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Masters Degrees (Dosimetry)

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The M.Sc. in Medical Physics is a full time course which aims to equip you for a career as a scientist in medicine. You will be given the basic knowledge of the subject area and some limited training. Read more
The M.Sc. in Medical Physics is a full time course which aims to equip you for a career as a scientist in medicine. You will be given the basic knowledge of the subject area and some limited training. The course consists of an intense program of lectures and workshops, followed by a short project and dissertation. Extensive use is made of the electronic learning environment "Blackboard" as used by NUI Galway. The course has been accredited by the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (UK).

Syllabus Outline. (with ECTS weighting)
Human Gross Anatomy (5 ECTS)
The cell, basic tissues, nervous system, nerves and muscle, bone and cartilage, blood, cardiovascular system, respiratory system, gastrointestinal tract, nutrition, genital system, urinary system, eye and vision, ear, hearing and balance, upper limb – hand, lower limb – foot, back and vertebral column, embryology, teratology, anthropometrics; static and dynamic anthropometrics data, anthropometric dimensions, clearance and reach and range of movement, method of limits, mathematics modelling.

Human Body Function (5 ECTS)
Biological Molecules and their functions. Body composition. Cell physiology. Cell membranes and membrane transport. Cell electrical potentials. Nerve function – nerve conduction, nerve synapses. Skeletal muscle function – neuromuscular junction, muscle excitation, muscle contraction, energy considerations. Blood and blood cells – blood groups, blood clotting. Immune system. Autonomous nervous system. Cardiovascular system – electrical and mechanical activity of the heart. – the peripheral circulation. Respiratory system- how the lungs work. Renal system – how the kidneys work. Digestive system. Endocrine system – how hormones work. Central nervous system and brain function.

Occupational Hygiene (5 ECTS)
Historical development of Occupational Hygiene, Safety and Health at Work Act. Hazards to Health, Surveys, Noise and Vibrations, Ionizing radiations, Non-Ionizing Radiations, Thermal Environments, Chemical hazards, Airborne Monitoring, Control of Contaminants, Ventilation, Management of Occupational Hygiene.

Medical Informatics (5 ECTS)
Bio statistics, Distributions, Hypothesis testing. Chi-square, Mann-Whitney, T-tests, ANOVA, regression. Critical Appraisal of Literature, screening and audit. Patient and Medical records, Coding, Hospital Information Systems, Decision support systems. Ethical consideration in Research.
Practicals: SPSS. Appraisal exercises.

Clinical Instrumentation (6 ECTS)
Biofluid Mechanics: Theory: Pressures in the Body, Fluid Dynamics, Viscous Flow, Elastic Walls, Instrumentation Examples: Respiratory Function Testing, Pressure Measurements, Blood Flow measurements. Physics of the Senses: Theory: Cutaneous and Chemical sensors, Audition, Vision, Psychophysics; Instrumentation Examples: Evoked responses, Audiology, Ophthalmology instrumentation, Physiological Signals: Theory Electrodes, Bioelectric Amplifiers, Transducers, Electrophysiology Instrumentation.

Medical Imaging (10 ECTS)
Theory of Image Formation including Fourier Transforms and Reconstruction from Projections (radon transform). Modulation transfer Function, Detective Quantum Efficiency.
X-ray imaging: Interaction of x-rays with matter, X-ray generation, Projection images, Scatter, Digital Radiography, CT – Imaging. Fundamentals of Image Processing.
Ultrasound: Physics of Ultrasound, Image formation, Doppler scanning, hazards of Ultrasound.
Nuclear Medicine : Overview of isotopes, generation of Isotopes, Anger Cameras, SPECT Imaging, Positron Emitters and generation, PET Imaging, Clinical aspects of Planar, SPECT and PET Imaging with isotopes.
Magnetic Resonance Imaging : Magnetization, Resonance, Relaxation, Contrast in MR Imaging, Image formation, Image sequences, their appearances and clinical uses, Safety in MR.

Radiation Fundamentals (5 ECTS)
Review of Atomic and Nuclear Physics. Radiation from charged particles. X-ray production and quality. Attenuation of Photon Beams in Matter. Interaction of Photons with Matter. Interaction of Charged Particles with matter. Introduction to Monte Carlo techniques. Concept to Dosimetry. Cavity Theory. Radiation Detectors. Practical aspects of Ionization chambers

The Physics of Radiation Therapy (10 ECTS)
The interaction of single beams of X and gamma rays with a scattering medium. Treatment planning with single photon beams. Treatment planning for combinations of photon beams. Radiotherapy with particle beams: electrons, pions, neutrons, heavy charged particles. Special Techniques in Radiotherapy. Equipment for external Radiotherapy. Relative dosimetry techniques. Dosimetry using sealed sources. Brachytherapy. Dosimetry of radio-isotopes.

Workshops / Practicals
Hospital & Radiation Safety [11 ECTS]
Workshop in Risk and Safety.
Concepts of Risk and Safety. Legal Aspects. Fundamental concepts in Risk Assessment and Human Factor Engineering. Risk and Safety management of complex systems with examples from ICU and Radiotherapy. Accidents in Radiotherapy and how to avoid them. Principles of Electrical Safety, Electrical Safety Testing, Non-ionizing Radiation Safety, including UV and laser safety.
- NUIG Radiation Safety Course.
Course for Radiation Safety Officer.
- Advanced Radiation Safety
Concepts of Radiation Protection in Medical Practice, Regulations. Patient Dosimetry. Shielding design in Diagnostic Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Radiotherapy.
- Medical Imaging Workshop
Operation of imaging systems. Calibration and Quality Assurance of General
radiography, fluoroscopy systems, ultrasound scanners, CT-scanners and MR scanners. Radiopharmacy and Gamma Cameras Quality Control.

Research Project [28 ECTS]
A limited research project will be undertaken in a medical physics area. Duration of this will be 4 months full time

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The programme mainly consists of the studies of individual, environmental and substance exposure to radiation, focusing on the use of radiation for treatment and diagnosis of oncological diseases, and protection of individual and environment from unreasonable radiation. Read more

The programme mainly consists of the studies of individual, environmental and substance exposure to radiation, focusing on the use of radiation for treatment and diagnosis of oncological diseases, and protection of individual and environment from unreasonable radiation. Knowledge, skills and competences are regulated by EC directive 2013/59/EURATOM; therefore, the graduates have unique prospects for international development and career.

Why @KTU?

Combination of physics and medical sciences

Study programme is implemented together with the Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, and is harmonised with Medical Physics study programmes of other European and world’s universities by http://www.iomp.org.

Well-equipped facilities with latest software tools

Well-equipped dosimetry laboratory and possibility to work and perform investigations with Linear accelerators, X-ray, CT, MRI, PET and other imaging facilities, gamma cameras (SPECT).

Acquired knowledge is applied in practice

Significant part of studies is performed working together with the interdisciplinary teams of radiotherapists/radiologists in hospitals and medical care centres.

Career

Student’s competences:

– Application and improvement of radiation technologies and methods in medicine and industry;

– Planning of patients’ dosages in radiation therapy and provision of recommendations regarding dosimetry;

– Knowledge and application of radiation protection strategy, protective factors and measures;

Student’s skills:

– Able to apply known physical methods and concepts in medical practice and develop new ones, provide recommendations to the patients regarding dosimetry;

– Able to work individually with radiation equipment and technologies guaranteeing the quality of radiation medical services and implementing optimisation measures for radiation protection;

– Able to work in team while developing and implementing management strategies for patients’ expose based on research-practical activities, and take personal responsibility.



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This course offers the academic training required for a career in scientific support of medical procedures and technology. The course is coordinated through the Medical Physics Departments in St. Read more
This course offers the academic training required for a career in scientific support of medical procedures and technology. The course is coordinated through the Medical Physics Departments in St. James's Hospital and St. Luke's Hospital, Dublin.

Students enter via the M.Sc. register. This course covers areas frequently known as Medical Physics and Clinical Engineering. It is designed for students who have a good honours degree in one of the Physical Sciences (physics, electronic or mechanical engineering, computer science, mathematics) and builds on this knowledge to present the academic foundation for the application of the Physical Sciences in Medicine.

The course will be delivered as lectures, demonstrations, seminars, practicals and workshops. All students must take a Core Module. Upon completion of this, the student will then take one of three specialisation tracks in Diagnostic Radiology, Radiation Therapy or Clinical Engineering. The running of each of these tracks is subject to a minimum number of students taking each track and therefore all three tracks may not run each year.

Core Modules

Introduction to Radiation Protection andamp; Radiation Physics (5 ECTS)
Imaging Physics andamp; Technology (5 ECTS)
Introduction to Radiotherapy and Non-Ionising Imaging (5 ECTS)
Basic Medical Sciences (5 ECTS)
Introduction to Research Methodology and Safety (5 ECTS)
Medical Technology and Information Systems (5 ECTS)
Seminars (5 ECTS)
Specialisation Track Modules (Diagnostic Radiology)

Radiation Physics and Dosimetry (5 ECTS)
Medical Informatics and Image Processing (5 ECTS)
Ionising and Non-Ionising Radiation Protection (5 ECTS)
Imaging Physics and Technology 2 (10 ECTS)
Specialisation Track Modules (Radiation Therapy)

Radiation Physics and Dosimetry (5 ECTS)
Principles and Applications of Clinical Radiobiology (5 ECTS)
External Beam Radiotherapy (10 ECTS)
Brachytherapy and Unsealed Source Radiotherapy (5 ECTS)
Specialisation Track Modules (Clinical Engineering)

The Human Medical Device Interface (5 ECTS)
Principle and Practice of Medical Technology Design, Prototyping andamp; Testing (5 ECTS)
Medical Technology 1: Critical Care (5 ECTS)
Medical Technology 2: Interventions, Therapeutics andamp; Diagnostics (5 ECTS)
Medical Informatics and Equipment Management (5 ECTS)
Project Work and Dissertation (30 ECTS)

In parallel with the taught components, the students will engage in original research and report their findings in a dissertation. A pass mark in the assessment components of all three required sections (Core Module, Specialisation Track and Dissertation) will result in the awarding of MSc in Physical Sciences in Medicine. If the student does not pass the dissertation component, but successfully passes the taught components, an exit Postgraduate Diploma in Physical Sciences in Medicine will be awarded. Subject areas include

Radiation Protection and Radiation Physics
Imaging Physics and Technology
Basic Medical Sciences
Medical Technology Design, Prototyping and Testing
Medical Informatics
Image Processing
External Bean Radiotherapy
Brachytherapy and Unsealed Source Radiotherapy
The Human-Medical Device Interface
The course presents the core of knowledge for the application of the Physical Sciences in Medicine; it demonstrates practical implementations of physics and engineering in clinical practice, and develops practical skills in selected areas. It also engages students in original research in the field of Medical Physics / Engineering. The course is designed to be a 1 year full-time course but is timetabled to facilitate students who want to engage over a 2 year part-time process.

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Therapeutic radiographers are at the forefront of cancer care, having a vital role in the delivery of Radiotherapy services. They treat cancer patients with x-rays using highly sophisticated equipment. Read more
Therapeutic radiographers are at the forefront of cancer care, having a vital role in the delivery of Radiotherapy services. They treat cancer patients with x-rays using highly sophisticated equipment. They are also responsible for ensuring that treatment planning and delivery is achieved with absolute precision.

In the treatment of cancer, accuracy is paramount and a variety of highly specialised equipment is available within Radiotherapy Departments to achieve this. Computerised Tomography (CT) simulators employ the latest technology to localise tumours.

Technological advances

Technological advances in linear accelerator design ensure that treatment conforms to patients needs with pinpoint accuracy. Treatment units housing radioactive sources also play a useful role in patient management, as do 3D planning systems.

London South Bank University has invested heavily to ensure that students have access to the best learning tools and staff. There are two dedicated fully equipped skill labs that enable Dosimetry (Radiotherapy treatment planning) and a state of the art virtual environment of a radiotherapy treatment room (VERT).

Communication and care

Alongside the technology, the importance of high standards of communication and care of cancer patients cannot be overestimated. Cancer patients are treated by a multidisciplinary team in which the therapeutic radiographer plays a major role in reducing the sense of vulnerability and promoting patients autonomy.

As a graduate, you'll be eligible to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) as a Radiographer .

PgDip programme

The PgDip programme is an accelerated programme over two years, for graduate students who already have a Level 6 qualification. Building on graduate skills you'll develop an enquiring, reflective, critical and innovative approach to Therapeutic Radiography within the context of the rapid changes occurring in the health service.

Top-up to MSc

By adding the research element of a dissertation (an extended and independent piece of written research), you'll be able to graduate with a Masters-level qualification.

Modules

On this programme we'll develop you as confident and competent practitioner who practices autonomously, compassionately, skilfully and safely. The programme comprises of five compulsory modules instilling a range of academic knowledge from health sciences to profession specific radiotherapy and oncology practice. And, add a dissertation for the award of a Masters.

Year 1

Radiation science and technology
Applied biological sciences
Radiotherapy theory and practice 1

Year 2

Patient care and resource management in radiotherapy
Radiotherapy theory and practice 2
Dissertation (MSc only)

Teaching and learning

Academic theoretical knowledge is gained through taught session led by lecturers and experts in the field, supported by blended learning and self-study activities.

Practical skills are normally developed through practical skills based sessions using VERT and dosimetry software, problem-based approaches and clinical placement.

Types of learning activities include:

• Lectures
• Seminars
• Enquiry-based learning
• Tutorials
• Formative assessments
• E discussions
• Observation and demonstration of practices within clinical placements.

Placements

Clinical placements are an essential element of the course. You will spend 50% of your time involved in academic study and 50% in clinical practice within a broad variety of healthcare settings. A clinical practice placement allows you to put theory into practice by working with a range of health professionals in clinical situations to develop the skills, knowledge and experience required to become a competent radiographer. Although sometimes initially challenging, practice learning is one of the most interesting and exciting aspects of learning to be a radiographer.

Clinical settings

At LSBU you will experience a variety of clinical settings such as NHS Trusts and the independent sector.

Placements for Therapeutic Radiography include:

• Brighton and Sussex University Hospital: Sussex Cancer Centre
• Maidstone and Tunbridge Wells NHS Trust: Kent Oncology Centre
• Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust
• Royal Surrey Hospital
• Queens Hospital, Romford.

Structure of placements

Placements are spread over two years.

The first clinical placement; approximately seven weeks after the start of the course, gives a real taster of the role of the radiotherapy radiographer in the radiotherapy treatment process. It gives you an opportunity to confirm correct choice of career early within the course. Thereafter clinical placements follow the same pattern throughout the course.

Support from a mentor

An identified Link Lecturer and Personal Tutor from the University will be the person you can contact during working day hours whilst on placement with any concerns or questions you are unable to solve otherwise. As there is a close relationship between LSBU and the clinical placement; the Link Lecturer will pay regular scheduled visits to the different sites to meet up with students.

Professional links

The programme is validated by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and accredited by the Society and College of Radiographers.

Radiotherapy as a career

On successful completion of the course you'll be eligible to register with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) as a therapeutic radiographer.

From helping plan and administering treatment, to explaining it to patients and assessing their responses, therapeutic radiographers are involved in every stage of the treatment process.

Therapeutic radiographers work closely with professionals from other disciplines, are involved in the care and support of the cancer patient and their families through all parts of the patient pathway from the initial referral through to treatment review and follow-up stages. They are predominantly responsible for treatment for the accurate localisation, planning and delivery of ionising radiation.

Therapeutic radiographers need excellent interpersonal skills and emotional resilience as they deal with patients and their families at very difficult and emotional times. Making patients feel comfortable and guiding them through the process can be as important as the technical skills required for this role.

Career progression

Through the acquisition of a wide range of transferable skills such as psychosocial, organisational, management, technical and scientific skills, individuals are well prepared to work in any situation that best suits their individual expertise and interest.Working as a consultant practitioner is one common career path as well as management, research, clinical work and teaching.

After qualification, clinically experienced therapeutic radiographers may gain additional specialist skills and expertise through the postgraduate, post-registration and continuing professional development frameworks.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

• Direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
• Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
• Mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

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This programme pathway is designed for students with an interest in the engineering aspects of technology that are applied in modern medicine. Read more

This programme pathway is designed for students with an interest in the engineering aspects of technology that are applied in modern medicine. Students gain an understanding of bioengineering principles and practices that are used in hospitals, industries and research laboratories through lectures, problem-solving sessions, a research project and collaborative work.

About this degree

Students study in detail the engineering and physics principles that underpin modern medicine, and learn to apply their knowledge to established and emerging technologies in medical imaging and patient monitoring. The programme covers the engineering applications across the diagnosis and measurement of the human body and its physiology, as well as the electronic and computational skills needed to apply this theory in practice.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of seven core modules (105 credits), one optional module (15 credits), and a research project (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits) is offered.

A Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits) is offered.

Core modules

  • Ionising Radiation Physics: Interactions and Dosimetry
  • Imaging with Ionising Radiation
  • MRI and Biomedical Optics
  • Ultrasound in Medicine
  • Medical Electronics and Control
  • Clinical Practice
  • Medical Device Enterprise Scenario

Optional modules

Students choose one of the following:

  • Applications of Biomedical Engineering
  • Materials and Engineering for Orthopaedic Devices
  • Computing in Medicine
  • Programming Foundations for Medical Image Analysis

Dissertation/report

All MSc students undertake an independent research project within the broad area of physics and engineering in medicine which culminates in a written report of 10,000 words, a poster and an oral examination.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, demonstrations, practicals, assignments and a research project. Lecturers are drawn from UCL and from London teaching hospitals including UCLH, St. Bartholomew's, and the Royal Free Hospital. Assessment is through supervised examination, coursework, the dissertation and an oral examination.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Physics and Engineering in Medicine: Biomedical Engineering and Medical Imaging MSc

Funding

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

Graduates from the Biomedical Engineering and Medical Imaging stream of the MSc programme have obtained employment with a wide range of employers in health care, industry and academia sectors.

Employability

Postgraduate study within the department offers the chance to develop important skills and acquire new knowledge through involvement with a team of scientists or engineers working in a world-leading research group. Graduates complete their study having gained new scientific or engineering skills applied to solving problems at the forefront of human endeavour. Skills associated with project management, effective communication and teamwork are also refined in this high-quality working environment.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The spectrum of medical physics activities undertaken in UCL Medical Physics & Biomedical Engineering is probably the broadest of any in the United Kingdom. The department is widely acknowledged as an internationally leading centre of excellence and students receive comprehensive training in the latest methodologies and technologies from leaders in the field.

The department operates alongside the NHS department which provides the medical physics and clinical engineering services for the UCL Hospitals Trust, as well as undertaking industrial contract research and technology transfer.

Students have access to a wide range of workshop, laboratory, teaching and clinical facilities in the department and associated hospitals. A large range of scientific equipment is available for research involving nuclear magnetic resonance, optics, acoustics, X-rays, radiation dosimetry, and implant development, as well as new biomedical engineering facilities at the Royal Free Hospital and Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital in Stanmore.



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This programme pathway is designed for students with a developing interest in radiation physics, both ionising and non-ionising, that underpins many of the imaging and treatment technologies applied in modern medicine. Read more

This programme pathway is designed for students with a developing interest in radiation physics, both ionising and non-ionising, that underpins many of the imaging and treatment technologies applied in modern medicine. Students gain an understanding of scientific principles and practices that are used in hospitals, industries and research laboratories through lectures, problem-solving sessions, a research project and collaborative work.

About this degree

Students study the physics theory and practice that underpins modern medicine, and learn to apply their knowledge to established and emerging technologies in medical science. The programme covers the applications of both ionising and non-ionising radiation to the diagnosis and treatment of human disease and disorder, and includes research project, workplace skills development and computational skills needed to apply this theory into practice. 

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of seven core modules (105 credits), one optional module (15 credits), and a research project (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma of eight modules (120 credits) is offered.

A Postgraduate Certificate of four modules (60 credits) is offered.

Core modules

  • Ionising Radiation Physics: Interactions and Dosimetry
  • Imaging with Ionising Radiation
  • MRI and Biomedical Optics
  • Ultrasound in Medicine
  • Treatment with Ionising Radiation
  • Clinical Practice
  • MSc Research Project
  • Medical Device Enterprise Scenario

Optional modules

Students choose one of the following:

  • Computing in Medicine
  • Applications of Biomedical Engineering
  • Programming Foundations for Medical Image Analysis

Dissertation/report

All MSc students undertake an independent research project within the broad area of physics and engineering in medicine which culminates in a report of up to 10,000 words, a poster and an oral examination.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, demonstrations, tutorials, assignments and a research project. Lecturers are drawn from UCL and from London teaching hospitals including UCLH, St. Bartholomew's, and the Royal Free Hospital. Assessment is through supervised examination, coursework and assignments, a research dissertation and an oral examination.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Physics and Engineering in Medicine: Radiation Physics MSc

Funding

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

A large percentage of graduates from the MSc continue on to PhD study, often in one of the nine research groups within the department, as a result of the skills and knowledge they acquire on the programme. Other graduates commence or resume training or employment within the healthcare sector in hospitals or industry, both within the UK and abroad. 

Employability

Postgraduate study within the department offers the chance to develop important skills and acquire new knowledge through involvement with a team of scientists or engineers working in a world-leading research group. Graduates complete their study having gained new scientific or engineering skills applied to solving problems at the forefront of human endeavour. Skills associated with project management, effective communication and teamwork are also refined in this high-quality working environment.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The spectrum of medical physics activities undertaken in UCL Medical Physics & Biomedical Engineering is probably the broadest of any in the United Kingdom. The department is widely acknowledged as an internationally leading centre of excellence and students on this programme receive comprehensive training in the latest methodologies and technologies from leaders in the field.

The department operates alongside the NHS department which provides the medical physics and clinical engineering services for the University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, as well as undertaking industrial contract research and technology transfer. The department is also a collaborator in the nearby London Proton Therapy Centre, currently under construction.

Students have access to a wide range of workshop, laboratory, teaching and clinical facilities in the department and associated hospitals. A large range of scientific equipment is also available for research involving nuclear magnetic resonance, optics, acoustics, X-rays, radiation dosimetry, and implant development. 



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This programme pathway is identical to the campus-delivered radiation physics stream but is designed for students who are unable to travel to London because of their work duties or international location. Read more

This programme pathway is identical to the campus-delivered radiation physics stream but is designed for students who are unable to travel to London because of their work duties or international location. Teaching is delivered for each module via video lectures, top-up online tutorials and additional e-learning resources, with coursework and supervised examinations which are arranged across the world by the British Council.

About this degree

Students study in detail the physics theory and practice that underpins modern medicine, and learn to apply their knowledge to established and emerging technologies in medical science. The programme covers the applications of both ionising and non-ionising radiation to the diagnosis and treatment of human disease and disorder, and includes a research project and the development of computational skills needed to apply this theory into practice.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of eight core modules (120 credits) and the research dissertation (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma, eight core modules (120 credits), is offered.

A Postgraduate Certificate, four core modules (60 credits), is offered

Core modules

  • Ionising Radiation Physics: Interactions and Dosimetry
  • Imaging with Ionising Radiation
  • MRI and Biomedical Optics
  • Ultrasound in Medicine
  • Treatment with Ionising Radiation
  • Clinical Practice
  • Computing in Medicine
  • MSc Research Project
  • Medical Device Enterprise Scenario

Optional modules

There are no optional modules for this programme.

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a research report of up to 10,000 words, a poster and an oral presentation.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, demonstrations, tutorials, assignments and a research project. Lecturers are drawn from UCL and from London teaching hospitals including UCLH, St. Bartholomew's, and the Royal Free Hospital. Assessment is through supervised examination, coursework and assignments, a research dissertation and an oral examination.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Physics and Engineering in Medicine by Distance Learning MSc

Funding

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

A large percentage of graduates from the online Master's programme commence or continue training or employment within the healthcare sector, mostly in UK and overseas hospitals. Online learning offers the ability to up-skill or re-skill in physics disciplines applied to medicine while also training or practising in the field.  

Employability

Postgraduate study within the department offers the chance to develop important skills and acquire new knowledge through involvement with a team of scientists or engineers working in a world-leading research group. Graduates complete their study having gained new scientific or engineering skills applied to solving problems at the leading edge of human endeavour. Skills associated with project management, effective communication and teamwork are also refined in this high-quality working environment. The department has a recognised track record for producing excellent graduates who go on to hold leading roles in universities, companies and hospitals around the world.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The spectrum of medical physics activities undertaken in UCL Medical Physics & Biomedical Engineering is probably the broadest of any in the United Kingdom. The department is widely acknowledged as an internationally leading centre of excellence and students receive comprehensive training in the latest methodologies and technologies from leaders in the field.

The department operates alongside the NHS department which provides the medical physics and clinical engineering services for the University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, as well as undertaking industrial contract research and technology transfer. The department is also a collaborator in the nearby London Proton Therapy Centre currently under construction.

Students have access to an exceptionally wide range of expertise, laboratory, teaching and clinical facilities in the department and associated hospitals. A large range of scientific equipment is available for research involving nuclear magnetic resonance, optics, acoustics, X-rays physics, radiation dosimetry, and implant and interventional device development. 



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About the course. Study the dynamic field of efficient information transfer around the globe. We teach this course jointly with the Department of Computer Science so you get up-to-date knowledge and understanding. Read more

About the course

Study the dynamic field of efficient information transfer around the globe. We teach this course jointly with the Department of Computer Science so you get up-to-date knowledge and understanding.

Our graduates are in demand

Many go to work in industry as engineers for large national and international companies, including ARUP, Ericsson Communications, HSBC, Rolls-Royce, Jaguar Land Rover and Intel Asia Pacific.

Real-world applications

This is a research environment. What we teach is based on the latest ideas. The work you do on your course is directly connected to real-world applications.

We work with government research laboratories, industrial companies and other prestigious universities. Significant funding from UK research councils, the European Union and industry means you have access to the best facilities.

How we teach

You’ll be taught by academics who are leaders in their field. The 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) puts us among the UK top five for this subject. Our courses are centred around finding solutions to problems, in lectures, seminars, exercises and through project work.

First-class facilities

Semiconductor Materials and Devices

LED, laser photodetectors and transistor design, a high-tech field-emission gun transmission electron microscope (FEGTEM), a focused ion beam (FIB) milling facility, and electron beam lithographic equipment.

Our state-of-the-art semiconductor growth and processing equipment is housed in an extensive clean room complex as part of the EPSRC’s National Centre for III-V Technologies.

Our investment in semiconductor research equipment in the last 12 months totals £6million.

Electrical Machines and Drives

Specialist facilities for the design and manufacture of electromagnetic machines, dynamometer test cells, a high-speed motor test pit, environmental test chambers, electronic packaging and EMC testing facilities, Rolls-Royce University Technology Centre for Advanced Electrical Machines and Drives.

Communications

Advanced anechoic chambers for antenna design and materials characterisation, a lab for calibrated RF dosimetry of tissue to assess pathogenic effects of electromagnetic radiation from mobile phones, extensive CAD electromagnetic analysis tools.

Core modules

  • Network and Inter-Network Architectures
  • Network Performance Analysis
  • Data Coding Techniques for Communications and Storage
  • Advanced Communication Principles
  • Mobile Networks and Physical Layer Protocols
  • (either) Foundations of Object-Orientated Programming (or) Object-Orientated Programming and Software Design
  • Major Research Project

Examples of optional modules

  • Computer Security and Forensics
  • 3D Computer Graphics
  • Software Development for Mobile Devices
  • Cloud Computing
  • Advanced Signal Processing
  • Antennas, Propagation and Satellite Systems
  • Optical Communication Devices and Systems
  • Computer Vision
  • Broadband Wireless Techniques; Wireless Packet Data Networks and Protocols
  • System Design

Teaching and assessment

We deliver research-led teaching from our department and Computer Science with individual support for your research project and dissertation. Assessment is by examinations, coursework and a project dissertation with poster presentation.



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Course description. Semiconductor photonics and electronics underpin many areas of advanced and emerging technologies, from high efficiency LED lighting to advanced photovoltaics and lasers for communications. Read more

Course description

Semiconductor photonics and electronics underpin many areas of advanced and emerging technologies, from high efficiency LED lighting to advanced photovoltaics and lasers for communications.

This course covers fundamentals through to cutting edge research in areas such as GaN materials and devices (behind the solid state lighting LED revolution), nanoscaled materials and devices, and photonic device manufacture.

You will gain a comprehensive understanding of the materials and device theory whilst developing excellent practical experimental skills in extensive semiconductor cleanroom lab-work, giving you a competitive edge for work in industry or further study.

How we teach

You’ll be taught by academics who are leaders in their field. The 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) puts us among the UK top five for this subject. Our courses are centred around finding solutions to problems, in lectures, seminars, exercises and through project work.

First-class facilities

Semiconductor Materials and Devices

LED, laser photodetectors and transistor design, a high-tech field-emission gun transmission electron microscope (FEGTEM), a focused ion beam (FIB) milling facility, and electron beam lithographic equipment.

Our state-of-the-art semiconductor growth and processing equipment is housed in an extensive clean room complex as part of the EPSRC’s National Centre for III-V Technologies.

Our investment in semiconductor research equipment in the last 12 months totals £6million.

Electrical Machines and Drives

Specialist facilities for the design and manufacture of electromagnetic machines, dynamometer test cells, a high-speed motor test pit, environmental test chambers, electronic packaging and EMC testing facilities, Rolls-Royce University Technology Centre for Advanced Electrical Machines and Drives.

Communications

Advanced anechoic chambers for antenna design and materials characterisation, a lab for calibrated RF dosimetry of tissue to assess pathogenic effects of electromagnetic radiation from mobile phones, extensive CAD electromagnetic analysis tools.

Core modules

  • Semiconductor Materials
  • Principles of Semiconductor Device Technology
  • Packaging and Reliability of Microsystems
  • Nanoscale Electronic Devices
  • Energy Efficient Semiconductor Devices
  • Optical Communication Devices and Systems
  • Compound Semiconductor Device Manufacture
  • Major Research Project

Teaching and assessment

Research-led teaching, lectures, laboratories, seminars and tutorials. A large practical module covers the design, manufacture and characterisation of a semiconductor component, such as a laser or light emitting diode.

This involves background tutorials and hands-on practical work in the UK’s national III-V semiconductor facility.

Assessment is by examinations, coursework or reports, and a dissertation with poster presentation.



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IN BRIEF. Receive guidance and tuition from respected nuclear medicine professionals. Enjoy access to managed practical sessions in internationally renowned nuclear medicine facilities. Read more

IN BRIEF:

  • Receive guidance and tuition from respected nuclear medicine professionals
  • Enjoy access to managed practical sessions in internationally renowned nuclear medicine facilities
  • Gain a qualification that's professionally accredited by the Society of Radiographers
  • Part-time study option

COURSE SUMMARY

As a healthcare professional, this course offers you a valuable multidisciplinary opportunity to participate in continuing professional development.

During your time with us, you'll tackle five compulsory modules that will develop a deep understanding of the theory of nuclear medicine imaging. Practically, it will allow you develop skills in nuclear medicine that will allow you to practice competently and deal with complex and challenging situations

The course takes a blended approach to learning where you have blocks of attendance at Universtiy for lectures, tutorials and workshops. Supporting these learning activities are online learning through our virtual learning environment (BlackBoard).

The opportunity to come to university and meet your peers is important as it helps develop a sense of community and you are able to support each other through the programme. The time at university is highly valued by students.

You must have a UK-based clinical placement before commencing the course and spend a minimum of 3 days per week in clinical practice (excluding annual leave and weeks at the University). We can advise on this should you not have a placement but please note we cannot arrange it for you. Please contact the programme leader for advice

COURSE DETAILS

This course is made up of five compulsory modules which integrate theory with the clinical application and practice of nuclear medicine. There is a clinical practice requirement for the duration of the PgDip and you will be required to work closely with a nominated clinical supervisor.

COURSE STRUCTURE

The PGDip runs over one year making use of the three trimesters. The dissertation module continues in year 2 if you wish to continue. There is the option of retuning to complete the MSc after a break in your studies. You are advised to discuss with the programme leader the best option for you.

The course structure provides you the chance to exit with the following awards:

  • Postgraduate Diploma: five modules over one year
  • Master's: five modules plus a dissertation over a total of 19 months

TEACHING

Your learning will be delivered through lectures, seminars, onlnie learning and group work.

You'll receive support from course tutors over email and via our virtual learning environment, Blackboard, where you can access discussion boards, online lectures, podcasts, videos and other learning materials.

ASSESSMENT

Fundamentals of Nuclear Medicine

  • Description and justification of a quality control procedure for a gamma camera (50%)
  • Critique and justification of a clinical imaging protocol (50%)

Advanced concepts of Nuclear Medicine

  • Case Study written in a style suitable for publication (100%

Scientific Principles of Hybrid Imaging in Nuclear Medicine

  • Electronic exam (2 hours) (100%)

Clinically based practices in Nuclear Medicine

  • Objective structured clinical examination (30%)
  • Portfolio of clinical learning and experience (70%)

Statistics and Research Methods in nuclear medicine

  • Portfolio of learning (100%)

Your learning will be delivered through lectures, seminars, onlnie learning and group work.

You'll receive support from course tutors over email and via our virtual learning environment, Blackboard, where you can access discussion boards, online lectures, podcasts, videos and other learning materials.

FACILITIES

During the scientific principles of hybrid imaging module you will have access to the University’s CT scanner where you will be able to undertake practical workshops.

We have an extensive collection of anatomical and physics phantoms and dosimetry equipment that is available to students undertaking the dissertation module.

CAREER PROSPECTS

This course will equip you with the skills and knowledge that will qualify you for additional roles and responsibilities, which, in turn will enhance your career opportunities. You will have the knowledge and skills to be able to work in any nuclear medicine department. You will have developed knowledge and skills in research and will be able to evaluate critically published literature and use this to inform practice. You will have skills in creating and disseminating original.

Graduates of this programme have gained senior positions in clinical departments, industry and in education and research.

LINKS WITH INDUSTRY

The programme team is made up of academic and clinical staff form a range of professional backgrounds including radiographers, clinical technologists, physicists, radiologists and nuclear medicine physicians. Staff have a wealth of experience in practice and research to ensure the course content is current.

We have strong links with industry especially in the North West, for example, during the SPECT and Fundamentals module there will be practical session at the Nuclear Medicine Department in the Christie Hospital and the Central Manchester Nuclear Medicine Department. Likewise during the Hybrid Imaging module there will be a practical session at the Central Manchester Nuclear Medicine Department.



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Therapeutic radiographers play an important role for cancer patients as they are appropriately trained to plan and deliver radiotherapy treatment while ensuring each patient receives care and support and is treated as an individual. Read more
Therapeutic radiographers play an important role for cancer patients as they are appropriately trained to plan and deliver radiotherapy treatment while ensuring each patient receives care and support and is treated as an individual. This programme has been developed to accelerate graduates into the radiotherapy workforce with the essential technical, communication and caring skills that are required in the NHS or private radiotherapy departments.

Key benefits

This course is accredited by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and on successful completion, you can apply to register with them for the protected title of Therapeutic Radiographer.

This course is also accredited by the Society and College of Radiographers (SCoR).

Course detail

We are recognised nationally and internationally as one of the leading education and training centres for Radiotherapy and Oncology, and are proud to have produced the Society and College of Radiographers national student of the year in 2013 (BSc Radiotherapy and Oncology). A recent Radiotherapy MSc graduate also obtained the UWE Santander Master's Bursary for research or work experience. He used the money to gain experience at the Peter Mac RT department in SABR and HEARTSPARE (treatment techniques) in Australia.

Our teaching staff are known for their exceptional knowledge, clinical experience and student support, while our national student survey rank proves our continually high standards when it comes to learning experience and employability.

Our academic team's research-based approach to teaching led to them being chosen to host the inaugural VERT International Users Conference in 2010.

Year 1

In your first year you'll study a range of modules that allow you to build on your existing graduate skills. You will learn the fundamentals of radiotherapy and oncology linking with the relevant anatomy and associated physiology. You will also be introduced to applied physics relating to the radiation and technology in order to receive the underpinning knowledge required for the first clinical placement.

• Principles of Radiotherapy and Oncology (15 credit)
• Science and Technology in Radiotherapy (15 credits)
• Radiotherapy and Oncology Practice (15 credits including Practice Placement 1)
• Research methods in Radiotherapy (15 credits)
• Radiotherapy and Oncology theory and Practice (30 credits including Practice Placement 2)
• Dissertation (45 credits)

Year 2

In your second year, you'll build on the knowledge and skills you learned in Year 1 to explore more complex aspects of Radiotherapy and Oncology practice.

• Communication Skills in Cancer and Palliative Care (15 credits)
• Complex issues in radiotherapy and oncology (30 credits including Placement 3)

Placements

We have excellent industry links in the South West, with placements possible in nine different NHS hospitals from Cheltenham to Truro. You'll take part in three 14-week placements over the two years, where you'll learn on the job while carrying out primary research towards your final dissertation.

Format

Based on our health-focused Glenside campus, this course begins in January and involves classroom-based modules and clinical placements where you gain your clinical competence and undertake research. It's an excellent mix of study and professional experience. The focus is on using your graduate skills to be an independent learner and manage your workload effectively.

Assessment

We use a range of assessment methods throughout the programme, including written assignments, exams, presentations, interactive online assessment, objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) and continuous practice assessment in a clinical environment.

The course is assessed according to the University Academic Regulations and Procedures, and we expect full attendance at all times. You must take your professional practice placements in order, and you'll need to pass each placement before being allowed to start the next. There is always at least one external examiner.

Careers / Further study

Students graduating from this course are highly employable, and there are lots of career opportunities and areas for role extension in therapeutic radiography, including planning and dosimetry. Once qualified you will be eligible to register with the Health and Care Professionals Council.

How to apply

Information on applications can be found at the following link: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/study/applyingtouwebristol/postgraduateapplications.aspx

Funding

- New Postgraduate Master's loans for 2016/17 academic year –

The government are introducing a master’s loan scheme, whereby master’s students under 60 can access a loan of up to £10,000 as a contribution towards the cost of their study. This is part of the government’s long-term commitment to enhance support for postgraduate study.

Scholarships and other sources of funding are also available.

More information can be found here: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/feesandfunding/fundingandscholarships/postgraduatefunding.aspx

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About the course. Study the key design aspects of a modern wireless communication system, in particular cellular mobile radio systems. Read more

About the course

Study the key design aspects of a modern wireless communication system, in particular cellular mobile radio systems.

There is a current shortage of communications engineers with a comprehensive appreciation of wireless system design from RF through baseband to packet protocols.

Our graduates are in demand

Many go to work in industry as engineers for large national and international companies, including ARUP, Ericsson Communications, HSBC, Rolls-Royce, Jaguar Land Rover and Intel Asia Pacific.

Real-world applications

This is a research environment. What we teach is based on the latest ideas. The work you do on your course is directly connected to real-world applications.

We work with government research laboratories, industrial companies and other prestigious universities. Significant funding from UK research councils, the European Union and industry means you have access to the best facilities.

How we teach

You’ll be taught by academics who are leaders in their field. The 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) puts us among the UK top five for this subject. Our courses are centred around finding solutions to problems, in lectures, seminars, exercises and through project work.

First-class facilities

Semiconductor Materials and Devices

LED, laser photodetectors and transistor design, a high-tech field-emission gun transmission electron microscope (FEGTEM), a focused ion beam (FIB) milling facility, and electron beam lithographic equipment.

Our state-of-the-art semiconductor growth and processing equipment is housed in an extensive clean room complex as part of the EPSRC’s National Centre for III-V Technologies.

Our investment in semiconductor research equipment in the last 12 months totals £6million.

Electrical Machines and Drives

Specialist facilities for the design and manufacture of electromagnetic machines, dynamometer test cells, a high-speed motor test pit, environmental test chambers, electronic packaging and EMC testing facilities, Rolls-Royce University Technology Centre for Advanced Electrical Machines and Drives.

Communications

Advanced anechoic chambers for antenna design and materials characterisation, a lab for calibrated RF dosimetry of tissue to assess pathogenic effects of electromagnetic radiation from mobile phones, extensive CAD electromagnetic analysis tools.

Core modules

  • Advanced Signal Processing
  • Advanced Communication Principles
  • Antennas, Propagation and Satellite Systems
  • Mobile Networks and Physical Layer Protocols
  • Broadband Wireless Techniques
  • Wireless Packet Data Networks and Protocols
  • Major Research Project

Examples of optional modules

  • Data Coding Techniques for Communication and Storage
  • Optical Communication Devices and Systems
  • Computer Vision
  • Electronic Communication Technologies
  • Data Coding Techniques for Communication and Storage

Teaching and assessment

Research-led teaching and an individual research project. Assessment is by examinations, coursework and a project dissertation with poster presentation.



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The Medical Physics and Bioengineering MRes provides structured training in this diverse and multi-disciplinary field and students may subsequently progress to an MPhil/PhD as part of a Doctoral Training Programme. Read more
The Medical Physics and Bioengineering MRes provides structured training in this diverse and multi-disciplinary field and students may subsequently progress to an MPhil/PhD as part of a Doctoral Training Programme.

See the website http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/taught/degrees/medical-physics-bioengineering-mres

Key Information

- Application dates
All applicants:
Open: 5 October 2015
Close: 29 July 2016

English Language Requirements

If your education has not been conducted in the English language, you will be expected to demonstrate evidence of an adequate level of English proficiency.
The English language level for this programme is: Standard
Further information can be found on http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/life/international/english-requirements .

International students

Country-specific information, including details of when UCL representatives are visiting your part of the world, can be obtained from http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/international .

Degree Information

The programme covers all forms of ionising and non-ionising radiation commonly used in medicine and applies it to the areas of imaging and treatment. The programme involves Master's level modules chosen from a wide range offered by the department and a research project. Good performance in the MRes will lead to entry into the 2nd year of the Doctoral Training Programme where the research project is continued.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four optional modules and a research project.

- Core Modules
There are no core modules for this programme.

- Options
Students choose four optional modules from the following:
Ionising Radiation Physics: Interactions and Dosimetry
Medical Imaging
Clinical Practice
Treatment with Ionising Radiation
Medical Electronics and Control
Bioengineering
Optics in Medicine
Computing in Medicine
Medical Devices and Applications
Foundations and Anatomy and Scientific Computing
Image Processing
Computational Modelling in Biomedical Imaging
Programming Foundations for Medical Image Analysis
Information Processing in Medical Imaging
Image-Directed Analysis and Therapy

- Dissertation/report
All students undertake a research project.

Further information on modules and degree structure available on the department web site Medical Physics and Bioengineering MRes http://www.ucl.ac.uk/medphys/prospective-students/phd/dtp

Funding

Scholarships relevant to this department are displayed (where available) below. For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/scholarships .

Careers

Our graduates typically find work in academia, the NHS, and in industry

Why study this degree at UCL?

The department is one of the largest medical physics and bioengineering departments in Europe, with links to a large number of active teaching hospitals. We have arguably the widest range of research of any similar department, and work closely with other world-leading institutions.

Students on the programme will form part of an interactive network of researchers across many disciplines and will benefit from the strengths of UCL in the healthcare field.

Student / staff ratios › 144 staff including 110 postdocs › 107 taught students › 135 research students

Application and next steps

- Applications
Students are advised to apply as early as possible due to competition for places. Those applying for scholarship funding (particularly overseas applicants) should take note of application deadlines.

- Who can apply?
The programme is suitable either for students wishing to study for a stand-alone MRes in Medical Physics & Bioengineering or for students planning progression to a Doctoral Training Programme.

What are we looking for?
When we assess your application we would like to learn:
- why you want to study Medical Physics and Bioengineering at graduate level
- why you want to study Medical Physics and Bioengineering at UCL
- what particularly attracts you to this programme
- how your personal, academic and professional background meets the demands of a challenging programme
- where you would like to go professionally with your degree

Together with essential academic requirements, the personal statement is your opportunity to illustrate whether your reasons for applying to this programme match what the programme will deliver.

For more information see the Applications page http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/apply .

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Programme Aims. Read more

Programme Aims

This award is offered within the Postgraduate Scheme in Health Technology, which aims to provide professionals in Medical Imaging, Radiotherapy, Medical Laboratory Science, Health Technology, as well as others interested in health technology, with an opportunity to develop advanced levels of knowledge and skills.

The award in Medical Imaging and Radiation Science (MIRS) is specially designed for professionals in medical imaging and radiotherapy and has the following aims.

A. Advancement in Knowledge and Skill

  • ​To provide professionals in Medical Imaging and Radiotherapy, as well as others interested in health technology, with the opportunity to develop advanced levels of knowledge and skills;
  • To develop specialists in their respective professional disciplines and enhance their career paths;
  • To broaden students' exposure to a wider field of health science and technology to enable them to cope with the ever-changing demands of work;
  • To provide a laboratory environment for testing problems encountered at work;
  • To equip students with an advanced knowledge base in a chosen area of specialisation in medical imaging or radiotherapy to enable them to meet the changing needs of their disciplines and contribute to the development of medical imaging or radiation oncology practice in Hong Kong; and
  • To develop critical and analytical abilities and skills in the areas of specialisation that are relevant to the professional discipline to improve professional competence.

B. Professional Development

  • ​To develop students' ability in critical analysis and evaluation in their professional practices;
  • To cultivate within healthcare professionals the qualities and attributes that are expected of them;
  • To acquire a higher level of awareness and reflection within the profession and the healthcare industry to improve the quality of healthcare services; and
  • To develop students' ability to assume a managerial level of practice.

C. Evidence-based Practice

  • ​To equip students with the necessary skill in research to enable them to perform evidence-based practice in the delivery of healthcare service and industry.

D. Personal Development

  • ​To provide channels through which practising professionals can continuously develop themselves while at work; and
  • To allow graduates to develop themselves further after graduation.

Characteristics

The Medical Imaging and Radiation Science award offers channels for specialisation and the broadening of knowledge for professionals in medical imaging and radiotherapy. It will appeal to students who are eager to become specialists or managers in their areas of practice. Clinical experience and practice in medical imaging and radiotherapy are integrated into the curriculum to encourage more reflective observation and active experimentation.

Programme Structure

To be eligible for the MSc in Medical Imaging and Radiation Science (MScMIRS), students are required to complete 30 credits:

  • 2 Compulsory Subjects (6 credits)
  • 3 Core Subjects (9 credits)
  • 5 Elective Subjects (15 credits)

Apart from the award of MScMIRS, students can choose to graduate with one of the following specialisms:

  • MSc in Medical Imaging and Radiation Science (Computed Tomography)
  • MSc in Medical Imaging and Radiation Science (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)
  • MSc in Medical Imaging and Radiation Science (Ultrasonography)

To be eligible for the specialism concerned, students should complete 2 Compulsory Subjects (6 credits), a Dissertation (9 credits) related to that specialism, a specialism-related Specialty Subject (3 credits), a Clinical Practicum (3 credits) and 3 Elective Subjects (9 credits).

 Compulsory Subjects

  • Research Methods & Biostatistics
  • ​Multiplanar Anatomy

Core Subjects

  • Advanced Radiotherapy Planning & Dosimetry
  • Advanced Radiation Protection
  • Advanced Technology & Clinical Application in Computed Tomography *
  • Advanced Technology & Clinical Application in Magnetic Resonance Imaging *
  • Advanced Technology & Clinical Application in Nuclear Medicine Imaging
  • Advanced Topics in Health Technology
  • Advanced Ultrasonography *
  • Clinical Practicum (CT/MRI/US)
  • Dissertation
  • Digital Imaging & PACS
  • Imaging Pathology

 * Specialty Subject

Elective Subjects

  • Bioinformatics in Health Sciences
  • Professional Development in Infection Control Practice


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The Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering MRes provides structured training in this diverse and multidisciplinary field and students may subsequently progress to an MPhil/PhD as part of a Doctoral Training Programme. Read more

The Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering MRes provides structured training in this diverse and multidisciplinary field and students may subsequently progress to an MPhil/PhD as part of a Doctoral Training Programme.

About this degree

The programme covers all forms of ionising and non-ionising radiation commonly used in medicine and applies it to the areas of imaging and treatment. The programme involves Master's-level modules chosen from a wide range offered by the department and a research project. Good performance in the MRes will lead to entry into the second year of the Doctoral Training Programme where the research project is continued.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four optional modules (15 credits each) and a research project (120 credits).

Core modules

  • There are no core modules for this programme.

Optional modules

Students choose four optional modules from the following:

  • Ionising Radiation Physics: Interactions and Dosimetry
  • Medical Imaging
  • Clinical Practice
  • Treatment with Ionising Radiation
  • Medical Electronics and Control
  • Bioengineering
  • Optics in Medicine
  • Computing in Medicine
  • Medical Devices and Applications
  • Foundations and Anatomy and Scientific Computing
  • Image Processing
  • Computational Modelling in Biomedical Imaging
  • Programming Foundations for Medical Image Analysis
  • Information Processing in Medical Imaging
  • Image-Directed Analysis and Therapy

Dissertation/report

All students undertake a research project.

Teaching and learning

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering MRes

Careers

Our graduates typically find work in academia, the NHS, and in industry

Employability

This programme gives students a good grounding in basic research training in a focused topic. Graduates will be ideally suited to enter PhD programmes in a variety of subject areas or enter professions requiring a postgraduate Master's qualification.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Medical Physics & Biomedical Engineering is one of the largest medical physics and bioengineering departments in Europe, with links to a large number of active teaching hospitals. We have arguably the widest range of research of any similar department, and work closely with other world-leading institutions.

Students on the programme will form part of an interactive network of researchers across many disciplines and will benefit from the strengths of UCL in the healthcare field.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Medical Physics & Biomedical Engineering

95% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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