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Masters Degrees (Doctoral)

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Applications are open for PhD studentships at Imperial College Business School, a top 10 global university*. We are looking for exceptional candidates to join our world-leading research team in September 2016. Read more
Applications are open for PhD studentships at Imperial College Business School, a top 10 global university*. We are looking for exceptional candidates to join our world-leading research team in September 2016. All students on our Doctoral programme will receive fully-funded studentships.

Our Doctoral Programme

Our full-time, five year programme offers an inspirational learning experience that equips you with the skills to become a world-leading expert in your chosen subject. Our programme combines highly relevant and structured training in the first year when you complete a Master's in Research, with the freedom to explore your chosen area of research over the course of a further four years.

Our research culture

Our aim is to drive business advantage through the fusion of business and technology.
At Imperial College Business School, our research meets the highest standards of academic excellence and rigour, yet produces knowledge that is relevant for practice.

We are looking for excellent candidates with strong and innovative research proposals to begin their doctoral studies in the areas of:
• Finance
• Innovation and Entrepreneurship
• Management

The Business School also houses a number of specialist research centres where many of our doctoral students collaborate on exciting research projects with faculty and industry partners.
Some of these include:
• Brevan Howard Centre for Financial Analysis
• Centre for Health Policy
• Centre for Management Buyout Research
• Enterprise Research Centre
• KPMG Centre for Advanced Business Analytics
• Risk Management Laboratory

Studentships available

Studentship applications are now open for students with an outstanding academic background. All students on our Doctoral programme are offered fully-funded places by the Business School, including a full tuition fee waiver and a living stipend for up to five years. Our Doctoral programme has one intake each year in September. The deadline for our 2016 intake is Monday 11 January 2016 and early application is recommended.


*Ranked 9th in the world, THE World University Rankings 2014-2015, joint 2nd in the QS World University Rankings 2014. The Business School has the highest proportion of ‘world-leading' and ‘internationally excellent' research in the UK (Research Excellence Framework, 2014).'

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This course has embraced a totally unique method of doctoral study, as it is the first within the United Kingdom to deliver totally online doctoral study in the fields of community development and social work and allied professions. Read more

Why Study this Programme?

This course has embraced a totally unique method of doctoral study, as it is the first within the United Kingdom to deliver totally online doctoral study in the fields of community development and social work and allied professions. This course allows busy practitioners to remain in their chosen professions whilst developing doctoral research skills. The online nature of this course will enable the student to have access to highly influential professorial staff who are international experts within their chosen field whilst remaining at home, and not have the additional expense of relocating themselves and their families. The use of interactive methods will allow students to develop their own supportive research community throughout their doctoral studies.

Programme at a Glance

YEAR 1:

SW4800 Themes and Perspectives in Social Research
SW4801 Doing Social Research
SW4802 Developing Research Skills in Social Care

YEAR 2:

SW4803 - Statistical and Quantitative Analysis in Community Practice
SW4804 - Designing & Planning Your Research Project: Methods & Methodology
SW4712 - Responding to Contemporary Issues in Social Work and Social Care.

YEAR 3 - 7:

SW5800 Doctoral Thesis (50,000 words)

Postgraduate Advice Event

The next UCLan Postgraduate Advice Event will be on Monday 29th June, 2015.
For details and registration for this event please visit our Eventbrite page - http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/uclan-postgraduate-advice-event-tickets-15974940477
Please contact Course Enquiries with any queries regarding postgraduate study and research.

Further Information

DO YOU WANT TO?

- Understand how research works
- Learn how to actually understand and undertake research
- Work towards becoming a published expert within your own profession both nationally and internationally.
- Have a greater understanding of how ethical and political considerations impacts upon research, and your chosen field.

DO YOU WANT TO DEVELOP RESEARCH SKILLS TO?

- Empower communities and individuals
- Have the recognition and status to assist others to effect change
- Build on your existing experience and strengths.
- Are you interested in developing the requisite skills to make sense of the social world within which your profession operates? If so the course will provide you with expert support and supervision throughout from a selected supervisory team. The use of online lectures, discussion groups’ and one to one supervision will support and guide you towards the completion of your doctoral thesis.

Fees

Full-time: N/A
Part-time: Years 1 & 2 UK/EU £1575 per year // Year 1& 2 Non EU international £1875 // Thesis stage year 3-7 Uk/EU £2000 // Thesis stage year 3-7 Non EU international £4000

Further Particulars

DBS CHECKS -

This course will involve access to children and/or vulnerable adults. You will be required to obtain a satisfactory Enhanced Disclosure and Barring Service clearance (formerly termed CRB) and we will guide you through this process.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT -

This course utilises online tools to produce a rich and productive learning environment. The taught element takes place over the first two years and assist students to learn the underpinning knowledge and research skills necessary to complete a doctoral thesis and become an established research professional. Students are provide with online lectures, discussion groups and a supportive virtual café to allow them to mutually support each other’s learning. The assessments in the first two years are a combination of written assignments and presentations. Once the student have successfully completed the taught element of the course they will progress onto the thesis element. This is where through a process of intensive online supervision the student will undertake their own piece of original research, which they will write up into a thesis. Finally this thesis will be orally examines in a viva voce (which requires the students attendance).

OPPORTUNITIES -

The expectation is that students will be employed in their current professional field and that this will enable them to access research opportunities.

Uclan has a number of partner universities throughout the world and especially Europe through the Erasmus programme. The hope is that local support networks can be provided to support students throughout their studies.

This doctoral qualification will assist students to move into academia or professional research as well as increasing their status within their existing n professional field. Doctoral qualifications are recognised internationally and should assist students to progress in their chosen field wherever they are in the world.

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The Centre for Doctoral Training in Pervasive Parallelism addresses the most disruptive challenge faced by the computing industry for 50 years. Read more

The Centre for Doctoral Training in Pervasive Parallelism addresses the most disruptive challenge faced by the computing industry for 50 years. Driven by performance and energy constraints, parallelism is now crucial to all layers of the computing infrastructure, from smartphones to globally distributed systems.

This EPSRC-sponsored programme tackles the many urgent interconnected problems raised by parallel systems. How do we design programming languages for such systems? How should the architecture be structured? Which theories, tools and methodologies will allow us to reason about the behaviour of this new hardware and software?

We urgently need answers to these questions to maintain the familiar pace of technological progress, and the benefits it brings to so much of modern life. Spanning theory and practice, the centre addresses this "pervasive parallelism challenge", educating the graduates who will undertake the fundamental research and design required to transform methods and practices. As a pervasive parallelism graduate, you will develop not only deep expertise in your own specialism, but crucially, an awareness of its relationships to other facets of the challenge. These cross-cutting synergies will enable us to unlock the true potential of current and future technologies.

This MSc is the first part of a longer 1+3 (MSc by Research + PhD) programme offered by the School through the EPSRC.

Our supervisors offer internationally leading expertise across all aspects of the pervasive parallelism challenge. These include parallel programming, wireless and mobile networking, reasoning about interaction, models of concurrent computation, energy efficient computing, systems architecture, and performance modelling.

Many more topics can be found be exploring the centre's pages and those of its supervision team and research teams. Most importantly, we believe that key research insights can be made by working across the boundaries of conventional groupings.

Training and support

We offer a four year programme, focused throughout on your development into an independent researcher, under the guidance of an expert supervision team. In the first year, you will undertake a small number of courses, and a large introductory research project, together with a range of sessions on transferable research skills.

Courses are designed to broaden your awareness of pervasive parallelism. Successful students will be awarded a Master of Research degree at this point. From this basis, the subsequent three years will be spent developing and pursuing a PhD research project, under the close supervision of your primary and secondary supervisors.

Our industrial partnerships and engagement programme will ensure that your research is informed by real world case-studies and will provide a source of diverse internship opportunities.

You will have opportunities to take up three- to six-month internships with leading companies in this area, including ARM, Intel, IBM and Microsoft, and to participate in our industrial engagement programme, exchanging ideas and challenges with our sponsor companies at brainstorming and networking events.

The School of Informatics holds a Silver Athena SWAN award, in recognition of our commitment to advance the representation of women in science, mathematics, engineering and technology. The School is deploying a range of strategies to help female staff and students of all stages in their careers and we seek regular feedback from our research community on our performance.

Facilities

You will have access to state-of-the-art facilities from on-chip accelerators including GPGPUs and multicore CPUs to the supercomputer scale systems hosted by the Edinburgh Parallel Computing Centre.

More broadly, the award-winning Informatics Forum is an international research facility for computing and related areas. It houses more than 400 research staff and students, providing office, meeting and social spaces.

It also contains two robotics labs, an instrumented multimedia room, eye-tracking and motion capture systems, and a full recording studio amongst other research facilities. Its spectacular atrium plays host to many events, from industry showcases and student hackathons to major research conferences.

Nearby teaching facilities include computer and teaching labs with more than 250 machines, 24-hour access to IT facilities for students, and comprehensive support provided by dedicated computing staff.

Among our entrepreneurial initiatives is Informatics Ventures, set up to support globally ambitious software companies in Scotland and nurture a technology cluster to rival Boston, Pittsburgh, Kyoto and Silicon Valley.

Career opportunities

We intend for our graduates to become the research leaders, both in industry and academia, whose work will lead the way into the era of mainstream parallelism. This vision is shared by our industrial supporters who have indicated their strong desire to find highly qualified candidates to fill roles in this area. We also have outstanding support for entrepreneurial initiatives through Informatics Ventures.

Our component research groups already have excellent track-records in post-graduation destinations, including the research labs of industry-leading companies, and post-doctoral research positions in top tier universities.



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Robots have the potential to revolutionise society and the economy, working for us, beside us, and interacting with us. This EPSRC-sponsored programme will produce graduates with the technical skills and industry awareness to create an innovation pipeline from academic research to global markets. Read more

Robots have the potential to revolutionise society and the economy, working for us, beside us, and interacting with us. This EPSRC-sponsored programme will produce graduates with the technical skills and industry awareness to create an innovation pipeline from academic research to global markets.

The robotics and autonomous systems area has been highlighted by the UK Government in 2013 as one of the eight Great Technologies that underpin the UK's Industrial Strategy for jobs and growth. Key application areas include manufacturing, assistive and medical robots, offshore energy, environmental monitoring, search and rescue, defence, and support for the ageing population.

The University of Edinburgh and Heriot-Watt University are jointly offering this innovative four-year PhD training programme, which combines a strong general grounding in current theory, methods and applications with flexibility for individualised study and a specialised PhD project.

Robotics and autonomous systems are increasingly studied beyond the range of classical engineering. Today robots represent one of the main areas of application of computer science and provide challenges for mathematics and natural science.

It is impossible to imagine transportation, warehousing, safety systems, space and marine exploration, prosthetics, and many other areas of industry, technology and science without robots. Robots are used in theoretical biology and the neurosciences as a model of behaviour.

Areas of interest specific to the center include: movement control, planning, decision making, bio- and neurorobotics, human-robot interaction, healthcare applications, robot soccer, neuroprosthetics, underwater robotics, bipedal walking, service robots, robotic co-workers, computer vision, speech processing, computer animation realistic simulations, and machine learning.

Many more topics can be found be exploring the Centre’s web pages, particularly the personal web pages of the Centre supervisors:

Training and support

Our four-year PhD programme combines Masters level coursework and project work with independent PhD-level research.

In the first year, you will undertake four or five masters level courses, spread throughout robotics, machine learning, computational neuroscience, computer architectures, statistics, optimization, sensorics, dynamics, mechanics, image processing, signal processing, modelling, animation, artificial intelligence, and related areas. You will also undertake a significant introductory research project. (Students with previous masters-level work in these areas may request to take less courses and a larger project.)

At the end of the first year, successful students will be awarded an MSc by Research by the University of Edinburgh. From this basis, the subsequent three years will be spent developing and pursuing a PhD research project, under the close supervision of your primary and secondary supervisors. The PhD will be awarded jointly by the University of Edinburgh and the Heriot-Watt University.

You will have opportunities for three to six month internships with leading companies in your area, and to participate in our industrial engagement programme, exchanging ideas and challenges with our sponsor companies.

Throughout your studies, you will participate in our regular programmes of seminars, short talks and brainstorming sessions, and benefit from our pastoral mentoring schemes.

Our user partners in industry include companies working in offshore energy, environmental monitoring, defence, assisted living, transport, advanced manufacturing and education. They will provide the real world context for research, as well as opportunities for reciprocal secondments, internships and involvement in our industrial engagement programme.

The School of Informatics holds a Silver Athena SWAN award, in recognition of our commitment to advance the representation of women in science, mathematics, engineering and technology. The School is deploying a range of strategies to help female staff and students of all stages in their careers and we seek regular feedback from our research community on our performance.

Facilities

You will have access to the outstanding facilities in the Edinburgh Robotarium, a national facility for research into robot interaction, supporting the research of more than 50 world-leading investigators from 17 cross-disciplinary research groups.

Research groups at the Edinburgh Robotarium include humanoid movement control, underwater, land and airborne autonomous vehicles, human robot interaction, bio- and neuro-robotics, and planning and decision making in multirobot scenarios.

In addition, our research groups contain a diverse range of compute clusters for compute and data-intensive work, including a large cluster hosted by the Edinburgh Compute and Data Facility.

Career opportunities

Our aim is to produce innovation-ready graduates who are skilled in the principles of technical and commercial disruption and who understand how finance and organisation realise new products in start-up, SME and corporate situations.

We intend for our graduates to become leaders in the globally emerging market for autonomous and robotic systems that reduce risk, reduce cost, increase profit and protect the environment. This vision is shared by our industrial supporters, whose support for our internship programme indicates their strong desire to find highly qualified new employees.

Our component research groups already have excellent track-records in post-graduation destinations, including the research labs of industry-leading companies, and post-doctoral research positions in top tier universities.



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Data science is the study of the computational principles and systems for extracting knowledge from data, for maintaining data, and for ensuring its quality. Read more

Data science is the study of the computational principles and systems for extracting knowledge from data, for maintaining data, and for ensuring its quality. Large data sets are now generated by almost every activity in science, society and commerce.

This EPSRC-sponsored programme tackles the question: how can we efficiently find patterns in these vast streams of data?

Many research areas in informatics are converging on the problem of data science. Those represented in the School include machine learning, artificial intelligence, databases, data management, optimization and cluster computing; and also the unstructured data issues generated in areas such as natural language processing and computer vision.

Our programme will allow you to specialise and perform advanced research in one of these areas, while gaining breadth and practical experience throughout data science.

A short sample of our research interests includes:

  • machine learning applied to problems in biology, astronomy, computer science, engineering, health care, and e-commerce
  • database theory and technology for managing unstructured data and for maintaining trust in data
  • big data and management of streaming data
  • management of unstructured data, including natural language processing, speech processing, and computer vision

Many more topics can be found by exploring the Centre’s web pages, particularly the personal web pages of the Centre supervisors:

You will be supervised by one of our 58 world-renowned faculty. You will also benefit from interacting with a group of 35 leading industrial partners, including Amazon, Apple, Google, IBM, and Microsoft.

This will ensure your research is informed by real world case studies and will provide a source of diverse internship opportunities. Moreover we believe that key research insights can be gained by working across the boundaries of conventional groupings.

Training and support

The MScR is the first part of a longer 1+3 (MSc by Research + PhD) programme offered by the School through the EPSRC.

Our four-year PhD programme combines masters level coursework and project work with independent PhD-level research.

In the first year, you will undertake six masters level courses, spread throughout machine learning, databases, statistics, optimization, natural language processing, and related areas. You will also undertake a significant introductory research project. (Students with previous masters-level work in these areas may request to take three courses and a larger project, instead of six courses.)

At the end of the first year, successful students will be awarded an MSc by Research. From this basis, the subsequent three years will be spent developing and pursuing a PhD research project, under the close supervision of your primary and secondary supervisors.

You will have opportunities for three to six month internships with leading companies in your area, and to participate in our industrial engagement programme, exchanging ideas and challenges with our sponsor companies.

Throughout your studies, you will participate in our regular programmes of seminars, short talks and brainstorming sessions, and benefit from our pastoral mentoring schemes.

The School of Informatics holds a Silver Athena SWAN award, in recognition of our commitment to advance the representation of women in science, mathematics, engineering and technology. The School is deploying a range of strategies to help female staff and students of all stages in their careers and we seek regular feedback from our research community on our performance.

Facilities

Our research groups contain a diverse range of compute clusters for compute and data-intensive work, including a large cluster hosted by the Edinburgh Compute and Data Facility.

More broadly, the award-winning Informatics Forum is an international research facility for computing and related areas. It houses more than 400 research staff and students, providing office, meeting and social spaces.

It also contains two robotics labs, an instrumented multimedia room, eye-tracking and motion capture systems, and a full recording studio amongst other research facilities. Its spectacular atrium plays host to many events, from industry showcases and student hackathons to major research conferences.

Nearby teaching facilities include computer and teaching labs with more than 250 machines, 24-hour access to IT facilities for students, and comprehensive support provided by dedicated computing staff.

Among our entrepreneurial initiatives is Informatics Ventures, set up to support globally ambitious software companies in Scotland and nurture a technology cluster to rival Boston, Pittsburgh, Kyoto and Silicon Valley.

Career opportunities

We intend for our graduates to become the research leaders, both in industry and academia, whose work will lead the way in data science. This vision is shared by our industrial supporters, whose support for our internship programme indicates their strong desire to find highly qualified new employees.

You will be part of a new generation of data scientists, with the technical skills and interdisciplinary awareness to become R&D leaders in this emerging area.

Our component research groups already have excellent track-records in post-graduation destinations, including the research labs of industry-leading companies, and post-doctoral research positions in top tier universities.



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If you are responsible for leading learning in your organisation, whether it’s a school, college, a HE institution or as an educator in the public or private sector, this doctoral level programme is a fantastic opportunity to study education at a deep level and relate this back to your own practice. Read more

If you are responsible for leading learning in your organisation, whether it’s a school, college, a HE institution or as an educator in the public or private sector, this doctoral level programme is a fantastic opportunity to study education at a deep level and relate this back to your own practice. The EdD will help you expand your knowledge and understanding of how education works and allow you to transform your own practice.

Key features

Focus your attention on the nature of educational practice itself. Approach education in its broadest sense. Study and theorise the nature of your work from a social perspective - then relate this back to your own practice.

Engage with a range of new ideas with which to re-think educational practice on a carefully organised course with a clear structure based on a social perspective on education.

Study on a flexible and work-friendly programme that has been structured to fit around your existing commitments. You’ll probably study part time over five years (two years of taught modules and three years of thesis) but you can take up to seven if you need to.

Choose to start at masters level if you are unsure about doctoral study.

Begin to engage with new educational theory at the University-based sessions. Participate in lively discussions and share ideas with others on your course in seminars, lectures and workshops.

Access a wide range of support and resources to fuel your independent study. Draw on books and journals and an online environment where you’ll communicate with and draw support from your peers and from staff with a long history of excellence in professional development.

Meet and share ideas with others in your cohort from a range of disciplines. Tap into this diversity to compare the interrelationships between policy and practice across different educational areas and institutions.

Make your mark on the future of education as part of our learning community where you can link into active and renowned research networks. Find out more about research within the Institute of Education.

Attend our annual postgraduate research conference and present your ongoing ideas in a challenging and supportive environment.

Course details

Part one is the modular stage of the programme and spans two years. Over the two years of part one you’ll cover four modules, including policy and professional practice, professional learning, researching education practice, and social research. These modules are assessed by work amounting to 5,000 words and assignments are fitting for a research community, and potentially leading to publications, like conference papers or journal articles.

Part two is the thesis stage of the programme and spans four years. You are supported by two academic supervisors and you’ll stay connected with peers and staff at a range of Saturday workshops. In the final year, you’ll present a thesis of approximately 50,000 words, assessed through a viva voce exam. The thesis comprises a substantial piece of original research into an area of practice of your own choosing, through which you’ll make an original contribution to knowledge.

Applying

Here is a summary of the process:

Initial contact - email the Doctoral College.

Application - download the application form for postgraduate study from the website and, once complete, send it to the Doctoral College.

Selection - your application will be sent to staff at the Plymouth Institute of Education who will consider documentary evidence and then invite you to interview, if appropriate.

Notification - once a decision has been made, the Doctoral College will write to you to offer you a place, or to decline your application.

Programme preparation and start - once accepted, the Plymouth Institute of Education will be your first port of call for day-to-day information about the programme.

You will need to be able to demonstrate the following:

The potential to study at doctoral level. This would normally be indicated by successful completion of a masters degree, but in exceptional cases may be through successful completion of a task set by the admissions tutor(s).

An ability to work collaboratively in exploring and developing experience and ideas.

That you are working in a professional context where you are responsible for supporting learning. Candidates not currently working in a professional context, but with appropriate and sufficiently extensive experience, may be considered at the discretion of the admissions tutor(s). If you are in professional practice but, in the opinion of the admissions team, do not yet have sufficient or appropriate experience to draw on, you may be deemed ineligible.

A strong commitment to educational enquiry and the ability to reflect critically on practice, as a means of professional learning.

The following points will also be taken into account in selecting candidates:

Accreditation for prior certificated learning (APCL) will be considered up to 60 credits and normally only for work completed at doctoral level within the last seven years.

Accreditation for prior experiential learning (APEL) may, exceptionally, be considered. This will be done in the line with the guidance in the programme and University regulations.



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The Master of Research (MRes) in Economics offered by the School of Economics and Finance (SEF) is a research-oriented postgraduate programme for students who already hold an MSc in economics or a related field and who may wish to progress to doctoral study at Queen Mary (or elsewhere). Read more

Overview

The Master of Research (MRes) in Economics offered by the School of Economics and Finance (SEF) is a research-oriented postgraduate programme for students who already hold an MSc in economics or a related field and who may wish to progress to doctoral study at Queen Mary (or elsewhere). Students build on their core postgraduate training by completing two advanced modules in macroeconomics, microeconomics, econometrics, or financial economics; and can choose from a selection of option modules that cover a range of theoretical and applied topics. Students also conduct original research to fulfil the substantial dissertation component of the degree, which can form the basis of later doctoral work.

The MRes can be pursued as a stand-alone degree or as the first year of a planned PhD, and when appropriate a conditional offer of admission to the doctoral programme will be made. Generous financial assistance is available for candidates with demonstrated potential for a successful research career.

Why join the MRes programme

The School of Economics and Finance is one of the UK's leading departments, ranked jointly sixth in the UK for overall research quality.

The breadth and depth of our expertise enables us to offer courses and supervision in virtually all major areas of economics and finance. The School has more than 30 research-active staff working in a wide range of research areas, including macroeconomics, microeconomic theory and game theory, applied microeconomics, econometric theory, time series analysis, theoretical and empirical finance, and financial econometrics. Staff members typically publish in the leading economics and finance journals, with publications over the 2014 Research Excellence Framework period in journals including Econometrica, the American Economic Review, the Review of Economic Studies, the Journal of Political Economy, the Journal of Econometrics, the Journal of Finance, and many others. Individual members of staff also have active collaborations with various governmental and non-governmental agencies, including the UK Treasury, the Bank of England, the World Bank, the Inter-American Development Bank, OECD, and ILO.

The School hosts two weekly seminar series with external speakers from institutions in North America and Europe, as well as two internal workshops.

We have a vibrant community of doctoral students conducting research in economics and finance. Our MRes/PhD programme has held Economic and Social Research council (ESRC) recognition since 2008 and is affiliated with the QMUL-Goldsmiths Doctoral Training Centre (DTC), which awards ESRC-funded 1+3 year studentships and offers social science training beyond the areas covered by the School.

Excellent career opportunities are open to our MRes/PhD graduates. Recent placements include lectureships or postdoctoral research positions at universities and research institutions worldwide such as Cambridge, Warwick, York, Leicester, Aarhus, Vienna and IZA. Our graduates are also typically hired by central banking institutions: recent placements include the Bank of England and the Bank of France.

The School offers generous financial support on a competitive basis to MRes students with demonstrated potential for a successful research career. Both domestic and international candidates are eligible for tuition waivers and stipends (amounting to £16,000 for 2014-15) to cover living expenses. In addition, MRes Economics students who progress to the PhD programme will have the option to increase their level of support (to a total of £20,000 for 2014-15) by undertaking 60 hours of teaching for the School. PhD students are also entitled to a £1,000 yearly research allowance.

Fellowships are also available through the ESRC Doctoral Training Centre and the College Principal Competition (please note early application deadline for such scholarships).

Facilities
Post-graduate students also have access to extensive computing resources. In addition to personal computers and computer labs with mathematical, statistical and real-time trading software (Eviews, Stata, Matlab, Gauss, Reuters, Bloomberg, TWS, FXCM), and a full range of economic and financial data services (DataStream, Macrobond, Bankscope, CRSP), MRes students also have access to macro computing Unix-based resources.

Structure

The MRes Economics requires one year of full-time study.

In Semester 1, MRes students register for two of the following 30-credit modules:

· ECOM083 Topics in Macroeconomics
· ECOM084 Topics in Microeconomics
· ECOM085 Topics in Econometrics
· ECOM086 Topics in Financial Economics

In Semester 2, MRes students register for two of the following 15-credit option modules (not necessarily all offered each year):

· ECOM025 Financial Econometrics
· ECOM027 Labour and Public Policy
· ECOM044 Advanced Asset Pricing and Modelling
· ECOM054 Public Economics
· ECOM056 Empirical Macroeconomics
· ECOM081 Development Economics
· ECOM088 Advanced Corporate Finance
· ECOM089 Empirical Microeconomics

During Semester 2 and the Summer Recess students complete a 90-credit dissertation (approximately 15,000 words) under the supervision of a member of academic staff. The dissertation is submitted in August of the year following entry to the programme, and can form the basis of later doctoral work.

In total students earn 60+30+90=180 credits over the course of the MRes programme.

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The Master of Research (MRes) in Finance offered by the School of Economics and Finance (SEF) is a research-oriented postgraduate programme for students who already hold an MSc in finance or a related field and who may wish to progress to doctoral study at Queen Mary (or elsewhere). Read more

Overview

The Master of Research (MRes) in Finance offered by the School of Economics and Finance (SEF) is a research-oriented postgraduate programme for students who already hold an MSc in finance or a related field and who may wish to progress to doctoral study at Queen Mary (or elsewhere). Students build on their core postgraduate training by completing two advanced modules, one in financial economics and the other in macroeconomics, microeconomics, or econometrics; and can choose from a selection of option modules that cover a range of theoretical and applied topics. Students also conduct original research to fulfil the substantial dissertation component of the degree, which can form the basis of later doctoral work.

The MRes can be pursued as a stand-alone degree or as the first year of a planned PhD, and when appropriate a conditional offer of admission to the doctoral programme will be made. Generous financial assistance is available for candidates with demonstrated potential for a successful research career.

Why join the MRes programme?

The School of Economics and Finance is one of the UK's leading departments, ranked jointly sixth in the UK for overall research quality.

The breadth and depth of our expertise enables us to offer courses and supervision in virtually all major areas of economics and finance. The School has more than 30 research-active staff working in a wide range of research areas, including theoretical and empirical finance, financial econometrics and time series analysis, econometric theory, macro finance, microeconomic theory and game theory, and applied microeconomics. Staff members typically publish in the leading finance and economics journals, with publications over the 2014 Research Excellence Framework period in journals including Econometrica, the American Economic Review, the Journal of Political Economy, the Journal of Econometrics, the Journal of Finance, and many others. Individual members of staff also have active collaborations with various governmental and non-governmental agencies, including the UK Treasury, the Bank of England, the World Bank, the Inter-American Development Bank, OECD, and ILO.

The School hosts two weekly seminar series with external speakers from institutions in North America and Europe, as well as two internal workshops.

We have a vibrant community of doctoral students conducting research in economics and finance. Our MRes/PhD programme has held Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) recognition since 2008 and is affiliated with the QMUL-Goldsmiths Doctoral Training Centre (DTC), which awards ESRC-funded 1+3 year studentships and offers social science training beyond the areas covered by the School.

Excellent career opportunities are open to our MRes/PhD graduates. Recent placements of our students include lectureships or postdoctoral research positions at universities and research institutions worldwide such as Cambridge, Warwick, York, Leicester, Aarhus, Vienna and IZA. Our graduates are also typically hired by central banking institutions: recent placements include the Bank of England and the Bank of France.

The School offers generous financial support on a competitive basis to MRes students with demonstrated potential for a successful research career. Both domestic and international candidates are eligible for tuition waivers and stipends (amounting to £16,000 for 2014-15) to cover living expenses. In addition, MRes Finance students who progress to the PhD programme will have the option to increase their level of support (to a total of £22,000 for 2014-15) by undertaking 60 hours of teaching for the School. No additional application is needed to be considered for financial support.

Fellowships are also available through the ESRC Doctoral Training Centre and the College Principal Competition (please note early application deadline for such scholarships).

Facilities

Post-graduate students also have access to extensive computing resources. In addition to personal computers and computer labs with mathematical, statistical and real-time trading software (Eviews, Stata, Matlab, Gauss, Reuters, Bloomberg, TWS, FXCM), and a full range of economic and financial data services (DataStream, Macrobond, Bankscope, CRSP), MRes students also have access to macro computing Unix-based resources.

Structure

The MRes Finance requires one year of full-time study.

In Semester 1, MRes students register for two of the following 30-credit modules:

· ECOM083 Topics in Macroeconomics
· ECOM084 Topics in Microeconomics
· ECOM085 Topics in Econometrics
· ECOM086 Topics in Financial Economics

For MRes Finance students ECOM086 Topics in Financial Economics is a compulsory module.

In Semester 2, MRes students register for two of the following 15-credit option modules (not necessarily all offered each year):

· ECOM025 Financial Econometrics
· ECOM027 Labour and Public Policy
· ECOM044 Advanced Asset Pricing and Modelling
· ECOM054 Public Economics
· ECOM056 Empirical Macroeconomics
· ECOM081 Development Economics
· ECOM088 Advanced Corporate Finance
· ECOM089 Empirical Microeconomics

During Semester 2 and the Summer Recess students complete a 90-credit dissertation (approximately 15,000 words) under the supervision of a member of academic staff. The dissertation is submitted in August of the year following entry to the programme, and can form the basis of later doctoral work.

In total students earn 60+30+90=180 credits over the course of the MRes programme.

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This excellent course enables you to gain the wide range of counselling psychology competencies needed to be eligible to apply for chartered status with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). Read more
This excellent course enables you to gain the wide range of counselling psychology competencies needed to be eligible to apply for chartered status with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC).

In the most recent (2014-15) Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 100% of graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

More about this course

The Professional Doctorate in Counselling Psychology is a three-year full-time, four-year part-time taught doctoral programme leading to a doctoral qualification that automatically confers professional registration with the Health Care Professions Council (HCPC), accreditation as a fully qualified chartered counselling psychologist with the British Psychological Society (BPS), and recognition within the UK and the EU as a chartered counselling psychologist eligible to practice.

The programme offers a sound and marketable model, combining in-depth competency in cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), strong humanistic values, and psychodynamic awareness. The course was re-accredited by the HCPC and the BPS in 2012. It was commended for the depth and breadth of the modules offered; a number of our modules were described as cutting-edge and very well suited to the current zeitgeist and employment market. These modules include a first-year module devoted to working with difference and diversity, and a third-year service evaluation research exercise.

Run by a dedicated team of HCPC registered and BPS accredited chartered counselling and clinical psychologists, this course offers wide-ranging and high quality clinical and research expertise to trainees. Course team members have between one and 11 years of post-qualification clinical experience, and two thirds hold PhD or professional doctoral titles. Two thirds of the staff are academically published authors.

While student numbers are growing, the team prides itself on retaining a small cohort each year of no more than 20 students. This enables us to offer you a relatively high volume of individual attention from staff. All students are assigned a personal tutor and two research supervisors. You are offered a relatively high proportion of research supervision (10 hours in Year 1 and 20 hours each year in Years 2 and 3); safe spaces for clinical group supervision and skills practice; and an experiential and workshop style of teaching and learning. Trainees and staff develop collaborative relationships in relation to learning and personal development.

The programme has a dedicated placements coordinator, and an extensive online placement provider database, accessible prior to training commencement. We offer a comprehensive placements induction in the first week of training, and we encourage and support you to be in placement or at interview stage with placement providers by the beginning of your training.

The first year of training is the equivalent of a Master’s year. Students who exit at the end of Year 1 are eligible for an MSc in Psychological Therapies. This MSc offers eligibility to register with the British Association of Counselling and Psychotherapy (BACP), leading to clinical practice in either in public, private or third sector organisations. However, the course has high student retention rates, with the majority of students continuing from the MSc level into the doctoral level of training in Years 2 and 3. Student satisfaction within the programme is very high; feedback forms regularly comment on the high quality and breadth of teaching, the clinical and research expertise of the lecturers, and the dedication of the staff, both at a personal and professional level. Our students feel valued and attended to by the teaching team because the size of each cohort allows for a more tailored experience for each student.

Through postgraduate teaching and workshops across the wider applied psychology subject area, London Met counselling psychology trainees develop advanced levels of knowledge and skills in a broad range of qualitative and quantitative psychological research methods. The course emphasises criticality, epistemological critique and reflexivity across all research teaching and learning. Extensive support in the form of individual and group supervision and teaching is offered, alongside methodology learning, to support trainees in undertaking a piece of doctoral level research that will make an original contribution to the professional practice of counselling psychology, and more widely.

As trainees you will develop a wide range of intellectual and practical skills and knowledge. The training has a solid track record of trainees emerging as robust, sophisticated, and highly employable practitioners of counselling psychology. In recent years, we are proud that a number of our trainees have won BPS Division of Counselling Psychology trainee prizes for written assignments and research poster presentations.

The principle aims and achievements of the course are to produce graduates who are:
-Competent, informed, reflective, ethical and professionally sound practitioners of counselling psychology who are able to work in a range of settings and are committed to their own on-going personal and professional development
-Able to understand, develop and apply models of advanced psychological inquiry and research that enable the creation of new knowledge and which recognise the complex nature of human experience and relationships
-Able to adopt a questioning and evaluative approach to the philosophy, practice, research and theory that constitutes counselling psychology and aware of the wider social, cultural and political domains within which counselling psychology operates
-In possession of a set of skills and competencies that are transferable to a wide variety of professional contexts and which enhance employability
-Able to demonstrate the range of counselling psychology competencies needed to be eligible to apply for chartered status with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC)

Many students are conducting research in collaboration with National Health Service (NHS) Trusts or non-governmental organisations (NGOs). Graduates find permanent employment within a few months post-qualification, with many trainees holding part-time clinical employment whilst they are in the final year of the training because their clinical skills and knowledge are of such a high standard. Other graduates from the programme find work in academia in visiting or permanent teaching posts or as research fellows.

The course is involved in on-going in-house events and conferences such as CultureShock, and in research and clinical collaborations with five NHS trusts. The programme is also involved in research and in the training of clinical staff with the Freedom from Torture Foundation and Khulisa, both community based organisations close to the Holloway Campus. The programme is also collaborating with the School of Social Sciences and School of Social Professions to link interpreters with clinicians and to establish training inside and outside the University on working with interpreters in mental health settings.

Assessment

A wide range of assessment methods is used on the programme. In Year 1 you'll complete seven master's level assignments, including a reflective essay, case formulation, process report, examination and two short research assignments using qualitative and quantitative methodologies.

You'll also complete a 7,000-word reflexive critical literature review and a 3,000-word proposal towards the end of Year 1. Your proposal must demonstrate an adequate basis for a doctoral level research project for you to proceed into Year 2 of the programme. Year 1 is the most intensive period of assessment on the programme.

If you progress to Year 2 you'll complete an extended clinical case study, integrative process analysis and theoretical essay at the end of the year, reflecting cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and psychodynamic learning. At the end of Year 3 a similar assignment is completed, reflecting a trans-theoretical, pluralistic perspective. You should complete your research project by the end of Year 3, submitting a 25,000 word thesis and subsequently participating in a viva voce examination.

You'll receive research supervision to guide your research throughout the programme. Research progress is formally monitored and evaluated through the submission of annual reports to the Research and Postgraduate Office in Years 2 and 3.

You are required to complete a minimum of 450 clinical hours in a range of placements under supervision over the duration of the programme, as well as a minimum of 60 hours of your own personal therapy.

Supervisors complete six-monthly practice competency evaluations, which enable bidirectional feedback and reflection on your progress and continuing professional development in your practice placements. Your personal and professional development is individually monitored and supported throughout the programme via annual reviews and appraisals with a tutor from the programme team.

Professional accreditation

The Professional Doctorate in Counselling Psychology leads to a doctoral qualification that automatically confers professional registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and accreditation as a fully qualified chartered counselling psychologist with the British Psychological Society.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Advanced Research Design and Analysis for Psychology (core, 20 credits)
-Counselling Psychology Practice and Development (core, 20 credits)
-Professional and Ethical Issues (core, 20 credits)
-Psychological Knowledge and Models of Therapy (core, 20 credits)
-Research Project and Critical Skills (core, 60 credits)
-Therapeutic and Reflective Skills (core, 20 credits)
-Working with Difference and Diversity (core, 20 credits)

Year 2 modules include:
-Advanced Psychological Research (core, 160 credits)
-Advanced Psychological Theory and Practice 1 (core, 100 credits)
-Advanced Psychological Theory and Practice 2 (core, 100 credits)

After the course

Career opportunities for counselling psychologists include posts in a variety of areas. These include National Health Service (NHS) settings such as primary care, Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) services, community mental health, drug and alcohol, rehabilitation, eating and personality disorder services, as well as the prison service, voluntary sector, private practice, academia, training, supervision, management and consultancy.

Graduates from the programme frequently go on work in one or more of these areas. Some have gone on to provide practice placements or to supervise or teach students on the programme. The range of advanced clinical and research skills and abilities gained through the course prepare graduates to undertake work in a variety of fields of activity.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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The DBA is our flagship programme in business and management at Portsmouth Business School. It has been designed for private and public sector management professionals who wish to advance their careers by studying and researching for a doctoral degree in business and management. Read more

Why take this course?

The DBA is our flagship programme in business and management at Portsmouth Business School. It has been designed for private and public sector management professionals who wish to advance their careers by studying and researching for a doctoral degree in business and management. It allows students to conduct applied, practice–oriented research on topics that are directly relevant to their employing organisations and provide benefits both for their own careers as well as for the employers.

DBAs are increasingly recognised as valuable alternatives to the traditional PhD doctoral research degree that is mostly much more theory-oriented and less applied to concrete organisational problems and needs. The DBA also includes an intensive taught phase that prepares students in considerable depth for the empirical research that they undertake – usually in the organisation where they are currently employed at a senior/executive level.

What will I experience?

The DBA offers students the opportunity to:

Experience a unique approach to intellectual inquiry emphasizing the integration of theory and practice
Conduct practice-oriented research
Contribute to applied management knowledge
Develop intellectually and personally as an individual, as an executive and as a contributor to the professional community
Gain a prestigious doctoral degree achieved through a rigorous, structured and comprehensive educational experience

What opportunities might ti lead to?

The DBA is aimed at Master’s or MBA-qualified postgraduates who wish to:

Take their management and professional development to new levels
Add to their professional body of knowledge
Further develop their own management careers

The research focus of the DBA addresses real business issues, with the results providing professional outcomes that are of direct relevance to your organisation. Research is both theoretical and practical. The DBA thesis is comparable to a PhD in terms of effort, rigor, contribution to knowledge, supervision and assessment.

Module Details

Our part-time programme involves between three and four years study and includes taught units, research methodology and action research. It is assessed by assignments primarily during year one (taught year), culminating in the final assessment of a doctoral level, research-based report.

The Portsmouth DBA comprises two key stages:

Year one: the taught component and assignment assessments.

Years two, three and four: the research component and final assessment.

A formal ‘Progression Board’, by which students should have successfully completed all first year assignments, denotes progression from stage one to stage two.

Part 1

This is the 'taught' component of the programme, which will equip students with the skills that they will need in preparation for Part 2. Part 1 consists of four units, namely:

Professional Review and Development: This unit will enable you to conduct a critical self-evaluation and identify your own learning requirements in relation to your doctoral programme of study and your own continuous professional development (CPD).

Advanced Research Techniques: This unit is key to your research practice and will allow you to successfully employ appropriate research theory and methodology in your own doctoral study and professional practice.

Publication and Dissemination: This unit focuses on output – analysing and critiquing publication and dissemination routes/methods within the field of business and management. It will cover both academic and professional dissemination in journals, books and conferences, as well as examine the need to communicate effectively with a range of professional groups.

Proposal for Professional Research and Development: This unit will enable you to reflect upon and consolidate prior learning and will underpin the preparation of a costed, coherent, realistic, achievable and well-argued proposal for a programme of professional research and development. This proposal must have been successfully completed in order to be approved by the formal Progression Board.

Part 2

You will study a research unit (Professional Research and Development) spanning years two, three and four. This will primarily involve supervision by your assigned DBA Supervisor and is overseen by the DBA Director, who will seek to ensure that timely progress is being made in the research, resulting in appropriate completion.

Programme Assessment

Our approach to learning is friendly, supportive and participative. The programme encourages active involvement and debate and fosters a lively exchange of ideas and knowledge. Our focus on application, rather than theory alone, is embedded throughout.

In year one, you will need to participate in the taught sessions, workshops and discussion forums and must be available to attend these. There is no attendance requirement in subsequent years, as your research is likely to comprise independent study in your own organisation, although regular meetings with your supervisor will be necessary.

Supervision and support is also a major component of the course. An allocated supervisor will guide and support you throughout your research programme and you will benefit from the ideas and learning experiences of your peers in what we call a ‘learning set’ (a small group of 3 or 4 peers who are at the same stage of DBA research as you).

Assessment is by coursework assignments at the end of the first year and students progress to the individual research phase after having passed the year one assessment. During the first taught year, students are allocated a mentor to help them develop their research topic in more depth and to prepare them for the research phase where they will be guided by a team of two academic supervisors over the following years.

Student Destinations

Your research will endeavour to make a significant original contribution to professional practice and theory relating to business and management. It will also challenge current assumptions and provide authoritative solutions, as well as influence and provide inspiration and leadership for others in the changing environment of professional practice.

Overall, the DBA is the highest level of professional and academic achievement inevitably leading to career growth in your current organisation and paving the way to further employment opportunities.

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This course is for experienced professionals working in various professional contexts. It enables the development of high level skills in the application of research, communication, leadership and consultancy in practice. Read more

This course is for experienced professionals working in various professional contexts. It enables the development of high level skills in the application of research, communication, leadership and consultancy in practice. The professional doctorate is designed to produce professionals who are competent and confident in using their skills to tackle emergent problems in their professional practice, and to develop practice to meet the demands of the 21st century. You will be creating, conceiving, developing and undertaking doctoral projects that require a strong emphasis on individually determined learning and self directed study. The focus of the learning is on collaborative enquiry, shared  learning, individual learning, individual exploration and mutual challenge and support where you and your supervisors relate as professional equals. Emphasis is placed on facilitated learning to enable you to develop detailed, analytical leading edge and lateral ways of thinking that enhance your critical insights into professional and work-based issues.  Autonomy of learning is promoted through registration of a doctoral learning plan devised by you with reference to your own learning requirements.

There are nine doctoral titles available across the University and you select the most appropriate at doctoral research module stage.

Facilitation of learning

Your learning is facilitated through a mix of master class seminar presentations and workshops alongside your colleagues undertaking PhDs. Web-based tools (The Hub and E-Portfolio) are used to facilitate discussion groups online and as a specific learning framework. Summative and formative assessment and discussions maximise opportunities for problem solving, analysis and synthesis of material, project planning and implementation, construction of written reports, reflection and reflective analysis and assimilation and presentation of evidence. Assessment strategies are designed to ensure rigour of academic thinking, and to promote the achievement of your personal and professional goals, augmenting individuals’ experiences and expertise. Normally a cohort of at least six students commences annually. This cohort approach supports doctoral level development, pertinent both to your individual practice and to the wider professional arena.

Teaching hours and attendance

During your initial year of study you will attend QMU for three, one week blocks of study in September, January and April. Further to this, you will meet with your Supervisory Team at least once a semester, but more often monthly, and you will require to undertake a significant amount of independent study. Further study week opportunities are available as you progress. Part-time students should consider carefully how they will achieve this while undertaking their work role.

Links with industry/professional bodies

This is a high-level academic award, extremely relevant to a broad range of arenas across health, business, hospitality, creative industries and social sciences. Doctoral graduates are in a position to investigate and transform professional practice developments. In addition, any work-related project is carried out in conjunction with the student’s work base, ensuring partnership working with all involved, and communication with peers, professional colleagues and policy makers.

Modules

Two work-based learning modules (90 credits each): Theory and Context of Professional Practice/ Development and Evaluation of Professional Practice.

Doctorate Research (60 credits)

You will also complete a thesis (180 credits).

Students enter with ‘advanced standing’, possessing 120 credits from a postgraduate diploma/ master’s award.

Careers

Graduates will already be well established as a professional in their specialist field, but will now have high levels of knowledge and investigative and research skills, which advance practice in professional spheres. The qualification offers you recognition of your expertise and professional standing acknowledged worldwide.

Quick Facts

  • As you choose the focus of your learning within your own professional arena, this course is highly relevant and flexible to your particular context. 
  • The aim of the course is to help you to develop expertise professionally, personally, and in research skills, enabling you to take forward your profession. 
  • This course will give you an internationally recognised high level of qualification. For example: Doctor of Business Administration, Doctor of Social Science, Doctor of Person- Centred Practice.


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The PhD programme in Accounting will facilitate the creation and interpretation of new knowledge by the research student, demonstrated through the thesis. Read more
The PhD programme in Accounting will facilitate the creation and interpretation of new knowledge by the research student, demonstrated through the thesis. The programme comprises a short taught component followed by a longer research phase. Taught modules allow the students to broaden, as well as deepen, their knowledge of research methods at the same time as undertaking their own research and developing a set of transferable professional skills. The taught component is designed to ensure that doctoral researchers understand the breath of techniques used in modern social science research.

Doctoral researchers will be capable of analysing a range of data using a range of qualitative and quantitative techniques. They will be able to explain theories underlying different approaches to social science research. Doctoral researchers are expected to participate to the fullest possible extent in the life of the Department of Accounting and the Business School. This means attending seminars organised by the Department of Accounting and more widely in the Business School thereby helping expose doctoral researchers to new ideas emanating from outside their own area of specialisation. It also requires actively participating in PhD workshops and conferences organised by the Department of Accounting, the Business School and Graduate School as well as institutions outside the University of Birmingham.

Ultimately all doctoral researchers will have the ability to characterise and solve business and accounting problems using advanced research tools. They should be able to derive policy implications from their research and communicate these to policy makers, practitioners and other academics in a manner which is comprehensible. They will also be able to peer review others’ research and offer constructive criticism and to extend the frontiers of the discipline through their own innovative research.

Doctoral researchers may choose to become academics, work in Government, businesses, supranational organisations or in the research arms of major financial institutions. They are expected to achieve a substantial understanding of contemporaneous accounting and business issues enabling them to take a lead in ongoing debates within society. They will be aware of and understand the function of related institutions at both a national and international level.

About Birmingham Business School

At Birmingham Business School we deliver world-class research and teaching that provides the; insight, ambition and skills to shape advanced and sustainable business strategies. We put people at the heart of business and business at the heart of society.

Consistently found in global ranking tables and accredited by leading bodies, AMBA, EQUIS and AACSB. The triple-crown accreditation confirms our position within an elite group of global business schools.

Birmingham Business School is already globally renowned for the quality of our research and teaching. With students representing over 60 countries currently studying at our main campus, our courses being taught in a range of international business schools, and an international faculty and global alumni community of around 23,000 graduates, we have a global footprint that ensures worldwide impact.

Our dedication to providing our students with a rich educational experience within our Business School has led to increased investment in our career services and corporate relations programme. This will further enhance the already excellent career prospects of our graduates, with additional opportunities for project work and internships with leading global businesses.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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Our Computer Science MPhil and PhD programme gives you an opportunity to make a unique contribution to computer science research. Read more
Our Computer Science MPhil and PhD programme gives you an opportunity to make a unique contribution to computer science research. Your research will be supported by an experienced computer scientist within a research group and with the support of a team of advisers.

Research supervision is available under our six research areas, reflecting our strengths, capabilities and critical mass.

Advanced Model-Based Engineering and Reasoning (AMBER)

The AMBER group aims to equip systems and software engineering practitioners with effective methods and tools for developing the most demanding computer systems. We do this by means of models with well-founded semantics. Such model-based engineering can help to detect optimal, or defective, designs long before commitment is made to implementations on real hardware.

Digital Interaction Group (DIG)

The Digital Interaction Group (DIG) is the leading academic research centre for human-computer interaction (HCI) and ubiquitous computing (Ubicomp) research outside of the USA. The group conducts research across a wide range of fundamental topics in HCI and Ubicomp, including:
-Interaction design methods, eg experience-centred and participatory design methods
-Interaction techniques and technologies
-Mobile and social computing
-Wearable computing
-Media computing
-Context-aware interaction
-Computational behaviour analysis

Applied research is conducted in partnership with the DIG’s many collaborators in domains including technology-enhanced learning, digital health, creative industries and sustainability. The group also hosts Newcastle University's cross-disciplinary EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Digital Civics, which focusses on the use of digital technologies for innovation and delivery of community driven services. Each year the Centre awards 11 fully-funded four-year doctoral training studentships to Home/EU students.

Interdisciplinary Computing and Complex BioSystems (ICOS)

ICOS carries out research at the interface of computing science and complex biological systems. We seek to create the next generation of algorithms that provide innovative solutions to problems arising in natural or synthetic systems. We do this by leveraging our interdisciplinary expertise in machine intelligence, complex systems and computational biology and pursue collaborative activities with relevant stakeholders.

Scalable Computing

The Scalable Systems Group creates the enabling technology we need to deliver tomorrow's large-scale services. This includes work on:
-Scalable cloud computing
-Big data analytics
-Distributed algorithms
-Stochastic modelling
-Performance analysis
-Data provenance
-Concurrency
-Real-time simulation
-Video game technologies
-Green computing

Secure and Resilient Systems

The Secure and Resilient Systems group investigates fundamental concepts, development techniques, models, architectures and mechanisms that directly contribute to creating dependable and secure information systems, networks and infrastructures. We aim to target real-world challenges to the dependability and security of the next generation information systems, cyber-physical systems and critical infrastructures.

Teaching Innovation Group

The Teaching Innovation Group focusses on encouraging, fostering and pursuing innovation in teaching computing science. Through this group, your research will focus on pedagogy and you will apply your research to maximising the impact of innovative teaching practices, programmes and curricula in the School. Examples of innovation work within the group include:
-Teacher training and the national Computing at School initiative
-Outreach activities including visits to schools and hosting visits by schools
-Participation in national fora for teaching innovation
-Market research for new degree programmes
-Review of existing degree programmes
-Developing employability skills
-Maintaining links with industry
-Establishing teaching requirements for the move to Science Central

Research Excellence

Our research excellence in the School of Computing Science has been widely recognised through awards of large research grants. Recent examples include:
-Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), Centre for Doctoral Training in Cloud Computing for Big Data Doctoral Training Centre
-Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), Centre for Doctoral Training in Digital Civics
-Wellcome Trust and Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) Research Grant: a £10m project to look at novel treatment for epilepsy, confirming our track record in Systems Neuroscience and Neuroinformatics.

Accreditation

The School of Computing Science at Newcastle University is an accredited and a recognised Partner in the Network of Teaching Excellence in Computer Science.

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Would you like to acquire research skills in both anthropology and ethnography?. Are you considering moving on to doctoral and research degree programmes?. Read more
  • Would you like to acquire research skills in both anthropology and ethnography?
  • Are you considering moving on to doctoral and research degree programmes?
  • Do you want a course that is part of the North West Doctoral Training College (NWDTC)?

This programme is designed to prepare students to carry out doctoral level research in Social Anthropology. It provides training in a wide range of research methods and teaches students how to develop a substantive research project in a theoretically and methodologically informed way. Although primarily intended as preliminary to doctoral research, the MA Anthropological Research programme is also available as a stand-alone taught MA degree for people who wish to improve their social research skills and gain an in-depth understanding of ethnographic methods and approaches.

Students on the MA Anthropological Research work closely with an expert supervisor in Social Anthropology, with further guidance from a second supervisor. All students attend the following core course units: Issues in Ethnographic Research I and II, Postgraduate Research Seminar, Independent Theoretical and Ethnographic Analysis I, and Introduction to Quantitative Methods. In consultation with their supervisor they also select three short, 5 credit modules in qualitative or quantitative research methods. Computer training is also available. Students then select two specialist course units, of which one must be within Social Anthropology (options vary from year to year) and one may be elsewhere in the University.

Contact:

Programme Director: Dr Soumhya Venkatesan

Tel: 0161 275 3917

Email: 

Teaching and learning

IMPORTANT NOTE ON PART-TIME STUDY

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over two years.  There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme.  

You must first check the schedule of the compulsory modules and then select your optional modules to suit your requirements.  

Updated timetable information will be available from mid-August and you will have the opportunity to discuss your module choices during induction week with your Course Director

Coursework and assessment

Under the guidance of their supervisors, students are required to complete eight course units and a 12,000-15,000 word dissertation which is, in effect, a doctoral fieldwork research proposal. This is prepared over the summer period and presented in September. Most course units, including the postgraduate research seminar, are assessed by essays of up to 4,000 words. Some units also involve assessment of presentations and practical work.

Facilities

Social Anthropology, and the School of Social Sciences of which it is part, are based in a modern building which allows 24/7 access.

There is shared workspace available for research students within Social Anthropology including networked computers and printing facilities. There are also many work areas elsewhere in the building and in the University.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

In keeping with the main purpose of the MAAR as a research-training masters, many graduates successfully proceed to undertake PhD studies, whether in Manchester or elsewhere. The MAAR is also an excellent programme in which to acquire skills in social research methods, especially the ethnographic methods that are fast becoming popular in the business, voluntary and educational sectors as a way to find out about how people engage with their everyday worlds.



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Our Professional Doctorates programmes are aimed at busy full-time practitioners from a broad range of professions, both nationally and internationally, including education, educational psychology, social work, community learning and development, psychology, healthcare and policing whether in public, voluntary or private sector agencies. Read more
Our Professional Doctorates programmes are aimed at busy full-time practitioners from a broad range of professions, both nationally and internationally, including education, educational psychology, social work, community learning and development, psychology, healthcare and policing whether in public, voluntary or private sector agencies.

What is a Professional Doctorate about?

This type of doctorate will allow you to reflect on different elements of your professional practice and will contribute to developing evidence, practice and policy in your professional field. Whilst the Professional Doctorates does not certify competence to practice, it does provide you with an opportunity to enhance your own and others' practice.

A professionally based doctoral aims to:
•critically appraise the current evidential basis of professional theory, policy and practice;
•develop relevant advanced specialist research, development & dissemination skills;
•make a valuable and original contribution to knowledge, methodology, practice and policy;
•meets accepted standards of rigour and excellence; and,
•widely disseminate that contribution to knowledge.

What is the structure of the Professional Doctorate programme?

There are 5 modules and students normally take 5 years to complete part-time or 3 years full-time.
•Module 1 - Research Methods
•Module 2 - Literature Review
•Modules 3-5 - Research project(s) consisting of approximately 15,000 words each. It can be 3 small interconnected projects, a double project plus 1, or a single large project.

Up to two modules (one, if granted direct entry to module 2) may be overtaken by Recognition of Prior Learning.

How are Professional Doctorate programmes delivered?

The taught component of module 1 is normally delivered online, so you can complete it in your own time at a distance. If you already have a Masters degree, with an assessed element of research methods, you may not need to complete this module.

These modules are presented as a thesis and assessed by oral examination (viva voce) at the end of the programme.

How will my progress be monitored?

Your progress will be monitored in a variety of ways:

Supervision
Students meet with their supervisors at least every month to support and guide students through their Professional Doctorates.

Presentations and fora
From time to time students are expected to make presentations about their work to other students and staff. This aims to help support students with their work and to build on their work so far. There are also online fora for students to discuss issues relating to their research.

Thesis Monitoring Committee
A Doctoral student’s progress is monitored by an independent Thesis Monitoring Committee within the School. This Committee consists of at least two members of staff not concerned with a student’s supervision and it meets twice per year for full time students, and one per year for part-time students.
After 12 months of study, Doctoral students are expected to present their work to their Thesis Monitoring Committee who will determine the level the student is working at – either Masters of Doctoral level. This process is called Transfer of Ordinance and it confirms whether a student will continue to the next stage of their Professional Doctorates or whether they should transfer to the MPhil programme. Part-time students will normally present before the end of their second year of study.

Viva
At the end of study, students undertake an examining process called Viva Voce to present their thesis to an Examination Board who will determine whether a student’s work is of a high enough standard to be awarded a Professional Doctorate.

What academic skills support will I receive?

We provide Research Methods and Generic Skills Training and students are assigned two supervisors (relevant to the area of a students’ doctorate) who meet with them regularly. Supervision can take place by telephone, email and video conferencing. Guidance can also be drawn from other relevant members of staff with specific expertise.

How will I be guided through the Professional Doctorate?

The University Code of Practice for Supervised Postgraduate Research provides clear guidance on your responsibilities as a student and how you will be supported. Students also receive a School Student Handbook which provides further detail.

What facilities will I have access to?

Professional Doctorates students have access to doctoral student office accommodation, high quality IT facilities, telephones, printing/photocopying and access to financial support to attend research conferences.

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