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Masters Degrees (Documentation)

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Today, there are around 6-7,000 languages spoken in the world and it is widely agreed that at least half of those are under threat of extinction within 50 to 100 years. Read more
Today, there are around 6-7,000 languages spoken in the world and it is widely agreed that at least half of those are under threat of extinction within 50 to 100 years. Language documentation is a new sub-discipline within linguistics that has emerged as a response to the growing crisis of language endangerment. It emphasises data collection methodologies, in two ways: first, in encouraging researchers to collect and record a wide range of linguistic phenomena in genuine communicative situations; and secondly, in its use of high quality sound and video recording to make sure that the results are the best possible record of the language.

The MA programme in Language Documentation and Description is intended for students who wish to specialise in the documentation and description of languages, with a focus on minority and endangered languages. This specialist MA is characterised by an integrated core of subject offerings that are oriented around issues in language documentation and description, plus a series of options in linguistics, applied linguistics, and language studies.

The programme is formulated with two main pathways:

MA Language Documentation and Description [Language Support and Revitalisation] provides an introductory overview of the study of language as well as courses geared at enabling students to support endangered and minority language communities in a number of ways. This pathway is open to students with or without a background in linguistics.

MA Language Documentation and Description [Field Linguistics] provides students with a sound knowledge of state-of-the-art methods and technology for language documentation and description with an emphasis on endangered and minority languages. This pathway is open to students who already hold an undergraduate major in linguistics/applied linguistics, or an MA in linguistics.

This course is part of the Endangered Languages Academic Programme (ELAP), which specifically aims to advance the documentation and description of endangered languages. ELAP also runs seminars, workshops, and intensive courses on the documentation of endangered languages. The programme is funded by the Lisbet Rausing Charitable Fund, and forms part of the Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project (http://www.hrelp.org/).

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/malangdocdesc/

Structure

The MA Language Documentation and Description (LDD) consists of three components: core courses, option courses and dissertation research. This degree programme is formulated with two different pathways; one specialising in Language Support and Revitalisation and the other specialising in Field Linguistics.

Regardless of the pathway they chose, all students take the equivalent of 2 full units as core courses, and the equivalent of 1 full unit as option courses and submit a Masters dissertation at the end of the year. The MA may be taken part-time, over two or three years, and there is a possibility for transferring between the two pathways for part-time students.

- MA Language Documentation and Description [Language Support and Revitalisation]

This pathway is open for full-time study to students with or without a BA in linguistics and provides an introductory overview of the study of language as well as courses geared at enabling students to support endangered and minority language communities in a number of ways. For part-time options and details please see the MA Handbook.

- MA Language Documentation and Description [Field Linguistics]

This pathway is open to students with a BA in Linguistics and equivalent and provides students with a sound knowledge of state-of-the-art methods and technology for language documentation and description with an emphasis on endangered and minority languages. For part-time options and details please see the MA handbook.

- Optional Courses

Any course/s to the value of 1 unit from the list of running Linguistics PG courses.

Programme Specification

MA Language Documentation and Description - Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 29kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/malangdocdesc/file80773.pdf

Faculty of Languages and Cultures

Six of the academic departments are devoted to teaching and research in the languages, literatures and cultures of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, with the seventh teaching and conducting research in Linguistics. The Language Centre caters to the needs of non-degree students and governmental and non-governmental organisations. It maintains a huge portfolio of courses, including year-long diploma programmes, weekly evening classes in about 40 different African and Asian languages, and tailored intensive one-to-one courses. The Language Centre also offers courses in French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Their teaching is in three main areas:
- language competence acquisition;
- textual and cultural studies - both comparative and language-specific, and covering not only 'literature' in a strict sense but also visual media, performance, folklore, translation etc.;
- language studies with linguistics at its core - including the prestigious Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project.

The Faculty is also home to the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/).

While SOAS as a whole represents the most substantial concentration in the Western world of expertise dedicated to African, Middle Eastern and Asian studies, the Faculty of Languages and Cultures is heavily committed to teaching and research grounded in a knowledge of the principal languages and cultures of two thirds of humankind.

Department of Linguistics

The department is a centre for linguistic study in an unparalleled range of languages, many of which we are documenting for the first time. They include languages of Africa, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, South East Asia, Central Asia, Australia, the Pacific, and Siberia. The department has close academic ties to the rest of our faculty, the Departments of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, as well as the Language Centre.

The research interests of members of staff cover a wide range of theoretical and applied aspects of linguistics, including syntax, phonology, semantics, information structure, sociolinguistics, historical linguistics, linguistic typology, language documentation and description, language contact and multilingualism, language support and revitalisation, language archiving, lexicography, language pedagogy, translation studies, and the studies of individual languages and language families.

View Degree Programmes - http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This MA provides a next step in performance-making skills, and in documenting and promoting your work. You'll develop your capacity for devising, physical theatre, directing, choreography, solo work and live art, building on your existing knowledge with new directions in collaboration, composition, and documentation. Read more

This MA provides a next step in performance-making skills, and in documenting and promoting your work. You'll develop your capacity for devising, physical theatre, directing, choreography, solo work and live art, building on your existing knowledge with new directions in collaboration, composition, and documentation. We work in studio spaces to allow a free flow between practical work and discussion.

You will have the opportunity to benefit from our close contact with a wide range of companies and artists based in London. Leading professionals we have worked with include:

  • Choreographer Jonathan Burrows (who holds an honorary doctorate with the college)
  • Lone Twin
  • Jasmin Vardimon Company
  • Non Zero One
  • Theatre Ad Infinitum
  • Analogue

You'll learn how performers can take different routes into the world of work – not everyone's routes have to look the same. We create an environment to support excellence in professional practice and we'll work with you to develop your portfolio of skills and documentation.

Through the course, you'll have the chance to take part in independent and group projects, and to engage critically and practically with a wide range of performance practices. While you develop your projects, you'll also be able to use our distinctive performance spaces on the campus – including the state of the art Caryl Churchill Theatre, a converted ‘found space’ Boilerhouse Theatre and the only permanent Noh stage outside of Japan. Towards the end of the course, you'll select a subject area that really interests you, working on your own independently-researched dissertation.

Course structure

  • Making Performance
  • Contemporary Performance Practices
  • Independent Project in Contemporary Performance Practices
  • Dissertation

Teaching & assessment

You'll be assessed on creative and critical responses to course content, and these could take diverse forms. The course addresses the centrality of diverse approaches to contexts within the world of work through the development of a portfolio of skills and increased capacities in documentation, as part of a means of self-representation for professional practice.

During the autumn and spring terms your modules will prepare you for your independent research final project. The shape of this assessment will be responsive to the areas of interest and expertise you have developed over the year. For instance, in addition to the more usual end of year performance that some students will pursue, we can support internships with reflective documentation, curation of an arts project with documentation or a series of workshops with analysis of progress, to name just a few.

You will also work over the year on a dissertation that arises from a specific research question or topic in the field of contemporary performance practices.

Your future career

Our graduates have gone on into professional performance-making both through development of collaborations begun on the course and through joining established companies. They have started careers in theatre training and in education including practical teaching at postgraduate level.

If you come to the end of the course and find yourself curious about an area of study – or want to take your dissertation topic further – the MA is a perfect grounding for a PhD, with many of our students going onto advanced research with us.



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We support innovative art research across a range of modes and practices that seek to contribute to wider cultural and artistic fields through original, critical work. Read more

We support innovative art research across a range of modes and practices that seek to contribute to wider cultural and artistic fields through original, critical work.

The Department of Art supports the development of art research in and through Fine Art, Curating, Art writing and across disciplines. We consider all elements of the MPhil/PhD to be sites of rigorous experimentation and encourage you to develop your research through processes of making, collaboration, investigation, study, inquiry, trial and error, analysis and speculation.

We understand that your research may change shape and subject matter as you make intertextual and interdisciplinary connections and as relevant modes of artistic, cultural, social, scientific and philosophical production become important to you throughout the course of your research. We work with you as you find the appropriate practice for pursuing your research and related form for consolidating and disseminating your findings.

It is important to note that the MPhil/PhD is not an extension of the MFA. The MFA is a professional degree geared specifically to the development of your art practice. Distinct from this, the MPhil/PhD in Art is a 3-4 year (full-time) or 6-8 year (part-time) research project, the pursuit of which may involve your already-established practice, or require the development new modes of practice specific to the research project.

The PhD is also distinct from ongoing studio practice or a residency in that it asks you to place your work in relation to that of other practitioners, be they artists and other cultural workers, philosophers, sociologists, anthropologists, political scientists, or others; be they in a contemporary and/or historical context. In this respect, the model of the PhD encourages you to follow your curiosity for – and make connections with and between – the thought and action of others.

Another major distinguishing quality of art research is the need to document process. For this, our researchers are encouraged to think expansively about how to do so. How might a process of documentation become a space for reflecting on decisions, however intuitive they are in the first instance? How might this process communicate something of the mode of enquiry that is pursued, as much as of the findings? How might this process, as much as the outcome of the research, reflect the complexity inherent in thinking, making, questioning and communicating art?

MARs 

Based in the Department of Art, and linked to the MPhil/PhD Programme, is the Mountain of Art Research (MARs). MARs supports and promotes the development of innovative art research across a range of art practices including - but not limited to - studio, performance, film and video, curatorial, critical, art-writing, situated, participatory and interdisciplinary practice.

Committed to rigorous formal experimentation, maverick conceptual exploration and socially-engaged articulation, MARs emphasises the material ‘stuff’ of art research as much as its speculative possibilities and political imperative. As both platform and ethos, the aim of MARs is to challenge received ideas and habits; to promote new ways of thinking and being both in and out of this world.

Through MARs we bring together researchers within Art, across disciplines, between institutions and beyond higher education for intentional, concentrated discussion and sharing of research.

Applications 

You will apply with a well-developed idea for and individual research project that you have begun to plan artistically as well as to contextualise with reference to contemporary and historical examples of artworks, exhibitions, designs, social, political and philosophical ideas, etc.

Programme pathways

Within the overarching programme of MPhil/PhD in Art there are three different pathways for undertaking doctoral research, including:

Pathway 1: Thesis by Practice 

The thesis comprises a substantial body of studio practice, curatorial practice and/or art writing practice, presented as an integrated whole. This is accompanied by a considered form of documentation, as appropriate to the project, and a written component of approximately 20,000-40,000 words for PhD (10,000-20,000 words for MPhil) offering a critical account of the research.

Pathway 2: Thesis by Practice and Written Dissertation 

The thesis comprises a body of studio practice, curatorial practice and/or art writing practice AND a written dissertation of 40,000-80,000 words for PhD (20,000-40,000 for MPhil), presented together as an integrated whole. The thesis will be accompanied by a considered form of documentation, as appropriate to the project.

Pathway 3: Thesis by written dissertation

The thesis comprises a written dissertation of 80,000-100,000 words for PhD (40,000-50,000 words for MPhil), presented as an integrated whole.

Researchers will start on one of these three pathways when they apply and may change to a different option only up until the time of Upgrade.

Skills

Our art programmes aim to equip you with the necessary skills to develop independent thought and confidence in your practice. In addition, these skills are of use in other career paths you may wish to follow.

Careers

Our researchers have been successful in many fields including media, museums, galleries, education, the music business and academia. Many have continued to be successful, practising artists long after graduating, and have won major prizes and exhibited around the world.



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We support innovative art research across a range of modes and practices that seek to contribute to wider cultural and artistic fields through original, critical work. Read more

We support innovative art research across a range of modes and practices that seek to contribute to wider cultural and artistic fields through original, critical work.

The Department of Art at Goldsmiths has an international reputation for creativity, innovation, and cultural diversity. Our aim is to facilitate artists, curators and writers to make work and to reflect upon, debate and disseminate individual and collaborative practices, thus contributing to wider artistic culture and debate.

As an MPhil/PhD researcher, you will be contributing to the Department's research culture as well as to the wider Goldsmiths tradition: one that values interdisciplinary approaches to knowledge and understanding, supports inventive new practice and critical work, and contributes to the creation of a dynamic research environment both nationally and internationally.

MPhil/PhD research

The Department of Art supports the development of art research in and through Fine Art, Curating, Art Writing and across disciplines. We consider all elements of the MPhil/PhD to be sites of rigorous experimentation and encourage you to develop your research through processes of making, collaboration, investigation, study, inquiry, trial and error, analysis and speculation.

We understand that your research may change shape and subject matter as you make intertextual and interdisciplinary connections and as relevant modes of artistic, cultural, social, scientific and philosophical production become important to you throughout the course of your research. We work with you as you find the appropriate practice for pursuing your research and related form for consolidating and disseminating your findings.

It is important to note that the MPhil/PhD is not an extension of the MFA. The MFA is a professional degree geared specifically at the development of your art practice. Distinct from this, the MPhil/PhD is a 3-4 year (full-time) or 6-8 year (part-time) research project, the pursuit of which may involve your already-established practice, or require the development new modes of practice specific to the research project.

The PhD is also distinct from ongoing studio practice or a residency in that it asks you to place your work in relation to that of other practitioners, be they artists and other cultural workers, philosophers, sociologists, anthropologists, political scientists, or others; be they in a contemporary and/or historical context. In this respect, the model of the PhD encourages you to follow your curiosity for – and make connections with and between – the thought and action of others.

Another major distinguishing quality of art research is the need to document process. For this, our researchers are encouraged to think expansively about how to do so. How might a process of documentation become a space for reflecting on decisions, however intuitive they are in the first instance? How might this process communicate something of the mode of enquiry that is pursued, as much as of the findings? How might this process, as much as the outcome of the research, reflect the complexity inherent in thinking, making, questioning and communicating art?

MARs

Based in the Department of Art, and linked to the MPhil/PhD Programme, is the Mountain of Art Research (MARs). MARs supports and promotes the development of innovative art research across a range of art practices including - but not limited to - studio, performance, film and video, curatorial, critical, art-writing, situated, participatory and interdisciplinary practice.

Committed to rigorous formal experimentation, maverick conceptual exploration and socially-engaged articulation, MARs emphasises the material ‘stuff’ of art research as much as its speculative possibilities and political imperative.

As both platform and ethos, the aim of MARs is to challenge received ideas and habits; to promote new ways of thinking and being both in and out of this world.

Through MARs we bring together researchers within Art, across disciplines, between institutions and beyond higher education for intentional, concentrated discussion and sharing of research.

Applications 

You will apply with a well-developed idea for an individual research project that you have begun to plan artistically as well as to contextualise with reference to contemporary and historical examples of artworks, exhibitions, designs, social, political and philosophical ideas, etc. 

Programme pathways

Within the overarching programme of MPhil/PhD in Art there are three different pathways for undertaking doctoral research, including:

Pathway 1: Thesis by Practice 

The thesis comprises a substantial body of studio practice, curatorial practice and/or art writing practice, presented as an integrated whole. This is accompanied by a considered form of documentation, as appropriate to the project, and a written component of approximately 20,000-40,000 words for PhD (10,000-20,000 words for MPhil) offering a critical account of the research.

Pathway 2: Thesis by Practice and Written Dissertation 

The thesis comprises a body of studio practice, curatorial practice and/or art writing practice AND a written dissertation of 40,000-80,000 words for PhD (20,000-40,000 for MPhil), presented together as an integrated whole. The thesis will be accompanied by a considered form of documentation, as appropriate to the project.

Pathway 3: Thesis by written dissertation

The thesis comprises a written dissertation of 80,000-100,000 words for PhD (40,000-50,000 words for MPhil), presented as an integrated whole.

Researchers will start on one of these three pathways when they apply and may change to a different option only up until the time of Upgrade.

Skills

Our art programmes aim to equip you with the necessary skills to develop independent thought and confidence in your practice. In addition, these skills are of use in other career paths you may wish to follow.

Careers

Our researchers have been successful in many fields including media, museums, galleries, education, the music business and academia. Many have continued to be successful, practising artists long after graduating, and have won major prizes and exhibited around the world.



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Goldsmiths’ Department of Music has a lively and varied research base, large postgraduate community, active performing tradition, and offers proximity to London’s resources. Read more

Goldsmiths’ Department of Music has a lively and varied research base, large postgraduate community, active performing tradition, and offers proximity to London’s resources.

Staff research interests are correspondingly diverse and wide-ranging, and we offer research supervision in any of these areas of specialism.

Our MPhil pathways

You can register for any one of the following:

  • Written thesis of up to 100,000 words (MPhil: 60,000 words). We offer supervision in many areas of music studies.
  • Composition. Examined by portfolio of compositions, together with a 20,000 word commentary (MPhil: 12,000 words).
  • Performance. Examined by a full-length recital, together with a related 50,000-word thesis (MPhil: 30,000 words).
  • Sonic Arts: Examined by portfolio of practice, and a 40,000-60,000 word commentary (MPhil: 20,000-30,000 words). Portfolios may include recordings, documentation of installation work, or other sonic arts work.
  • Practice-Based Research in Music: Examined by portfolio of practice, and a 30,000-60,000 word written element. Portfolios may include recordings of composition; documentation of performance; ethnographic film; web-based and digital humanities projects; documentation of installation; other practice-based research.

Research supervision

You are assigned members of staff qualified to supervise your research throughout your period of registration. Supervision involves regular meetings throughout the period of study, and involves the development of an intensive intellectual relationship between you and your supervisor.

Facilities

You have access to Goldsmiths’ Graduate School, containing an open-access computer room, a student common room and seminar room for use by postgraduate research students. 

Find out more about research degrees at Goldsmiths

Structure

You can study full-time or part-time. The programme normally begins in September, but applications for entry in January and April may be considered.

Supervision is available in any of the areas of specialism outlined above or covered by staff research interests.

Research students are strongly encouraged to contribute to the Department’s research culture. You will have regular opportunities to present papers at seminars and conferences.

Composers can have pieces performed or recorded by Goldsmiths ensembles, including the Sinfonia, or by the Ensembles-in-Residence.

Performers are encouraged to take part in departmental concerts, and may audition for concerto appearances.



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The Architectural Computation MSc provides a comprehensive understanding of the skills required to create generative, emergent and responsive forms, through exposure to real programming environments. Read more

The Architectural Computation MSc provides a comprehensive understanding of the skills required to create generative, emergent and responsive forms, through exposure to real programming environments. Taught by architects and experts in artificial intelligence, students benefit from studio sessions with tutors who have experience of research in this field.

About this degree

On completion of the programme, students will be able to use computational techniques in architecture, understand and predict the consequences of their design actions through computational processes, integrate their predictions into the design process, and carry out self-sufficient research into new methods and processes.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of five core modules (75 credits), the choice between two streams of optional modules (45 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits, full-time nine months) is offered.

Core modules

  • Computational Analysis
  • Computational Synthesis
  • Design as a Knowledge-Based Process
  • Introduction to Programming for Architecture and Design
  • Morphogenetic Programming

Optional modules

There are two streams of optional modules:

  • Embodied and Embedded Technologies
  • Digital Interaction

Dissertation/report

All MSc students submit a 10,000-word report related to the main themes of the programme, typically involving the development of an interactive installation or a system to improve the design process.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, workshops and seminars as well as individual and collaborative projects. Assessment is through unseen examination, coursework (including 3000-word essay, learning log, digitally fabricated piece and documentation, short video piece, and physical piece with video documentation) practical exercises and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Architectural Computation MSc

Careers

After completing the programme, most graduates go on to join leading architectural and engineering practices, either directly with design teams or with specialist modelling groups. Alumni have also joined (or founded) cutting-edge emerging digital design practices such as United Visual Artists and Moving Brands, or moved into academic research.

Employability

Our MSc provides a full learning experience with set projects and structured learning. It can be taken by those without any computational experience or those looking for industry-applicable skills. 

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Bartlett is the UK's largest multidisciplinary Faculty of the Built Environment, bringing together scientific and professional specialisms required to research, understand, design, construct and operate the buildings and urban environments of the future.

Located in London, we are at the heart of a large cluster of creative architects and engineering firms, next to the UK's seat of government and finance and with all the resources of a world city to hand.

The new architecture coming out of the Bartlett is characterised by a high level of invention and creativity. The school is internationally known as a centre for innovative design.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Bartlett School of Architecture

81% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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The MSc Nursing graduate entry programme is aimed at highly motivated graduates who wish to become a registered adult nurse and achieve an MSc in an accelerated two year timeframe. Read more

Overview

The MSc Nursing graduate entry programme is aimed at highly motivated graduates who wish to become a registered adult nurse and achieve an MSc in an accelerated two year timeframe. Nursing is an exciting and rewarding career choice. It’s one in which you can make a real and positive contribution to people with long and short-term health problems who are facing some of the most challenging experiences of their lives.

The programme will utilise an enquiry based learning approach which will build on your existing graduate skills for learning and will be underpinned by a student centred philosophy. It will also encompass shared learning with other disciplines and professions, developing your clinical leadership skills and preparing you for professional adult nursing practice.

The programme will focus on quality care, clinical skills, leadership and will be designed to be both research intensive and research informed. You will learn the pivotal roles of nurse and client, while developing your nursing skills and building your knowledge of professional and ethical practice.

Successful completion of this innovative programme will ensure you will meet the registration requirements of the Nursing and Midwifery Council.

During our stimulating and intensive 2-year course to become a Keele, person-centred, graduate entry adult nurse, we aim to facilitate your development to become one of the best post-graduate nurses in the country. To achieve this you will develop a skill set which includes:

- Deliver safe, competent, evidence-based nursing practice
- Adopting professional values, attitudes and behaviours,
- Developing your interpersonal skills,
- Effective team-working,
- Improving management and leadership skills
- Demonstrate competence in research and be able to successfully manage a project

Subject to Validation and sufficient numbers

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/adultnursingmsc/

Course Aims

Preparation for nursing practice encompasses learning in the spheres of knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviours. It is recognised that evidence based knowledge is required for safe and effective nursing practice and as such programme content is driven by the NMC Standards for Pre-registration Nursing Education, QAA Academic and Practitioner Standards for nursing alongside the QAA Master’s Degree Characteristics (NMC, 2010; QAA, 2010). The programme builds in terms of academic skill sets, professional responsibility and technical complexity throughout the two years.

Upon successful completion of the programme, students will be able to:
- Consistently utilise a person-centred approach to nursing care based on partnership, which respects the individuality of people and families, to ensure high quality care.

- Have a systematic understanding and critical awareness of the knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviours to become a thoughtful, compassionate and effective nurse who provides high-quality care based on best evidence.

- Demonstrate excellent self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems making sound nursing judgements and communicate their conclusions clearly.

- Have the ability to independently engage in critical inquiry and implement research findings that makes a significant positive difference to nursing care and clinical effectiveness.

- Apply clinical reasoning and decision-making skills to enable them to safely manage complex healthcare, risk and ‘uncertainty’ both systematically and creatively.

- Be responsive to innovation and new technologies and innovative practice that promotes safe adoption and dissemination of better quality service delivery.

- Develop a transferable skill set required for independent reflexive learning and research for continuing professional development and post- graduate nursing careers.

- Consistently demonstrate emotional expressiveness, self-confidence, and self-determination in effective leadership and communication.

- Promote equality and demonstrate courageous, ethical and anti-discriminatory practices that support empowerment, advocacy and safeguarding in nursing practice.

- Work effectively in teams to collaborate and work in partnership with people, professionals, communities and other agencies and work flexibly across changing healthcare economies.

Entry Requirements

The MSc Nursing, Graduate Entry Nursing (GEN) programme recognises that prior learning and experience is integral to the student’s learning.
Academic Entry requirements:
- A first degree (2:1 or above)

- Applicants must have English and Maths at GCSE or equivalent qualification at grade A - C

- Evidence of recent study (within 5 years)

- We accept applications from candidates who meet residency requirements of UK students. Any overseas qualifications should be equivalent to UK qualifications which meet our entry requirements. If you have completed your degree outside the UK, we will require a clear copy of your degree documentation to ensure NARIC comparability. Please note that all applicants who are invited to interview will be required to present their original degree documentation. IELTS tests will be accepted as an equivalent to GCSE English at grade C. We request IELTS with an overall score of 7 (and a minimum of 7 in all sub-tests).

- Please note that you will be required to have obtained the academic entry requirements before applying.

Teaching & Assessment

The programme utilises an enquiry-based learning approach which builds on your existing skills for learning and is underpinned by a student centred philosophy. It also encompasses shared learning with other disciplines and professions, developing your clinical leadership skills and preparing you for practice.

As with all our courses, you can expect to experience a stimulating blend of learning activities, from practice learning, simulation, problem based learning, tutorials, lectures and clinical skills workshops through to innovative web-based activities and inter-professional learning.

Each module will encourage you to demonstrate deep learning that includes subject-specific knowledge and transferable skills. Service user involvement in the programme will ensure that the concept of person-centeredness is explicit.

We have a wide variety of innovative assessments that will develop and enhance your graduate skill set. These may include report writing, simulated activities, an MCQ exam, case studies, presentations, designing a renewable learning resource, reflective writing, developing a research proposal to undertaking a Masters dissertation

Additional Costs

Currently course fees are paid for all students who meet the NHS student bursaries eligibility criteria. Currently eligible students will receive a non-means tested grant of £1,000, a means-tested bursary. Additional allowances may be available for students with disabilities and dependents, but you will not be eligible for the Reduced Rate student loan. Information on NHS bursaries is available here NHS Bursary Scheme and Professional and Career development loans is available here Loans

Disclaimer:
Students and prospective students should not rely on the current NHS Bursary rules and allowances when planning for subsequent academic years. These rules may be subject to review in the future and as a result may change.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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The flexible modular structure of our taught MA programme allows you to focus on a chosen area of specialism but simultaneously facilitates exploration of a wide range of research areas relating to music. Read more

The flexible modular structure of our taught MA programme allows you to focus on a chosen area of specialism but simultaneously facilitates exploration of a wide range of research areas relating to music. It will provide an excellent foundation for undertaking postgraduate research at doctoral level, but will also benefit the professional development of musicians intending to pursue careers in teaching, arts administration, broadcasting, and other domains.

Students on the taught MA programme join a vibrant international postgraduate community and study with scholars, composers, and performers who have achieved international recognition in their fields. The Music Department was ranked #1 in The Sunday Times University League Table 2016, and was in the top three music departments in the Research Excellence Framework 2014 and the Complete University Guide 2017.

The MA Music programme supports study of the following areas of specialism:

  • Musicology
  • Ethnomusicology
  • Composition (acoustic and electronic)
  • Performance

In addition, other options typically available have included:

  • British Music
  • Indian Music
  • Music, Mind, and Culture
  • World Music Analysis
  • Audiovisual Documentation and Analysis

Course structure

You will choose modules from sections A, B, C, and D below:

A. Major project, weighted at 60 credits (a dissertation, a public recital, or a portfolio of compositions/orchestrations and arrangements – depending on your chosen area of specialism)

B. A 30-credit module linked to your chosen area of specialism

C. Two compulsory core 30-credit modules embedding research training and engaging with major intellectual issues attendant on all subject areas

D. An additional 30 credits of Music undergraduate modules/selected undergraduate OR postgraduate modules offered by another department OR another related specialism-specific module from list B, subject to approval of the Board of Studies in Music.

Example: MA with specialism in Musicology

A. A 12,000-word dissertation on a musicological topic weighted at 60 credits

B. 30-credit module ‘Contemporary Musicology’

C. Compulsory core 30-credit modules, ‘Core Research Seminars’ and ‘Research Methods and Resources’

D. 30 credits of Music undergraduate modules/selected undergraduate OR postgraduate modules offered by another department OR another related specialism-specific module from list B

Core Modules

  • Research Methods and Resources
  • Core Research Seminars

And

the following specialism-specific modules will be offered every year: 

  • Contemporary Musicology
  • Ethnomusicology in Practice and Theory
  • Compositional Techniques
  • Music Performance 

Optional Modules

Optional modules in previous years have included:

  • British Music
  • Music Analysis
  • Practice and Theory of Choral Conducting
  • Electronic Music
  • Orchestration and Arranging
  • Indian Music
  • World Music Analysis
  • Music, Mind, and Culture
  • Audiovisual Documentation and Analysis. 

Course Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered through a mixture of seminars, practical sessions and one-to-one supervision. Seminars provide opportunities for you to discuss and debate particular issues, and to present your own original work, informed by the knowledge that you have gained through independent study outside the programme’s formal contact hours. Practical sessions in areas such as studio or field recording techniques help to prepare you for your own independent work. All students must undertake an independent project (dissertation, composition portfolio, or performance), which is developed with the help of one-to-one expert supervision. Finally, optional modules can be drawn from the undergraduate and postgraduate programmes of Music or of other departments –these free-choice modules may involve other forms of staff-student contact, depending on the subject area. The Department actively promotes interdisciplinary approaches to the study of music and you are encouraged to engage with other disciplines in the humanities and sciences.

The contact hours experienced by each individual student will vary considerably, given a high degree of flexibility in the programme. You will typically attend between 2 and 4 hours of seminars per week in term time, as well as additional practical sessions as appropriate. Individual supervision of dissertations, performance projects and composition portfolios amounts to an average of 6 hours spread over the second and third terms.

Outside timetabled contact hours, you are also expected to attend research seminars, both student-led and those involving staff or guest academic speakers (typically 1-2 hrs each week). You must also undertake your own independent study to prepare for your classes and assessments, to broaden your subject knowledge and to prepare your dissertations or portfolios. You are encouraged, as an integral part of your studies, to take advantage of other opportunities including participating in performance opportunities (including staff-led ensembles) and attending research and composition seminars, some of which are organised in conjunction with University research institutes.

There is a busy programme of musical performance, both within and outside the Music department, which complements your academic programme by providing opportunities both to listen to and to perform a wide variety of music. The many musical ensembles to which you can contribute includes both independent societies (including orchestras, choirs, opera and musical theatre as well as a Javanese gamelan) and department-run ensembles such as the New Music Ensemble and Korean percussion group.



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The world of robotics is exciting and fast paced – revolutionising the way we live, work and play. This course is for you if you’re a non-engineering graduate wishing to work for engineering companies. Read more
The world of robotics is exciting and fast paced – revolutionising the way we live, work and play.

This course is for you if you’re a non-engineering graduate wishing to work for engineering companies. This MSc will give you the skills needed to work for employers developing or applying:
-Devices or systems for robotics and automation
-Smart systems with autonomous capability
-Ubiquitous and wearable computing

You build on your individual responsibility, critical awareness and creative thinking, and examine issues such as:
-Project management, planning and scheduling
-Resourcing
-Documentation and communication

We also offer this MSc with an industrial placement year, making it a two-year course, or with a Masters industrial placement.

How will I study?

You’ll study an introduction to the course in the autumn term, with some tests and practical robotics projects. In the spring term you take taught modules.

Across the spring and summer terms you’ll work on your Masters Individual Project, either at the University or at a company.

Modules are assessed via:
-Hands-on projects
-Reports
-Essays
-Unseen examinations

The project is assessed by a report, presentation and dissertation.

MSc project

On our Masters courses, you’ll complete a substantial MSc project, which is often practical as well as theoretical. The project is designed for you to excel in your personal and professional development and to consolidate the material covered in your modules.

It demands individual responsibility and exposes you to issues of:
-Project management
-Resourcing
-Planning
-Scheduling
-Documentation and communication
-Critical awareness and creative thinking

In Engineering and Design, project assessment can include interim reports, presentations and a dissertation. Some projects are undertaken in groups and replicate the type of professional teamwork expected in industry. Topics are generated from the academic research and industrial collaborations in our Department, and a member of faculty supervises the project.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course.
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Careers

An MSc in Robotics and Autonomous Systems could be your passport to a career in a wide range of established and rapidly developing areas that are changing our lives including:
-Smart technologies
-Driverless vehicles
-Vehicle design
-Renewable energies
-Film and television
-Car production
-Space or underwater exploration
-Commercialised agriculture
-Medical diagnosis
-Remote and minimally invasive surgery
-Crime prevention

Read less
The world of robotics is exciting and fast paced – revolutionising the way we live, work and play. This course is for you if you’re a non-engineering graduate wishing to work for engineering companies. Read more
The world of robotics is exciting and fast paced – revolutionising the way we live, work and play.

This course is for you if you’re a non-engineering graduate wishing to work for engineering companies. This MSc will give you the skills needed to work for employers developing or applying:
-Devices or systems for robotics and automation
-Smart systems with autonomous capability
-Ubiquitous and wearable computing

You build on your individual responsibility, critical awareness and creative thinking, and examine issues such as:
-Project management, planning and scheduling
-Resourcing
-Documentation and communication

We also offer this MSc without a placement or with a Masters industrial placement.

How will I study?

You’ll study an introduction to the course in the autumn term, with some tests and practical robotics projects. In the spring term, you take taught modules.

Across the spring and summer terms, you’ll work on your Masters Individual Project, either at the University or at a company.

For your placement, you work in an industrial setting for at least 40 weeks, making your MSc a two-year course (full time). We help you seek and apply for your placement.

Modules are assessed via:
-Hands-on projects
-Reports
-Essays
-Unseen examinations

The project is assessed by a report, presentation and dissertation.

MSc project

On our Masters courses, you’ll complete a substantial MSc project, which is often practical as well as theoretical. The project is designed for you to excel in your personal and professional development and to consolidate the material covered in your modules.

It demands individual responsibility and exposes you to issues of:
-Project management
-Resourcing
-Planning
-Scheduling
-Documentation and communication
-Critical awareness and creative thinking

In Engineering and Design, project assessment can include interim reports, presentations and a dissertation. Some projects are undertaken in groups and replicate the type of professional teamwork expected in industry. Topics are generated from the academic research and industrial collaborations in our Department, and a member of faculty supervises the project.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course.
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Careers

An MSc in Robotics and Autonomous Systems could be your passport to a career in a wide range of established and rapidly developing areas that are changing our lives including:
-Smart technologies
-Driverless vehicles
-Vehicle design
-Renewable energies
-Film and television
-Car production
-Space or underwater exploration
-Commercialised agriculture
-Medical diagnosis
-Remote and minimally invasive surgery
-Crime prevention

Read less
The world of robotics is exciting and fast paced – revolutionising the way we live, work and play. This course is for you if you’re a non-engineering graduate wishing to work for engineering companies. Read more
The world of robotics is exciting and fast paced – revolutionising the way we live, work and play.

This course is for you if you’re a non-engineering graduate wishing to work for engineering companies. This MSc will give you the skills needed to work for employers developing or applying:
-Devices or systems for robotics and automation
-Smart systems with autonomous capability
-Ubiquitous and wearable computing

You build on your individual responsibility, critical awareness and creative thinking, and examine issues such as:
-Project management, planning and scheduling
-Resourcing
-Documentation and communication

We also offer this MSc with an industrial placement year, making it a two-year course, or without a placement.

How will I study?

You’ll study an introduction to the course in the autumn term, with some tests and practical robotics projects. In the spring term you take taught modules.

Across the spring and summer terms you’ll work on your Masters Individual Project, either at the University or at a company.

For your Masters placement, you work in an industrial setting for at least 12 weeks. We help you seek and apply for your placement.

Modules are assessed via:
-Hands-on projects
-Reports
-Essays
-Unseen examinations

The project is assessed by a report, presentation and dissertation.

MSc project

On our Masters courses, you’ll complete a substantial MSc project, which is often practical as well as theoretical. The project is designed for you to excel in your personal and professional development and to consolidate the material covered in your modules.

It demands individual responsibility and exposes you to issues of:
-Project management
-Resourcing
-Planning
-Scheduling
-Documentation and communication
-Critical awareness and creative thinking

In Engineering and Design, project assessment can include interim reports, presentations and a dissertation. Some projects are undertaken in groups and replicate the type of professional teamwork expected in industry. Topics are generated from the academic research and industrial collaborations in our Department, and a member of faculty supervises the project.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course.
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Careers

An MSc in Robotics and Autonomous Systems could be your passport to a career in a wide range of established and rapidly developing areas that are changing our lives including:
-Smart technologies
-Driverless vehicles
-Vehicle design
-Renewable energies
-Film and television
-Car production
-Space or underwater exploration
-Commercialised agriculture
-Medical diagnosis
-Remote and minimally invasive surgery
-Crime prevention

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The pathway in International Financial Law is a widely respected specialist LLM with an international reputation. It focuses on the law, documentation and legal issues affecting major transactions in global financial markets and their regulation. Read more

The pathway in International Financial Law is a widely respected specialist LLM with an international reputation. It focuses on the law, documentation and legal issues affecting major transactions in global financial markets and their regulation. It benefits from an unrivalled London location, and is taught by a practitioner-led faculty providing cutting edge teaching expertise in the field.

Key benefits

  • Reputed teaching team made up of senior academics with a strong practitioner background, giving the specialist LLM its strength and credibility.
  • Wide-ranging selection of modules, many unique in this area, covering fields which are major practice areas in global and regional law firms in major financial centres and with investment banks.
  • Opportunities to listen to and meet with a range of guest speakers, including partners from global law firms.

Description

The International Financial Law LLM focuses on the law, documentation and legal issues affecting major transactions in global financial markets (International loans and Bonds, International Project Finance, Derivatives and Securitisations), corporate mergers and acquisitions and their regulations under key legal regimes (EU, US and the UK), as well as international investment.

It will give you an in-depth understanding of many of the cutting edge transactions in this field (eg credit derivative structures and synthetic securitisations) as well as the volume of anticipated regulatory law now being enacted both in the EU and in the US in response to the financial market crisis of 2008. It will also cover allied legal disciplines strongly related to these topics such as Comparative Corporate Insolvency.

The LLM is strongly oriented towards a problem-solving approach, both as to legal rules and their practical use. It consequently has a clear practice orientation, but also employs critical analysis of the law and its development to the issues of the global financial market.

The leader of this pathway is Professor Ravi Tennekoon.

Course purpose

The LLM in International Financial Law consists of a strongly practice-oriented set of modules providing you with both the necessary legal knowledge and practical orientation necessary to practice in this field. While providing and expecting the highest level of academic rigour many of the modules will seek to train you to problem-solve and advise as practitioners in the global law firms or as investment banking counsel. The teaching in this area will be strongly international in outlook, in addition to being practice-oriented and intellectually challenging.

Aimed at recent law graduates (or graduates of joint degrees with a substantial legal content) as well as established legal or other professionals who may have graduated a number of years ago, the programme is rigorous and demanding.

Course format and assessment

In the first and second semester you study your selection of taught modules (half and full). These are in most cases assessed in the third semester (May/June) by written examination, or in some cases by the submission of an assessed essay. 

Dissertation or research essays must be submitted in September, after the May/June examinations.

Career prospects

In a competitive world we can give you the competitive edge to take your career to the next level. That's why you'll find our LLM course is supplemented by opportunities to develop your skills and professional networks. 

The result is that students are presented with a wide range of employment destinations when they leave; from positions with global law firms located in London and other major financial centres and positions as in-house legal counsel with investment banks as well as positions at the European Central Bank, European Commission and UN. 

Sign up for more information. Email now

Have a question about applying to King’s? Email now



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Recent political shifts in Muslim majority countries have put Muslim minorities in the spotlight and impacted upon their relationship with their host societies. Read more
Recent political shifts in Muslim majority countries have put Muslim minorities in the spotlight and impacted upon their relationship with their host societies.

This new programme gives you an opportunity to consider Muslim minority communities comparatively, within both western and non-western contexts. You will explore key themes such as ethnicity, gender, and the varieties of religious interpretations and practices that have resulted in issues and challenges arising uniquely within different Muslim minority communities. The programme is highly interdisciplinary and offers a flexible combination of module choices including for example, law, history, international relations, and diplomacy.

You will acquire skills necessary to work in a wide range of professions that require an understanding of inter-cultural relations and policy-making at both local and national levels. You will also gain the expertise to evaluate materials from different sources such as the media, government reports and legal documents as well as academic research.

The programme is offered by the Department of Religions and Philosophies http://www.soas.ac.uk/religions-and-philosophies/ and delivered by the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy (CISD) http://www.soas.ac.uk/cisd/

Structure

Students take four modules (comprising one core and three elective) over two years and write a dissertation

Core modules:

‌•Muslim Minorities in a Global Context
‌•Dissertation

Optional modules:

‌•Introduction to Islam
‌•Muslim Minorities and the State: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives
‌•Islamic Law in a Global Context
‌•Religions and Development
‌•The Art of Negotiation
‌•Global Public Policy
‌•International Security
‌•Global Diplomacy: Citizenship and Advocacy
‌•Strategic Studies
‌•Political Islam in South Asia
‌•Contemporary India, State, Society and Politics

Disclaimer

Important notice regarding changes to programmes and modules http://www.soas.ac.uk/infocomp/programme-disclaimer/

Teaching and Learning

Teaching & Learning
Virtual Learning Environment (VLE)

This programme is taught 100% online through our VLE. In the VLE you will have access to learning materials and course resources anytime so you can fit your studies around your existing commitments. For each module, students will be provided with access, through both the SOAS Library and the University of London’s Online Library, to all necessary materials from a range of appropriate sources.

A key component of the student experience will be peer to peer learning, with students enrolled in discussion forums.

Assessment

Each module is assessed by five written online assessments (‘etivities’*) comprising 30% and one 5,000 word essay comprising 70% of the module mark. The etivities provide formative and summative feedback to students as a means of monitoring their progress and encouraging areas in which they can improve.

Dissertation

The Dissertation is assessed by the submission of a written dissertation of not more than 15,000 words, excluding the bibliography and appendices, which will account for 85% of the mark awarded for the module. The remaining 15% of the module mark will be based on the mark obtained for a 1,500 word research proposal.

* An 'e-tivity' is a framework for online, active and interactive learning following a format that states clearly to the students its 'Purpose'; the 'Task' at hand; the contribution or 'Response' type; and the 'Outcome' (Salmon, G. (2002) E-tivities: The Key to Active Online Learning, New York and London: Routledge Falmer.)

How to Apply

You can apply using our online application form http://www.cefims.ac.uk/forms/appform/cisd_appform.shtml

If you have any questions please use our online enquiry form.

The deadlines for applications are as follows:

31 March 2016 for a 20 April 2016 start
Your completed application will be reviewed by a member of academic staff. If your application is successful, we will send you an official offer within ten working days and you will be asked to submit the relevant supporting documentation. Once in receipt of our offer, we
recommend submitting your documents immediately.

Supporting documentation for applications - please view website http://www.soas.ac.uk/cisd/programmes/ma-muslim-minorities-in-a-global-context-online/

Email:

Phone: +44 (0)20 7898 4050

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Our MA in Culture Industry will allow you to explore the interface between contemporary economics and culture, from the scale of a start-up or artwork to that of governmental policy, a city, or the global marketplace. Read more

Our MA in Culture Industry will allow you to explore the interface between contemporary economics and culture, from the scale of a start-up or artwork to that of governmental policy, a city, or the global marketplace. It will also provide the approaches in critical and theoretical analysis that will enable you to conduct further academic research in areas ranging from art history to urban studies and critical theory.

Taking full advantage of the UK’s leading role in the creative industries, and London’s status as a world city, this course creates opportunities for you to:

  • make projects
  • go on field trips
  • do placements
  • carry out academic learning and research
  • meet leading creative practitioners and theorists

This will give you first-hand experience of the fast moving creative economy, as well as giving you indispensable skills in understanding that economy from a cultural, philosophical and political standpoint.

Engage with the cultural sector

Within the accelerated climate of digital networks and globalisation, the forms and behaviour of culture are mutating, converting the workshop into the handheld device and the cinema and gallery into the bedroom. This course is aimed at creative practitioners, entrepreneurs and theorists wanting to experiment with these changes, and set them into a historically and discursively rich framework.

Through participant observation, critical theory, and playful experiment, the course will not just prepare you for a career in the cultural sector, but help you to engage with it imaginatively, critically and tactically.

Placements

Placements are student-led and supported by the research and organisational network of the course leaders. Students on the MA in Culture Industry have undertaken placements at the BBC, Stephen Graham Gallery, White Cube gallerySHAPE ArtsChinatown Oral History ProjectMaximum Rock n Roll, the British CouncilBlack Dog PublishingResonance FMGlasgow BiennaleLondon Architecture WeekGlastonbury FestivalLondon Film Festival, the British MuseumSouth Bank CentreGrizedale Arts, the Japan Foundation, the London Anime and Gaming Con, and Sound and Music.

Students' projects

Our students’ projects are very diverse, and have included exhibitions, publications, websites, photographic projects, market stalls, travel guides, films, novels, app prototypes, ethnographies, and community resource projects.

Modules & structure

Core modules

Recommended option modules

You take option modules to the value of 30 credits. This could include:

Assessment

Essays; project report and documentation/placement report and documentation; research lab participation.

Download the programme specification. If you would like an earlier version of the programme specification, please contact the Quality Office.

Please note that due to staff research commitments not all of these modules may be available every year.



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The . MSc in International Business.  is an official one-year programme taught in English. Its aim is to train specialists in global business management and covers the fields of finance and accounting, marketing, operations, human resources and strategic management. Read more

The MSc in International Business is an official one-year programme taught in English. Its aim is to train specialists in global business management and covers the fields of finance and accounting, marketing, operations, human resources and strategic management.

Globalization of the economy is a tangible reality nowadays. Hence the need for companies to develop a strategy for internationalization in order to safeguard their competitiveness in global environments. In this sense the MSc in International Business arises from the need to train future managers in worldwide companies operating at an international level.

This programme contributes in a decisive way to a wider specialization for graduates in International Business, Management and Business Administration, and such like, who have acquired a more generalized training during their studies. The skills that students develop with this Master’s Degree are substantially those of an advanced post-graduate level. This training is complemented by applying these skills to the analysis and resolution of practical cases which might arise during their professional activity. The studies focus on a participatory methodology which addresses different situations that are at all times applicable to the reality of the company.

Once the programme is achieved the student will reach an academic level that will allow him or her a solid placement in their specific fields as general manager, marketing manager, operations manager, human resources manager or managing director in an international corporation.

Erasmus+ Exchange

The programme offers the chance to do an Erasmus+ Exchange during the second semester. Current opportunities include 3 Erasmus agreements at world-class universities:

·        Copenhagen Business School

·        University of Amsterdam

·        Goethe University Frankfurt

*Keep in mind that international applicants interested in an Erasmus Exchange must apply before May 31stand provide all the required documentation before July 10th in order to formalize the enrolment during July.

Programme Content

The MSc in International Business offers students advanced knowledge of basic aspects on how to manage an international company.

The programme consists of 60 credits given throughout two semesters (an academic term), namely: 32.5 credits in compulsory subjects, 17.5 optional credits and 10 End-of-Term project credits. All compulsory-subject credits are given taking into account their core curriculum during the first semester. The optional courses are focused on specialization according to student’s own interests, and take place during the second semester, including the Master’s End-of-Term project.

FIRST SEMESTER

Core Subjects (30 credits)

– International Strategy

– Global Supply Chain Management

– Multinational Accounting

– Multinational Financial Management

– Global Marketing

– International Human Resource Management

– Legal Aspects of Global Business

SECOND SEMESTER

– Research Methods for International Business (2.5 credits)

Elective Subjects (17.5 credits)

Master Thesis (10 credits)

Course Fees

Tuition fees for graduate programmes are set annually by the Government of Catalonia and the University of Barcelona and there are different rates for EU and non-EU students. Please note that the tuition fees for the academic year 2018-2019 have not yet been set. Students with a degree awarded outside Spain should pay €218.15 when they apply for admission.



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