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Masters Degrees (Domestic Abuse)

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Examine the impact of being abusive or being abused. You will look at theoretical perspectives considering abusiveness and its impact in different international, cultural and social contexts- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-understanding-domestic-violence-and-sexual-abuse/. Read more
Examine the impact of being abusive or being abused. You will look at theoretical perspectives considering abusiveness and its impact in different international, cultural and social contexts- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-understanding-domestic-violence-and-sexual-abuse/

This MA in Understanding Domestic Violence and Sexual Abuse is unique and represents the first psychologically informed programme of its kind.

It is particularly suitable for people wanting to increase their grasp of the interplay between mental distress, domestic violence and sexual abuse. The programme will offer a blended learning approach with a mixture of online and face to face contact. The online components will be largely focused on the acquisition of theoretical knowledge through computer mediated activities via the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE).

The classroom-based content of the programme will have an emphasis on experiential and reflective learning which will help you understand the process of identifying, assessing and managing both perpetrators and victims. This aspect of the programme will be delivered in blocks preferably over weekends to make the study more accessible to working adults.

Individual modules on the programme are likely to be valued as part of a continuing professional development plan for psychological therapists and other workers in the field.

You may take individual modules separately or exit with a Postgraduate Certificate or Diploma.

You can keep up to date with everything that's happening on the programme by following us on Twitter.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Suzanne Martin.

Modules & Structure

Your learning will be underpinned by a unique synthesising of psychodynamic, systemic, cognitive behavioural and social theories to examine the impact of being abusive or of being abused. The programme focuses on looking at practice and research from these theoretical perspectives and will consider abusiveness and its impact in different cultural and social contexts from childhood to older age.

The learning will be provided by a cross-disciplinary team that covers approaches from the social work, community and youth work, cross-sectoral arts, and therapeutic approaches including art and dance psychotherapy, psychodynamic, counselling and cognitive behavioural approaches.

You'll be assessed through a mix of coursework, presentations, and a final dissertation.

Skills

The MA will develop skills including:

a knowledge various theoretical perspectives
an understanding of cross-disciplinary work within the field
an understanding of the different international, cultural and social contexts from childhood to older age within the field

Careers

It is expected that a number of professionals will use either the course credit or the degree to supplement their CPD portfolios, which are a requirement for the majority of these professionals.

For workers with extensive experience this programme (or its constituent courses) will provide a sound basis in theoretical knowledge and current research which will help them develop their current work and increase their potential for further advancement in the field.

The UK has developed recognised forms of intervention in this field that have an international application and relevance. Issues regarding domestic violence and sexual abuse have an international public health and human rights dimension, which makes the programme internationally relevant.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Supported by the internationally renowned Child and Woman Abuse Studies Unit, the MA in Woman and Child Abuse provides a solid grounding in theoretical frameworks, policy and practice approaches. Read more
Supported by the internationally renowned Child and Woman Abuse Studies Unit, the MA in Woman and Child Abuse provides a solid grounding in theoretical frameworks, policy and practice approaches.

The course is ideal for those who are working in specialised services for women and children who have experienced violence, in policymaking or delivery at local, regional or national levels, or are wishing to establish careers in these sectors.

More about this course

This course provides a comprehensive grounding in theoretical frameworks, research, policy and practice approaches to woman and child abuse.

The MA content covers all forms of violence against women and child abuse, including sexual violence, domestic violence, sexual exploitation, trafficking and harmful practices. Reflecting the work of the Child and Woman Abuse Studies Unit, a specialist research unit, the MA focuses on what we know about these forms of abuse, the contexts in which they occur and the connections between them. While the main focus will be on the UK, intellectual, policy and practice approaches from across the globe will be discussed.

The course content will be cross-disciplinary, mainly drawing on sociology and including social policy, criminology and psychology.

Assessment approaches vary according to the aims of each module and how it is delivered. Examples include essays or other written coursework and individual presentations.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Researching Communities (core, 20 credits)
-Sexual Exploitation of Children and Young People (core, 20 credits)
-Sexual Violence: Causes, Consequences and Interventions (core, 20 credits)
-Violence Against Women: Issues, Research and Policy (core, 20 credits)
-Woman and Child Abuse Dissertation (core, 60 credits)
-Children and Families: Policy and Practice (option, 20 credits)
-Community Development (option, 20 credits)
-Crime and Offender Patterns (option, 20 credits)
-Doing Evaluation: Skills and Techniques (option, 20 credits)
-International Child and Human Rights Law (option, 20 credits)
-Law, Ethics and Policy in Mental Health (option, 20 credits)
-Social Policy Themes and Priorities: Local, Regional and Global (option, 20 credits)
-Social Research: Principles, Practice and Contexts (option, 20 credits)
-Women, Gender and Human Rights (option, 20 credits)

After the course

The course is particularly suited to those who are working in specialised services for women and children who have experienced violence. It is also excellent preparation for those who are wishing to establish careers in this sector.

Our graduates have gone on to key roles in policymaking or service delivery at local, regional and national levels, and some pursue further studies to PhD level, including with the Child and Woman Abuse Studies Unit.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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The MSc Forensic Psychology is the only BPS accredited programme in Wales, offering a unique opportunity for students to study Forensic Psychology in Wales. Read more

Course Overview

The MSc Forensic Psychology is the only BPS accredited programme in Wales, offering a unique opportunity for students to study Forensic Psychology in Wales. Working collaboratively with NOMS Cymru (National Offender Management Services, Wales), helps keep the programme up to date with strategy development and policy decisions. Regular contributions from practitioners within the Principality enable students to understand more about services within Wales and their impact on our society locally. We also have many national contributors who share their extensive knowledge and experience.​

Due to the popularity of this programme you should submit your application at the earliest opportunity, and at the very latest by 29th July. ​

See the website https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/health/courses/Pages/Forensic-Psychology---MSc-.aspx

​Course Content​​

Forensic Psychology is the practice and application of psychological research relevant to crime, policing, the courts, the criminal and civil justice system, offenders, prison, secure settings, offender management, health and academic settings as well as private practice.

It looks at the role of environmental, psychosocial, and socio-cultural factors that may contribute to crime or its prevention. The primary aim of Forensic Psychology as an academic discipline is to develop understanding of the processes underlying criminal behaviour and for this improved understanding to impact on the effective management and rehabilitation of different groups of offenders in all settings within the criminal justice system.

The first aim of the programme is to provide students with a thorough and critical academic grounding in the evidence relating to environmental, cultural, cognitive and biological factors that may contribute to a wide variety of forms of offending. The programme will encourage students to consider the role and limitations of causal explanations for offending in the development of offender treatments, services and policy.

The second aim of the programme is to introduce students to the basic professional competencies for working in the many settings where forensic psychology is practiced, including skills related to inter-disciplinary working, risk assessment, ethics, continuing professional development, report writing and differences in practice when working with offenders, victims, the courts and the police.

The programme aims to produce Masters degree graduates with the ability to understand the limitations of the conceptual underpinnings of interventions and assessments used in forensic psychology and who are able therefore to engage in critical evaluation of the evidence base upon which their own practice will eventually be based. The programme will specifically avoid providing any formal supervised practice. Its aim is to produce reflective scientist-practitioners who will be ready to engage with the next stage of training (i.e. BPS Stage 2 or HCPC route) towards registration as a Forensic Psychologist with the Health and Care Professions Council.

Students will complete the following taught modules and will also be required to conduct a novel, supervised research dissertation with participants preferably drawn from a forensic setting:

Research Methods and Design (30 credits)
The aim of this module is to extend students knowledge and experience of quantitative and qualitative research methods. Topics covered include: randomised control trials, ANOVA, ANCOVA, MANOVA, Power analysis, Regression, Non parametric methods, interviews, discourse analysis, grounded theory, reflective analysis and psychometric evaluation.

Forensic Mental Health (20 credits)
This module aims to provide students with a critical examination of the relationship between mental illness, personality disorder, learning disability and criminal behaviour. The module will encourage students to view the mental health needs of offenders in the broadest possible context and to appreciate the inter-disciplinary nature of services available to mentally disordered offenders, difficulties in accessing those services and problems for custodial adjustment presented by specific psychiatric diagnoses

Professional Practice and Offender Management (20 credits)
The focus of this module is the professional practice of forensic psychology. The module builds on the groundwork laid by earlier modules and covers professional skills and the types of interventions that a practicing forensic psychologist may engage in. The topics covered by this module include ethics, report writing, working with other agencies, and working with offenders and victims.

Psychological Assessments and Interventions (20 credits)
This module covers psychology as it may be applied to the reduction of re-offending by convicted criminals. The central focus of the module is the 'what works' literature. A range of topics will be covered demonstrating the broad application of psychology to offender rehabilitation in the Criminal Justice System, and within Wales particularly. These topics include: (1) Offender assessment: risk, need and protective factors (2) factors affecting response to treatment; (3) ethical issues of compulsory treatment; and (4) interventions for a range of offending behaviours.

Theories of Criminal Behaviour (10 credits)
The module aims to examine the contribution made by biological, psychodynamic, evolutionary, cognitive and socio-cultural perspectives to our understanding of the aetiology of criminal behaviour. It will explore psychological theories of a variety of offending behaviours such as: violence, aggression, domestic abuse, sex offending, vehicle crime, fire setting as well as gangs and gangs membership.

Legal Psychology (10 credits)
This module covers psychology as it may be applied to the law, and the central focus of the module is evidence. A range of topics will be covered, demonstrating the broad application of psychology within the legal system. These topics include the interviewing of suspects and witnesses, vulnerable victims, offender profiling and the detection of deception.

Addiction and Psychological Vulnerabilities (10 credits)
This module informs students about different factors that may contribute to psychological vulnerability in offenders and victims. A variety of topics will be covered, including issues around the concept of addictive behaviours, vulnerability and the protection of vulnerable adults, including factors which may increase vulnerability to offending and victimisation.

Learning & Teaching​

​Teaching on the MSc Forensic Psychology Programme is predominantly conducted in small groups and adopts an interactive approach. The Research Methods and Design module and the Dissertation workshops are the only part of the programme which is taught in a larger group of around 40 to 50 students as opposed to between 10 and 20 students on the core modules. As a result teaching involves a range of discussions, activities, evaluations of papers, case studies and role play exercises. The focus within the programme is on both content and key skills to develop specialists in the field of forensic psychology with flexible generic skills. These experiences also help to foster student development and confidence as independent life-long learners.

Student learning is promoted through a variety of learning and teaching methods. These include: lectures, workshops, online learning through the virtual learning environment, Moodle, as well as self directed learning. Each student will have an allocated personal tutor to support them through their period of study.

As this programme is accredited by the BPS, there is a requirement for students to attend at least 80% of the taught sessions for the programme.

Assessment

The MSc is assessed by a range of different coursework assignments – e.g. presentations, reports, essays, reflective reports, academic posters, research proposal. There are no examinations.

Employability & Careers​

An MSc in Forensic Psychology is the first step (stage one) in gaining Chartered Psychologist status with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and Registered Practitioner status with the Health and Care Professionals Council (HCPC). The MSc in Forensic Psychology will provide the knowledge base and applied research skills that will provide the foundation for stage two of the chartered process that requires a minimum of two years of full-time supervised practice with an appropriate client group.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

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The course gives students an in-depth knowledge and understanding of domestic abuse and its impact, in order to inform professional practice in line with good practice indicators and sector Occupational Standards. Read more
The course gives students an in-depth knowledge and understanding of domestic abuse and its impact, in order to inform professional practice in line with good practice indicators and sector Occupational Standards.

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The Masters in Social Work is the professional postgraduate qualification for social work throughout the UK. The course aims to equip students with the knowledge, skills and values appropriate for work in a variety of social work settings. Read more
The Masters in Social Work is the professional postgraduate qualification for social work throughout the UK. The course aims to equip students with the knowledge, skills and values appropriate for work in a variety of social work settings. The teaching and learning is delivered by qualified/registered Social Work academic staff who are actively engaged in research, consultancy, direct practice and publication.

Course content

Social workers deal with some of the most vulnerable people in society at times of greatest stress. By the end of this programme you will have been assessed against the Standards of Proficiency for Social Work and the Professional Capabilities Framework. Once qualified, you will be able to apply to the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) for registration. Competent practice is essential for the award and you will undertake 200 days of practice learning (placement and skills for practice) during the programme. Practice learning through placement experience is undertaken in blocks of the course and skills for practice, 30 days experiential skills for practice during Year one (in the university), 70 days (in placement) during Year 1 and 100 days (in placement) during Year two.

For students enrolled on the programme, you will be expected to travel to placements with employer providers and be able to travel to service users. Being a holder of a current UK driving licence is therefore desirable.

Year One
During this initial year your knowledge and skills for social work practice is developed and assessed. The value base of social work is emphasised and you will engage in teaching designed to support your learning and understanding of anti-oppressive, anti-discriminatory and anti-racist practice in a model that promotes social justice and relationship based practice. The Preparing for Professional Social Work Practice module is designed to develop students’ skills, knowledge and understanding about social work. The course is delivered by a range of qualified social work academics, service users and social work practitioners, which includes 30 days experiential skills. You will have an opportunity to undertake a five-day shadow placement with an employer provider in a social work setting. The first year is designed to prepare and assess students’ ‘readiness for direct practice’ prior to the 70 day placement

Year Two
You will develop your understanding of different service user groups and service provision in social work settings building on the teaching and learning during Year one. The teaching will provide opportunities for you to work in small learning sets developing your reflective critical thinking skills. A module on diversity develops your understanding of the correlations between oppression, discrimination and inequality and how gender shapes organisations and service delivery. A 100-day assessed placement learning opportunity will be completed in a social work setting. During this final year you will also undertake research which is either empirical or literature based which is presented in a final dissertation.

Masters in Social Work students will have the opportunity to enrol onto the Developing Housing Practice module. This is a 10 credit level 7 module which, on completion, gives students partial accreditation with the Chartered Institute of Housing (CIH) which is equivalent to 10 credits towards postgraduate housing related training. This would be offered to the Masters students as an elective online module. There are a number of overlaps between housing and social work which include: vulnerable adults, people seeking asylum, safeguarding children, domestic abuse, hate crime, community safety and anti-social behaviours. This optional module would support the employability of the Masters students and offer a unique partial accreditation in housing-related training which complements social work.

Course modules (16/17)

-Life Span 1: Human Growth and Development
-Diversity
-Social Work Law and Policy
-Dissertation and Research Skills for Effective Social Work Practice
-Preparing for Professional Social Work Practice
-Life Span 2: Assessing and Managing Risk in Child and Adult Protection
-Developing Housing Practice, Knowledge and Provision
-Gender and Sexuality Studies in Social Work

Methods of Learning

This programme promotes an approach to learning that engages students as active participants. This includes group work, role play, individual skills development, inquiry based learning, seminars and lectures. Students link academic learning to two supervised and assessed placement learning opportunities. Over the two years you will experience a range of social work services and work with service users.

Facilities and Special Features

-Prepares you for professional social work practice
-Enables you to develop their practice skills
-Develops your skills and knowledge in working with other professions
-Raises political awareness and encourages you to be a creative, critical and reflective thinker
-The Social Work subject team sign up to and hold the International Federation of Social Work definition of social work
-Students will have the opportunity to develop a range of communication skills in the first year through experiential teaching and learning facilitated by Service Users, Social Work Practitioners and Practice Educators.

Careers

You will undertake 170 days of practice learning (placement). You will complete a student profile during the first year of study and through strong partnerships between the University and employer providers, you will be matched to a specific service placement. You will be expected to be able to travel effectively to and from the placement and be able to carry out community based duties (where required) during the placement which may involve independent travel. It is therefore desirable that you hold a current UK driving licence. Placement learning opportunities can be outside of Northampton. All placement providers are quality assured by the University.

Other admission requirements

English Language & Mathematics: Social work entrants must hold at least a GCSE grade C in English Language and Mathematics (O level grade C or CSE grade 1 are the equivalent). Key Skills Level Two qualifications are also acceptable. For students whose first language is not English an IELTS score of 7 is required.

You will be required to declare that you have these qualifications.
-Ability to write thoughtfully, insightfully and coherently about your motivation in applying for the course and understanding and commitment to the social work profession.
-Relevant work experience. Students must demonstrate (100 days or equivalent) relevant previous experience in social care or a related area. This could be paid or voluntary work.
-Students yet to graduate should provide an academic reference on the application, indicating their predicted degree classification. Students who have already graduated can also provide a professional reference.
-All applicants must confirm prior to interview/offer decision making that they have the ability to use basic IT facilities, including word processing, internet browsing and the use of email, and may be asked to specify how these skills have been obtained.

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This programme critically addresses a range of key issues and debates relating to crime and the criminal justice system. Students have the opportunity to develop in-depth understanding of crime, deviance and criminal justice from critical theoretical, policy, legal, political and practical perspectives. Read more
This programme critically addresses a range of key issues and debates relating to crime and the criminal justice system. Students have the opportunity to develop in-depth understanding of crime, deviance and criminal justice from critical theoretical, policy, legal, political and practical perspectives. Addressing issues of historical and contemporary concern such as terrorism, prostitution, legal and illegal drugs, crime in the night time economy, forced migration, gender and crime, domestic violence, crime prevention, punishment, policing, youth crime and justice, law enforcement and the use of new technologies. Students study issues of theoretical and social importance with lecturers who are international experts in their fields.

Course Structure

Students take a range of taught modules primarily in the first two terms of the academic year. Students also undertake a module on research design which enables students to develop a research proposal for their dissertation.

Core Modules:
Theorising Crime and Criminal Justice (30 credits)
-Apply theories of crime and justice to topical issues
-Theory and practice of criminal justice
-Analysis of contemporary politics
-Governance of criminal justice

Perspectives on Social Research (15 credits)
-Introduction to social scientific research
-Establishing cause and interpreting meaning in social sciences
-Essentials of quantitative and qualitative research in social science research

Research Design and Progress (15 credits)
-Formulating research questions
-Ethical review procedures
-Research proposal design, evaluation, and development
-Conversational analysis in practice
-Qualitative interviewing.

Dissertation (60 credits)
-A dissertation of up to 15,000 words.

Optional Modules:
Typical modules outlined below are those that were available to students styuding this programme in previous years. Choose modules to the value of 60 credits, listed below (60 credits)
-Gender, Violence and Abuse (30 credits)
-Drugs, Crime and Society (30 credits)
-Crime, Justice and the Sex Industry (30 credits)
-Cybercrime and cybersecurity: (30 credits)
-Sociology of Forensic Science (30 credits)
-Statistical Exploration and Reasoning (15 credits)
-Qualitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)
-Quantitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)

You will also have the opportunity to take a range of modules from other programmes within the Faculty such as those associated with the MSc in Risk and Security.

Learning and Teaching

The MSc Criminology and Criminal Justice is a 1 year full-time programme which may also be taken part-time. The programme’s core consists of a 60 credit dissertation module, one 30 credit module on Criminological Theory, one 15 credit module on Theories of Social Research and one 15 credit module on Research Design. Students are also required to undertake 60 further credits of modules from within SASS or other related departments which may be taught in a variety of ways.

Core teaching on the programme falls primarily within the two 10 week terms, the second of which commences one week prior to the Undergraduate Term. Depending on module choice students may receive between 6 and 8 hours of tuition per week in either or both of these terms.

The programme is taught according to a variety of approaches. Modules such as ‘Theorising Crime and Criminal Justice’ operate a standard 2 hour session within which lecturing, seminar discussion, workshops or presentations may take place. Modules such as ‘Perspectives on Social Research’, ‘Quantitative Methods’ and ‘Qualitative Methods’ operate a weekly lecture series followed by seminar discussion. Other modules such as ‘Statistical Exploration and Reasoning’ operate computer-based practicals.

Following completion of teaching in terms 1 and 2, the ‘Research Design’ module allows for 4 day long workshops. Reflecting on the process of research design, the module supports the student in formulating the research question for their dissertation.

The MSc programme is research-led at its core. The compulsory module 'Theorising Crime and Criminal Justice' links explicitly with the research activities of the criminology staff; the module ‘Crime Violence and Abuse’ links with the current research activities of the School’s research group of the same name; and ‘Drugs, Crime and Society’ is taught by an internationally renowned expert in the field . Students subsequently undertake a 60 credit dissertation on a topic of their choice supervised by staff who are actively researching in a relevant area. While this module is intended to afford an opportunity for a significant piece of independent and original research, it includes up to four hours of regular supervision which takes place typically from the end of term 2. Students will also participate in two one-hour workshops convened by a supervisor and usually alongside others researching in similar areas.

While teaching is intensive, particularly in terms 1 and 2, it is intended that the programme presents options for part-time study. Consequently, teaching is undertaken where possible in timetable slots which take place late in the afternoon.

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Drawing on current research across the social sciences, government guidance, and legislative frameworks, this degree focuses on the issues that are key in facilitating your professional and academic development as a social worker- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-social-work/. Read more
Drawing on current research across the social sciences, government guidance, and legislative frameworks, this degree focuses on the issues that are key in facilitating your professional and academic development as a social worker- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-social-work/

Why study MA Social Work at Goldsmiths?

-This Masters programme is ideal if you are a graduate, with relevant experience, interested in pursuing a professional career in social work

-It prepares you according to the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) Standards of Proficiency – Social Workers in England and the Professional Capabilities Framework (PCF), the Quality Assurance Agency subject benchmark for social work, and the Department of Health's requirements for social work training

-Social work education at Goldsmiths has a long and distinguished record – we house one of the most respected social work units in the UK, and you will be taught by established social work academics and associate lecturers who have considerable research and/or practice experience in their fields

-Our social work programmes are highly regarded by potential employers within London and further afield, and our graduates have an excellent record of securing employment; they've gone on to work in local authority children's services departments, adult services departments, and independent sector and voluntary sector agencies such as the NSPCC, Family Action and Mind, and a recent graduate was named Newly Qualified Social Worker of the Year

-We'll equip you with the knowledge, values and skills you'll need to practise as a reflective and ethical social worker, equipped for the challenges of contemporary social work practice

-You will cover areas of human growth and development; community; needs and services; law and organisational contexts of social work; and research methods. Specific learning will include mental health and disability, and social work processes of assessment, planning, intervention and review

-The Masters includes practice placements in two settings and with different service user groups, so you'll be able to gain invaluable real world experience

-We'll encourage you to think deeply about human rights and social justice, and to embed these values in your practice

-You will develop your skills for reflective and evidence-based practice and will be able to further your research mindedness

This programme is approved by the Health & Care Professions Council.

Excellence in practice and teaching

Goldsmiths has a long tradition of social work education, and our programmes are internationally regarded as excellent in both practice learning and critical studies. They also have a strong focus on anti-discriminatory and anti-oppressive practice.

We have a lively programme of research taking place in areas as diverse as:

-the links between child abuse and domestic violence
-multi-family group work with teenage parents
-service user perspectives and transnational adoption
-mental health social workers' use of mental health laws and coercion
-equality and diversity in social work education
-the effects of political conflict on social work practice and education
-reflective professional social work practice
-evaluative approaches to service provision

Our research informs and underpins our teaching and students are invited to share our interests as well as develop their own through undertaking a small scale research project and developing their research mindedness in a final year extended essay.

Find out more about service user and carer involvement in social work education at Goldsmiths.

South East London Teaching Partnership

The Department of Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies at Goldsmiths has recently entered into a formal Teaching Partnership with the Royal Borough of Greenwich, the London Borough of Southwark and the London Borough of Lewisham for the delivery of social work education at Goldsmiths.

We are one of only four sites across the country to have received government funding to develop and test new and innovative approaches to social work qualifying education, early career training and continuing professional development programmes. As a result, a significant number of social work practitioners, from all levels within these three local authorities, are involved in the MA Social Work programme, delivering or co-delivering lectures, workshops and seminars. This means that there is a very close relationship with practice to ensure that by the end of the programme students are equipped to deliver authoritative, compassionate, social work practice that makes a positive difference to people’s lives.

You will be encouraged to make links between anti-oppressive practice, social work values, the legal framework, theories, methods and skills of intervention and social work practice throughout the course.

Intake

The programme has an intake of around 35-40 students each year. Goldsmiths is committed in its policy and practice to equal treatment of applicants and students irrespective of their race, culture, religion, gender, disability, health, age or sexual orientation. We particularly welcome applications from members of minority groups.

The teaching includes lectures and workshops with the entire student group and small study groups, reflective practice discussion groups and seminars of between 10 and 14 students. A significant proportion of the course takes the form of small study groups and seminars.

The MA is a full-time course. It is not possible to study the course part-time. It is not possible for students to transfer from a social work course at another university onto the second year of the Goldsmiths MA in Social Work course.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact the Admissions Tutor.

Modules & Structure

Successful applicants on the MA in Social Work commit to studying on a full-time taught course over two years. On successful completion you will receive a MA in Social Work which is the professional entry qualification to be a social worker and it enables you to apply for registration as a social worker with the Health and Care Professions Council.

The curriculum aims to provide you with the value, knowledge and skill base for practice and is organised around study units, workshops, lectures/seminar modules, projects and private study. The teaching and learning opportunities centre on the key areas of the social sciences and their application to Social Work practice, as well developing your intellectual capacity, and the skills necessary to get you ready for practice. There is an expectation that you attend at least 85% of all aspects of the programme.

The structured learning includes specific learning in:

human growth and development, mental health and disability
social work theories and methods; assessment, planning, intervention and review
communication skills with children, adults and those with particular communication needs
law, and partnership working across professional disciplines and agencies
social science research methods, including ethical issues
Practice is central to the programme, and there will be practice placements in two settings and with different service user groups (eg child care and mental health). The learning on the programme builds over the two years and prepares you to apply your knowledge to practice situations. We work closely with a range of practice organisations in the Greater London Area. The placements are allocated by our placement tutor and matched with individual profiles. In some instances you may have to travel long distances to your placement organisation. You will need to cover the cost of travel to your placement. You will be expected to work the core hours.

At Goldsmiths we recognise:

the unique contribution that all students bring as individuals to the programme in terms of their personal qualities and life experiences
that professional training builds on the uniqueness of each individual by facilitating the student’s exploration of the values, knowledge base and skills of Social Work practice
that it is the student’s responsibility not only to develop a technical acquaintance with the framework of Social Work practice but also to demonstrate competence through its application in practice
that Social Workers are at the interface of society’s attempts to promote welfare
Social workers have a dual responsibility to act within the state’s welfare framework and also to recognise the pervasive influence of oppression and discrimination at an individual and a structural level in most of the situations in which they work. We will prepare you for this professional responsibility.

Year 1

In year 1 you are introduced to social work as a professional activity and an academic discipline. You consider key concepts such as the nature of need, community, social work services, and the significance of the service user perspective.

You are also provided with an introduction to: life-span development, assessment in social work and a range of social work intervention approaches. Your assessed practice consists of 70 days spent as a social worker; this gives you the chance to develop your communication and social work practice skills with service users, and to work in partnership across professional disciplines and agencies.

Year 2

Year 2 provides you with an overview of the legal and organisational context of social work, and extends your knowledge and skills in one of the two main specialist areas of social work practice: working with children and families, or working with adults in need. You will work in small groups to explore methods of intervention, research and theories which are relevant to a particular area of social work, while another assessed practice element enables you to meet the professional requirements for social work training via 100 days of practice under the guidance of a practice assessor.

You are expected to demonstrate competence across a range of standards and this is formally assessed. The learning on the MA Social Work programme builds over the two years and prepares you to apply that knowledge to practice situations.

Practice placements

You are required to spend 170 days in practice settings.

In Year 1 there is a practice placement lasting 70 days and in Year 2 the practice placement lasts 100 days. These placements are arranged through the allocation system devised by the College. The practice placements will be supported by 30 days for the development of practice skills.

You have an identified Practice Educator for each of the two practice placements. Most of our placements are located in South East London, so if you live elsewhere you will need to travel.

We have partnership agreements with the following organisations for placements in social work:

London Borough of Brent – Childrens Services
London Borough of Brent – Adults Services
Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea – Adults Services
London Borough of Lambeth – Childrens Services
London Borough of Southwark – Childrens Services
London Borough of Southwark – Adults Services
London Borough of Lewisham – Childrens Services
London Borough of Lewisham – Adults Services
London Borough of Croydon – Adults Services
Royal Borough of Greenwich – Childrens Services
Royal Borough of Greenwich – Adults Services
London Borough of Bromley – Childrens Services
London Borough of Bromley – Adults Services
NSPCC (London Region)

We also work with about 20-30 voluntary/private social care agencies each year. Here are some that we've worked with recently:

Equinox Care Mental Health Services
Body and Soul HIV Service
Jamma Umoja Family Assessment Services
Advocacy in Greenwich Learning Disability Service
Lewisham Refugee Network
Turning Point Mental Health Services
Carers Lewisham

Assessment

The programme is assessed by a range of methods including essays, assessed role plays, take home papers, project work, a practice based case study, a final year dissertation, and the production of a practice portfolio for each placement.

Assessment of practice is by reports by your Practice Educator. This includes direct observation of your work with service users as well as your practice portfolio, and a narrative giving an evaluation of your work.

Professional standards

Social work is a regulated profession. From 1 August 2012, the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) took on the regulation of social workers and the regulation of the performance of social work courses. This means that social work students will need to adhere to the standards set out in the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) Guidance on conduct and ethics for students (HCPC 2009), and work towards meeting the HCPC Standards of Proficiency - Social workers in England (HCPC 2012). These are the standards social work students are expected to demonstrate at the end of their last placement/ qualifying level.

Skills

You'll develop the ability to practise social work in a wide variety of settings with different service user groups.

Careers

The programme will enable you to register and practise as a qualified social worker.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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This course is designed for staff in local authorities, the NHS, voluntary and third sector who use group work, informal learning and activity, outreach and community work especially those working with young people and adults often labelled as hard to reach. Read more
This course is designed for staff in local authorities, the NHS, voluntary and third sector who use group work, informal learning and activity, outreach and community work especially those working with young people and adults often labelled as hard to reach.

This very flexible distance learning course can be studied part-time or full-time. It attracts staff from across the UK from a variety
of settings such as parenting education, youth work, children’s centres, sexual health roles, drug abuse, housing and homelessness, youth offending, mental health, community development and domestic violence. It is also suitable for youth work and community development work practitioners seeking to explore health related topics prevalent in both generic work and
specialist health education and development projects.

Students must complete a dissertation in a health-related topic identified in discussion with academic staff. This course enables the development of innovative, progressive practitioners to reflectively engage with concepts and practices of social justice and equality.

•Suitable for qualified practitioners, with a flexible study course allowing study alongside work
•DMU holds an international reputation in the field of youth and community development
•Staff are engaged in professional practice, research, consultancy and teaching, providing you with teaching that is relevant, current and applicable to recent initiatives
•Provides an opportunity to study at an advanced academic and professional level
•High quality practice-related modules enabling practitioners and clients to achieve planned change through the process of education, development and practice-orientated research

Course modules:

The course comprises of three core modules:
•Issues of Health and Well-being (15 credits)
•Health and Social Research Methods (15 credits)
•Theory and Practice of Community Development (15 credits)

You will study up to five other modules depending on your chosen pathway. There are three pathways:
•The Generic pathway
•The Research pathway
•The Management pathway

There is plenty of opportunity to specialise on a chosen theme within modules and by using the Negotiated Module and the
Dissertation/Practice-Related Project to pursue themes in depth. A number of specialist modules are taken, these include:

First semester 15 credit modules:
•Negotiated Module
•Managing Services and People
•Anti-Oppressive Practice

Second semester modules:
•Health and Social Research Methods 2 (15 credits)
•Optional modules x 2 (select from a varied list of specialist modules)
•Dissertation (60 or 90 credits)

There are a several specialist optional modules available in each of the semesters, although some are only available biennially.

Teaching and Assessment :

The core module and most specialist modules are launched during one of two block teaching weeks held each year. These modules are supported by a wide variety of written material, individual and corporate tasks. You are required to engage in a number of online seminars in each module which is compulsory.

The course works to build a learning community, from the initial contact on selection day and in the induction periods onwards. Assessment is usually by written assignment of 4,000 words per15 credit module. Contributions to online seminars are compulsory and also an attendance requirement.

International students come to study in the UK because the quality of our teaching is among the best in the world, offering a varied selection of teaching methods to suit all learning requirements.

Expertise:

Staff in the department have more than 50 years’ experience and are one of the largest teams in the UK. They continue to work for a range of organisations that work with young people including charities, voluntary and statutory agencies at local,
national and international levels.

Thematic areas of interest include a specialist expertise and interest in global youth and community development work (resulting
in numerous conferences and publications by Dr Momodou Sallah, a leading expert in this area); work with black young
people (again, resulting in key conferences and texts by Carlton Howson and Momodou Sallah); youth participation and citizenship (including an evaluation of a Beacon Councils initiative and ongoing partnership work with the Centre for Social Action); anti-oppressive practice (Dr Jagdish Chouhan); hospital and other health-related youth work; (Dr Scott Yates) and the
context, management and operation of children and young people’s services; (Mary Tyler, and recent high profile work undertaken by visiting professors Bernard Davies and Bryan Merton). In the last five years seven books have been published by
authors in the division with a further two forthcoming titles.

Graduate Careers:

Many of our graduates go into a wide range of senior posts in community health, youth work and community development work in
both the statutory and voluntary sector, all over the world. An MA is a recommended qualification for workers who want
to hold senior positions. The MA is recognised internationally as a valid postgraduate level of study and its content is relevant for issues relating to a developing country’s health and community provision.

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This course is for experienced youth and community development work practitioners seeking to further develop their knowledge and understanding of their practice and the rapidly changing contexts in which they work. Read more
This course is for experienced youth and community development work practitioners seeking to further develop their knowledge and understanding of their practice and the rapidly changing contexts in which they work. It is also suitable for staff in local authorities, the NHS, voluntary and third sector who use group work, informal learning and activity, outreach and community work, especially those working with young people and adults often labelled as hard to reach. This very flexible distance learning course can be studied part-time or full-time. It attracts staff from across the UK from a variety of settings such as parenting education, youth work, children’s centres, sexual health roles, drug abuse, housing and homelessness, youth offending, mental health, community development and domestic violence.

This course enables the development of innovative, progressive practitioners to reflectively engage with concepts and practices of social justice and equality.
•Suitable for qualified practitioners, with a flexible study course allowing study alongside work
•D MU holds an international reputation in the field of youth and community development
•Staff are engaged in professional practice, research, consultancy and teaching, providing you with teaching that is relevant, current and applicable to recent initiatives
•Provides an opportunity to study at an advanced academic and professional level
•High quality practice-related modules enabling practitioners and clients to achieve planned change through the process of education, development and practice-orientated research
The course consists of three core modules:
•Health and Social Research Methods;
•Theory and Practice of Community Development;
•Theory and Practice of Youth Work

You will study up to five other modules depending on your chosen pathway. There are three pathways:
•The generic pathway offers the greatest flexibility
•The research pathway includes taught modules in research methods and advanced research methods, plus a 90 credit dissertation. You will consider practice-based, evaluative and academic modes of research
•On the management pathway you are required to take three management modules and complete a management-focused dissertation

You will take a number of specialist modules, these include:
First semester modules:
•Negotiated Module (15 credits) allows you to formulate, present and implement an individual proposal in an area of professional relevance and interest
•Managing Services and People (15 credits) increases self-confidence and performance as a manager of people and projects within a youth work and community development environment
•Anti-Oppressive Practice (15 credits) analyses concepts of oppression, discrimination and inequality and develops effective anti-oppressive and anti-discriminatory practice
•Health and Social Research Methods 2 (15 credits) is focused on critical deconstruction of approaches to research and evaluation.
Second semester modules:
•Health and Well-being (15 credits) introduces key concepts of health and well-being in the context of youth work and community development
•Optional modules x 2 (select from a varied list of specialist modules)
•Dissertation (60 or 90 credits)
•There are several specialist optional modules available in each of the semesters, although some are only available biennially.

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The focus of this programme is on contemporary substantive issues in criminology and criminal justice and on criminological research methods. Read more
The focus of this programme is on contemporary substantive issues in criminology and criminal justice and on criminological research methods. It is particularly appropriate for those engaged in criminal justice policy analysis and development or similar work in allied fields.

The programme develops a theoretical, policy and technical understanding of key issues within criminology, criminal justice and research methods. More specifically, it aims to develop an advanced understanding of the complex nature of crime, harm and victimisation together with an appreciation of the role of the state/criminal justice system in the regulation of human behaviour, deviance and crime. The programme will equip you to design and implement social scientific research using a broad range of methodologies, consider research ethics, analyse and present the material such research generates.

Through combining criminology and research methods, the programme enables you to think logically and in an informed manner about criminological issues. The programme fosters a critical awareness of the relationship between theory, policy and practice and enables you to utilize your research knowledge of research skills and translate these into research practice in the field of criminology and broader social science research professions.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/criminology-social-research-methods-msc

Modules

You'll undertake modules from a broad base of subject areas including:

- Criminological theory
This module charts the development of criminological thinking from the onset of modernity through to the present day. It will place discrete theories in their proper sociological, historical, political and cultural contexts. It will seek to establish the implications and relationships of various theories to criminal justice policy. A number of contemporary issues (terrorism, urban disturbances, and gang culture) will be explored with a view to critically evaluating the value of competing theoretical frameworks.

- Crime, harm and victimisation
The module aims to deconstruct the fundamental elements of criminology: the crime, the criminal and the victim. It begins by examining historical and contemporary patterns of crime and criminality, as officially measured, within the UK and beyond. It then engages with more critical academic debates about defining and measuring crime, considering definitions of crime as: a breach of criminal law; a violation of collective conscience; a product of conduct norms; a social construct; ideological censure; a gendered reality; a violation of human rights, and; social or environmental harm. The module engages with critical deconstructions of the 'offender' and the 'victim', considering how these are socially constructed and how our understanding of these, like of 'crime', has changed and continues to change in late-/post-modern society.

- Responding to crime: justice, social control and punishment
This module explores some of the key issues and controversies in the delivery of justice, social control and punishment. It begins with a critical consideration of the concept of justice and emphasises the significance of this in relation to how the state responds to various forms of crime. It encourages you to think critically about the role of the state in the regulation of behaviour and provides an overview of key changes that have occurred in the field of crime control and criminal justice. One of the key features of contemporary crime control discourse is the rise of risk management and the pursuit of security. This module outlines the ways in which such a discourse has transformed criminal justice thinking and practices of both policing and penal policy, and also of crime (and harm) prevention.

- Criminological research in practice
This module uses examples from recent and current research conducted by members of the Crime and Justice Research Group at LSBU and external guest speakers to develop both the research training and subject understanding elements of the MSc, demonstrating how research becomes knowledge – generating theoretical advances, policy initiatives, new research questions and university curricula. Lectures/seminars will take the form of a research commentary, talking you through a research project from idea inception through research design, fieldwork, analysis and dissemination and, where appropriate, on to the influences research has had (or could have) on subsequent academic works and policy developments. Particular emphasis will be placed on challenges peculiar to criminological research.

- Methods for social research and evaluation: philosophy, design and data collection
This module introduces you to core concepts in social research and shows how they can be used to address social scientific questions and practical issues in policy evaluation. You'll be introduced to central topics in the philosophy of social sciences and the effect they have on research choices. You are then introduced to different ways research can be designed and the ways design affects permissible inferences. You are then introduced to the theory of measurement and sampling. The final third of the module focuses on acquiring data ranging from survey methods through qualitative data collection methods to secondary data.

- Data analytic techniques for social scientists
You are introduced to a range of analytic techniques commonly used by social scientists. It begins by introducing you to statistical analysis, it then moves to techniques used to analyse qualitative data. It concludes by looking at relational methods and data reduction techniques. You'll also be introduced to computer software (SPSS, NVivo and Ucinet) that implements the techniques. Students will gain both a conceptual understanding of the techniques and the means to apply them to their own research projects. An emphasis will be placed on how these techniques can be used in social evaluation.

- Dissertation
The dissertation is a major part of your work on the MSc, reflected in its value of 60 credits. The aim of the dissertation is to enable students to expand and deepen their knowledge of a substantive area in criminology, whilst simultaneously developing their methodological skills. You'll choose an area of investigation and apply the research skills of design and process, modes of data generation and data analysis techniques to undertake a 15,000 word dissertation. You'll be allocated a dissertation supervisor from the departmental team and will meet regularly for personal supervision meetings.

Employability

This MSc will enable you to pursue a range of professional careers in criminal justice related work in statutory, commercial or community voluntary sectors and operating at central, regional and local government levels, for example, the Home Office; police forces; local government; crime and disorder reduction partnerships and their equivalencies throughout the world.

The acquisition of specific criminological and research methods knowledge will also enhance the career opportunities if you are currently working in the field. The specialist focus on research methods also offers an excellent foundation for those interested in undertaking subsequent doctoral research in the field.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Professional links

The Crime and Criminal Justice Research Group, (CCJRG), at LSBU has developed a strong national and international reputation for delivering high quality and real life impact research. It has worked closely with a range of government agencies, including the Office for Criminal Justice Reform (Ministry of Justice); Government Office for London; the Scottish Executive, Northern Ireland Office and the Equalities and Human Rights Commission. It has also undertaken extensive research in collaboration with various London local authorities together with a range of voluntary and charity-based agencies.

Placements

Our criminology programme also has a strong voluntary work scheme.You're encouraged to undertake voluntary work in a variety of criminal justice related agencies. Recent positions have been within the police service, the prison service, legal advice, victim support, domestic violence and child abuse agencies and youth offending and youth mentoring schemes.

Teaching and learning

Study hours:
Year 1 class contact time is typically 6 hours per week part time and 12 hours per week full time plus individual tutorial and independent study.

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Social work education at Goldsmiths has a long and distinguished record. We welcome enquiries from appropriately qualified applicants with research interests that align with those of our staff- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-social-work/. Read more
Social work education at Goldsmiths has a long and distinguished record. We welcome enquiries from appropriately qualified applicants with research interests that align with those of our staff- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-social-work/

We provide a thriving research environment in which the research interests of staff are enormously varied, including:

child protection
learning disability
mental health
the interconnections between domestic violence and child abuse
explorations of gender and sexuality in social care

Assessment is by thesis and viva voce.

The MPhil programme offers the opportunity for you to continue your research to a PhD.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Jennifer Mayo-Deman.

Department

The Department of Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies has human relationships at its heart

You’ll benefit from the wealth of experience of our staff and their commitment to ensuring that you’ll leave us as a reflective, research-minded professional.

We offer programmes in Community Studies, Social Work, and Therapeutic Studies.

Our degrees are informed by our commitment to social justice and applied practices – whether you want to:

-understand and challenge the ways that vulnerable individuals and groups are disadvantaged and marginalised
-become a social worker, community and youth worker, therapist or counsellor
-change people’s lives through dance, drama and music

You’ll benefit from the wealth of experience of our staff and their commitment to ensuring that you’ll leave us as a reflective, research-minded professional.

How to apply

Before you apply for a research programme, we advise you to get in touch with the programme contact, listed above. It may also be possible to arrange an advisory meeting.

Before you start at Goldsmiths, the actual topic of your research has to be agreed with your proposed supervisor, who will be a member of staff active in your general field of research. The choice of topic may be influenced by the current research in the department or the requirements of an external funding body.

If you wish to study on a part-time basis, you should also indicate how many hours a week you intend to devote to research, whether this will be at evenings or weekends, and for how many hours each day.

Research proposals

Along with your application and academic reference, you should also upload a research proposal at the point of application.

This should be in the form of a statement of the proposed area of research and should include:

delineation of the research topic
why it has been chosen
an initial hypothesis (if applicable)
a brief list of major secondary sources

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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