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Our Conflict Resolution in Divided Societies MA offers a multidisciplinary, comparative study of national, ethnic and religious conflicts in deeply divided societies. Read more

Our Conflict Resolution in Divided Societies MA offers a multidisciplinary, comparative study of national, ethnic and religious conflicts in deeply divided societies. It focuses on cases from the Middle East, comparing these to case studies from around the world, examining the theoretical literature on the causes and consequences of conflict, conflict regulation, and internationally led and grassroots peace processes.

Key benefits

  • Additional academic development, mentoring and time to ensure your intellectual development.
  • A wide range of optional modules taught by international leading scholars in conflict resolution, conflict studies and Middle East studies.
  • Engagement with leading practitioners, including from the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, the British Council, the media, civil society organisations.
  • Exposure to latest debates through regular public lectures organised by the department and its research clusters.
  • Opportunity to study Arabic, Turkish, Farsi or Hebrew through King’s Modern Language Centre.
  • Strong intellectual and methodological foundations for further research. Research skills for archival research as well as qualitative and quantitative research methodologies for the social sciences.
  • Develop communication skills by presenting and disseminating research in written and oral forms to classmates, tutors, and the wider academic community.

Description

This course examines the causes, consequences and outcomes of national, ethnic and religious conflicts in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. It will give you an understanding of theories of conflict and conflict regulation in deeply divided societies and how these apply to a wide range of cases, with special but not exclusive attention given to the Middle

East. Topics covered include, indicatively, the dynamics of nationalism, sectarianism and identity, the role of civil society in peace processes, truth and reconcilation commissions, and the role of collective memory.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

For every 20-credit module, we will provide you with two hours of teaching a week during term time, and we expect you to undertake 180 hours of independent study. For your dissertation, you will have a twelve-session Research Methods course and four hours of consultation with a supervisor. You will undertake 580 hours of independent study. Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

Taught modules: Full-time students can typically expect six hours of lectures/seminars per week and part-time students can expect four hours of lectures/seminars per week in the first year and two hours of lectures/seminars per week in the second year, plus the dissertation methods course and the dissertation module.

Dissertation module: 12-session Research Methods course and four contact hours of consultation with a supervisor.

The approximate workload for 20-credit modules offered by the Department of Middle Eastern Studies is 20 hours of lectures and seminars and 180 hours of self-guided learning. Dissertation: 580 hours self-study and project work.

Assessment

We assess Conflict & Coexistence in Divided Societies module by essays and class participation. 

We assess optional taught modules by essay and, in some cases, by class participation.

Career prospects

Our graduates take the skills that they develop to become leaders in the public and private sectors, academia, government, diplomacy and journalism.



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This route, which is not only the Faculty of Education's doctoral training programme but also accredited by the Economic and Social Research Council, provides a broad-based training in educational research that aims to help students. Read more
This route, which is not only the Faculty of Education's doctoral training programme but also accredited by the Economic and Social Research Council, provides a broad-based training in educational research that aims to help students:

- To become familiar with an appropriate range of intellectual and methodological traditions within the field
- To become skilled and critical readers of educational research
- To develop knowledge in depth of some substantive area of education and educational research
- To develop their capacity to frame research questions and devise appropriate research designs
- To develop confidence in using a range of both qualitative and quantitative approaches to gathering, analysing and interpreting evidence
- To develop their skills in presenting research-based evidence and argument
- To gain practical experience of educational research through conducting a small-scale investigation.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/ededmeeer

Course detail

During their period of study, one year full time or two years part time, students follow six modules on:

1. Research Aims, Strategies of Enquiry and Design
2. Research Methods and Analysis
3. Research, Reporting and Presentation
4. Perspectives on Research Methodology
5. Issues in Data Analysis and Interpretation
6. Thesis Preparation.

Throughout, a student is supported by a supervisor who has expertise in the substantive field of the student's research project.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the programme, students will have:

- a comprehensive understanding of research techniques, and a thorough knowledge of the literature applicable to their specific educational domain;
- demonstrated originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- shown abilities in the critical evaluation of current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- demonstrated self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, and acted autonomously in the planning and implementation of research.

Format

Students attend 2-4 hour taught sessions (a mix of lectures and smaller group seminars) once a week. The course consists of two levels. Introductory Level sessions will offer a general introduction to different aspects of educational research. Intermediate Level sessions are divided into two types: (1) the compulsory main programme of study sessions will offer further elements focused on the foundations of educational research theory and practice; (2) the elective sessions will offer intermediate level topics built on the foundation sessions taught at Introductory Level. Students are required to take all Introductory and Intermediate main programme sessions and should select 11 of the elective elements of the programme. The elective sessions are intended to facilitate students' depth of understanding and application of approaches appropriate to their proposed lines of enquiry. The course has been designed to allow students intending to undertake a particular mode of enquiry to focus more attention on their preferred methods within a framework that still ensures a broad and balanced coverage.

Written feedback is provided on the thesis by two independent assessors. Informally, feedback will also be provided through regular supervisions. Supervisors are required to provide a report on student progress which can be viewed by the student through CGSRS.

Assessment

Thesis: Up to 20,000 words.

Students following the two year MEd programme are required to submit the following in Year 1:
Essay 1: 6,000-6,500 words.
Essay 2: 6,000-6,500 words.

Continuing

Students wishing to continue from the MEd in Educational Research to the PhD or EdD are required to achieve:

1) an average of 70 across both sections with the thesis counting as double-weighted (eg: (Essay 1 + Essay 2 + thesis + thesis) divided by 4 = 70 or above.
Or
2) a straight mark of 70 or higher for the thesis.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

The Faculty is pleased to say that, in general, education students are successful in most of the funding competitions, and, in a typical year, will host students who have been awarded funding from all of the major funding bodies.

In addition, a number of Colleges have their own scholarships/bursaries, but these will be restricted to College members. Finally, it is important to note that deadlines for scholarships and bursaries are early, so applicants are strongly encouraged to explore funding opportunities as soon as possible - at least a year in advance of the start of the course.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Professionally validated by the National Youth Agency, this programme brings together community development and youth work practice with the research methods and theoretical preoccupations of anthropology. Read more

Professionally validated by the National Youth Agency, this programme brings together community development and youth work practice with the research methods and theoretical preoccupations of anthropology.

This programme is fully endorsed by the National Youth Agency for pay and qualification purposes.

This MA is the first of its kind in the country, combining academic and professional qualifications. It is aimed at students who wish to pursue a career in youth and community work and who need a professional qualification. 

Taught jointly by the Departments of Anthropology, and Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies, the programme reflects the common concerns of lecturers in both disciplines.

Established in 1992, it is the first of three pathways, with an additional MA in Applied Anthropology and Community Development launched in 2012 and an MA in Applied Anthropology and Community Arts launched in 2015. The three pathways entail different placements but are taught together, providing much opportunity for exchange of ideas and collaboration amongst students.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Pauline von Hellermann (Department of Anthropology)or Dr Kalbir Shukra (Department of Social and Therapeutic Studies)

Modules & structure

The MA combines an academic programme of lectures, seminars and tutorial assignments with practical experience.

Modules are taken over one academic year if you are studying full-time, and two years if you are studying part-time (part-time study only available to home/EU students).

Full-time students attend on Tuesdays and Thursdays and spend the rest of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies.

Part-time students attend on Thursdays in one year and Tuesdays in the other and spend some of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies

The Department of Anthropology teaches two of the core components of your degree: Contemporary Social Issues and Anthropological Research Methods.

  • The Contemporary Social Issues module runs through the Autumn and Spring Term, with lectures and student-led seminars alternating on a weekly basis. In the autumn it explores key analytical concepts in anthropology and related social sciences relevant to youth and community work, such as class, gender, race and culture. The Spring Term addresses more specific contemporary social issues affecting communities and young people, such as transnationalism, mental health, gentrification and new media. The module is assessed by a take-home exam in May.
  • Anthropological Research Methods is taught in the Spring Term. Here, you will become familiar with ethnographic research and writing. Through literature and practical research exercises (five days of fieldwork is attached to this module), you will learn about different methods of data collection including surveys, in-depth interviews, participant observation and participatory research. It combines weekly lectures and seminar-based work with the completion of a small individual project in the second term. Assessment is by essay, combining project material with theoretical literature.

In addition we strongly encourage all students, in particular those without a background in anthropology, to sit in on other MA option courses offered by the anthropology department, such as Anthropological Theory, Anthropology of Development, Anthropology of Violence, Anthropology of Art and Anthropology and the Environment.

The Department of Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies runs the three fieldwork modules, which involve placements that, are supported by seminars, lectures, workshops and tutorials.

This MA pathway entails a total of 400 hours. This is divided between 20 hours of observations and 380 hours of placements, consisting of three placements with at least two different organisations. The accompanying teaching is divided into three modules.

  • Fieldwork I: Perspectives and Approaches (80 hours practice) In this module you explore key themes, principles, values and competing perspectives underlying youth work and community development. The value of experiential learning approaches and critical pedagogy in informal learning and community development are explored alongside group work principles, processes and theories. You consider your own values and reflect on your practice perspective.
  • Fieldwork 2: Critical Practice (150 hours practice) In this module you critically analyse the changing context of community development and youth work practice, develop as critically reflective practitioners and learn how to recognise and challenge discrimination and oppression. Key themes include ethical dilemmas faced in practice, youth participation and methods of engaging communities with a view to facilitating ‘empowerment’.
  • Fieldwork 3: Management, Enterprise and Development (150 hours practice plus twenty hours observations) This module advances critical understanding of the management of projects, staff and resources, the legal context of community and youth work, how to produce funding bids, prepare budgets and grapple with the issues and processes involved in developing a social enterprise as well as monitoring and evaluation. 

All three modules are currently assessed by an essay, documents completed by the student in relation to the placement and community development national occupational standards learning, a report by the placement supervisor and a fieldwork contract form.

The final placement also involves an assessment of the observations. Overall, at least 200 hours of all fieldwork must be face-to-face with the 11 - 25 year age group.

Download the programme specification, relating to the 2017-18 intake. If you would like an earlier version of the programme specification, please contact the Quality Office.

Please note that due to staff research commitments not all of these modules may be available every year.

Skills & careers

Our graduates find work directly or indirectly related to the disciplines relatively quickly after graduating, or even while on the programme. The majority of our students gain work in youth work or community work. Examples of recent graduate employment include:

  • Full-time health youth worker for a London Borough, leading on LGBTQ awareness and homophobic bullying
  • Community Centre based youth worker
  • Mentoring and Befriending Co-ordinator at a civil society equalities organisation
  • Community Development Worker in a social work team in Hong Kong

Some seek and gain work in a wide range of other settings, often shaped by the particular interests that they develop during their time with us, such as working with refugees or with disability groups. Others join social enterprises to bid for contracts, join newly developing cooperatives or established NGOs in the UK and abroad.



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Why study at Roehampton. Build a rewarding career as a professionally-qualified and State registered art psychotherapist. Graduates are able to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professional Council (HCPC). Read more

Why study at Roehampton

  • Build a rewarding career as a professionally-qualified and State registered art psychotherapist. Graduates are able to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professional Council (HCPC).
  • Follow a syllabus informed by Carl G. Jung’s pioneering theories on analytical psychology.
  • Benefit from our established network of art psychotherapists and gain work experience in supervised clinical placements. 
  • In the Research Excellence Framework 2014, the leading national assessment of quality, 100% of the research we submitted was rated “world leading” or “internationally excellent” for its impact.

Course summary

This course is designed for experienced artists and professionals who have worked within a clinical setting and would like to build a rewarding career as an art psychotherapist.

You will be taught by leading experts who will equip you with the skills, experience, and confidence to work as an art psychotherapist in challenging, yet rewarding environments. Our graduating students are eligible to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professionals Council (HCPC). Registered practitioners work in a variety of different settings including psychiatric hospitals, social services departments, special education, prisons and the voluntary sector.

Our comprehensive programme is divided into three areas covering theory, experiential learning and work placement experience. The theoretical aspect covers child developmental and psychodynamic principles alongside art therapy theory and Jungian analytical psychology. This perspective is located within the larger field of analytical psychotherapy and provides you with an in-depth theoretical underpinning that informs clinical practice. 

A vital part of the programme is a supervised clinical placement which allows you to complete one hundred mandatory days of practice during your training. Placements are available in a variety of settings that include mental health (both in the NHS and other psychiatric hospitals and day centres), disabilities services or in hospitals or social services, special education, or a range of other settings. 

Content

The course is divided into three distinct areas; theory, which will develop your understanding as it relates to clinical practice, experiential learning where you will engage in art therapeutic processes to develop an understanding of the discipline from the inside while developing your identity as an artist, and lastly, a work placement. You will also get the opportunity to collaborate with the other students within the arts and play therapies in workshops and shared modules.

Our full-time course starts with an intensive week followed by two taught days, two further days of clinical placement and one day for studio practice per week. The part-time route starts with an intensive week followed by one day per week in University and a minimum of one further day on clinical placement. You will need to complete one hundred days of supervised clinical practice over the duration of the programme. You will also attend weekly personal therapy which is compulsory to become a professional registered practitioner. 

Modules

Here are examples of modules:

  • Art Psychotherapy Workshop 1: Placement Preparation
  • Art Psychotherapy Workshop 2: Symbols as Language of the Unconscious
  •  Human Development and Growth
  • Theory 2: The Therapeutic Relationship and its Experience and Expression
  • Art Psychotherapy Clinical Placement 1
  • Art Psychotherapy Clinical Placement 2

Career options

Graduates go on to work as art therapists within school adult mental health, community, third sector or NHS day service providers. Most art psychotherapists work within institutions as members of multidisciplinary teams and collaborate with psychiatrists, psychologists and other professionals.

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Food from aquatic systems is essential for much of the world’s population – but wild catches are declining. Fortunately Aquaculture (farming of aquatic animals) is an alternative source of high quality nutrition and employment. Read more

Introduction

Food from aquatic systems is essential for much of the world’s population – but wild catches are declining. Fortunately Aquaculture (farming of aquatic animals) is an alternative source of high quality nutrition and employment. Aquaculture has been very successful but diseases can be damaging. Aquaculture has over 40 years of experience in investigating and controlling fish and shrimp diseases worldwide, which it utilises to improve your problem-solving skills, equipping you to make a real contribution to the sustainability of aquaculture.

Key information

- Degree type: MSc, Postgraduate Diploma
- Study methods: Full-time
- Start date: September
- Course Director: Dr Trevor Telfer

Course objectives

The course is specifically aimed at students with a veterinary science qualification with the object of giving training in the wide range of disciplines and skills necessary for the investigation, prevention and control of aquatic animal diseases. You will gain an understanding of the biology, husbandry and environment of farmed aquatic species, in addition to specialist expertise in aquatic animal diseases. It is also intended to prepare students who plan to pursue a PhD in the area of aquatic animal health or disease.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Structure and content

The full Master’s course for each degree outcome is divided into four taught modules containing 12 subject areas or topics; two Foundation modules, two Advanced modules and a single Research Project module. The overall course is divided into three parts:

- Foundation modules
The Foundation modules are taught between September and December. There are six compulsory topics of study within two taught modules, taken consecutively, giving instruction in basic aquaculture concepts and skills. Successful completion of both Foundation modules will qualify you for a Postgraduate Certificate in Sustainable Aquaculture.

- Advanced modules
The two Advanced modules consisting of six compulsory topics of study are taught between January and April. Successful completion of the advanced modules, subsequent to the Foundation modules, will qualify you for a Postgraduate Diploma in Aquatic Pathobiology.

- Research Project module
The Research Project module is normally completed between April and August, and involves research in many areas of aquatic animal health. These projects mostly laboratory based and often result in peer reviewed publications. Successful completion of the module, subsequent to foundation and advanced modules, will qualify you for an MSc in Aquatic Veterinary Studies.

Delivery and assessment

The course is delivered through a variety of formats including lectures, practical classes, seminars, field visits and directed study. Assessment consists of a number of assignments in a range of formats. The Research Project is graded on activities undertaken during the project, the thesis and a presentation you make in front of your peers, supervisors and examiners. The dissertation is examined by internal and external examiners.

Why Stirling?

REF2014
In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

Rating

The Institute of Aquaculture, with a rating of 2.45 in the latest Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), was graded the top aquaculture department in the UK.

Strengths

The degree has been taught for almost 40 years and only one of its kind. It gives students the unique opportunity to study the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of aquatic animal diseases in cultured organisms in one of the top institutions of the world.

Career opportunities

The course has run for almost 40 years and has trained over 200 students (in combination with Aquatic Pathobiology) from all over the world. It equips you with expertise applicable to a wide range of potential careers. Our graduates generally find employment in their area of interest, and the world employment market in the area of aquatic animal health remains buoyant.
The course provides a natural career progression for most candidates and a conversion course for others wishing to enter the field. It also provides training for those who wish to pursue a PhD, especially in aquaculture, aquatic health, fisheries and aquatic resources management.
Over the last five intakes, in combination with the Aquatic Pathobiology degree, about 30 percent of graduates have gone on to a PhD or further research, about 25 percent have taken employment as fish health consultants or veterinarians, about 20 percent work in government fisheries departments, about 15 percent are university lecturers and the remainder are managers of farms or aquaria or have other types of employment.

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The Institute of Aquaculture is one of a handful of institutions worldwide wholly devoted to aquaculture science and is the only university department of its kind in the UK. Read more

Introduction

The Institute of Aquaculture is one of a handful of institutions worldwide wholly devoted to aquaculture science and is the only university department of its kind in the UK. The Institute is internationally recognised for both research and teaching and has more than 70 staff and 80 postgraduate students.
Our goal is to develop and promote sustainable aquaculture and in pursuit of this carry out research across most areas of aquaculture science including:
- Reproduction and Genetics
- Health Management
- Nutrition
- Environmental Management
- Aquaculture Systems and International Development

Key information

- Degree type: Postgraduate Diploma, MSc
- Study methods: Full-time
- Start date: September The course is available on a block-release basis (by selecting individual or a series of modules) over a period not exceeding five academic years.
- Course Director: Dr Trevor Telfer

Course objectives

You will gain an understanding of the biology, husbandry and environment of farmed aquatic species, in addition to specialist expertise in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of aquatic animal diseases in cultured organisms. It is also intended as preparation for students who plan to pursue a PhD in the area of aquatic animal health or disease.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Structure and content

The full Master’s course for each degree outcome is divided into four taught modules containing 12 subject areas or topics; two foundation modules, two advanced modules and a single Research Project module. The overall course is divided into three parts:

- Foundation modules
The Foundation modules are taught between September and December. There are six compulsory topics of study within two taught modules, taken consecutively, giving instruction in basic aquaculture concepts and skills. Successful completion of both Foundation modules will qualify you for a Postgraduate Certificate in Sustainable Aquaculture.

- Advanced modules
The two advanced modules consisting of six compulsory topics of study are taught between January and April. Successful completion of the advanced modules, subsequent to the Foundation modules, will qualify you for a Postgraduate Diploma in Aquatic Pathobiology.

- Research Project module
The Research Project module is normally completed between April and August, and involves research in many areas of aquatic animal health. These projects are mostly laboratory based and often result in peer-reviewed publications. Successful completion of the module, subsequent to foundation and advanced modules, will qualify you for an MSc in Aquatic Pathobiology.

Delivery and assessment

The course is delivered though a variety of formats including lectures, practical classes, seminars, field visits and directed study. Assessment consists of a number of assignments in a range of formats. The Research Project is graded on your activities during the project, your dissertation and a seminar presentation made in front of your peers, supervisors and examiners. The dissertation is examined by Aquaculture and external examiner.

Why Stirling?

REF2014
In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

Rating

The Institute of Aquaculture, with a rating of 2.45 in the latest Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), was graded the top aquaculture department in the UK.

Strengths

The degree has been taught for almost 40 years and only one of its kind. It give students the unique opportunity to study the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of aquatic animal diseases in cultured organisms in one of the top institutions of the world.

Career opportunities

This course has run for almost 40 years and has trained over 200 students (in combination with Aquatic Veterinary Studies) from all over the world. It equips graduates with expertise applicable to a wide range of potential careers. The career path selected depends on your personal interests, as well as your previous experiences. Our graduates generally find employment in their area of interest and the world employment market in the area of aquatic animal health remains buoyant.
The course provides a natural career progression for most candidates and a conversion course for others wishing to enter the field. It also provides training for those who wish to pursue a PhD, especially in aquaculture, aquatic health, fisheries and aquatic resources management.
Over the last five intakes, in combination with the Aquatic Veterinary Studies degree, about 30 percent of graduates have gone on to a PhD or further research, about 25 percent have taken employment as aquatic health consultants, about 20 percent work in government fisheries departments, about 15 percent are university lecturers and the remainder are managers of farms or aquaria or have other types of employment.

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This exciting. MRes Computer Science. course is designed to give you the opportunity to develop research skills in a computing area that meets your interests and career development needs. Read more

This exciting MRes Computer Science course is designed to give you the opportunity to develop research skills in a computing area that meets your interests and career development needs. It allows you to combine material from any of our taught Masters courses in the computing suite with an extended research project over a one-year period.

Current demands are greater than ever for individuals to attain postgraduate levels of qualification in an increasingly competitive jobs market. As a result, the MRes Computer Science has been designed to meet the needs of students and employers, providing superior qualified graduates to national and international employers.

The MRes is divided into a taught element (60 credit points) and a laboratory-based research project (120 credit points).

This MSc Computer Science course offers the chance to study a range of topics in the computer science area, including principles of system design, software engineering, enterprise computing, computing architecture and applications of artificial intelligence. You will also have the opportunity to undertake an individual project, based on subjects that interest you, as well as research at the University or your industrial experience if you do a placement.

Demand for high-level software engineering skills continues to rise. Employers are finding it increasingly hard to recruit suitably qualified programmers and software technologists and so, with its emphasis on the application of the latest research ideas, the course will give you the skills to enjoy a highly rewarding career in the cutting-edge computing industry.

The MSc is divided into 60 credit point taught modules and the research project is worth 60 credit points.

Modules

  • Major Project
  • Research Methods
  • Advanced Software Engineering
  • Systems Analysis and Design
  • Service-oriented Cloud Technologies
  • Applied Artificial Intelligence
  • Mobile Interactive Systems
  • Internet Programming
  • 3D Games Algorithms
  • Computer Forensics
  • Robotics and Cybernetics
  • Computer Security
  • Embedded Systems
  • Mobile Networks
  • Network and Cloud Security
  • Wireless Communications

COME VISIT US ON OUR NEXT OPEN DAY!

Visit us on campus throughout the year, find and register for our next open event on http://www.ntu.ac.uk/pgevents.



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The course is aimed at graduates and professionals with a background in any area of 2 or 3 dimensional design. You will learn how to apply design visualisation techniques and strategies to areas such as product design, interior design, graphic design and various other specialisations. Read more

Summary

The course is aimed at graduates and professionals with a background in any area of 2 or 3 dimensional design. You will learn how to apply design visualisation techniques and strategies to areas such as product design, interior design, graphic design and various other specialisations. Students will evaluate, choose and apply relevant theories, concepts and techniques to the solution of design and the knowledge that underpins it.

Graduates from this course can use their acquired knowledge and skills in a variety of jobs including: design practice: in-house and consultancy; design entrepreneurship- self-employment; 3D design visualisation in interior design, architecture, product design, 3D virtual environments for games; education as teachers/lecturers of design-related topics.

This is a 45-week course divided into three 15 week trimesters. Each trimester is divided into a ten week structured programme followed by five weeks of independent learning and reflection.

Modules

The Postgraduate Certificate (PgCert) stage offers a choice of modules in which you will study Design Realisation which has a choice of project briefs from other MA programmes within the school, such as Interior or Product Design and Design Visualisation. Here you will complete a project showcasing your analogue and digital visualisation techniques, also exploring the potential of processes that are not totally dependent on digital technologies. These include evolutionary mock-ups, scenario enactment, physical modelling, two and three-dimensional collages and other animation techniques.

The Postgraduate Diploma (PgDip) stage offers a choice of modules such as Competition or Collaboration and Collaborative Practice (Co-Lab). The competition brief will be based on a contemporary project where you will initially collaborate with other product or interior design MA students. Co-Lab offers a choice of exciting project briefs which can then be incorporated into the planning of your personal project. Each project brief will demonstrate your strengths in a chosen range of visualisation techniques, and the potential of those techniques for enhancing the effectiveness of an appropriate design process.

The Master's stage will require completion of a personal project.

Assessment

Assessments will take place during individual/ group presentations at interim stages and at the end of each module. Immediate verbal feedback is given to students during the interim stages and written feedback is given at the end of each module.

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The course is available in Standard Track and in Special Track. Course Structure. Part 1 (Diploma). In addition to the Principal Subject, in which the student specialises; up to three additional subjects can be studied. Read more
The course is available in Standard Track and in Special Track

Course Structure
Part 1 (Diploma):

In addition to the Principal Subject, in which the student specialises; up to three additional subjects can be studied. Total of 120 credits.

Part 2 (MA):

Normally consists of a dissertation, composition portfolio, or critical edition (in the area of the Principal Subject). Total of 60 credits.

Course description
Standard Track:

The course combines specialisation in one area (including Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Composition, Solo Performance) with further training in up to three complimentary areas.

The range of choice on this course makes it one of the most flexible MA programmes in the UK. Students can make their education as broad or narrow as they wish. For those with a single-minded interest in one area specialised degrees are available.

The programme is divided into two parts: two semesters of taught study (Part I, 120 credits) and a substantial independent piece of work in the main area, produced over the summer (Part II, 60 credits).

Part 1 is centred on the Principal Subject module (WMM4044, 40 credits) in the student’s main area of interest. It lays the foundations of a Part 2 project in the same area. The following subjects are available:

Historical Musicology
Editorial Musicology
Ethnomusicology
Celtic Traditional Music
Music in Wales
Music and the Christian Church
Composition
Electroacoustic Composition
Composing Film Music
Studying Film Music
Solo Performance
Sacred Music Studies
Early Music
20th-/21st-century Music
WMP4052 Preparing for the Part 2 project (10 credits) acts as a bridge between Parts 1 and 2.

An additional 40 credits will be gained through submissions in other fields through either one Major Open Submission (WXM4046, 40 credits) or two Minor Open Submissions (WMP4047 and WMP4048, 20 credits each). Students can select from a number of subject areas, including, but not restricted to, those listed above. Additional offerings include modules in Arts Administration, Music in the Community, Ethnomusicology and Analysis.

Depending on the main area of specialism, students will attend a core module in musicology (WMP4041 Current Musicology, 30 credits) or composition (WMP4042 Contexts and Concepts in Composition, 30 credits). During these modules students will became familiar with up-to-date research and creative techniques and methodologies in the selected disciplines.

Subject-specific teaching is provided through a combination of individual tuition and seminar session in small groups. Within each of the chosen subject areas, students can identify their own projects, for which they will receive expert supervision.

Special Track:

The MA in Music (Special Track) allows students to specialise in any one of the following areas: Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Celtic Traditional Music, Music in Wales, Studying Film Music.

All the training will be centred on the student’s main area, aided by a broader look at the methodological foundation of the discipline as a whole (through the core module in musicology).

The programme is divided into two parts: two semesters of taught study (Part 1, 120 credits) and a substantial independent piece of work in the main area, produced over the summer (Part 2, 60 credits).

Part 1 is centred on the Principal Subject module (WMM4045, 60 credits) in the student’s area of specialism. Another aspect of the same area will be explored in the Independent Special Study (WMP4049, 20 credits).

WMP4052 Preparing for the Part 2 project (10 credits) acts as a bridge between Parts 1 and 2.

Depending on the main area of specialism, students will attend a core module in musicology (WMP4041 Current Musicology, 30 credits) or composition (WMP4042 Contexts and Concepts in Composition, 30 credits). During these modules students will became familiar with up-to-date research and creative techniques and methodologies in the selected disciplines.

Subject-specific teaching is provided through a combination of individual tuition and seminar session in small groups. Within each of the chosen subject areas, students can identify their own projects, for which they will receive expert supervision.

Compulsory modules:

Standard Track

Principal Subject, to be chosen from the published list for that Academic Year (40 Credits). Study areas currently offered are: Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Ethnomusicology, Celtic Traditional Music, Music in Wales, Music and the Christian Church, Composition, Electroacoustic composition / Sonic arts, Composing Film Music, Studying Film Music, Solo Performance, Music in the Community, Sacred Music Studies, Early Music, 20th-/21st-century Music.
Compulsory Core Module: either Current Musicology (for musicologists) or Concepts of Composition (for composers) (depending on the Principal Subject) (30 Credits).
Open submissions: to be chosen from the optional modules (40 credits).
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits).
(Total of 120 credits)

Special Track

Principal Subject, to be chosen from the published list for that Academic Year (60 Credits). Study areas currently offered: Historical Musicology; Editorial Musicology; Music in the Christian Church; Celtic Traditional Music; Music in Wales; Studying Film Music).
Compulsory Core Module: either Current Musicology (for musicologists) or Concepts of Composition (for composers) (depending on the Principal Subject) (30 Credits).
Independent Special Study (must be in the same area as the Principal Subject) (20 credits)
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits)
(Total of 120 credits)

Optional modules:

Standard Track

Open Submissions (40 or 20 credits) may be chosen in any of the following study areas (but have to be different from the Principal Subject): Historical Musicology; Editorial Musicology; Ethnomusicology; Celtic Traditional Music; Music in Wales; Music and the Christian Church; Composition; Electroacoustic Composition / Sonic Arts; Composing Film Music; Studying Film Music; Solo Performance; Sacred Music Studies; Early Music; 20th-/21st-century Music; Analysis, Arts Administration, Music Studio Techniques, Popular Music Studies, Techniques and Practice of Instrumental or Vocal Teaching (20 credits only), Performance Practice (20 credits only), Music for Instruments and Electronics (20 credits only), Supporting Studies (20 credits only), ELCOS Language Skills (20 credits, international students only.ded study (e.g. portfolio of compositions, performance recital).

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The 21st century business environment requires managers who can understand the complex challenges that shape today’s increasingly globalised marketplace and keep up with the pace of change. Read more
The 21st century business environment requires managers who can understand the complex challenges that shape today’s increasingly globalised marketplace and keep up with the pace of change.

The Bath MSc in International Management provides you with an advanced understanding of the international business environment by developing your global perspectives on business, informed by a deep understanding of the different national and cultural contexts in which firms operate.

Our MSc in International Management is an intensive full-time programme lasting 12 months. The programme is divided into two 11-week semesters of taught content, and the summer period, where you can choose between a research dissertation and the practice track where you will be asked to apply what you have learned on your degree to practical problems and issues facing an organisation.

Visit the website http://www.bath.ac.uk/management/msc_international/

Why the MSc in International Management?

Our MSc in International Management is distinct from other international management programmes because it offers an interdisciplinary and cross-functional perspective, integrating management studies with a broader understanding of the international economic environment.

It provides an integrative understanding of international management themes by developing your broad knowledge of contemporary business including:
-the tools and techniques associated with operating an organization across borders;
-the relationship between different functional elements of the firm and its relationship to the external environment;
-the interactions between firms, governments and society in an international context

If you want a successful career in the world of international business, the Bath MSc in International Management could be the programme for you.

Programme Structure

Our MSc in International Management is an intensive full-time programme lasting 12 months. The programme is divided into two 11-week semesters of taught content, and the summer period, where you can choose between a research dissertation and the practice track. The dissertation gives you an opportunity to undertake a substantive piece of independent research that matches your own academic interests. The practice track is designed to allow you to apply learned concepts and theories to the practical problems and issues of a company, and it will allow you to undertake a number of tasks, both working in teams and working individually.

In Semester 1 you will study four compulsory units and one optional unit. The compulsory units are:
-The Global Environment of Business (spans both semesters)
-International Business Strategy
-Cross-Cultural Management
-Analysing International Management

The optional units include: Business Ethics; International Relations Theories; Global Marketing; Entrepreneurship and Innovation; The European Union as a Global Economic Actor

For students with advanced understanding of a particular language, you can also choose a language module: French, German or Spanish, delivered by the University’s Foreign Languages Centre

In Semester 2 you will study one compulsory units and four optional units: The compulsory unit is:
-Analysing International Management

The optional units are currently:
(choose 4, with a minimum of 3 from List A)

List A
-Financial management for international business
-Project management
-Supply management
-Business in emerging markets
-Environmental management
-Global governance and accountability

List B
Students with advanced understanding of a particular language can also choose a language module: French, German or Spanish.
*Please note that modules and unit content are subject to change. Please see the latest programme catalogue for information on courses currently available.

Summer period

During the summer period you will be able to choose between two tracks: (1) dissertation track and (2) practice track. Both tracks allow you to demonstrate critical insight and reflective thinking about business/management/policy issues. The tracks also help develop your written and presentation skills, and your ability to develop effective arguments. All of these attributes are transferable skills relevant to the workplace and your future career.

Dissertation track

The dissertation track gives you the opportunity to do a piece of substantial work on your own, demonstrating originality, innovation, drive, and determination. The dissertation also enables you to plan and execute your own project, giving you complete choice and flexibility.

Practice track

The practice track allows you to undertake a number of tasks, both working in teams with other members of your cohort and working individually. The practice track is designed to allow you to apply learned concepts and theories to practical problems and issues, including a management problem which will be presented to you by an organisation. This track also provides opportunities for gaining practical experience in running team projects.

BMT Hi-Q Sigma to present Case Week Project

BMT Hi-Q Sigma, a Management Consultancy providing advice and insight across Government, Defence, Energy and Transport industries, will present a business problem to practice track students as part of Case Week in June.

You will then have two weeks to propose your own solutions to the problem, using the skills and knowledge gained during the programme, under guidance from your supervisors. The week will culminate with presentations to BMT Hi-Q Sigma.

Career development and Support

We recognise that enhancing your employability is a primary goal for undertaking a Master's degree at Bath. We have a successful track record and extensive experience of working with a wide range of global organisations to develop the right skills and competencies that our students will need to achieve their career goals.

Destinations of our MSc in International Management graduates (2014):

93% of 2014 International Management graduates were employed within 6 months of graduation. Our outstanding record for employability is reflected in the companies and organisations where these graduates now work:

Recruiters include:

Abercrombie and Fitch
China Development Bank
Deloitte
Ford Motor Company
Google
IRIS Intelligence
JC Decaux
Nomura Research Institute
Siemens
Statoil Fuel & Retail AS

Career Development Programme

Our expert careers team is dedicated to providing first class careers support exclusively for School of Management MSc students.
We offer a Comprehensive Career Development Programme and provide an individual service by working with you on a one-to-one basis to identify your career goals and help you to plan your job search.

Our Career Development programme is integrated into your MSc timetable and includes;

- An overview of career opportunities in different sectors
- Workshops on the recruitment process including: CVs, cover letters, application forms and interview advice
- Mock interviews and assessment centres
- Opportunities to network with graduate recruiters, sector specialists and alumni
- Guest speakers, company visits and presentations, employer-led skills sessions
- Development of employability skills by participating in company sponsored community projects
- Week-long business immersion week - The Future Business Challenge
- Additional support for international students and those seeking global job opportunities

A highly ranked business school

We have established ourselves as one of Europe’s leading business schools and 2016 marks the 50th Anniversary of the University of Bath, celebrating our past achievements and looking forward.

The School of Management is one of the UK's leading business schools. Currently ranked 1st for Student Experience (Times Higher Education 2015) (http://www.bath.ac.uk/management/about/rankings.html#NSS) and 1st for Business & Management (The Complete University Guide 2016) (http://www.thecompleteuniversityguide.co.uk/league-tables/rankings?s=Business+%26+Management+Studies), we are a leading centre for management research - placed 8th in the UK in the latest REF2014 (http://www.bath.ac.uk/management/about/rankings.html#ref) for business and management studies, confirming the world-class standing of our faculty.

Find out about the department here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/management/faculty/

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/management/msc-operations-logistics-supply-chain/how-to-apply

Government Loans

A new system of postgraduate loans for Masters courses is being developed for students at English universities. There will be loans of up to £10,000 available for Masters students starting a course in 2016/17. More information is available on the study site (http://www.bath.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/taught/government-loans/index.html) and the government website external website.

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Professionally validated by the National Youth Agency, this programme brings together community development and youth work practice with the research methods and theoretical preoccupations of anthropology. Read more

Professionally validated by the National Youth Agency, this programme brings together community development and youth work practice with the research methods and theoretical preoccupations of anthropology.

This MA is the first of its kind in the country, combining academic and professional qualifications. It is aimed at students who wish to pursue a career in youth and community work and who need a professional qualification. 

Taught jointly by the Departments of Anthropology, and Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies, the programme reflects the common concerns of lecturers in both disciplines.

Established in 1992, it is the first of three pathways, with an additional MA in Applied Anthropology and Community Development launched in 2012 and an MA in Applied Anthropology and Community Arts launched in 2015. The three pathways entail different placements but are taught together, providing much opportunity for exchange of ideas and collaboration amongst students.

Modules & structure

The MA combines an academic programme of lectures, seminars and tutorial assignments with practical experience.

Modules are taken over one academic year if you are studying full-time, and two years if you are studying part-time (part-time study only available to home/EU students).

Full-time students attend on Tuesdays and Thursdays and spend the rest of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies.

Part-time students attend on Thursdays in one year and Tuesdays in the other and spend some of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies

The Department of Anthropology teaches two of the core components of your degree: Contemporary Social Issues and Anthropological Research Methods.

  • The Contemporary Social Issues module runs through the Autumn and Spring Term, with lectures and student-led seminars alternating on a weekly basis. In the autumn it explores key analytical concepts in anthropology and related social sciences relevant to youth and community work, such as class, gender, race and culture. The Spring Term addresses more specific contemporary social issues affecting communities and young people, such as transnationalism, mental health, gentrification and new media. The module is assessed by a take-home exam in May.
  • Anthropological Research Methods is taught in the Spring Term. Here, you will become familiar with ethnographic research and writing. Through literature and practical research exercises (five days of fieldwork is attached to this module), you will learn about different methods of data collection including surveys, in-depth interviews, participant observation and participatory research. It combines weekly lectures and seminar-based work with the completion of a small individual project in the second term. Assessment is by essay, combining project material with theoretical literature.

In addition we strongly encourage all students, in particular those without a background in anthropology, to sit in on other MA option courses offered by the anthropology department, such as Anthropological Theory, Anthropology of Development, Anthropology of Violence, Anthropology of Art and Anthropology and the Environment.

The Department of Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies runs the three fieldwork modules, which involve placements that, are supported by seminars, lectures, workshops and tutorials.

This MA pathway entails a total of 400 hours. This is divided between 20 hours of observations and 380 hours of placements, consisting of three placements with at least two different organisations. The accompanying teaching is divided into three modules.

  • Fieldwork I: Perspectives and Approaches (80 hours practice) In this module you explore key themes, principles, values and competing perspectives underlying youth work and community development. The value of experiential learning approaches and critical pedagogy in informal learning and community development are explored alongside group work principles, processes and theories. You consider your own values and reflect on your practice perspective.
  • Fieldwork 2: Critical Practice (150 hours practice) In this module you critically analyse the changing context of community development and youth work practice, develop as critically reflective practitioners and learn how to recognise and challenge discrimination and oppression. Key themes include ethical dilemmas faced in practice, youth participation and methods of engaging communities with a view to facilitating ‘empowerment’.
  • Fieldwork 3: Management, Enterprise and Development (150 hours practice plus twenty hours observations) This module advances critical understanding of the management of projects, staff and resources, the legal context of community and youth work, how to produce funding bids, prepare budgets and grapple with the issues and processes involved in developing a social enterprise as well as monitoring and evaluation. 

All three modules are currently assessed by an essay, documents completed by the student in relation to the placement and community development national occupational standards learning, a report by the placement supervisor and a fieldwork contract form.

The final placement also involves an assessment of the observations. Overall, at least 200 hours of all fieldwork must be face-to-face with the 11 - 25 year age group.

Skills & careers

Increasing employment prospects are central to this programme.

Our graduates find work directly or indirectly related to the disciplines relatively quickly after graduating, or even while on the programme. The majority of our students gain work in youth work or community work. Examples of recent graduate employment include:

  • Full-time health youth worker for a London Borough, leading on LGBTQ awareness and homophobic bullying
  • Community Centre based youth worker
  • Mentoring and Befriending Co-ordinator at a civil society equalities organisation
  • Community Development Worker in a social work team in Hong Kong

Some seek and gain work in a wide range of other settings, often shaped by the particular interests that they develop during their time with us, such as working with refugees or with disability groups. Others join social enterprises to bid for contracts, join newly developing cooperatives or established NGOs in the UK and abroad.



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This MSc focuses on the design, creation, and operation of democratic institutions. Read more

This MSc focuses on the design, creation, and operation of democratic institutions. Students gain understanding of when a given set of institutes are appropriate for a society and what will make them function, and how scholars have thought about these matters, applying theory to examples of institution-building and design.

About this degree

Students are equipped with the theoretical tools and empirical evidence necessary for an in-depth understanding of democratic institutions and politics. They develop an understanding of the potential benefits and pitfalls of different institutional designs, reforms, and administrative practices, and are able to analyse problems raised by new and reforming democracies.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four compulsory core modules (75 credits), optional modules (45 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

  • Democracy and Constitutional Design (30)
  • Democratic Political Institutions (15)
  • Introduction to Qualitative Methods or Advanced Qualitative Methods (15)
  • Introduction to Quantitative Methods or Advanced Quantitative Methods (15)

Optional modules

Choose one of the following 15 credit modules (the other two remain available as options):

  • Parliaments, Political Parties and Policy Making (15)
  • Governing Divided Societies (15)
  • The European Union, Globalisation and the State (15)

Choose further modules up to a value of 30 credits in total from a list here

The following are suggestions:

  • Public Policy Economics and Analysis (PPEA) (15)
  • NGO, Non-Profit and Voluntary Sector Policy and Management (15)
  • Making Policy Work (15)
  • Equality, Justice and Difference (15)
  • Public Ethics (15)
  • Agenda Setting and Public Policy (15)
  • British Government & Politics (15)
  • Law and Regulation I (15)
  • International Political Economy (15)
  • Governing Divided Societies (15)
  • Gendering the Study of Politics: Theory and Practice (15)
  • Conflict Resolution and Post-War Development (15)
  • Democracy and Accountability: Holding Power to Account (15)

Dissertation/report

All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures and seminars. Assessment is through unseen examinations, long essays, coursework, and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Democracy and Comparative Politics MSc

Careers

Alumni of this programme work in a variety of fields. Many take on roles within their home governments, and a substantial number find jobs with non-governmental organisations (NGOs), working in their home countries or abroad. Some work for a research institutes or provide research for business, and a small number have also gone on to PhD study.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Account Manager, Financial Times
  • Political Organiser, David Lammy MP
  • Consultant, World Bank Group
  • Parliamentary Assistant, UK Parliament
  • Senior Policy Adviser, Civil Service

Employability

Graduates of the programme are equipped with the theoretical tools and empirical evidence necessary for entry into the world of government policy, non-governmental organisations, or the private sector.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Political Science is recognised as a centre of excellence in the field and offers a uniquely stimulating environment for the study of democracy and comparative politics.

Students on the programme benefit from greater interaction with fellow students and academic staff due to small class sizes.

London features a wealth of seminars, conferences, and other events on democratic topics. These provide a means for students to expand their knowledge and to extend their professional networks prior to entering the job market.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Political Science

89% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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The programme is a full-time taught postgraduate degree course leading to the degree of MSc in Biomedical Engineering. Read more
The programme is a full-time taught postgraduate degree course leading to the degree of MSc in Biomedical Engineering. It has an international dimension, providing an important opportunity for postgraduate engineers to study the principles and state-of-the-art technologies in biomedical engineering with a particular emphasis on applications in advanced instrumentation for medicine and surgery.

Why study Biomedical Engineering at Dundee?

Biomedical engineers apply engineering principles and design methods to improve our understanding of living systems and to create new techniques and instruments in medicine and surgery.

The taught modules in this course expose students to the leading edge of modern medical and surgical technologies. The course also provides concepts and understanding of the role of entrepreneurship, business development and intellectual property exploitation in the biomedical industry, with case examples.

The research project allows students to work in a research area of their own particular interest, learning skills in presentation, critical thinking and problem-solving. Project topics are offered to students during the first semester of the course.

UK qualifications are recognised and respected throughout the world. The University of Dundee is one of the top UK universities, with a powerful research reputation, particularly in the medical and biomedical sciences. It has previously been named 'Scottish University of the Year' and short-listed for the Sunday Times 'UK University of the Year'.

Links with Universities in China:

This course can be taken in association with partner universities in China with part of the course taken at the home institution before coming to Dundee to complete your studies. For students from elsewhere it is possible to take the entire course at Dundee.

What's so good about Biomedical Engineering at Dundee?

The University of Dundee has had an active research programme in biomedical engineering for over 20 years.

The Biomedical Engineering group has a high international research standing with expertise in medical instrumentation, signal processing, biomaterials, tissue engineering, advanced design in minimally invasive surgery and rehabilitation engineering.

Research partnerships:

We have extensive links and research partnerships with clinicians at Ninewells Hospital (largest teaching hospital in Europe) and with world renowned scientists from the University's College of Life Sciences. The new Institute of Medical Science and Technology (IMSaT) at the University has been established as a multidisciplinary research 'hothouse' which seeks to commercialise and exploit advanced medical technologies leading to business opportunities.

This course has two start dates - September or January, and lasts for 12 months.

How you will be taught

The structure of the MSc course is divided into two parts. The taught modules expose students to the leading edge of modern biomedical and surgical technologies. The course gives concepts and understanding of the role of entrepreneurship, business development and intellectual property exploitation in the biomedical industry, with case examples.

The research project allows students to work in a research area of their own particular interest, learning skills in presentation, critical thinking and problem-solving. Project topics are offered to students towards at the beginning of second semester of the course.

What you will study

The course is divided into two parts:

Part I (60 Credits):

Bioinstrumentation (10 Credits)
Biomechanical Systems (20 Credits)
Biomaterials (20 credits)
Introduction to Medical Sciences (10 Credits)
Part II (120 Credits) has one taught module and a research project module. It starts at the beginning of the University of Dundee's Semester 2, which is in mid-January:

The taught module, Advanced Medical and Surgical Instrumentation (30 Credits), exposes students to the leading edge of modern medical and surgical technologies. It will also give concepts and understanding of the role of entrepreneurship, business development and intellectual property exploitation in the biomedical industry, with case examples.
The research project (90 Credits) will allow students to work in a research area of their own particular interest and to learn skills in presentation, critical thinking and problem-solving. Project topics will be offered to students before Part II of the course. We shall do our best to provide all students with a project of their choice.
The time spent in Dundee will also give students a valuable educational and cultural experience.

How you will be assessed

The course is assessed by coursework and examination, plus dissertation.

Careers

An MSc degree in Biomedical Engineering will prepare you for a challenging and rewarding career in one of many sectors: the rapidly growing medical technology industry, academic institutions, hospitals and government departments.

A wide range of employment possibilities exist including engineer, professor, research scientist, teacher, manager, salesperson or CEO.

The programme also provides the ideal academic grounding to undertake a PhD degree leading to a career in academic research.

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This Professional Graduate Diploma in Education is for graduates wishing to enter the teaching profession in Scotland at secondary level. Read more

This Professional Graduate Diploma in Education is for graduates wishing to enter the teaching profession in Scotland at secondary level.

The one-year programme is the Scottish route to qualified teacher status. We aim to prepare you for the range of roles that teachers are expected to play: a competent, reflective classroom practitioner; a collaborator who contributes to the wider informal curriculum of the school; a subject specialist and curriculum developer; and a teacher in society, whether building strong relationships with parents or contributing to national policy debates.

The 36-week secondary programme is divided equally between University- based and school-based activities.

The programme is designed to prepare you for the range of roles that teachers are expected to play:

  • a competent, reflective classroom practitioner
  • a collaborator who contributes to the wider informal curriculum of the school
  • a subject specialist and a curriculum developer
  • a teacher in society, whether building strong relationships with parents or contributing to national policy debates

We currently offer our secondary programme in the following subjects:

  • art and design
  • biology
  • chemistry
  • design and technology
  • drama
  • English
  • geography
  • history
  • mathematics
  • modern foreign languages (Chinese, French, German)
  • music
  • physical education
  • physics

Programme structure

This 36-week programme, starting in late August, is divided into three blocks, of 16 weeks, 11 weeks and nine weeks. Each block contains an equal balance between University-based and school-based activities.

Campus activities will include lectures and workshops, with a focus on student-centred learning in a multidisciplinary setting. School activities will include observation and analysis of teaching and learning, through to developing and implementing your own teaching practice.



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The International Relations MA degree investigates themes as varied as the evolution of the discipline, globalisation, international law, diplomacy, war and peace. Read more
The International Relations MA degree investigates themes as varied as the evolution of the discipline, globalisation, international law, diplomacy, war and peace.

The course has been designed to enable newcomers to engage readily with the subject, whilst offering those who already have a background in international relations an opportunity to deepen their exploration of its scope and complexities.

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

The University is international in its outlook and the diversity of the student population enriches the learning environment. The course equally benefits from world-class researchers in the School of Humanities, whilst also borrowing expertise from sister schools and research centres. Of particular value are reciprocal links with distinguished scholars at universities around the world, as well as relationships with IR practitioners in government, non-governmental organisations, international organisations and prominent think-tanks.

The application of theory to practice is fundamental to the course. It is with this practicality in mind that the MA is further divided into three specialisms: Diplomacy; African Governance and Security and International Law. The course also allows you to personally experience applied IR, offering credit-bearing field trips, for example to participate in the Model United Nations in New York, that expose you to the realities of formulating foreign and security policies and translating ideas into practice.

Likewise, there’s the opportunity to gain first-hand experience through participating in volunteering and placement opportunities and longer, subsidised, post-award internships. Students can also take part in online international learning: meeting, working and collaborating with peers from diverse backgrounds, cultures and nationalities without leaving the UK by, for example, taking part in live debates with students in Italy, presenting with peers in Mexico, or developing case studies with colleagues in Russia.

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

The MA International Relations is divided into specialisms with each grounded in an exploration of the theoretical bases of IR. Your choice of optional subjects and the topic you research for your final dissertation will determine the path you take through the course. You will also receive an induction into the study skills required for academic study at postgraduate level and explore global professional practice, learning how to critically evaluate and develop solutions to complex, inter-related, multi faceted issues, working with students across disciplines to facilitate an appreciation of how different sectors solve internal issues and how different sectors can learn and adopt solutions from other fields.

Students take three mandatory subjects designed to establish the core agenda of the programme:
-Trafficking in Human Beings
-Diplomacy and the International System
-Applied International Relations Theory

You also choose two options from:
-International Law in the Contemporary World Arena
-International Political Economy
-Governance for Security in the Developing World
-Post-colonial African Politics
-Threats to Global Security
-International Security Praxis

Finally, to attain the award of Master of Arts, you must complete an extended dissertation examining in depth an area of the course that particularly interests you based on research undertaken with the support of a dedicated supervisor.

HOW WILL THIS COURSE ENHANCE MY CAREER PROSPECTS?

As an internationally recognised discipline whose graduates are increasingly sought after by employers, International Relations can open career prospects in the international and domestic spheres – in public administration within government or between governments. Moreover, by choosing a specialism, you can opt to focus on one of three prominent areas within International Relations. The Diplomacy specialism aims to equip you with the skills needed for employment in your national diplomatic service and international governmental and nongovernmental organisations. The International Law specialism can open career opportunities in, among other areas, criminal justice, aid and development, environmental protection, gender issues and human rights. If choosing the African Governance and Security specialism, you’ll develop an understanding of one of the world’s fastest growing regions with potential career opportunities in the domestic and international public and private sectors.

The course also encourages a critical approach to problem-solving and provides the key transferable skills valued by employers in management and administration across the employment spectrum.

GLOBAL LEADERS PROGRAMME

To prepare students for the challenges of the global employment market and to strengthen and develop their broader personal and professional skills Coventry University has developed a unique Global Leaders Programme.

The objectives of the programme, in which postgraduate and eligible undergraduate students can participate, is to provide practical career workshops and enable participants to experience different business cultures.

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