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Masters Degrees (Documentary Making)

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This is an exciting and dynamic time for documentary practice; in recent years there has been a renaissance in documentary, seeing huge developments in both technology and form. Read more
This is an exciting and dynamic time for documentary practice; in recent years there has been a renaissance in documentary, seeing huge developments in both technology and form. Documentary stories are now being told via telecommunications, in cinemas, on TV, and online.

In this contemporary course you will be provided tuition in the technological, ethical and intellectual developments in this recent boom in theatrical, broadcast and cross platform documentary. You will be taught by award winning documentary filmmakers and high profile TV, film and cross platform commissioners. Tutors Marc Isaacs , Helen Littleboy and Victoria Mapplebeck, are all active filmmakers with excellent industry contacts and through collaborating with them on work in progress you will gain a unique learning opportunity that will provide genuine vocational experience. We also welcome regular guest lecturers, giving students a direct link to industry professionals and the opportunity to learn from their substantial experience and expertise.

On graduating, our students are skilled in creative and professional documentary practice. We have one of the highest employability rates amongst UK Universities and our graduates have gone on to become award-winning filmmakers and journalists.

This is a split campus course, taught in both Egham and Bedford Square in central London.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/mediaarts/coursefinder/madocumentarybypractice.aspx

Why choose this course?

- We have had regular lectures from award winning filmmaker Marc Isaacs, Channel 4 commissioner Kate Vogel and Emily Renshaw Smith, commissioner of Current TV. Forthcoming guest lectures include BBC Director Adam Curtis, feature director Chris Waitts and Matt Locke, Commissioning Editor for New Media and Education at Channel 4.

- Guest commissioners provide students with knowledge of and links to current commissioning strategies. Several of our invited commissioners have subsequently worked with our students on developing their projects.

- You will have exclusive 24-7 access to six purpose-built editing rooms equipped with Final Cut Studio 2 on Mac Pro editing systems. Our Location Store provides an equipment loan and advisory support service with a lending stock that includes twenty Sony HVR-V1E cameras, twenty Sennheiser radio microphone kits and a selection of professional quality sound recording and lighting equipment.

- With access to the latest digital recording and editing equipment, and covering areas from authorship to authenticity, this course offers you an in-depth study of creative production, taking you from conception through commissioning to research, composition and exhibition.

- You will be provided with excellent tuition in self-shooting documentary filmmaking techniques. You will be able to meet the growing demand for self-shooting directors and producers in both the independent and commercial documentary industries.

Department research and industry highlights

- TRENT is an exciting and innovative collaborative project between the British Universities Film and Video Council (BUFVC) and Royal Holloway, University of London (RHUL) and funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC). Led by John Ellis the project brings together the nine existing online databases hosted and curated by the BUFVC which provide important film, radio and television material along with accompanying metadata and contextual information for academics, students, teachers and researchers. This project brings together all the material contained in these databases, yet Trent is not simply a master database. Instead it foregrounds creative searching through a common interactive interface using real-time ‘intelligent’ filtering to bringing disparate databases into a single search and discovery environment whilst maintaining the integrity and individual provenance of each.

- The EUscreen project is major funded EU project which aims to digitise and provide access to European’s audio-visual heritage. This innovative and ambitious three year project began in October 2009 and the project consortium is made up of 28 partners from 19 European countries and is a best practice network within the eContentplus programme of the European Commission. The Department of Media Arts at Royal Holloway’s is responsible for the content selection policy for EUscreen and those involved include John Ellis, Rob Turnock and Sian Barber.

- Video Active is a major EU-funded project aiming to create access to digitised television programme content from archives around Europe. It involves collaboration between the Department of Media Arts at Royal Holloway and Utrecht University, and eleven European archives including the BBC, to provide access to content and supporting contextual materials via a specially designed web portal. The team from the Department of Media Arts, who are John Ellis, Cathy Johnson and Rob Turnock, are responsible for developing content selection strategy and policy for the project.

- Migrant and Diasporic Cinema in Contemporary Europe is an AHRC-funded international Research Network, led by Daniela Berghahn, which brings together researchers from ten UK and European universities, filmmakers, policy makers and representatives from the cultural sector. The Research Network explores how the films of migrant and diasporic filmmakers have redefined our understanding of European identity as constructed and narrated in European cinema. The project seeks to identify the numerous ways in which multi-cultural and multi-ethnic presences and themes have revitalised contemporary European cinema by introducing an eclectic mix of non-Western traditions and new genres.

- Lina Khatib was awarded an AHRC Research Leave Grant to complete a book on the representation of Lebanese politics and society in Lebanese cinema over the last thirty years. The study focuses on cinema’s relationship with national identity in the context of the Civil War and the post-war period in Lebanon.

- Gideon Koppel was awarded an AHRC Research Leave Grant to complete his feature-length documentary portrait of a rural community in Wales, The Library Van, which has been partly funded by the Arts Council of Wales.

Course content and structure

You will study three core units during the year.

Core course units:
- From Idea to Screen
From Idea to Screen introduces the practice of documentary film making - exploring eclectic notions of the genre, from the conventional to those more associated with fine art. The course tutors also use their own work which is deconstructed across all its constituent parts idea, conception, pre-production planning, and research, shooting and post-production. Ideas to Screen will explore ways of translating observations and ideas into imagery – both visual and aural. There will be an emphasis on experimental forms of narrative – at time crossing the boundaries between fine art and documentary. For the final and assessed project in this unit, each student will be asked make a video ‘portrait’ of a character.

- Foundations of Production
Contemporary documentary production requires managerial and business skills as well as creative ones. This unit will instruct you in the industrial skills required for the production of video, television and multimedia documentary. These include researching the market, writing proposals, acquiring funding for development and production, drafting contracts, drawing up budgets, copyright clearance, and marketing.

- Major Documentary Production – Dissertation
Developing out of study, research and practice from previous units, you will direct and produce a substantial documentary production. This is the largest assignment in the course and is appropriately weighted. The unit is tutorial based.

On completion of the course graduates will have:

- gained invaluable experience of both authored and commercial documentary production

- the ability to develop their own ideas, preparing them for the documentary industry but also finding ways to reinvent it

- an understanding of documentary film genre and its changing boundaries as well as the changing technologies and their impact on the genre

- an advanced understanding of the processes of making a documentary film from initial concept to final form and the various stages of production.

- an awareness of the institutions and mechanisms of the UK film and television industry

- a critical knowledge of the current and changing platforms for documentary film, from cinema to television and the internet.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including project work, photo essays and written production papers.

Employability & career opportunities

On graduating, our students will be skilled in creative and professional documentary practice. We have one of the highest employability rates amongst UK Universities and our graduates have become award-winning filmmakers and BBC journalists; recently one of our alumni Charlotte Cook was appointed Strand Co -Coordinator of BBC’s prestigious Documentary Strand Storyville.

Our graduate students have won and been nominated for many awards including, The One World Broadcasting Trust Award and The Jerwood First Cuts Documentary. In 2009 two of our students, Aashish Gadhvi and Michael Watts won the One World Student Documentary Fund which funds challenging international documentary projects.

Syed Atef Amjad Ali has recently had his film The Red Mosque previewed at The Amsterdam International Documentary Festival. The Red Mosque was made with production funds Syed received from The Jan Virijman Fund and also from the One World-Broadcasting Award.

Chung Yee Yu has won the Cinematography Award at Next Frame (A Touring Festival of International Student Film and Video) Chung Yee Yu has also won the Silver Award of Open Category of IFVA (The Hong Kong Independent Short Film & Video Awards)

Recent graduate Suzanne Cohen has just has her work selected for the BBC’s Film Network website; an interactive showcase for ‘new British filmmakers, screening three new short films in broadband quality every week, adding to a growing catalogue of great shorts’.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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As part of this course you will produce a major, practical documentary project informed by contemporary debates and historical perspectives, having gained the practical skills via a firm grounding in digital video production and exploring photography and multimedia using industry-standard equipment. Read more
As part of this course you will produce a major, practical documentary project informed by contemporary debates and historical perspectives, having gained the practical skills via a firm grounding in digital video production and exploring photography and multimedia using industry-standard equipment.

You will cover all stages of documentary production - from initial proposal to final edit, learning how to research and write a documentary, and create and edit film.

Choose from video, photography and multimedia technologies, discovering new and unique features of each medium. Underpinning the strong practical element are the political, legal, moral and ethical issues informing contemporary production and exhibition.

Intermediate qualifications available:

• Postgraduate certificate – 60 credits at Masters level
• Postgraduate diploma – 120 credits at Masters level

Visit the website: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/courses/postgraduate/next-year/documentary

Course detail

• Study an intensive specialist course in creative documentary, focused on practice informed by ideas, with access to state-of-the-art documentary film-making equipment and excellent links with industry professionals
• Explore a unique opportunity to study documentary practices in moving image, photographic and journalistic forms with opportunities to attend documentary festivals in the UK and mainland Europe
• Develop specialist knowledge of specific areas of the media and use the opportunities presented by your project work to enter competitions and make industry contacts
• Gain a qualification valuable to anyone seeking employment in the rapidly changing field of media: with the knowledge and skills to pitch ideas, write proposals, identify sources of funding and find appropriate avenues of distribution and exhibition of your work
• Benefit from a degree that prepares you for roles such as documentary producer, researcher or director, or qualifies you to continue to MPhil and PhD research degrees

Modules

• Documentary Practice
• Stills and Movies
• Production Research
• Practical Post Production and Digital Effects
• Documentary Project A
• Documentary Project B

Assessment

Assessment is an integral part of your learning. Your assessments will follow the pattern of teaching and learning.

As you complete each stage of your production we will give you feedback and give you advice on how to further develop and improve your work so that you can take it to the next stage. We will assess both the processes you use to produce work and the quality of the final production.

The media industry expects high quality work completed to absolutely fixed distribution deadlines. We will reflect this in our assessment of your work.

Careers

MA Documentary provides the opportunity for the committed student to engage with a range of industry relevant events, this includes professional practice seminars, developing documentary ideas into workable projects and visits to international festivals such as IDFA, British Shorts Berlin and Sheffield International documentary festival.

Funding

For information on available funding, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/money/scholarships/pg

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/course/applicationform

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Communication, Media Practice and Public Relations at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Communication, Media Practice and Public Relations at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in Communication, Media Practice and Public Relations (PR) is designed for students who want to focus their energy on the dynamic world of social media, develop their creative practice and professional writing skills or are looking to work in an entrepreneurial environment.

Key Features of Communication, Media Practice and Public Relations (PR)

The MA in Communication, Media Practice and Public Relations (PR) offers syllabus-based practice in professional, contemporary media skills, taught by industry professionals with academic backgrounds. The Communication, Media Practice and Public Relations (PR) programme includes modules in Professional Writing/Journalism, Visual Communications and Media Design, Video and Documentary Making and Public Relations (PR), Branding and Promotion. Other modules in communication, theory, film and history are also available.

The Communication, Media Practice and Public Relations (PR) programme allows graduates to add valuable and desirable professional media skills for careers in business, journalism, public and media relations, broadcasting, advertising and marketing and industry professionals to acquire new media skills and qualifications that will enhance their continuing professional development.

The full-time MA in Communication, Media Practice and Public Relations (PR) course is split across the year with three modules offered in each academic semester (a total of six modules in part one) and then a dissertation or professional media practice project over the summer (part two).

The part two component allows students in the Communication, Media Practice and Public Relations (PR) programme to either write a 16,000 word dissertation or undertake the professional media project which incorporates the practical elements of the course and a short unpaid work placement.

MA in Communication, Media Practice and Public Relations (PR) Aims

To research and develop stories in an online, multi-media environment.

To present the principles, theories and techniques surrounding video making.

To develop practical skills and conceptual knowledge of digital publishing, visual communication and media design.

To provide a critical overview of the role of public relations (PR) and promotional practice.

To develop writing skills in a wide range of genres.

Modules

Modules on the MA in in Communication, Media Practice and Public Relations (PR) typically include:

• Visual Communication and Media Design

• Video and Documentary Making

• Public Relations (PR), Branding and Promotion

• Reporting Terrorism

• Global Media

• Risk Reporting

• The Business and Politics of Digital Media

• Development Communications

• Online Journalism

• The Digital Edge

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for Communication, Media Practice and Public Relations (PR) graduates. Media Companies, non-profit organisations, global business, government and the public sector value the fact that our Communication, Media Practice and Public Relations (PR) Graduates have developed a range of critical and theoretical abilities and a creative and innovative approach to media practice. Our Graduates go on to work in business, marketing and Public Relations (PR), journalism, broadcasting, web-design, advertising, publicity, arts and cultural bodies.



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The Centre for Broadcasting and Journalism (CBJ) at Nottingham Trent University has been training aspiring journalists for 20 years. Read more
The Centre for Broadcasting and Journalism (CBJ) at Nottingham Trent University has been training aspiring journalists for 20 years. We provide specialist training to equip students with the well rounded skills required within this industry.

Why choose this course?

This MA will prepare you to research and produce long-form journalism for online, radio and television. It includes all the steps of the process from research and production across multiplatforms, to making a pitch, the commissioning process, costing and budgets.

The course takes a multiplatform approach to documentary making, developing in-depth research methods and story-telling, along with practical skills in writing broadcasting, online and visual journalism.

You'll be taught by our team of experienced media professionals as well as visiting journalists with a proven track record of making documentaries across all platforms.

As part of the course you'll form a production company and be guided through the commercial process of documentary making.

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A dynamic and practical documentary programme to develop your creative storytelling and multi-media production skills. The programme will include lectures, workshops and opportunities to learn from professional media experts. Read more
A dynamic and practical documentary programme to develop your creative storytelling and multi-media production skills. The programme will include lectures, workshops and opportunities to learn from professional media experts. You will also be encouraged to forge contacts with media companies and undertake a professional placement to enhance your employability in this creative sector

-Explore practical documentary making on a variety of media platforms
-Work with award-winning documentary makers and experienced journalists
-Study in the £38 million Redmonds Building and enjoy full access to Liverpool Screen School's state-of-the-art facilities
-Undertake a placement with a professional media company

This new practice-led masters degree focuses on documentary making on a variety of platforms, enabling you to develop the core skills required to become a successful documentary maker.
​Through the exploration of practical camerawork skills, including sound recording, editing and interviewing, you will become confident in your craft, while the journalism modules will develop your skills in storytelling, interviewing and the various journalistic principles.

You will also study and understand the laws which impact responsible journalism, including the latest media law and ethics.

​The degree is taught by two departments in Liverpool Screen School; Media Production runs a popular and highly successful undergraduate degree which develops students to become confident and independent media developers. The Journalism department has offered undergraduate and postgraduate degrees for many years and continues to produce well-skilled graduates ready for the workplace. The collaborative nature of this degree means you will receive the best learning support, access to the latest techniques, academic research and opportunities to engage with key external partners.

What you will study on this degree

Please see guidance below on core modules for further information on what you will study.

-Practical craft skills in camerawork, sound recording and editing
-Core journalism skills including storytelling, interview technique, media law and ethics
-Core documentary production skills
-Interactive story-telling
-Tools for interactive documentary-making

Further guidance on modules

The information listed in the section entitled 'What you will study' is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change. Students will be required to undertake modules that the University designates as core and will have a choice of designated option modules. Additionally, option modules may be offered subject to meeting minimum student numbers.

Academic Framework reviews are conducted by LJMU from time to time to ensure that academic standards continue to be maintained.

Please email if you require further guidance or clarification.

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Direct and produce your own film. Learn from experienced tutors who've screened work for the BBC and Channel 4. Find out how to pitch and compete for commissions. Read more

Introduction

Direct and produce your own film. Learn from experienced tutors who've screened work for the BBC and Channel 4. Find out how to pitch and compete for commissions. With MA Documentary graduates who've achieved distinction in leading industry awards and screenings, this course gives you the chance to become another of the celebrated faces behind the camera.

Content

Get to grips with the entire documentary film making process on this comprehensive course which blends theory with practical experience.

London College of Communication’s MA Documentary Film course leads on exploring the full range of documentary genre and modes of production that have brought about recent innovation. The digital revolution means new ways of directing, producing, and showing documentary films in the broadcast, independent and web 2.0 media. You will learn the entire process, taking the roles of Producer, Director, Camera Operator, Sound-Recordist and Editor.

You can expect to be grounded in documentary direction, camerawork and editing - the key artistic and technical skills for a successful production team. Each year students take their work from LCC onto the competitive British and international documentary filmmaking circuit. You will enhance your career prospects through the valuable skills, vision and opportunities that this postgraduate course provides, including guidance on pitching for funding and commissions.

Structure

Phase 1

1.1 Documentary: process and practice
1.2 Documentary: history and theory

Phase 2

2.1 Documentary Practices: taster tape and pitch and critical context
2.2 Documentary: ethics and methodologies

Phase 3

3.0 Major Project

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This unique MA programme is based in a university but run by leading film practitioners, ensuring that you not only receive the highest-quality practice-based learning, but you do so in a university research environment where you learn to understand the world we live in. Read more
This unique MA programme is based in a university but run by leading film practitioners, ensuring that you not only receive the highest-quality practice-based learning, but you do so in a university research environment where you learn to understand the world we live in.

Degree information

Students will learn to devise a visual research project; to apply anthropological and social science approaches to documentary film work; to think critically about the relationship between form and content in ethnographic/documentary practice; to master the technical skills needed to produce different kinds of films of different lengths for varied audiences; and to critically view and review film material.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of 1/2 core module(s) (45/60 credits), 2/3 optional /elective modules (30/45 credits) and a project/diary (90 credits).

Core modules
-Practical Ethnographic and Documentary Filming and Editing
-Students without a social science background at either undergraduate or Master's level also take Social Anthropology or another social science foundational module in Term One as agreed with the tutor.

Optional modules - students choose two of the following:
-Anthropology and Photography
-Documentary Film and the Ethnographic Eye
-The Story and I - Finding the Form and/or Time and the Staged Index
-One of the practical film-related options offered as part of Film Studies MA according to provision.
-One of the film history modules taught in the School of Slavonic & East European Studies (SSEES), or Departments of History or English, (for example, Russian Cinema in SSEES), details to be confirmed.
-An Anthropology or other social science module from the Faculties of Social & Historical Sciences, or Arts & Humanities.
-An Anthropology or other social science module from the Faculties of Social & Historical Sciences, or Arts & Humanities.

Dissertation/report
A major practical film project and diary allowing the students to demonstrate their mastery of the skills of documentary film-making in a film of 20–35 minutes.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of practical tutorials, seminars and masterclasses and assessed by camera and editing exercises and a written piece.

Placement
We facilitate two types of placements. Firstly, we will enable short-term internships at the film companies with whom we already have relationships through Open City Docs. Secondly, we will offer all our students the opportunity to work on the collaborative film-making projects linked to MyStreet Films, such as the Doc in a Day workshops that have proved so successful.

Careers

The programme equips students for careers in:
-Mass media including broadcast, cinematic and web-based moving image.
-Film and TV industry as camera operators, producers, directors, editors, researchers.
-Academia – ethnographic research, visual media and culture.
-Marketing and research.
-Communication and other media.
-Archives, as well as cultural heritage organisations.

Employability
The increasing demand for social and scientifically trained moving image specialists in the years ahead will continue, if not accelerate. Many of the graduates of our existing programmes now work in organisations such as Ipsos Mori film unit, BBC World Service and BBC Education.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This MA will allow you to benefit from UCL’s unique position in the heart of London, and from the many activities in film within the Department of Anthropology. The programme is unique in using professional film-makers to teach within a truly pan-disciplinary university research environment.

UCL now houses London’s Global Documentary Film Festival, Open City Docs Fest, created by Professor Michael Stewart. You can participate in the curation and delivery of this festival; gain experience in the delivery of a major public arts event; and benefit from established partnerships with world-famous institutions such as the the Science Museum and the British Film Institute.

This degree will from 2017 provide three strands: the existing non-fiction cinema and reportage based documentary will be joined by a 'Future Docs' strand (including VR and interactive documentary production).

Other admission requirements

Applicants with prior technical knowledge of film making are asked to send a video portfolio of up to 20’ duration (Vimeo link recommended). Applicants without a video portfolio are asked to complete a photo essay. Please see our guidelines on how to make a visual essay. You can submit either by post - a maximum of twenty 20cm x 25cm (8'x10”) stills – or by link to an external site.

All shortlisted applicants will be asked to submit a proposal for a film or video project - to consist of no more than four sides of A4, typed and double-spaced. This should include: an outline of what the film is about; the characters and other elements crucial to the narrative and the film structure/narrative. (You are not committed to the proposal for the final project.)

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This MA is for you if you have a passion for news, current affairs, documentary or any aspect of factual programme-making. It offers a practical training in, and critical engagement with, journalism and documentary-making. Read more
This MA is for you if you have a passion for news, current affairs, documentary or any aspect of factual programme-making. It offers a practical training in, and critical engagement with, journalism and documentary-making.

You’ll learn how to:
-Research, write, subedit and design for print and digital media
-Contextualise journalistic and documentary practice within a theoretical framework of journalism and documentary studies
-Understand how the news media is undergoing rapid and far-reaching change

How will I study?
You’ll learn through core practice and theory modules and options in the autumn and spring terms.

In the summer, you develop a research project that can take the form of a conventional dissertation, a journalism project or a documentary.

Assessment is by:
-Practical video/media work and supporting production documentation
-Term papers and critiques
-Portfolios of journalism accompanied by critical reflections

The final assessment may take the form of a 15,000-word dissertation, a 20-minute documentary or a portfolio of journalism and critical work.

Scholarships
Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course.
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Faculty
Our faculty work in journalism and documentary across a range of platforms and conduct internationally recognised research in these fields.

Faculty projects have been broadcast on the BBC and Channel Four and shown in high profiles venues such as:
-The BFI Southbank
-Jeu de Paume
-Brighton Festival

Elements of our degrees are taught by experienced journalists at Brighton Journalist Works.

Careers
This course equips you with the skills for a career in:
-Broadcast and online journalism
-Documentary production
-Television production and research
-The wider media and communications industry
-Teaching and academic research

The sessions by industry professionals and distinguished alumni such as Gerry Rothwell, Kim Longinotto, Penny Woolcock, Peter Beard and Marc Isaacs enable you to make links with potential employers and give you insights and advice on working in the media professions.

Employers of our graduates include:
-The BBC
-ITN News
-Al Jazeera
-Century Films
-Ricochet
-Back2Back Productions
-Brighton.tv
-EDF Energy
-BP
-Vodafone
-A variety of universities and research centres

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The MA in Digital Media is unique in its combination of practical and theoretical approaches to contemporary media and technology- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-digital-media-technology-cultural-form/. Read more
The MA in Digital Media is unique in its combination of practical and theoretical approaches to contemporary media and technology- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-digital-media-technology-cultural-form/

The established and exciting degree is designed to help you understand digital transformations in media, culture and society and apply this understanding in practice, in the media and creative industries and in further research. You will be equipped with skills that can be applied to current and future developments in digital media, social media, computing and other aspects of technology.

The MA in Digital Media educates aspiring media practitioners and academics as well as early and mid-career professionals who seek to reflect on their roles in a structured and stimulating learning environment designed to give all students up-to-the-minute knowledge of digital media and the skills to apply that knowledge to future developments.

The MA offers two pathways:

-Pathway 1 is a theory programme where you learn about developments in digital media and technology from a wide range of perspectives

-Pathway 2 is a theory and practice programme where you improve your skills, understanding and experience in one of the following areas:

Documentary
Image making
Journalism
Writing

Acclaimed academics and practitioners

Benefit from the experience and expertise of one of the world’s leading media and communications departments. You'll be taught by theorists and practitioners of international standing: Sarah Kember, Joanna Zylinska, Graham Young, Tony Dowmunt, Angela Phillips, Julian Henriques and David Morley.

Work placements and internships

The MA in Digital Media regularly attracts offers of work placements and internships. Recently these have come from Google, The Science Museum and N1creative.com.

Facilities

Our students have access to state-of-the-art facilities including well-equipped lecture and seminar rooms, exhibition spaces, computer facilities and digital media suites.

The department is also currently host to the renowned philosopher of media and technology, Bernard Stiegler and students will have access to his modulein Media Philosophy as well as priority access to the innovative and popular option After New Media. Designed to complement the MA in Digital Media, this course provides a framework for thinking about the current media environment as well as future forms of human and computer interaction.

An established record

The MA in Digital Media has been redefining media theory and practice since 2004. Our students become proficient in:

the history, sociology and philosophy of digital media
the application of critical conceptual skills to specialist areas and future forms of media
multimedia skills in image making (photography, video, animation, graphic art) script writing, journalism and documentary
MA Digital Media students have access the pioneering option ‘After New Media’, a non-assessed online module which explores the themes of self mediation, ethical mediation and intelligent mediation, and develops a framework for thinking about 'life' after new media. As befits a course of this kind we will be combining media, and exploring their pedagogic potential – uniting digital-online technologies with more traditional teaching formats, such as reading groups, seminars and an end of year symposium.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Sarah Kember.

Modules & Structure

The programme consists of:

Two compulsory core modules
Pathway 1 - between two and four option modules (worth 60 credits) OR
Pathway 2 - a two-term practice block (worth 30 credits) and either one or two option modules (worth 30 credits)
The dissertation or the practice/theory project

Assessment

Seen take-home paper; essays; dissertation or practice/theory project and other production work in the area of documentary, image-making, journalism or fiction.

Programme overview

This is an exciting programme which offers a critical, contextual and practical approach to digital media and technology. It problematises approaches to the 'new' media in academic and professional debate, especially those which overemphasise the potential for radical social change led by a homogenised technology itself.

The programme is defined by its resistance to technological determinism and its insistence on the importance of addressing the social and historical contexts within which a range of media technologies are employed. In order to provide a contextual framework and facilitate the conceptualisation of digital media and technologies as fully cultural forms and processes, the programme will draw on a range of disciplines including: media and cultural studies, sociology, anthropology and philosophy. However, the programme will remain focused on key contemporary concerns about the potential role of digital media in society and on refiguring the contours of the 'new' media debate.

The programme offers two pathways. Pathway 1 addresses central theoretical and conceptual concerns relating to digital media. Pathway 2 combines theoretical analysis and practical work, offering students the opportunity to explore new media theories and concepts in practice. Pathway 2 is primarily aimed at students who already have some experience in one of the areas on offer: documentary; digital photography and image making; journalism; writing. It is meant to appeal to media industry professionals who are keen to reflect critically on their practice within a structured learning environment, graduates of practice-based courses but also those who have gained their practical experience in documentary; digital photography and image making; journalism or writing in informal settings.

Programme structure

The first compulsory core course is Digital Media - critical perspectives and this is taught in a small workshop format in the Autumn term. This course functions as a foundation for the second core course and offers students a map of the key debates in digital media. The course is taught in ten two hour workshop sessions and is supported by the provision of one-to-one tutorials.

The second compulsory core course is Technology and Cultural Form - debates, models, dialogues and this develops questions of technology, power, politics and subjectivity which were introduced in the first core course. The first part of this course highlights the key conceptual concerns of a contextualised approach to digital media plus the relevant debates and models formulated by key figures in the field. The second part of this course aims to generate a dialogue between theoreticians and practitioners around some of the most intellectually stimulating, contentious and contemporary ideas in the field without necessarily seeking a resolution. This course is taught in ten two hour workshop sessions during the Spring term and is supported by the weekly provision of one-to-one tutorials.

Students are required to take options from the lists provided by the Media and Communications, Anthropology, Comparative Literature and Sociology Departments as well as the Centre for Cultural Studies. Examples might include: After New Media, Nature and Culture, Cultural Theory, Globalisation, Risk and Control, Embodiment and Experience, Political Communications. Options are taught primarily through lectures and seminars and take place in the Autumn or Spring terms.

Each student's option profile is discussed with the programme convenor in order to ensure that the balance of subject-specific topics is appropriate for the individual concerned. Option courses are taught primarily through lectures, seminars and tutorials and take place in the Autumn or Spring terms.

All students are required to produce either a 12,000 word dissertation on a topic agreed by the student and supervisor or a practice/theory project in the area of documentary, photography and image making, journalism or fiction. The length of the practical element is dependent on the media and the form used and will be agreed in advance with the supervisor. It will, however, be comparable with practical projects undertaken in practice MA programmes in the relevant field. Students undertaking the practice/theory project will also be expected to submit a 3-4000 word analysis of their practice which locates it within the theoretical debates explored in the MA as a whole. This essay may be presented as a separate document or as an integral part of the project depending on the nature of the project and by a agreement with both theory and practice supervisors.

Programme outcomes

The programme's subject specific learning outcomes require students to analyse and contextualise developments in digital media and technology with reference to key debates in the history, sociology, anthropology and philosophy of the media. Students who opt for the practice/theory pathway will also be required to produce material of publishable or broadcast standard and to evaluate the ways in which theoretical and practical insights intersect. All students will develop a wide range of transferable qualities and skills necessary for employment in related or unrelated areas. These are described by the Quality Assurance Agency as: 'the exercise of initiative and personal responsibility, decision-making in complex and unpredictable situations, and the independent learning ability required for continuing professional development'.

By the end of the programme students will be able to:

-Map and critically evaluate key debates in the field of new media
-Analyse and contextualise current and future developments in digital media and technology
-Evaluate and articulate key historical, sociological, anthropological and philosophical approaches to the study of digital media and technology
-Demonstrate in-depth knowledge of at least four differing areas of inquiry
-Demonstrate an advanced level of conceptual knowledge and (where relevant) practical skill appropriate for a sustained piece of work in the field
-Prepare and deliver clearly argued and informed work
-Locate, retrieve and present relevant information for a specific project
-Manage a complex array of competing demands and work effectively to a deadline
-Work resourcefully and independently
-Think critically and/or work practically within a given context

Skills

We provide graduates with skills that are cutting edge: in the critical analysis and/or creative production of digital media; in the disciplinary knowledge and conceptual frameworks necessary for current and future forms of media and technology; in the awareness of how digital media and technologies are re-shaping society from the ways we communicate (through social media and web 2.0) to the increasingly ‘smart’ environments in which we live.

Careers

Our programme provides a theory and practice pathway and prepares students for work in the following areas:

-media and creative industries; advertising, marketing and PR (graduates of the MA Digital Media have found work with Virgin Media, Google, the BBC and other leading organisations worldwide)
-research and academia (graduates from this programme have gone on to study for PhD degrees in higher education institutions around the world and also here with us)
-media production and new media art (graduates have exhibited, published and produced work in photography, journalism, TV, documentary, film and multimedia)

Graduate Ekaterina discusses her career:

"I work for a company, called Visual DNA, which already sounds like life happening After New Media. The company is the largest data provider in Europe and is totally multinational. We actually try to analyse human visual DNA, you memories, feelings, thoughts about the future, anticipations, etc by creating personality quizzes where instead of verbal answers we tend to use images.

My role is as Creative Developer. It involves working with images from concept to finding/shooting and post-production. My qualifications perfectly matched what they’ve been looking for, Digital Media rocks!

My tip for the new-to-be-graduates is this: physically go to places and companies and talk to people. It really opens up loads of possibilities, and when I tell someone where I’ve graduated from they look impressed, and there is some sort of respect coming from them."

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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This programme takes a project-led, practice-based approach to studying for an MA in Film Directing (Documentary) which integrates practical film making with analysis of contemporary film practice. Read more

This programme takes a project-led, practice-based approach to studying for an MA in Film Directing (Documentary) which integrates practical film making with analysis of contemporary film practice. Students choose to make a creative documentary or a non -fiction film which defies genre definition and pushes the boundaries of narrative. We develop these through workshops and tutorials. Our students work within an integrated framework that helps them question the form of their films and enables them to find the right language for their storytelling.

The programme encourages ways of working as a film community that foster the important exchange of ideas, with inspiration from international visiting film makers through Scottish Documentary Institute and support from our team of documentary practicioners. All tutors are top professionals currently working within the industry as directors, producers, editors, cinematographers or sound designers. A newly built Avid edit teaching space, and a new screening space helps us encourage a fresh approach to emerging technologies.

Graduate films do well internationally regularly winning BAFTAs, RTS Awards and awards at international festivals. Over the last five years students have received an Oscar nomination for an MA film made here and an Oscar shortlist for a film made by a recent graduate. We work closely with the Scottish Documentary Institute, the University’s internationally-acclaimed research centre in documentary film making.

The aim of the Film Directing programmes at ECA is to:

  • challenge boundaries, encourage original thought, and develop intellectual and critical approaches to making films
  • combine the contemporary energy and discipline of current creative approaches to film practices with the professionalism of industry practices, in order to produce innovative and grounded work
  • facilitate the interrelationship between different cultural traditions, traditional and emerging screen technologies, and classical and non-traditional cinematic genres and conventions.
  • provide postgraduate education in film making that constitutes a clear progression from undergraduate education whilst maintaining distinctiveness from industrial training- that gives scope for taking risks
  • foster filmmakers able to work and compete internationally

Programme structure

This programme is project-led and delivered through workshops and regular individual tutorials. It integrates practical studio work with theoretical and written studies from the Screen cultures course (see separate description) which is run independently from the Film Department.

The first semester, Design Studio is organised round a series of micro-films which lead to a growing awareness of film language and enhancement of technical skills to creatively support filmic vision. Cinematography and sound workshops are delivered by visiting lecturers. Directorial voice is built up also through tutorials in which an idea for a graduating film is developed and evolved. Awareness of current international documentary practice is built through regular seminars and screenings, collaborations with Film Festivals such as Take One Action and also supported by Scottish Documentary Institute. This is also to inspire students to push boundaries in their approach to narrative structure and visual language and not to get locked in conventional approaches. We want to encourage bold work that takes risks. At the end of the first semester all students pitch their films using a trailer or short excerpt from their research material. They also develop a treatment with feedback from tutorials.

Semester two is spent preparing and shooting the graduate film and is backed up with edit tutorials as well as project support from weekly meetings with a tutor. Students also receive seminars in production process including contracts.

Semester three is when the film is edited and finished with input from group crits, tutorials. Students also attend or often volunteer with Edinburgh Film Festival and the Edinburgh Pitch in order to observe and engage with key players from the international documentary world through hearing feedback from commissioning editors.

Alongside the ECA learning structure, students also have a pool of potential collaborators from Screen Academy Napier including the possibility of working with cinematographers, editors and producers.

Career opportunities

Our students go on to a wide range of roles, including producer, director, writer, production or location manager, researcher, editor, assistant director, cinematographer, or journalist. Graduates have found work directing for the BBC and making work internationally for top broadcasters and film funds. Related fields include advertising, community films, academia or film development agencies.

Creative Skillset

MA/MFA Film Directing has been awarded the Creative Skillset Tick, the industry kitemark of quality, following a rigorous assessment process by experts working in the Creative Industries. The Creative Skillset Tick is awarded to practice-based courses which best prepare students for a career in the industry. Screen Academy Scotland is one of only 3 Screen Academies in the UK along with National Film School and London Film School.



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IN BRIEF. Work towards a fulfilling career in an exciting field with the potential for travel. Learn from respected filmmakers via a series of masterclasses. Read more

IN BRIEF:

  • Work towards a fulfilling career in an exciting field with the potential for travel
  • Learn from respected filmmakers via a series of masterclasses
  • Develop the creative and technical skills you will need to produce striking and informative wildlife documentaries
  • Skillset-accredited course
  • Based at MediaCityUK
  • Work/industrial placement opportunity
  • International students can apply

COURSE SUMMARY

On this course you will learn the research, scriptwriting and production skills that you will need to produce polished, professional wildlife documentaries.

As well as lectures and seminars, you will attend masterclasses given by expert practitioners with links to the television industry. Plus you will take field trips to a range of animal habitats, where you will work on individual and group projects.

During your time with us, you will learn specialist wildlife-production techniques, including long-lens and time-lapse photography and close-up sound recording. There is a strong emphasis on professional practice, and your projects will be expected to measure up to scientific scrutiny, as well as exhibition and broadcast standards.

Graduates’ final films have won many awards at national and international festivals.

TEACHING

The course will employ a range of teaching and learning strategies in order to meet learning outcomes. These will include:

  • Lectures
  • Seminars
  • Camera, sound and editing skills practice and assessment
  • Analysis of case studies
  • Student-led independent research
  • Student-led project work and field trips.

This strategy will be integrated with an assessment strategy based on outcomes, students' reflective self-assessments and learning plans. Assessment methods will include production exercises and portfolios, projects, critical essays and a dissertation project.

ASSESSMENT

Each module within the course uses and combines a number of different assessment criteria. The following styles are used within the course modules:

  • Reports
  • Presentations
  • Essay
  • Practical project
  • Research Portfolio

EMPLOYABILITY

The course is ideal for those wishing to pursue careers in all aspects of wildlife documentary production, including directing, producing, script-writing, photography, sound recording and editing. A number of graduates are now working within the TV industry both in the UK and abroad, including several independent companies and ITV, all within wildlife documentary.

The majority of past students have found jobs in the television industry. Examples include:

  • Graduates who are now producer/directors and making long-form documentaries for broadcast
  • Ex-students are working for the BBC Natural History Unit as researchers and assistant producers and editors
  • Ex-students are working for independent Wildlife Documentary Production Companies as cameramen and assistant producers
  • Ex-students are working for ITV, producing short films from their wildlife images catalogue
  • A student is working as an assistant cameraman for a leading wildlife independent company
  • One student is working as a producer for Portuguese TV
  • Other graduates have jobs as field assistants (currently working in the arctic on a major wildlife film), runners and film librarians
  • A student is making web-based programmes for Cornwall TV
  • All are connected with wildlife and nature film-making

LINKS WITH INDUSTRY

This course has a number of links with media companies throughout the UK including the BBC Natural History Unit in Bristol. The current external examiner for the course is the head of the BBC Natural History Unit, Andrew Jackson. Students have undertaken work experience both at the BBC, Warehouse51 Wildlife Production Company and [email protected], the post production company that works on a range of wildlife programmes for the BBC and Disney Nature. Both the course leader and the visiting fellow keep close links with companies within the TV sector, including Panasonic, Sony, Canon and Arriflex to ensure students are aware of latest technologies.



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This course will enable you to develop film production skills with both digital and analogue equipment, as well as knowledge of the theories of contemporary cinema. Read more

This course will enable you to develop film production skills with both digital and analogue equipment, as well as knowledge of the theories of contemporary cinema. The focus is placed firmly on developing clear and simple storytelling techniques that go beyond arbitrary formal categorisations of drama, documentary or genre. The course takes its inspiration from forms of cultural production that have challenged conformity, including the work of artists, musicians, painters and performers, and the movements of Italian neo-realism and the developing cinemas of Africa, Latin America, South Korea and Iran.

Key features

  • This course encourages you to synthesise your personal experience, critical knowledge and craft skills to express yourself through moving pictures.
  • Your studies will be split broadly into 75 per cent practice and 25 per cent theory.
  • As well as the personal tutor scheme, we also run a pioneering peer-mentoring scheme in which recent MA graduates provide one-to-one assistance in the use of equipment and software.
  • Staff on this course are practising filmmakers.
  • The course is informed by practice and research in black music and cinema, neo-realist cinema, experimental filmmaking, performance and dance, storytelling, participative documentary and ghetto cinema.

What will you study?

You will study the basic principles of filmmaking, develop an understanding of the nature and potential of visual storytelling, and discover the importance of sound, lighting and the screenplay. You will also gain a sound knowledge of theories and ideas that can help in the interpretation of your own work and that of other filmmakers. You will produce a portfolio of moving-image projects to illustrate your technical ability in cinematography, sound recording, editing and writing/direction.

You will be able to use high-definition digital video camcorders, DSLRs and Macs running Final Cut Pro and Adobe Creative Cloud to apply classical and independent principles with contemporary technology; 8mm, super8 and 16mm film cameras are also available to explore analogue forms of filmmaking (students who wish to use our analogue cameras will have to cover their own stock and processing costs).

Assessment

Film production projects, critical journal, essays, and seminar presentations.

Work placement scheme

Many postgraduate courses at Kingston University allow students to do a 12-month work placement as part of their course. The responsibility for finding the placement is with the student; we cannot guarantee the placement, just the opportunity to undertake it. As the work placement is an assessed part of the course, the work placement is covered by a student's tier 4 visa. Find out more about the postgraduate work placement.

Core modules

  • Film Making 1
  • Film Making 2
  • Film Making 3 (Dissertation)
  • Film Writing
  • Sound and Vision


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Through object-based, interdisciplinary research, this Masters programme focuses on the act of making and everything that entails. Read more
Through object-based, interdisciplinary research, this Masters programme focuses on the act of making and everything that entails. We study studio practices from a variety of disciplines, their materials and techniques, but also intentions and concept. We examine art technological sources to register the artist’s voice, and other testimonies on artistic practice, make reconstructions of historical recipes and modern techniques to understand practices, ageing and its consequences as well as other changes artworks go through. Researching this all-inclusive story of an artefact is known as technical art history. It is an exciting and rapidly growing field involving (technical) art historians, scientists, conservators while also reaching out to other disciplines such as economic and social history, history of science, anthropology and aesthetics.

Why this programme

◾You will work with objects and benefit from staff contacts including those at: the City Collections, Hunterian Museum & Art Gallery, Glasgow Museums, National Museums and National Galleries of Scotland, National Trust Scotland and Historic Scotland.
◾You will take a study trip to Amsterdam or Munich, visiting major museums and their conservation studios and research labs as well as research institutions working in the field of technical art history.
◾You have the opportunity to take part in a project-based work placement engaging in interdisciplinary research, where you can explore a possible future career while meeting professional practitioners and developing your skills and experience.
◾You will benefit from guest speakers from the technical art history field, broadening your horizon and offering you network occasions and research contacts.
◾You will participate in two reconstruction workshops of historical painting techniques, as well as workshops on the reconstructions of pigment recipes and scientific examination techniques.

Programme structure

Drawing upon the expertise of an interdisciplinary team, the programme will include taught and research components as well as practical workshops and work placements.

This MLitt develops your skills in object-based research, as well as examining the authenticity, attribution and dating of art works – and their change and survival. You do not need any background in science or conservation. We will provide you with the right tools to understand what science can deliver, what conservators can do, and what role you can play in this truly interdisciplinary field.

You will take five core courses and one optional course. This is followed by a period of self-study towards a dissertation 15,000 words in length (including footnotes but excluding bibliography) and will be on a topic chosen in consultation with the tutors and the programme convenor.

Core courses

◾Research methods in practice
◾Art in the making: historical techniques
◾Art in the making: modern and Avant-Garde techniques
◾The authentic art work
◾Testimonies on painters' practice: documentary and visual sources

Optional courses

You may choose from the following options
◾Work placement
◾Independent study

Career prospects

Career opportunities include curatorial positions in museums and galleries, working with collections within cultural heritage organisations, or in the commercial environment of auction houses performing object-based research including technical investigation. The programme will also prepare you for a further postgraduate education in conservation or academic research.

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IN BRIEF. Study cutting-edge production techniques using the latest technologies at MediaCityUK. Learn from lecturers with extensive, first-hand experience of the media industry. Read more

IN BRIEF:

  • Study cutting-edge production techniques using the latest technologies at MediaCityUK
  • Learn from lecturers with extensive, first-hand experience of the media industry
  • Gain first had experience of the broadcast industry through live-industry briefs and media projects
  • Based at MediaCityUK
  • International students can apply

COURSE SUMMARY

On this course, you will learn how to research and produce original television documentaries.

During your time with us, you will receive expert instruction and guidance on the concepts, techniques and processes key to the documentary form. And you will produce your own documentaries, collaborating with your fellow students in production teams.

With opportunities to engage closely with industry, the course develops the skills and techniques required to work in the media, while encouraging independent creative content production.

TEACHING

The teaching of this course is comprised of seminars, workshops in storytelling and production practice, study of broadcast and editorial guidelines, independent research, collaborative project work and film screenings.

The aim is to support your learning with an effective blend of theory and creative practice, and to encourage ownership of your learning through self-directed projects.

ASSESSMENT

Methods of assessment depend on the module and elective pathway you are taking. They include:

  • Creative projects portfolios and productions
  • Live briefs
  • Critical reflections
  • Presentations
  • Essay

Each module has its own assessment package and this is structured appropriately to reflect the module content. Practical-based modules are assessed by project and a reflective critical evaluation.

CAREER PROSPECTS

In previous years, a large number of graduates from this course have moved into broadcasting jobs as camera operators, editors, sound assistants, researchers and assistant producers. Former students are currently employed at the BBC, ITV, Channel 4 and independent companies across the UK.

LINKS WITH INDUSTRY

To develop your skills and employability, there are opportunities on our Media Production courses to work on live briefs and gain valuable work experience. Previous students have worked with:

  • CBBC
  • Framestore
  • BBC Writersroom
  • BBC Natural History Unit
  • Nine Lives Media production company
  • Sumners Post Production Facility House
  • BBC Fast Train, BBC Academy, BBC Red Nose Day and BBC Turn Up the Talent
  • Sheffield Documentary Festival, Salford Media Festival, One World Media Festival

The following prominent speakers have delivered guest lectures:

  • Sir David Attenborough
  • Joe Godwin (Director of BBC Childrens)
  • Steve Hewlett (Media commentator / Guardian Columnist)
  • Tony Palmer (Documentary filmmaker)
  • Jackie Priddle (Aardman Animation Producer)
  • BBC Stepping Out and Audience Research Team


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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Professional Translation at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Professional Translation at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in Professional Translation MAPT (previously Translation with Language Technology) is an integrated programme designed to turn entrants with proven excellence in foreign languages into successful and marketable professional linguists.

Key Features of MA in Professional Translation

The MA in Professional Translation belongs to the European Master's in Translation Network which currently has 64 members throughout Europe with Swansea University being the only EMT member in Wales.

At the core of the MA in Professional Translation lies advanced translation work on general, administrative and technical text types, and training in industry-standard Computer-Assisted Translation (CAT) tools. Part 1 of the Professional Translation degree also includes opportunities to develop specialised skills in Public Service Interpreting, audiovisual translation, machine translation (MT) and software localization, terminology management, video making or digital publishing, while in the Translation Work Experience module students form simulated translation companies, working with local translation businesses, and undertake real commissions to professional standards and deadlines.

These different skills come together in a choice of Part 2 projects: either two Extended Translations of the student’s choice, or an academic Dissertation, or a 13-week Internship in a translation company, in the UK or abroad.

Course Content

Part One – Full-time Professional Translation students take three 20-credit (10 ECTS) modules in each of two academic semesters, while part-time students can distribute the same work flexibly over four semesters. There are three compulsory modules: Foundations of Translation and Interpreting, Translation Tools, and one Advanced Translation module from the range of language pairs listed above. Professional Translation students then choose three optional modules. These include: a second Advanced Translation module, History and Theory of Translation, one or two modules in Interpreting, Translation Technologies, Audiovisual Adaptation (subtitling, dubbing, audio description), Terminology Management, Translation Work Experience, or (subject to numbers) Video and Documentary Making, or Visual Communication and Media Design. There is also the option to study a new language intensively (French, German, Italian, Mandarin or Spanish), or to pick up again at intermediate level a language (French, German, or Spanish) not studied since secondary school.

Part Two - An individual project of 60 credits (30 ECTS) which full-time Professional Translation students undertake over the summer (by 15 September), while part-time students have up to a further year. The project can take three forms:

- Two Extended Translations with commentary. These are chosen by the Professional Translation student and offer the opportunity to develop domains of specialisation. At least one must be technical and must be performed using a major CAT tool; or

- Dissertation (15,000-20,000 words). This can be, for instance, on a topic in Translation Studies, a comparison of two or more published translations, terminology research in a specialised domain, or an investigation into aspects of translation technology. The dissertation offers excellent preparation for PhD work, but can also be a valuable indicator of professional expertise (e.g. in terminology or CAT tools); or

- Internship (13 weeks full time, part time pro rata). This is the most vocational option and can be undertaken either in the UK or abroad. We make our extensive list of professional contacts available to students but they must make their own application to companies and pass admissions tests. A successful internship may turn into a first job.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Professional Translation include:

Foundations of Translation and Interpreting

Advanced Translation

Translation Tools

Translation Technologies

Translation Work Experience for MA Students

Terminology Management

Beginners' Language

Intermediate Language

Extended Translations

Translation/Interpreting Internship

Student Quote

“After graduating from Swansea University with a First Class Honours BA Translation degree, I decided to study the MA in Professional Translation (previously Translation with Language Technology) and I also set up a translation business, Veritas, with a fellow graduate. Our business was successful from the outset, and we have experienced high rates of growth year on year. Veritas has won numerous awards, including the HSBC International Business Award in 2010, and we work with companies such as the British Red Cross, Nokia and the NHS. We now employ 9 members of staff and are still growing rapidly. Companies love to work with us, as they can see our passion for language and communication with other cultures. For me, it was a dream to study near the sea, and I loved Swansea so much that I made it a permanent home for my family”.

Rachel Bryan, Professional Translation, MA



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