run by visiting scholars, as well as our own expert staff at the University of Aberdeen Business School. In drawing upon the international expertise of research-active staff, the programme promotes the development of cross-disciplinary knowledge in preparing students for effective management careers in both the private and public sectors. You can take this programme over a year full time or two years part time with September or January start.
You may be able to continue working whilst you study, but there is also an online option which may help you manage your time much better whilst studying (below)

Programme Content

FIRST SEMESTER

Accounting & Finance For Managers
Provides an understanding of accounting information and financial reporting and introduces key aspects of financial analysis to undertake accounting; ratio analysis, user-group specific tools, e.g. Z scores and credit ratings; accounting information, the stock market; forecasting and valuation.

Operations Management
You look at the management of capacity and inventory, production planning and control, project management and the management and improvement of quality.

Business Economics
You examine the ways in which economic theory may be applied to solve real business problems, focussing on aspects of economics vital to a student of business, to be comfortable with the tools of economic analysis as applied to the international, economic and business environments in which modern day businesses and policy makers have to operate.

Business Strategy & Organisation
Drawing mainly on microeconomics theories and applications in order to introduce students to many typical business situations.

SECOND SEMESTER

Strategic Marketing
Marketing management and strategic planning across product and all communications areas of business

Managing People At Work
Management of people as a key element for organisational success

Managing Change and Innovation
You look at the context of innovation and change examining new product development (goods and services), innovation and change.

The Leadership Challenge
Investigates how each of us behave in a leadership role to develop your behaviour and your method of leadership.

THIRD SEMESTER

Strategic Financial Analysis
Key concepts of financial forecasting and analysis

Talking to Teams
Investigates how teams are shaped in terms of performance by their managers communication methods

People, Creativity and Change
The course helps you to understand the relationship between creativity and change within an organisation.

Supply Chain Management
You will gain a strong understanding of the supply chain.

Internationalisation
You will look at how globalisation affects the contemporary small business, trade and social capital.

Essential Human Resource Practise
The course helps you appreciate the links between HR procedures and organisational outcomes with practical issues faced by employees.

View this programme
https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-taught/degree-programmes/31/mba-aberdeen/

Why study at Aberdeen?

• Aberdeen is ranked as a Top 3 University for world leading research impact in Business and Management (REF 2014)
• Teaching is informed by close links with industry and delivered by industry professionals in some cases
• You gain top level operational management across special core functions required to drive business growth

Where you study

• University of Aberdeen for the MBA (Aberdeen)
• Online for the MBA (Global)
• Full time and part time options available plus September, January available for the MBA (Aberdeen) and other options available for the Online MBA

International Student Fees 2017/2018

Find out about fees:
https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/international/tuition-fees-and-living-costs-287.php

*Please be advised that some programmes have different tuition fees from those listed above and that some programmes also have additional costs.

Scholarships

View all funding options on our funding database via the programme page
https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-taught/finance-funding-1599.php
https://www.abdn.ac.uk/funding/

Living in Aberdeen

Find out more about:
• Your Accommodation
• Campus Facilities
• Aberdeen City
• Student Support
• Clubs and Societies

Find out more about living in Aberdeen:
https://abdn.ac.uk/study/student-life

Living costs
https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/international/finance.php

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This course, accredited by the Landscape Institute, provides an innovative design education involving opportunities such as participation in European and local consultancy within our Landscape Interface Studio. Read more
This course, accredited by the Landscape Institute, provides an innovative design education involving opportunities such as participation in European and local consultancy within our Landscape Interface Studio. All staff are ambitious and creative design practitioners and researchers. Our London location, local and European networks and international perspective provide the focus for contemporary design projects that address immediate and long-term landscape solutions in cities and their regions.

Key features
-Study visits, international workshops, external lectures, live projects, and London industry links, resources and institutions support a vibrant learning trajectory for your landscape architecture career ambitions.
-Working in the shared studio with MA Landscape & Urbanism and MLA students involves interdisciplinary collaboration and prepares students for co-disciplinary practice.

What will you study?

All design projects are developed as part of a personal portfolio that can be immediately useful in targeting employment. Design projects may include live competition briefs. Projects reflect critical challenges and potentials of contemporary landscape practice and the research and practice expertise of the teaching team, including water, places and people; community consultation in the public realm; time, transformation and experience; urbanism and professional practice. The modules may involve client contact, model making, mapping, drawing and digital media workshops. Critical thinking and expression is supported by the Landscape and Urbanism Theory module.

There is special commitment to processes of transformation and their communication, with an emphasis on learning through making in the Faculty's 3D workshop and on hand-drawing techniques to complement digital media presentation.

Assessment

Design projects and portfolio, professional practice project management report and practice review, seminar presentations, literature review, and landscape and urbanism manifesto.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list. Those listed here may also be a mixture of core and optional modules.

Core modules
-Landscape Architecture Design Portfolio
-Professional Practice Process and Making
-Landscape & Urbanism Theory, Research and Representation
-Research Techniques

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The MA in Fine Art enables artists to evaluate and develop their creative practice to the highest of standards. It develops theoretical awareness, critical thinking and independent arts practice to a professional level. Read more
The MA in Fine Art enables artists to evaluate and develop their creative practice to the highest of standards. It develops theoretical awareness, critical thinking and independent arts practice to a professional level.

The course facilitates critical debate between artists working both within and across media areas including painting, photography, digital imaging, printmaking, sculpture, installation and site-specific art. Alongside their studio-based enquiry, students undertake related research into the broader context of contemporary art practices and theoretical debates.

The course offers access to comprehensive specialist resources with technical instruction and support. Students are continually mentored by research-active staff to position their practice within professional cultural environments, arts-related employment or higher-level academic research.

Both full time and part time students benefit from spacious and well-equipped facilities and external links with galleries, which have included the Milton Keynes Gallery, NN Contemporary (Northampton), Corby Cube Gallery and Rugby Museum and Art Gallery. The course often offers international study trips, typically one European option (recent visits have been to France, Italy and Spain) and one long-haul destination (recent visits have been to India, Vietnam and the USA) each year.

In addition to the course having very good links with regional galleries and arts organisations, students are encouraged to engage with external activities and events, both national and international. A group of MA Fine Art students recently attended a printmaking residency at the world-renowned Frans Masereel Centrum in Belgium.

Our teaching staff have a broad range of research interests reflecting the disciplines available on the course, and all staff are practicing artists who publish and exhibit both nationally and internationally. Visiting speakers have included the internationally known artists Richard Long, Marcus Harvey, Simon Callery, Ian Davenport, Mark Francis, Lisa Milroy, David Batchelor, Richard Deacon, Svetlana Fialova, Richard Patterson, Ian McKeever, Dan Hays and Richard Wilson along with innovative arts organisations such as Artangel.

Course content

Upon commencing the Masters programme, students undertake the module ‘Extended Fine Art Practice and Research Methodologies’ (20 credits). This provides a grounding in different research-based methods and methodologies in Fine Art.

During the first trimester students also undertake the 20 credit studio-based module ‘Fine Art Practice’ wherein students begin to critically re-appraise and position their creative practice. Full-time students will also be enrolled on ‘Interfacings,’ a 20 credit module that considers a set of theoretical debates, issues and contexts that are pertinent to an interdisciplinary approach to artistic practice.

During the second trimester students enrol on the 40 credit module ‘Fine Art Practice and Context.’ This module culminates in a public developmental exhibition of their work. Alongside this module, full-time students can opt to take either the project-based ‘Independent Study’ module or the 20 credit module ‘Creative Practice and Enterprise.’

The final stage of the MA Fine Art course entails the student producing and exhibiting a body of creative work or completing a 15-18,000 word dissertation.

Course modules (16/17)

-Fine Art Practice and Documentation
-Interfacings: Fine Art and Postmodern Practice
-Creative Practice and Enterprise
-Fine Art Practice and Context
-Independent Study in the Arts
-Research project
-Extended Fine Art Practice and Research Methodologies

Opportunities Abroad

International study trips, typically one European option (recent visits have been to France, Italy and Spain) and one long-haul destination (recent visits have been to India, Vietnam and the USA) each year.

Methods of Learning

The MA Fine Art course supports all learners’ experience and development through a breadth of regular tutorial approaches. Tutor and learner contact is additionally enriched through a host of visiting artists of international stature. Modes of teaching delivery encompass tutorials, group crits, research supervision, lectures and seminars.

Schedule

During the first and second trimester specific modules are delivered usually on Mondays 9:30-12:30 and 13:00 – 16:00.

Assessments

The course is assessed in both theory and practice by assignment, examination, portfolio submission and exhibition.

In addition to an ongoing series of formative assessment points, the MA Fine Art course has three formal assessment periods that occur at the end of each trimester in February, May and September respectively.

Facilities and Special Features

The Fine Art subject is enriched through a spectrum of professional specialist spaces including: Fine Art New Media Space, Photographic Studio, Photographic Dark Room, Wood Workshop, Metal Workshop, Plaster and Resin Workshop, Etching Printroom, Screen Printing Room (including laser cutting), The Drawing Lab (Drawing research space and life room), Canvas Preparation Room and bookable installation spaces.

Careers

The course prepares students for the professional cultural environment and higher research study. PhDs at the University of Northampton can be pursued through traditional or practice led methodologies and this course provides a comprehensive and relevant foundation.

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MA Ceramic Design is recognised worldwide as one of the leading postgraduate programmes in ceramic design for small and mass manufacture. Read more
MA Ceramic Design is recognised worldwide as one of the leading postgraduate programmes in ceramic design for small and mass manufacture. Taught in Stoke-on-Trent, the home of UK ceramics for over two centuries in the Potteries, this long-established course consistently produces career-ready graduates that are in demand by leading ceramic companies both in the UK and overseas. With world-famous ceramic manufacturers quite literally on the doorstep, Stoke-on-Trent provides a unique venue for the study of ceramic design.

This course provides a design-led creative experience of ceramics within a broad subject context. Designing through intelligent making allows you to access ideas through a unique material. The deep knowledge of one material helps you to appreciate the opportunities in ceramics but also its translation into other materials and professional opportunities. Whether your personal aspirations are embedded in 2D surface and pattern, and or 3D shape, form and function.

The relationship between the course and the global ceramic industry is mutually beneficial and is primarily responsible for the unique character and international reputation of the course. The strength of this award lies in the accumulated wealth of specialist knowledge and practical skills, which are the essential tools of the ceramics designer; and in the good working practices developed over many years. In the close working relationship with industry, and in the clarity of purpose that ensures academic coherence, and the credibility of the award.

Students are encouraged to pursue new and innovative ideas, redefining established ceramic craft and ceramic design market opportunities. These ideas may now be less wedded to the immediate perceived needs of the mass manufacturing industry and for the mass market. As a consequence encouraging students to take a wider perhaps more entrepreneurial, enterprising standpoint – working as designer-producers for example, engaging with small to medium sized factories in developing aspirational products of contemporary relevance with ‘added value’ aimed potentially at new and different niche markets.

The MA Ceramic Design course has in recent years provided the creative genesis for The New English ceramic design brand and the University’s unique Flux, blue and white fine bone china collection.

This course can be studied part time. For more information on part time study, see the website: http://www.staffs.ac.uk/course/SSTK-06801.jsp?utm_source=findamasters&utm_medium=courseprofile&utm_campaign=postgraduate

Course content

Semester 1
-Tools and Techniques
-Collaborative Project

Semester 2
-Ceramic Design, Professional Pathways
-Creativity & Innovation

Semester 3
The Masters Project

Graduate destinations

Many of our Ceramic Design graduates now work as designers or senior managers and creative directors within the ceramics and related creative industries. Some have set up in business as designer-producers or as freelance design consultants. And others have become retail developers, stylists, buyers, trend forecasters, lecturers and teachers.

Other admission requirements

For you to be able to execute your own ideas whilst on the course, You would be expected to demonstrate:
-Your ability to communicate your creative design ideas visually, this is critically important. Through traditional sketching and drawing (drawing with your own hand) and through digital techniques (the use of appropriate computer softwares).
-A broad understanding and experience of ceramic moulded techniques (the use of plaster moulds, typically slipcasting) or hand making techniques would be expected.
-Alternatively you may be interested in ceramic surface, ideas for surface pattern design whether this be for graphics; textiles or ceramics.
-Evidence that you have an awareness of the global marketplace for ceramic design, and as such develop innovative ceramic ideas informed by this knowledge.

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This course is designed to provide expertise in the study of evolutionary and adaptive processes in primates, both human and non-human, in relation to both extinct and living species. Read more
This course is designed to provide expertise in the study of evolutionary and adaptive processes in primates, both human and non-human, in relation to both extinct and living species. There is a particular focus on primate behaviour, evolutionary psychology, cultural evolution and palaeoenvironments, drawing on the world-class expertise of members of our large Evolutionary Anthropology Research Group.

Many of our former students have gone on to do PhDs, but the course also provides advanced training for those wishing to prepare for a career working in fields such as primate conservation or in museum or educational contexts.

The course is designed for those with an undergraduate degree in anthropology, psychology, biology, zoology or a related discipline.

Course content

This course is designed to provide expertise in the study of evolutionary and adaptive processes in primates, both human and non-human, in relation to both extinct and living species. There is a particular focus on primate behaviour, evolutionary psychology, cultural evolution and palaeoenvironments, drawing on the world-class expertise of members of our large Evolutionary Anthropology Research Group.

All students take the following modules, which provide an essential foundation in theory and methods for Evolutionary Anthropology.

Compulsory modules:
-Dissertation
-Evolutionary Theory
-Statistical Analysis in Anthropology.

Student will then choose 90 credits from a selection of the following:

Previous optional modules have included:
-Academic and Professional Skills in Anthropology
-Evolutionary Perspectives on Western Diseases
-Primate Behaviour
-Cultural Evolution
-Evolutionary Psychology
-Palaeoanthropology and Palaeoecology
-Evolutionary and Ecological Topics in Medicine and Health
-Foreign language option.

Please see http://www.durham.ac.uk/anthropology/postgraduatestudy/taughtprogrammes/evolutionaryanthropology for further information.

Learning and Teaching

The MSc (full-time) consists of two terms of teaching, during which students are introduced to the range of research questions and methods, and a dissertation, involving the design, development and implementation of an independent research project. Students work closely with academic staff, and have the opportunity to become involved in active research projects.

The programme is delivered through a mixture of interactive lectures, seminars, student-led seminars, practical sessions and workshops, in addition to one-to-one dissertation supervision. Typically, lectures deliver key information on progressively more advanced themes and topics. Seminars provide an opportunity to reflect in more depth upon material delivered in lectures and gathered from independent study outside the programme’s formal contact hours. Student-led seminars give students an opportunity to engage with academic issues at the cutting-edge of research in Anthropology, in a learning environment focused on discussion and debate of current issues.

We place an emphasis on independent learning. This is supported by the University’s virtual learning environment, extensive library collections and informal contact with tutors and research staff. We consider the development of independent learning and research skills to be one of the key elements of our postgraduate taught curriculum and one which helps our students cultivate initiative, originality and critical thinking.

Students take required taught modules worth a total of 30 credits, and four optional modules, totalling 90 credits plus a 60-credit dissertation. Full-time students have on average 6-8 hours of formal teaching and learning contact per week. Outside timetabled contact hours, students are also expected to devote significant amounts of time to reading, discussing and preparing for classes, assignments and project work. Following the May assessment period, students undertake their 60 credit dissertation. This crucial piece of work is a significant piece of independent research that constitutes a synthesis of theory, method and practice in anthropology and is supported by an individual supervisor and a dissertation leader.

Throughout the programme, all students meet regularly with the degree tutor, who provides academic support and guidance. Furthermore, all members of teaching staff have weekly office hours when they are available to meet with students on a ‘drop-in’ basis. In term time, the department also has an extensive programme of departmental and research group seminars which postgraduate students are encouraged and expected to attend. The undergraduate Anthropology Society also organises its own visiting lecturer programme. We ensure that we advertise any other relevant seminars and lectures in Durham, Newcastle and further afield, and encourage students to attend relevant conferences.

Before the academic year starts, we provide information on preparation for the course. On arrival we have induction sessions and social events, headed by the Director of Postgraduate Studies and attended by both academic and administrative staff. Students also attend an “Introduction to Research Groups in Anthropology”.

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