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The part-time DPhil Programme considers applications from those who have already been awarded the MSc in Evidence-Based Health Care. Read more
The part-time DPhil Programme considers applications from those who have already been awarded the MSc in Evidence-Based Health Care. Applications may also be considered from students with a Master's in a related subject. Supervision is arranged to suit the DPhil topic and may involve staff from within the Medical Sciences Division as well as co-supervision with members of the Evidence-Based network.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/dphil-in-evidence-based-health-care

Description

The part-time DPhil is part of the Evidence-Based Health Care Programme, which is jointly run with the Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine in the Nuffield Department of Primary Health Care Sciences. The programme also works closely with the Centres of Evidence-Based Nursing, Evidence-Based Mental Health, and Evidence-Based Dentistry. The Department's graduate students have access to the full range of Oxford's library and computing facilities.

The part-time DPhil regulations normally require a minimum of six years' part-time study (equivalent to two years' full-time) up to a maximum of eight years part-time study. Research students may be required to undertake appropriate research training provided within the Department. In addition, they will be strongly encouraged to participate in seminars and informal meetings with staff and other researchers. The major commitment of time will be to individual study and research.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

Visit the DPhil in Evidence-Based Health Care page on the University of Oxford web site for more details!

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We offer two different programmes of postgraduate study, each in either full-time or part-time mode. These are degrees by research which require an original contribution to the body of knowledge in a particular academic or professional discipline. Read more

Course Outline

We offer two different programmes of postgraduate study, each in either full-time or part-time mode. These are degrees by research which require an original contribution to the body of knowledge in a particular academic or professional discipline.

- DPhil – 3 academic years of full-time study or 6 years of part-time study.
- MPhil – 2 academic years of full-time study or 4 years of part-time study.

Postgraduate students wishing to register for a DPhil must first register for the MPhil and seek conversion at a later stage.

MPhil and DPhil students undertake supervised but independent research, at the end of which they submit a thesis embodying the results of that research. This thesis must demonstrate familiarity with, and an understanding of the subject, its principal sources and authorities. It should display critical discrimination and a sense of proportion in evaluating evidence and the judgements of others. A DPhil thesis must embody an original contribution to the knowledge of the discipline either by the discovery of new knowledge, or by the exercise of a new and independent critical approach.

In addition to Economics, International Studies and Security and Intelligence Studies, the University offers MPhil / DPhil programmes in the following Humanities areas:

- Archaeology
- Art History
- Biography
- English Literature
- Garden History
- History
- Military History

Find out more about our Department of International Studies on http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/economics-international.

Research Proposals

Applications should be accompanied by a research proposal. Advice on submitting a proposal is available as a PDF document on the University's website: http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/dphil-prospectus.pdf.

Apply here http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities/mphil/economicsandinternationalstudies.

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The Clore Laboratory is an internationally recognised centre for integrated research into diabetes, obesity and metabolic diseases. Read more
The Clore Laboratory is an internationally recognised centre for integrated research into diabetes, obesity and metabolic diseases.

Established in 1986, it currently has a staff 15 of whom five are postdoctoral research scientists. Currently, there are three DPhil students. Students benefit from the holistic nature of the research, which ranges from investigations at the molecular and cellular level through to whole-body physiology, including the role of dietary interaction with the genetic background in producing disease.

The Clore Laboratory was purpose-built for metabolic research and has excellent facilities for molecular and cell biology, as well as biochemistry, physiology and pharmacology. The range of scientific disciplines among the researchers provides an excellent training ground in research methodologies.

In circumstances where it is not possible for students to undertake residency in Buckingham but have full-time access to laboratory facilities, it may be possible to register for an MPhil/DPhil degree, subject to the suitability of the proposed research programme and the availability of local supervision.

The Clore Laboratory is situated in the attractive and rural environment of Buckingham, at the heart of the University campus.

Find out more about our Medical School on http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/medicine.

Research Degrees

DPhil

This is a three-year research programme, the student being initially admitted to an MPhil/DPhil track. Progress from MPhil to DPhil registration is subject to assessment after 18 months. The research programme will be a substantial piece of independent work and will have made an original and significant contribution to knowledge. Examination is by thesis submission and external viva voce .

MPhil

This is a two-year research project with submission of a thesis and viva voce (oral) examination. The research will not have the same depth as a DPhil but will still be an original piece of work.

Supervision

Supervision of postgraduate students is under the control of the Director. On a day-to-day basis students will be supervised in the laboratory by an experienced researcher.

Apply here http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/bitm/postgraduate.

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The cutting-edge Taught MA in Biography was founded in 1996, remains unique to Buckingham and is consistently rated ‘excellent’ by external examiners and inspectors. Read more

Course outline

The cutting-edge Taught MA in Biography was founded in 1996, remains unique to Buckingham and is consistently rated ‘excellent’ by external examiners and inspectors. Since then, in response to student demand, the available options have been extended to include postgraduate research degrees at three levels: MA by Research, MPhil or DPhil level. Study can be on either a full-time or a part-time basis.

Find out more about our School of Humanities on http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities.

Course structure

For their first year of study students on all these courses attend the same weekly seminars as students taking the Taught MA in Biography. These provide the critical awareness of the subject which is an essential prerequisite for dissertation work and they are one of the most distinctive and valuable elements of the MA. They take place as follows:

- Autobiography (September to December)
- Special Paper in Biography (January to June)
- Research Methods (January to June)

The modules on Biography and Autobiography are designed to combine the study of classic biographies and memoirs with contemporary writing. In addition, the Research Methods module provides an invaluable and innovative training, especially devised for biographers.

Guest seminars on the course are led by leading biographers, critics, publishers and agents. Teachers and speakers on the course have included Andrew Motion, Kathryn Hughes, Frances Wilson, Frances Spalding, Jeremy Lewis, Rupert Shortt, Caroline Dawnay, Andrew Lownie and Miranda Seymour.

Research students are expected to produce, as a valuable preliminary to their own research project, written coursework for the Research Methods module (an annotated bibliography and a short biography, with supporting material, produced according to the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography format), and one other piece of written work, but the full amount of termly written work required for the taught course is not compulsory. During the early part of the course, research students refine their research proposal under the individual supervision of the course director for eventual discussion with the Research Officer. Once the research proposal has been accepted students concentrate on individual research and the preparation of a dissertation, under the supervision of the course director.

Teaching methods

One of the distinctive features of the programme is the value attached to the supervision which is provided for students working on dissertations. One-on-one supervisions are held every two or three weeks during term. While the dissertation must be the candidate’s independent work, it is the supervisor who offers advice on refining the topic (if necessary), on primary sources, on secondary reading, on research techniques and on writing the dissertation. Regular group discussions between research students at all degree levels (MA, MPhil and DPhil) allow the exchange of research experiences and mutual support.

Programme director

Professor Jane Ridley founded the Buckingham Biography MA in 1996. She is an Oxford-trained historian and biographer, and her publications include The Young Disraeli (1995) and The Architect and his Wife: A Life of Edwin Lutyens (2002), which won the Duff Cooper Prize. She has contributed widely to the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, and she is a regular reviewer for publications such as the Spectator, the Literary Review and the Times Literary Supplement. She is currently completing a biography of Edward VII, for which she was awarded a research fellowship by the Leverhulme Trust.

Location

Teaching takes place in London. See the University's website for more information.

Timescale

The normal periods of study for achieving these research degrees are as follows:

- MA Res– 1 year full-time or 2 years part-time
- MPhil – 2 years full-time or 4 years part-time
- DPhil – 3 years full-time or 6 years part-time

Administrative arrangements

A system of preliminary registration for all research degrees is in operation to allow students to prepare a formal proposal during the early part of their course. Admission to research degrees is normally on a provisional basis while the candidate, with the help of the supervisor, refines the proposal for the research, including developing a work plan and identifying the requirements for support and resources and how these will be met. Students for the MA degree in Biography by Research are registered initially for the taught MA until the research proposal has been accepted. Postgraduate students wishing to register for the DPhil programme in Biography must first register for the MPhil and seek conversion at a later stage. Registration is upgraded to DPhil, normally between 12 and 18 months from first registration, once the student has demonstrated through the submission of draft written work that he or she has the ability to conduct research at the advanced level required for the award of the degree. All research students must also subject their work to an annual progress review.

Changing the level of the research degree after the start of the course, although not impossible, can produce complications. Prospective students uncertain about the level or length of course best suited to them are strongly advised to discuss this with the course director before applying.

Apply here http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities/mres/biography.

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We offer two different levels of postgraduate research, each in either full-time or part-time mode. These degrees by research require an original contribution to the body of knowledge in a particular academic or professional discipline. Read more

Course Outline

We offer two different levels of postgraduate research, each in either full-time or part-time mode. These degrees by research require an original contribution to the body of knowledge in a particular academic or professional discipline.

DPhil -3 academic years of full-time study or 6 years of part-time study.
MPhil -2 academic years of full-time study or 4 years of part-time study.

Normally, postgraduate students wishing to register for our DPhil programme must first register for the MPhil and seek conversion at a later stage. The School operates a system of preliminary registration for all research degrees so as to allow students to prepare a formal proposal during their first two terms of study. All research students must also subject their work to an annual progress review.

Postgraduate research is not to be taken lightly! Above all, we seek to achieve an acceptable match involving a capable and well-motivated student, an appropriate research topic, and a member of faculty able / willing to supervise the research. A limited number of scholarships are available.

Start dates are available in January, April, July or September.

Find out more about our Business School on http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/business.

Teaching Method

Candidates spend a considerable part of their studies undertaking supervised research, at the end of which they submit a thesis embodying the results of that research. This thesis must demonstrate familiarity with, and an understanding of the subject, its principal sources and authorities. It should display critical discrimination and a sense of proportion in evaluating evidence and the judgements of others. The subject should be dealt with in a competent and scholarly manner.

Research Options

Recent examples of doctoral work include dissertations on:

- transformational management in Eastern Europe
- the role of knowledge management in creating a customer-driven service organisation
- the development of effective call centre agents.
- the professional service firm: designing delivery systems
- the effective call centre employee
- pricing decisions and the neo-classical economic theory of the firm

Research proposals are invited from areas of marketing, accounting, finance, strategy, organisational behaviour and service management.

Apply here http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/business/mphil/business.

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We offer three programmes of postgraduate study by research, all in either full-time or part-time mode. These are degrees by research which require an original contribution to the body of knowledge in a particular academic or professional discipline. Read more

Course Outline

We offer three programmes of postgraduate study by research, all in either full-time or part-time mode. These are degrees by research which require an original contribution to the body of knowledge in a particular academic or professional discipline.

- LLM by research – 1 academic year of full-time study or 2 years of part-time study.
- MPhil – 2 academic years of full-time study or 4 years of part-time study.
- DPhil – 3 academic years of full-time study or 6 years of part-time study.

Normally, postgraduate students wishing to register for our DPhil programme must first register for the MPhil and seek conversion at a later stage. The School operates a system of preliminary registration for all research degrees to allow students to prepare a formal proposal during their first two terms of study. All research students must also subject their work to an annual progress review.

Find out more about our Law School on http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/law

Teaching Method

Candidates spend the aforementioned time period undertaking supervised research, at the end of which they submit a thesis embodying the results of that research. This thesis must demonstrate familiarity with, and an understanding of the subject, its principal sources and authorities. It should display critical discrimination and a sense of proportion in evaluating evidence and the judgements of others. The subject should be dealt with in a competent and scholarly manner.

Apply here http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/law/mphil/law.

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At present, we offer the opportunity to gain a postgraduate degree by research at MSc, MPhil or DPhil level. Study can be on either a full-time or a part-time basis. Read more

Course outline

At present, we offer the opportunity to gain a postgraduate degree by research at MSc, MPhil or DPhil level. Study can be on either a full-time or a part-time basis. The minimum periods of study for achieving these research degrees are as follows:

- MSc – 1 year full-time or 2 years part-time
- MPhil – 2 years full-time or 4 years part-time
- DPhil – 3 years full-time or 6 years part-time

Specific projects that we would be happy to supervise immediately include:

Developmental Psychology

- Conceptual change
- Children’s mental models of natural phenomena
- Misconceptions of scientific theory and practice (in both children and adults)
- Science learning in schools
- Science teaching in schools
- Methods of investigating children’s knowledge

Music Psychology

- Expertise in sight-singing music:
- Expertise in any domain requires practice and involves the use of specific cognitive strategies. Research on sight-singing has suggested a number of factors involved in pitching sung notes, such as memory, reading intervals, the presence of other musical lines, and an understanding of tonality. This project would extend the existing research by carrying out a number of experiments on expert and less expert singers. (Note: this project could be extended to instrumental sight-reading.)
- Sung text intelligibility:
- A great deal of music is sung, and an important aspect of perceiving sung music is the extent to which the words can be understood. There are no doubt differences between understanding speech and sung words. This project would investigate a number of factors thought to affect the intelligibility of sung text, based on a previous exploratory survey questionnaire study, in a set of controlled experiments.
- Factors affecting music reading
- Effects of background music on various behaviours / cognitive abilities
- Factors affecting the understanding of sung text
- Gender and musical instrument playing as a function of experience

Cognition and Perception

- Expertise and strategies in cryptic crossword completion:
- Expertise in any domain requires practice and involves the use of specific cognitive strategies. An exploratory survey of expert cryptic crossword solvers has shed light on their solving habits and the role of motivation, but not really tackled the cognitive strategies involved. This project would investigate the cognitive aspects of cryptic crossword solving in experts, including looking at the role of group work when people solve crosswords together. Methods would include controlled experiments on anagram solving, clue recognition and solving, and completing part-answered clues, as well as the use of online verbal protocols during crossword solving.
- Expertise for problem solving
- Time estimation and processing
- Stroop effect in music reading
- Working memory and dual task performance

Educational Psychology

- Dyslexia
- Provision of special needs accommodations throughout education
- Effects and perceived benefits of special needs education post-education

General areas that we would be happy to supervise projects in include:

- Evolutionary psychology, particularly intergenerational conflict
- Psychology of religion
- Questionnaire design
- Object recognition and naming
- Reading for meaning in literary texts
- Discourse, authorship and readership
- Role of shame in counselling, therapy and education

Find out more about our Psychology Department on http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/psychology.

Research

The Master of Science (MSc) is available as a research degree. Candidates seeking the degree on the basis of research undertake one year of supervised research on a topic with an area for which the first degree would be the degree of Bachelor of Science (two years if they are studying part-time), at the end of which they submit a thesis embodying the results of their research. This research must demonstrate familiarity with, and an understanding of the subject, its principal sources and authorities. It should display critical discrimination and a sense of proportion in evaluating evidence and the judgements of others. The subject should be dealt with in a competent and scholarly manner. Candidates who are awarded the degree of MSc will have demonstrated their ability to conduct independent research using a range of primary and/or secondary sources and to present this in an organised, coherent and scholarly manner. Candidates for the degree of MSc must already hold a good honours degree or the equivalent. Admission to the degree is normally on a provisional basis while the candidate, with the help of the supervisor, refines the proposal for the research, including developing a work plan and identifying the requirements for support and resources and how these will be met.

The degree of Master of Philosophy (MPhil) is a degree that is awarded on the basis of a thesis embodying the results of supervised research. Despite the name of the degree, it may be awarded in any subject or discipline. Candidates spend a period of two years full-time or four years part-time undertaking supervised research, at the end of which they submit a thesis embodying the results of that research. This thesis must demonstrate familiarity with, and an understanding of the subject, its principal sources and authorities. It should display critical discrimination and a sense of proportion in evaluating evidence and the judgements of others. The subject should be dealt with in a competent and scholarly manner.

The research embodied in the thesis for the degree of Master of Philosophy (MPhil) must advance understanding in the field or area of study concerned.

Candidates seeking the degree of Doctor of Philosophy on the basis of a thesis embodying the results of supervised research must already hold a good honours degree or the equivalent.

Admission to the degree is normally on a provisional basis while the candidate, with the help of the supervisor, refines the proposal for the research, including developing a work plan and identifying the requirements for support and resources and how these will be met.

Apply here http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/sciences/msc/psychology.

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The Applied Computing Department is a young department of modest size but is successful in attracting research funding from various sources in the UK and the EU (including industry, research councils and charitable foundations). Read more

Course Outline

The Applied Computing Department is a young department of modest size but is successful in attracting research funding from various sources in the UK and the EU (including industry, research councils and charitable foundations). It supports a significant range of research interest and over the last few years the number of research students has grown steadily. The Department has a history of involvement in EU framework projects. More recently, we were partners in two EU FP6 funded projects: SecurePhone and BroadWan. We have been working and collaborating with many European research institutions including The Technical University Graz, CNUCE, Pisa, Thales, Thomson, TELENOR, RAL, Salzburg, Telephonica – Spain, Atos Origin, The University of Saarbrucken – Germany, INFORMA – Italy, and ENST – France.

The main research areas of interest in the Department cover image / video processing and analysis techniques and applications; wireless mobile network technologies; and biometric-based authentications for constrained devices / environments. In image processing we mainly, but not exclusively, use wavelet transform techniques for facial feature detection and recognition, online image / video compression for constrained devices, visual speech recognition, feature detection in biomedical images, digital watermarking, content-based video indexing for biometric video databases. In the wireless networking area, our research effort focuses on convergence and integration of different wireless technologies and standards, wireless mesh technologies, intrusion detection and prevention, efficiency and stability of ad hoc networks.

Currently the Department has a number of research groups consisting of 5 research active academics, 12 PhD and 3 MSc/MPhil students at various stages of their studies.

Find out more about our Department of Applied Computing on http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/appliedcomputing.

Teaching Method

Candidates spend a considerable part of their studies undertaking supervised research, at the end of which they submit a thesis embodying the results of that research. This thesis must demonstrate familiarity with, and an understanding of the subject, its principal sources and authorities. It should display critical discrimination and a sense of proportion in evaluating evidence and the judgements of others. The subject should be dealt with in a competent and scholarly manner.

After your degree

We have a high graduate employment rate:

- The Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) ranked Buckingham top for job prospects with 96.9% (July 2013).
- The Guardian League Table for 2014 ranked Buckingham top in the category of job prospects (June 2013).
- The Complete University Guide reported that the University ranked second for Graduate Prospects (May 2013).

Our graduates have gone on to further study at most of the world’s leading universities, including Harvard, London, Oxford and Cambridge and secured jobs in senior positions around the world. Among our alumni we have a graduate who became the head of his country’s civil service and one who became a leading Formula One motor-racing driver. Another secured a position as the Minister of Sabah and one female law graduate became the first British lawyer to become a French Advocate.

What our students and alumni say

Please see the Research Students page for examples of currently on-going as well as already successfully finished research projects: http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/appliedcomputing/researchstudents.

Apply here http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/sciences/mphil/computerscience.

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The Buckingham Centre for Astrobiology carries out research related to the interface between astronomy and biology. The Centre’s Director, Professor Chandra Wickramasinghe, is one of the pioneers of this new discipline, and together with a team of honorary professors carries out research over a wide range of topics. Read more
The Buckingham Centre for Astrobiology carries out research related to the interface between astronomy and biology. The Centre’s Director, Professor Chandra Wickramasinghe, is one of the pioneers of this new discipline, and together with a team of honorary professors carries out research over a wide range of topics. Possible research projects include studies on the nature of interstellar and comet dust, studies of meteorites and material collected in the stratosphere, theories of planet formation, transfer of life from one planetary system to another. These and other topics of research are available to applicants.

Find out more about The Buckingham Centre for Astrobiology (BCAB) on http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/research/bcab.

Teaching methods

Candidates spend a considerable part of their studies undertaking supervised research, at the end of which they submit a thesis embodying the results of that research. This thesis must demonstrate familiarity with, and an understanding of the subject, its principal sources and authorities. It should display critical discrimination and a sense of proportion in evaluating evidence and the judgements of others. The subject should be dealt with in a competent and scholarly manner.

Apply here http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/sciences/mphil/astrobiology.

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The academic staff in the Applied Computing Department (ACD) are all engaged in research and publications. Considering its modest size, ACD has successfully attracted research funding from various sources in the UK and the EU, including industry, research councils, HEA and EU framework projects such as FP6. Read more

Research programme

The academic staff in the Applied Computing Department (ACD) are all engaged in research and publications. Considering its modest size, ACD has successfully attracted research funding from various sources in the UK and the EU, including industry, research councils, HEA and EU framework projects such as FP6. Furthermore, ACD has been working and collaborating with many European research institutions.

For the academic year 2012-2013, 2 DPhil and 6 MSc students (1 in Mathematics) have graduated, four of whom graduated with Distinction. The 2 DPhil students have made it for the March graduation and we expect to have 3 or 4 more completing their DPhil research programmes for the next graduation. One of our new MPhil/DPhil students in Computing joined the Department last October, and 3 other MPhil/DPhil students have joined us since. Over the last few years, the number of research students in ACD has grown steadily to (currently) 29 PhD and 2 Master’s research students.

We have had over 20 refereed conference and journal papers published during the last 12 months, and two of the papers have been awarded best paper awards.

ACD supports diverse research topics addressing varied applied computing technologies such as:

- Image processing and pattern recognition with applications in biometric-based person identification, image super-resolution, digital watermarking and steganography, content-based image / video indexing and retrieval, biomedical image analysis.
- Multi-factor authentication and security algorithms.
- Wireless networks technologies (Multi-frequency Software-Defined / Cognitive Radios, convergence and integration of different wireless technologies and standards such as WiFi and WiMax, IPv4 and IPv6, wireless mesh technologies, intrusion detection and prevention, efficiency and stability of ad hoc networks).
- Hybrid navigation and localisation integrations for mobile handsets, including using Cellular and WiFi in conjunction with GPS and Glonass for seamless positioning indoors, Multiplexed receive chain of GPS/Glonass with on-board handset Bluetooth/WiFi, GNSS signals multiplexing for real time simulation.
- Cloud computing, including the readiness of mobile operating systems for cloud services and focusing on techniques for fast computing handovers, efficient virtualisation and optimised security algorithms.
- Data mining techniques, including database systems, the application of data mining techniques in image and biological data, human-computer interaction and visual languages.
- Research and development of Apps for mobile devices and smart TVs, particularly for application in the areas of education and healthcare.
- Differential geometry – Einstein metrics, quasi-Einstein metrics, Ricci solitons, numerical methods in differential geometry.

As well as researching the chosen subject, our students engage in delivering seminars weekly, attending conferences and workshops, attending online webinars and discussion forums, attending training and focused group studies, supervising tutorial and laboratory sessions for undergraduate students, peer reviews and final year project supervision, among a host of technical and networking activities to enhance their skills and techniques.

Find out more about our Department of Applied Computing on http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/appliedcomputing.
Apply here http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/sciences/msc/computingresearch.

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This cutting-edge programme is unique to Buckingham. A course with wide appeal, it is aimed at anyone who has an interest in biography or in researching and writing biography for themselves. Read more

Course outline

This cutting-edge programme is unique to Buckingham. A course with wide appeal, it is aimed at anyone who has an interest in biography or in researching and writing biography for themselves. The varied mix of backgrounds and interests that students bring to the course, the experience and commitment of the programme director and the friendly small-group setting allow a lively, enjoyable and intellectually rigorous exchange of ideas. Graduates have gone on to publish their own books, and to win prizes. Some have embarked on further research for the MPhil or the DPhil in Biography.

When it was founded in 1996, the Biography MA was the first of its kind. Since then Life Writing has become part of the postgraduate menu, but the Buckingham course has kept its distinctive edge. Unlike most Life Writing degrees, it is not linked to Creative Writing, and there is a strong emphasis on research and historical biography. The programme is consistently rated ‘excellent’ by external examiners and inspectors.

Find out more about our School of Humanities on http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities.

Location

Teaching takes place in central London, usually at a venue close to Marylebone station.

Timetable

The course offers entry points in September and January and runs for a calendar year if taken full-time. Teaching takes place on one day a week over three terms running from September to December, January to March and April to June; the term from July to September is devoted to independent research. The programme may be followed part-time over 2 years. In the first year part-time students follow the taught courses and the second year is normally devoted to the dissertation. A detailed programme is shown here. Suitably qualified students with a major research topic in mind may be accepted for the higher degrees of MPhil (two years full-time/four years part-time) or DPhil (three years full-time/six years part-time).

Course structure

Students have a choice between following the taught MA, or opting for the MA by Research. The taught MA gives an opportunity to produce written term papers on a variety of topics as well as a dissertation of up to 20,000 words. Students accepted for the MA by Research are required to produce written work which includes an extended dissertation of up to 40,000 words. All students produce coursework for the Research Methods module: an annotated bibliography and a short biography, with supporting material, produced according to the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography format.

Research support

One of the distinctive features of the programme is the value attached to the supervision which is provided for students working on dissertations. One-on-one supervisions are held every two or three weeks during term. While the dissertation must be the candidate’s independent work, it is the supervisor who offers advice on refining the topic (if necessary), on primary sources, on secondary reading, on research techniques and on writing the dissertation. Regular group discussions between research students at all degree levels (MA, MPhil and DPhil) allow the exchange of research experiences and mutual support.

Programme director

Professor Jane Ridley founded the Buckingham Biography MA in 1996. She is an Oxford-trained historian and biographer, and her publications include The Young Disraeli (1995); The Architect and his Wife: A Life of Edwin Lutyens (2002), which won the Duff Cooper Prize; and Bertie: A Life of Edward VII (2012), for which she was awarded a research fellowship by the Leverhulme Trust. She has contributed widely to the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, and she is a regular reviewer for publications such as the Spectator, the Literary Review and the Times Literary Supplement.

Apply here http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities/ma/biography.

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Oxford is a wonderful place to study and it has unrivalled facilities. We have been running this part-time masters course successfully for thirteen years. Read more

Overview

Oxford is a wonderful place to study and it has unrivalled facilities. We have been running this part-time masters course successfully for thirteen years. The overwhelming response gained from our students is one of satisfaction, enjoyment and fulfilment. We have brought together a good balance of men and women, older and younger students, historic environment professionals and those with a personal or community interest in the subject. We have had some great field experiences and outstanding seminars. Although the coursework requires a solid commitment from you over two years, the course atmosphere is informal and friendly, and we aim to support every student with ideas, guidance and encouragement.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/msc-in-applied-landscape-archaeology

What the course offers

The MSc in Applied Landscape Archaeology is a part-time modular course over two years, leading to an Oxford University Postgraduate Degree in Archaeology. Students become fully matriculated members of Oxford University during their period of registration, and therefore also become a member of a college. The course is designed for the needs of students who wish to study part-time and this includes those who are in full-time employment. Those with a personal or professional interest in landscape archaeology are welcome to apply.

Landscape Archaeology is an increasingly popular and widely-understood concept. Using a multi-period systematic approach, it is concerned with understanding past human impacts on the resources, topography and environment of the whole landscape, from uplands to coasts, and from farmed landscapes to urban/industrial areas.

Many methods of research are being developed in landscape archaeology, including geophysical survey, digital mapping and remote-sensing techniques such as LiDAR. These take their place alongside fieldwalking, historic landscape analysis, aerial photography and selective excavation to provide an effective armoury of techniques for the researcher. Skills such as survey and resource assessment are becoming essential for anyone involved in the management of the historic environment. Effecive communication and presentation of the value and potential of the historic landscape is vital in the world of planning, tourism, outreach and education.

The course involves a combination of academic study and field practice - survey and geophysics form a central theme, and we enjoy the support of Bartington Instruments Ltd for this.

This course is designed to appeal to those who already have experience of studying archaeology (or a closely-related subject) at undergraduate degree or diploma level and who wish to expand their academic, practical and professional skills in landscape archaeology. With a strong (but not exclusive) emphasis on the archaeology of Britain, it focuses on the applications of research methods in varying landscape situations. The course format is flexible and enables students to pursue their own research interests leading to a 15,000 word dissertation.

College affiliation

All students studying for a degree (including the DPhil) must be a member of a college. A number of Oxford colleges accept applications from part-time postgraduates whereas others do not: please consult the graduate prospectus or enquire with individual colleges. The majority of part-time DPhil students in Archaeology have chosen to apply to Kellogg College and most of the tutors and lecturers are members of the College. Kellogg is dedicated to graduate part-time students and has developed a unique expertise in attending to the intellectual, social, IT and welfare needs of part-time, mature graduate students. If a college choice is not specified on your application, it will be automatically sent to Kellogg if places are still available there.

Course structure

The course is divided into two one-year modules, Year A and Year B, which are run in alternate academic years (from October to September):

Year B begins in October 2015
Year A begins in October 2016

All students attend both modules, but they may be done in any order depending on year of admission. Because the course is modular there is no advantage to one combination over the other. Students normally study two consecutive modules and this is regarded as the best way to experience the course. However, in exceptional cases, regulations permit a student to intermit between modules (by permission of the Board of Studies only).

Both one-year modules have one core paper and two advanced papers spread over three terms.

Year A:

- Core Paper: Method and Theory in Landscape Archaeology
- Advanced Paper (Artefacts and Ecofacts in the Landscape)
- Advanced Paper (Archaeological Prospection)

Year B:
- Core Paper: Managing Historic Landscapes in the 21st Century
- Advanced Paper (Digital Landscapes)
- Advanced Paper (Reading the Historic Landscape)
- Field Training Week

Instead of one advanced paper, students may choose to opt for a ‘flexi-placement’ comprising at least 14 days spread over approximately one year to be spent working at an organisation which is involved in an aspect of landscape archaeology. The Course Director will supply details of these.

The dissertation (15,000 words) is the student’s own project which develops throughout the course and is submitted at the end of the second module. It can be based on a piece of fieldwork, or a methodological or artefactual study. Each student will be assigned a tutor who will supervise their dissertation. A dissertation workshop is held each year to help students work together on this essential course element.

In addition, once every two years (in late June - early July of Year B) a compulsory field survey training week will take place. Each student will also have a series of tutorials with the course director and tutors; these may take place in person or on-line.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/courses/msc-applied-landscape-archaeology/

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This one-year, full-time, taught MSc in Radiation Biology leads to an MSc awarded by the University of Oxford. It consists of. a 5 month core theoretical course covering the emerging areas of fundamental biology for oncology and its treatment by radiotherapy. Read more
This one-year, full-time, taught MSc in Radiation Biology leads to an MSc awarded by the University of Oxford. It consists of:

• a 5 month core theoretical course covering the emerging areas of fundamental biology for oncology and its treatment by radiotherapy

• a 6 month high-quality basic and clinically-applied research project

MSc Course Handbook - http://www.oncology.ox.ac.uk/sites/default/files/MSc%20in%20Radiation%20Biology%20Course%20Booklet%202016-17.pdf

The MSc in Radiation Biology forms the first year of training for students enrolled on the DPhil in Radiation Oncology (1+3). It will also provide a MSc degree for individuals who wish to continue in academic research in radiation biology at other Universities, or to start a career in other professions that require knowledge of radiation biology e.g. academic personnel associated with radiation protection issues.
Educational Training Bursaries to study for the MSc in Radiation Biology are avaliable from the CRUK Oxford Centre (http://www.cancercentre.ox.ac.uk/). These are for Clinicians and allied health professionals.

MSc Course Structure

Modular Structure -

Fundamental radiation biological science and laboratory methods/practical skills are taught in the first term (Michaelmas) and the first half of Hilary term, over a series of 12 modules. Each module is delivered over a period of one or two weeks and together the 12 modules comprise the ‘core content’ of the course.

Lectures will be given by local, national and international experts, with additional tutorials and practical sessions given by local staff. Sessions using distance learning material will complement these, and give students a wide knowledge and understanding of radiation biology.

Demonstration and practical sessions will enable students to learn particular techniques that are used in this speciality subject area.

The remaining 6 months is allowed for a high quality laboratory research project.

Assessments -

Six short essays and a series of laboratory reports will be assessed to provide formative assessment of student progress. Students also sit a qualifying examination in week 9 based upon Modules 1 – 6. This will normally be in an MCQ format. A second examination comprising short questions and essays is sat in week 9 of Hilary term. Students will submit an assignment and the research dissertation of approximately 10,000 words based upon their project and will be examined by research dissertation, by oral presentation and by a short viva voce.

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The Philosophy MA enables students to benefit from the acknowledged expertise of UCL's lively, close-knit intellectual community, and also access the stimulation and dynamism of London's wider philosophical community. Read more
The Philosophy MA enables students to benefit from the acknowledged expertise of UCL's lively, close-knit intellectual community, and also access the stimulation and dynamism of London's wider philosophical community. The programme offers the flexibility for recent graduates in the subject to study chosen topics in greater depth.

Degree information

The programme allows students to develop an advanced knowledge of problems in contemporary analytic philosophy, the history of philosophy and the study of value. It provides students with an understanding of a representative range of central philosophical debates and of the nature of philosophical problems, and encourages them to develop and defend their own viewpoint.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (30 credits), six optional modules (90 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules - these modules introduce students to graduate study in philosophy. Students will give short presentations on central topics and classic papers which form the basis of discussion.
-Research Preparation in Philosophy 1
-Research Preparation in Philosophy 2

Optional modules - options may include the following:
-Global Justice and Health
-Texts from Early Modern Philosophy: Hume
-Early Wittgenstein
-Epistemology
-Self-Knowledge
-Philosophy of Mind
-Moral Responsibility and Moral Dilemmas
-Kant
-Greek Philosophy
-Nineteenth Century Philosophy
-Philosophy of Mind and Cognitive Science
-Metaphysics of Science
-The Self in Early Analytic Philosophy
-Sartre’s Philosophy
-Epistemology of Disagreement
-Equality
-Recent Work in Practical Philosophy
-Graduate Studies in the Philosophy of Language
-Perception and its History

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project in any area of philosophy taught and approved by the Department, leading to in a dissertation of 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is taught through a combination of seminars, lectures, and supervisions. Students' performance is assessed through examinations, presentations, coursework, and the dissertation.

Careers

Graduates of this programme have become successful lawyers, journalists, theatre directors and novelists among other careers. Those who perform sufficiently well on the MA can expect to pursue further research in philosophy in London or elsewhere.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Research Assistant, Universität Zürich (University of Zurich) / Université de Fr
-Paralegal, marshall levine associates
-DPhil Population Health, University of Oxford
-GDL (Graduate Diploma in Law), City University London
-PhD Philosophy, King's College London

Employability
The programme equips graduates with the skills to analyse complex ideas, develop independence of judgement and originality of thought, evaluate arguments rigorously, present views lucidly both orally and on paper, and question orthodox views. The programme provide an ideal basis for future academic study and many graduates proceed to research degrees in the UK and abroad.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The department has strengths in philosophy of mind, language, political and moral philosophy, metaphysics, epistemology and the history of philosophy.

Our students benefit significantly from our location in London, which is one of the international centres of philosophical activity. London is home of a number of renowned journals (Philosophy; Mind & Language; Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society) and hosts regular visiting speakers from across the world. Over 60 philosophers are active in London making it one of the largest and most varied philosophical communities in the world.

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Nanotechnology and Regenerative Medicine are rapidly expanding fields with the potential to revolutionise modern medicine. This cross-disciplinary programme provides students with a robust scientific understanding in these fields, combined with a "hands-on" practical and translational focus. Read more
Nanotechnology and Regenerative Medicine are rapidly expanding fields with the potential to revolutionise modern medicine. This cross-disciplinary programme provides students with a robust scientific understanding in these fields, combined with a "hands-on" practical and translational focus.

Degree information

This programme will equip students with a critical understanding of:
-How nanotechnology can be harnessed for the improved detection and treatment of disease.
-The use of stem cells in medicine.
-Tissue engineering strategies for tissue regeneration.
-Improving biomaterials for directing cell behaviour.
-The regulatory, ethical and commercial hurdles for the translation of these emerging technologies.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of five core modules (75 credits), one optional module (15 credits) and a research project (90 credits). A Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits) is offered. The programme consists of two core modules (30 credits) and two optional modules (30 credits).

Core modules
-Nanotechnology in Medicine *
-Applied Tissue Engineering *
-Biomaterials
-Research Methodologies
-Practical Bio-Nanotechnology and Regenerative Medicine
-*PG Cert - compulsory modules

Optional modules - choose one of the following options; attendance at the other module is possible but will not be assessed.
-Stem Cells in Medicine and their Applications in Surgery
-Translation of Nanotechnology and Regenerative Medicine

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an extensive laboratory-based (90 credits) research project which culminates in a dissertation of c.15,000 words and an individual viva voce.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, tutorials, workshops, group discussions, practical sessions, and demonstrations. Assessment is through presentations, problem-solving workshops, written practical reports, coursework, unseen written examinations and the dissertation.

Careers

Student career options and progression during and following the completion of the degree are considered to be of the utmost importance. Personal tutors will offer individual advice and seminars are arranged on a variety of career competencies including CV writing, writing research proposals and positive personal presentation.

Networking with world-leading scientists, new biotechnology CEO's and clinicians is encouraged and enabled throughout the programme. Research output in terms of publishing papers and presenting at conferences is also promoted.

Recent career destinations include:
-PhD or Medicine at UCL, Imperial College London and Universities of Oxford and Cambridge
-Clinical PhD training programmes
-NHS hospitals in the UK
-EU and overseas hospitals and research facilities

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Health Careers Program, Harvard University
-PhD Medicine, Queen's University, Belfast
-PhD Bioengineering, Imperial College London
-PhD Nanomedicine, UCL
-DPhil Researcher (Biomedical Sciences), University of Oxford and studying MSc Nanotechnology and Regenerative Medicine, -University College London (UCL)

Employability
Graduates of the programme gain the transferable laboratory, critical and soft skills, such as science communication, necessary to pursue a scientific or clinical research career in the fields of nanomedicine and regenerative medicine.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Based within the world-leading medical research environment of the UCL Division of Surgery and Interventional Science this MSc retains a clinical focus and addresses real medicine needs. Students learn about the route of translation from research ideas into actual products which can benefit patients.

An in-depth laboratory-based research project is an integral component of the programme: expert support allows students to investigate cutting-edge projects and thereby open up opportunities for further research and publications.

Students are embedded within the vibrant research community of the Faculty of Medical Sciences which provides students - through research seminars, symposia and eminent guest lecturers - outstanding networking opportunities within the research, clinical and translational science communities.

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