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Masters Degrees (Distributed Computing)

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This course runs in Germany. This course covers a range of essential topics related to distributed computing systems. Yet these modules are not isolated; each one takes its place in the field in relation to others. Read more

About the course

This course runs in Germany.

This course covers a range of essential topics related to distributed computing systems. Yet these modules are not isolated; each one takes its place in the field in relation to others.

The emphasis in the course is to build the connections between topics, enabling software engineers to achieve co-operation between distinct autonomous systems under constraints of cost and performance requirements.

The course is suitable for:

Recent graduates in Electrical or Electronic Engineering or Computer Science, who wish to develop their skills in the field of distributed computing systems.
Practicing engineers and computer professionals who wish to develop their knowledge in this area.
People with suitable mathematical, scientific or other engineering qualifications, usually with some relevant experience, who wish to enter this field.

Aims

The past few years have witnessed that Grid computing is evolving as a promising large-scale distributed computing infrastructure for scientists and engineers around the world to share various resources on the Internet including computers, software, data, instruments.

Many countries around the world have invested heavily on the development of the Grid computing infrastructure. Many IT companies have been actively involved in Grid development. Grid computing has been applied in a variety of areas such as particle physics, bio-informatics, finance, social science and manufacturing. The IT industry has seen the Grid computing infrastructure as the next generation of the Internet.

The aim of the programme is to equip high quality and ambitious graduates with the necessary advanced technical and professional skills for an enhanced career either in industry or leading edge research in the area of distributed computing systems.

Specifically, the main objectives of the programme are:

To critically appraise advanced technologies for developing distributed systems;
To practically examine the development of large scale distributed systems;
To critically investigate the problems and pitfalls of distributed systems in business, commerce, and industry.

Course Content

Compulsory Modules:

Computer Networks
Network Security and Encryption
Distributed Systems Architecture
Project and Personal Management
High Performance Computing and Big Data
Software Engineering
Embedded Systems Engineering
Intelligent Systems
Dissertation

Special Features

Electronic and Computer Engineering is one of the largest disciplines in the University, with a portfolio of research contracts totalling £7.5 million, and has strong links with industry.

The laboratories are well equipped with an excellent range of facilities to support the research work and courses. We have comprehensive computing resources in addition to those offered centrally by the University. The discipline is particularly fortunate in having extensive gifts of software and hardware to enable it to undertake far-reaching design projects.

We have a wide range of research groups, each with a complement of academics and research staff and students. The groups are:

Media Communications
Wireless Networks and Communications
Power Systems
Electronic Systems
Sensors and Instrumentation.

Women in Engineering and Computing Programme

Brunel’s Women in Engineering and Computing mentoring scheme provides our female students with invaluable help and support from their industry mentors.

Accreditation

Distributed Computing Systems Engineering is accredited by the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET).

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Modern devices often rely on data that is distributed across multiple computers, whether closely located or more distant. Read more

Overview

Modern devices often rely on data that is distributed across multiple computers, whether closely located or more distant. Developing software for such systems offers many benefits, but it also poses new challenges to be overcome, particularly in guaranteeing the security and robustness of the communication between devices.

The MSc at Hull is designed to enable you to overcome those challenges. It prepares you to exploit the extraordinary potential of distributed systems, both in terms of storage capacity and processing power, whilst being aware of the unique constraints and security problems they introduce. You will have access to cutting-edge equipment and facilities, and you will finish with a much greater understanding of how software development needs to adapt to the unique environment of a distributed system. These skills and knowledge are highly sought-after in an industry that is increasingly adopting new distributed technology, such as cloud-based solutions.

The course begins in September each year and lasts twelve months. There are two trimesters of taught modules, followed by an individual dissertation project during the third trimester. There is an option to take an extra trimester – either immediately before or after the dissertation – gaining industrial experience through a module based in SEED, our software development unit working with commercial clients and software. This is unique to Hull.

The Department of Computer Science creates an excellent experience for students, with a supportive student community. We have an international reputation for our research activities, with a strong record of industrial and public grant funding. We are also affiliated with Microsoft’s DreamSpark programme, which allows you to access the latest Microsoft operating systems and development software for home use. Once registered with the department, you can download the software free of charge.

Industrial Experience

There is the option to take an Industrial Experience variant, with the opportunity to extend the period of study by a trimester, to gain experience of working alongside commercial software developers within a commercial software development facility on site (SEED), promoting real-world applications of the advanced concepts met in the course.

Study

The MSc Computer Science (Security and Distributed Computing) programme supports students with various levels of computing and programming practice experience, with material that supports the transition into the postgraduate environment. There is also suitable content on professional skills and the importance of ethics for practising computer scientists.
As a route into research, the programme supports the development of postgraduate technical skills, alongside critical research, analysis and planning activities.
In lectures you’ll benefit from a range of techniques, from interpreting complex ideas through interactive discussions, to live programming or other problem-solving demonstrations.
Core modules
• Oriented Design and Development Using C++
• Component-based Architecture
• Network Security
• Development Project
• Distributed Applications
• Trustworthy Computing
Optional modules
• Computer Science Software Development Practice (pass/fail module)
• Dissertation (There is the option of taking this module either in trimester 3 or trimester 4, depending on whether you take the Industrial Experience module.)
• The Industrial Experience optional 60-credit single trimester module allows students to gain significant commercial experience.

Teaching and learning

We place a strong emphasis on practical laboratory sessions. This will significantly develop your core computer science skills, and enhance your employability through exposure to commercial projects.
As teamwork plays a key role in commercial software development and has great value as an employable skill, group work is used in a number of modules.

Assessment

Practical coursework is the main form of assessment, and you will design, build and test software solutions to a variety of problems. This is complemented by written coursework.
The largest assessment is the dissertation, which is based on the work done in the third trimester (or fourth, depending on your option choices) and documented in a report of up to 20,000 words.

Careers

The MSc Computer Science (Security and Distributed Computing) is designed to open up pathways to postgraduate research, as well as careers in a wide range of areas within your discipline. The industrial placement option will enable you to practise your skills and knowledge of computer science ‘in situ’, giving you a useful insight and advantage when it comes to starting your career.
We have a range of inspirational extra-curricular activities including the Three Thing Game, Imagine Cup Worldwide Software Development Challenge, Really Useful Seminars and Global Game Jam. They are designed to boost your CV and employability, and taking part costs very little.

Our graduates typically gain roles including: Applications Developer, Business Systems Analyst, Computer Analyst, Computer Programmer, Computer Operations Manager, Data Management Analyst, Database Assistant, Developer Support Engineer, Games Programmer, Games Programmer (Engine design), Information Manager, IT Design, IT Systems Manager, IT Technician, IT user Support, Mobile Developer, Operations Director, Software Designer, Software Developer, Software Engineer, Solutions Developer, Systems Engineer, Technical Sales, Technical Specialist, Web Developer.

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Developments in cloud computing technology are transforming the way we live and work. This programme will equip you with specialist knowledge in this fast-growing field and allow you to explore a range of advanced topics in computer science. Read more

Developments in cloud computing technology are transforming the way we live and work. This programme will equip you with specialist knowledge in this fast-growing field and allow you to explore a range of advanced topics in computer science.

You’ll gain a foundation in topics like systems programming and algorithms, as well as specialist modules in advanced distributed systems – especially cloud techniques, technologies and applications.

Building on your existing knowledge of computer science, you’ll also choose from optional modules in topics across computer science. You could look at emerging approaches to human interaction with computational systems, data mining and functional programming among others.

The programme will give you the theoretical and practical skills required to design and implement larger, more complex systems using state-of-the-art technologies. You’ll even have the chance to work as an integral member of one of our research groups when you develop your main project.

Specialist facilities

You’ll benefit from world-class facilities to support your learning. State-of-the-art visualisation labs including a powerwall, a benchtop display with tracking system, WorldViz PPT optical tracking system and Intersense InertiaCube orientation tracker are all among the specialist facilities we have within the School of Computing.

We also have Ascension Flock of Birds tracking systems, three DOF and 6DOF Phantom force feedback devices, Twin Immersion Corp CyberGloves, a cloud computing testbed, rendering cluster and labs containing both Microsoft and Linux platforms among others. It’s an exciting environment in which to gain a range of skills and experience cutting-edge technology.

Course content

Core modules in Semester 1 will lay the foundations of the programme by giving you an understanding of the key topics of algorithms and systems programming. Throughout the year you’ll also take modules developing your understanding of cloud computing itself, from designing the high-level framework of a distributed system to big data and the “internet of things”.

From there you’ll have the chance to tailor your studies to suit your own preferences. You’ll choose from a wide range of optional modules on diverse topics such as image analysis, machine learning, semantic technologies and developing mobile apps.

Over the summer months you’ll also work on your research project. This gives you the chance to work as an integral part of one of our active research groups, focusing on a specialist topic in computer science and selecting the appropriate research methods.

Want to find out more about your modules?

Take a look at the Advanced Computer Science (Cloud Computing) module descriptions for more detail on what you will study.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • MSc Project 60 credits
  • Cloud Computing 15 credits

Optional modules

  • Web Services and Web Data 10 credits
  • Distributed Systems 10 credits
  • Mobile Application Development 10 credits
  • Machine Learning 10 credits
  • Information Visualization 10 credits
  • Data Mining and Text Analytics 10 credits
  • Combinatorial Optimisation 10 credits
  • Secure Computing 10 credits
  • Graph Algorithms and Complexity Theory 10 credits
  • Big Data Systems 15 credits
  • Data Science 15 credits
  • Bio-Inspired Computing 15 credits
  • Knowledge Representation and Reasoning 15 credits
  • Algorithms 15 credits
  • Parallel and Concurrent Programming 15 credits
  • Data Mining and Text Analytics 15 credits
  • Semantic Technologies and Applications 15 credits
  • Image Analysis 15 credits
  • Scheduling 15 credits
  • Scientific Computation 15 credits
  • Graph Theory: Structure and Algorithms 15 credits

Learning and teaching

Our groundbreaking research feeds directly into teaching, and you’ll have regular contact with staff who are at the forefront of their disciplines. You’ll have regular contact with them through lectures, seminars, tutorials, small group work and project meetings.

Independent study is also important to the programme, as you develop your problem-solving and research skills as well as your subject knowledge.

Assessment

You’ll be assessed using a range of techniques including case studies, technical reports, presentations, in-class tests, assignments and exams. Optional modules may also use alternative assessment methods.

Projects

The professional project is one of the most satisfying elements of this course. It allows you to apply what you’ve learned to a piece of research focusing on a real-world problem, and it can be used to explore and develop your specific interests.

Recent projects for MSc Advanced Computer Science (Cloud Computing) students have included:

  • Intelligent services to support sensemaking
  • Google cloud data analysis
  • Hadoop for large image management
  • Evaluating web service agreement in a cloud environment

A proportion of projects are formally linked to industry, and can include spending time at the collaborator’s site over the summer.

Career opportunities

Computing is an essential component of nearly every daily activity, from the collection, transformation, analysis and dissemination of information in business, through to smart systems embedded in commodity devices, the image processing used in medical diagnosis and the middleware that underpins distributed technologies like cloud computing and the semantic web.

This programme will give you the practical skills to gain entry into many areas of applied computing, working as application developers, system designers and evaluators; but further, links between the taught modules and our research provide our students with added strengths in artificial intelligence, intelligent systems, distributed systems, and the analysis of complex data. As a result, you’ll be well prepared for a range of careers, as well as further research at PhD level.

Graduates have found success in a wide range of careers working as business analysts, software engineers, wed designers and developers, systems engineers, information analysts and app developers. Others have pursued roles in consultancy, finance, marketing and education, or set up their own businesses.



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Computing and communications technologies are having a truly disruptive effect on societies and business worldwide. Mobile payments, wireless communications and the ‘Internet of Things’ are transforming the way we approach key challenges in development, security, healthcare and the environment. Read more

Computing and communications technologies are having a truly disruptive effect on societies and business worldwide. Mobile payments, wireless communications and the ‘Internet of Things’ are transforming the way we approach key challenges in development, security, healthcare and the environment.

Taught jointly by the School of Computing and the School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, this course will give you a grasp of all layers needed for mobile communication and computation, from the physical network layer through to the applications that run on mobile devices.

You’ll gain a full understanding of the web and cloud computing infrastructure, as core modules give you a foundation in key topics like systems programming and data communications. A range of optional modules will then allow you to focus on topics that suit your interests and career plans, from cloud computing to embedded systems design and high speed web architecture.

Specialist facilities

You’ll benefit from world-class facilities to support your learning. State-of-the-art visualisation labs including a powerwall, a benchtop display with tracking system, WorldViz PPT optical tracking system and Intersense InertiaCube orientation tracker are all among the specialist facilities we have within the School of Computing.

We also have Ascension Flock of Birds tracking systems, three DOF and 6DOF Phantom force feedback devices, Twin Immersion Corp CyberGloves, a cloud computing testbed, rendering cluster and labs containing both Microsoft and Linux platforms among others. It’s an exciting environment in which to gain a range of skills and experience cutting-edge technology.

Course content

You’ll take two core modules in Semester 1 that introduce you to fundamental topics like systems programming and network security. With this foundation, you’ll be able to gain high-level specialist knowledge through your choice of optional modules taught by the School of Computing and the School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering.

The optional modules you choose will enable you to direct your studies towards topics that suit your personal interests and career ambitions such as mobile app development, digital media engineering, big data, cloud computing and embedded systems design, among others.

Over the summer months you’ll also work on your research project. This gives you the chance to work as an integral part of one of our active research groups, focusing on a specialist topic in computer science and selecting the appropriate research methods.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • MSc Project 60 credits
  • Data Communications and Network Security 15 credits

Optional modules

  • Distributed Systems 10 credits
  • Mobile Application Development 10 credits
  • Combinatorial Optimisation 10 credits
  • Secure Computing 10 credits
  • Graph Algorithms and Complexity Theory 10 credits
  • Functional Programming 10 credits
  • Big Data Systems 15 credits
  • Mobile Applications Development 15 credits
  • Algorithms 15 credits
  • Parallel and Concurrent Programming 15 credits
  • Cloud Computing 15 credits
  • Graph Theory: Structure and Algorithms 15 credits
  • Communication Network Design 15 credits
  • Optical Communications Networks 15 credits
  • High Speed Internet Architecture 15 credits
  • Digital Media Engineering 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Mobile Computing and Communication Networks MSc in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Our groundbreaking research feeds directly into teaching, and you’ll have regular contact with staff who are at the forefront of their disciplines. You’ll have regular contact with them through lectures, seminars, tutorials, small group work and project meetings.

Independent study is also important to the programme, as you develop your problem-solving and research skills as well as your subject knowledge.

Assessment

You’ll be assessed using a range of techniques including case studies, technical reports, presentations, in-class tests, assignments and exams. Optional modules may also use alternative assessment methods.

Projects

The professional project is one of the most satisfying elements of this course. It allows you to apply what you’ve learned to a piece of research focusing on a real-world problem, and it can be used to explore and develop your specific interests.Most projects are experimentally based and linked with companies within the oil and gas industry to ensure the topic of research is relevant to the field whilst also addressing a real-world problem.

A proportion of projects are formally linked to industry, and can include spending time at the collaborator’s site over the summer.

Career opportunities

Career opportunities are extremely broad, covering jobs in the design of embedded software running on multi-core devices through to jobs involving the design and implementation of new mobile-applications centric systems for business. In the application of mobile computing skills, job opportunities span every area, from the automotive sector through to retail and banking.

You could launch a career in fields such as mobile app development, mobile systems architecture, project management, network consultancy. You could also work as an engineer in embedded mobile communications, network security or research and development among many others – and you’ll even be well-prepared for PhD study.

Careers support

You’ll have access to the wide range of engineering and computing careers resources held by our Employability team in our dedicated Employability Suite. You’ll have the chance to attend industry presentations book appointments with qualified careers consultants and take part in employability workshops. Our annual Engineering and Computing Careers Fairs provide further opportunities to explore your career options with some of the UK’s leading employers.

The University's Careers Centre also provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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Information Technology is now fundamental in every aspect of our daily lives. IT systems are crucial for delivering every day services such as banking, web based services and information systems. Read more
Information Technology is now fundamental in every aspect of our daily lives. IT systems are crucial for delivering every day services such as banking, web based services and information systems.

The MSc Information Technology is a full time, one year taught course, intended for students who are seeking a professional career in the IT industry. There is no requirement for a first degree in computing, but proficiency in at least one programming language is a requirement.

The course covers a range of topics including advanced programming, user-interface design, software engineering and management.

This course will give you the knowledge of IT from an organisation oriented viewpoint, allowing you to be capable of designing and implementing IT systems for a wide range of organisations.

The course has been specifically designed to suit the requirements of the IT industry, where you will be able to take up technical or management positions. Our graduates enter employment in many roles, including computer programmers, technical authors and research associates.

Course Aims
-Programming: You will gain a thorough grounding of advanced programming concepts using Java including efficient data structures and algorithms and high performance distributed computing.
-User-Interfaces: You will learn the theory of human computer interaction (HCI) and put this into practice in a number of ways, including user centred design of aspects of people's interaction with digital systems.
-Software Engineering: You will learn and be able to apply the principles of software engineering and case studies using UML, software testing techniques, and privacy and security aspect of software systems.

Learning Outcomes
We expect our graduates to be capable of designing and implementing IT systems for a wide range organisations. A thorough understanding of the following subjects are expected:
-Designing user interfaces following sound principles of interface design
-Designing, specifying, implementing and testing software components and systems using UML, Java and a range of software testing techniques
-Dependability of IT systems including topics in privacy and security
-Computer architectures and high performance distributed computing

Project

The dissertation project undertaken by students in Terms 3 and 4 (Summer Term and Vacation Term) is carried out individually, which might involve collaboration with another organisation. The subject matter of projects varies widely; most projects are suggested by members of staff, some by external organisations, and some by students themselves, usually relating to an area of personal interest that they wish to develop further.

A collaborative project is supervised by a member of the Department, but the collaborating organisation will normally provide an external supervisor. Organisations that have collaborated in projects in the past include Glasgow Town Planning Department, British Rail Passenger Services Department, North Yorkshire Police, North Yorkshire Fire Services, NEDO, the Royal Horticultural Society, Biosis UK, Centre Point sheltered housing, York Archaeological Trust, and the University of York Library.

The subject matter of projects varies widely; most projects are suggested by members of staff, some by external organisations, and some by students themselves, perhaps relating to an area of personal interest that they wish to develop further.

All project proposals are rigorously vetted and must meet a number of requirements before these are made available to the students. The department uses an automated project allocation system for assigning projects to students that takes into account supervisor and student preferences.

Examples of previous project include:
-A Study into the User Experience and Usability of Web Enabled Services on Smartphones
-Agent simulation of large scale complex IT systems
-Do People Disclose their Passwords on Social Media?
-Dynamic Sound Generation for Computer Games
-Iterative linear programming as an optimisation method for buyer resources in online auctions evaluated using a Java-based Monte Carlo simulation
-Qchat (Web-based chat application for quantum physicists)
-Software for dyslexic readers: an empirical investigation of presentation attributes
-Web-based IQ Testing Application for Fluid Intelligence Analysis
-Agent simulation of large scale complex IT systems

Information for Students

Whilst the MSc in Information Technology does not require a formal qualification in computing, we do expect you to have some understanding of computer related issues.

As everyone arrives with different experience, we have put together the following summary of what we expect you to know, with some suggestions of how you can prepare before you arrive.

You'll start the course with a focus on writing and developing Java programs. We assume that you are familiar with programming concepts and terminology, so we advise you to review basic programming concepts, such as:
-Variables and their types
-Control structures (e.g. if-statements, loops)
-Subprograms (e.g. procedures, functions)
-Compilation and debugging.

If you have never used Java, you will benefit greatly from doing some reading and trying out Java programming before you arrive. We will teach you from first principles, but the pace will be fast and you will find it easier to keep up if you've practiced with the basics beforehand. Tutorials and practical exercises are the best way for you to prepare, and the Deitel and Deitel book below is a good source of these.

Careers

Here at York, we're really proud of the fact that more than 97% of our postgraduate students go on to employment or further study within six months of graduating from York. We think the reason for this is that our courses prepare our students for life in the workplace through our collaboration with industry to ensure that what we are teaching is useful for employers.

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The MSc in Internet Systems and e-Business is a taught programme aimed at all graduates who want to train in modern computing. It provides an opportunity to acquire the skills required to pursue a career in Internet-based information systems. Read more
The MSc in Internet Systems and e-Business is a taught programme aimed at all graduates who want to train in modern computing. It provides an opportunity to acquire the skills required to pursue a career in Internet-based information systems. The programme is also suitable for those who have been in industry or other employment, possibly involving increasing recent work with IT, and now want to improve their career by means of formal training and a recognised qualification. The programme starts with an introduction to programming and then covers key details of software engineering and Internet technology.

Course Structure

Seven taught modules and then a dissertation module of approximately two months over the summer.

Core Modules

-Object-Oriented Programming in Java and UML
-Software Engineering for the Internet
-Distributed Computing
-Enterprise and Distributed Systems
-Research Methods and Professional Issues
-Web Technology
-Digital Imaging
-Dissertation

Learning and Teaching

The MSc in Internet Systems and e-Business is a full-time taught programme aimed at all graduates who want to train in modern computing. It provides an opportunity to acquire the skills required to pursue a career in Internet-based information systems. The programme is also suitable for those who have been in industry or other employment, possibly involving increasing recent work with IT, and now want to improve their career by means of formal training and a recognised qualification. Students are registered for 12 months from the course start date at the beginning of October each academic year. The programme starts with an introduction to programming and then covers key details of software engineering and Internet technology.

The programme consists of seven lecture/tutorial based core modules plus a research project. The two modules in Object Oriented Programming, and Web Technology, each feature 18 hours of lectures plus 8 hours of tutorial contact time.

The three modules in Digital Imaging, Distributed Computing and Research Methods and Professional Issues each feature 12 hours of lectures plus 8 hours of tutorial contact time. The lecture module on Software Engineering for the Internet has 20 hours of tutorials. The lecture module on Enterprise and Distributed Systems use a variety of teaching methods. It might typically feature 24 hours of lectures, 8 hours of tutorials and a total of 91 hours of laboratory/practical classes. The total contact hours for all 7 of these modules is therefore 96 hours of lectures, 68 hours of tutorials and 91 hours of laboratory/practical classes.

A major individual research project is also undertaken during the course under the guidance of an appropriate staff supervisor. This provides an open-ended challenge to each individual student. Regular meetings are held with the supervisor to discuss project progress and planning issues. At the end of the project students are required to submit a dissertation documenting their project work. Students should expect to have around 5 hours of contact time with their supervisors over the course of their research projects.

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Designed for graduates who want to move into computing from another discipline, the MSc Computing and IT Management provides you with a broad technical knowledge and a sound business context for managing IT systems. Read more
Designed for graduates who want to move into computing from another discipline, the MSc Computing and IT Management provides you with a broad technical knowledge and a sound business context for managing IT systems.

Through this course you will learn the skills needed to develop business applications through a fundamental understanding of software and web development, e-commerce and database management. You will also gain an understanding of the professional skills required to lead IT managers by working as a part of a team on a business change project.

You will have the option of learning about new and emerging technologies, such as cloud computing, that are radically changing the opportunities and threats for the provision of IT systems. You may also opt for human-centric computing which focuses on defining and delivering effective information systems from a human-centric perspective. You also have the option of learning the knowledge and skills required to create interactive visualisations and explanations of data.

On successful completion of the taught phase you will move to the dissertation phase. This provides the opportunity of developing your research skills and applying technical and management concepts and techniques to solve a complex computing problem.

This one-year full-time or three-year part-time course offers a balanced combination of theory and practice, and can serve either as preparation for a career as an IT professional, doctoral research, or as a self-contained advanced qualification in its own right.

Distinctive features

• The opportunity to undertake a conversion course in Computing and IT.

• Provides an intensive course specifically designed for those who wish to move into computing and IT management from another discipline.

• Professionally accredited by the BCS, the Chartered Institute for IT.

• The opportunity to learn the technical knowledge and skills needed to develop business applications.

• Working in a team on a business change project to develop IT management skills.

• The facility to tailor the course to your interests by the selection of an advanced option module.

Structure

You will study core modules to a total of 160 credits including dissertation, with an optional module worth 20 credits. Students will also undertake an individual project.

This is a full-time course undertaken over one calendar year. It is also available as a part-time course over three years, and with placement.

Core modules:

Information Processing in Python
Web Application Development
Information Modelling & Database Systems
Business and IT Management
E-Commerce and Innovation
Dissertation

Optional modules:

Distributed and Cloud Computing
Human Centric Computing
Visual Communication and Information Design
Computer Science Topic 1: Web and Social Computing (Part-time only)

Teaching

The School of Computer Science and Informatics has a strong and active research culture which informs and directs our teaching. We are committed to providing teaching of the highest standard and received an excellent report in the most recent Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) review.

A diverse range of teaching and learning styles are used throughout the MSc in Computing and IT Management. Students will attend lectures, participate in seminars, workshops and tutorials, and carry out practical and laboratory work.

Students obtain support materials usually via Learning Central (Cardiff University’s Virtual Learning Environment).

Students will also undertake a project and independent study to enable them to complete their dissertation. Dissertation topics may be suggested by the student or chosen from a list of options proposed by academic staff reflecting their current interest.

Support

As a School, we pride ourselves on providing a supportive environment in which we are able to help and encourage our students.

All students are allocated a personal tutor who will monitor your progress throughout your time at university and will support you in your personal development planning. You will see your Personal Tutor at least once each semester.

Our Senior Personal Tutor can also advise and respond to any personal matters as they arise. The School also has a formal student-staff panel to discuss topics or issues of mutual interest.

Feedback:

Feedback on coursework may be provided via written comments on work submitted, by provision of ‘model’ answers and/or through discussion in contact sessions.

Assessment

The taught modules within the courses are assessed through examinations and a wide range of in-course assessments, such as written reports, extended essays, practical assignments and oral presentations.

The individual project and dissertation will enable students to demonstrate their ability to build upon and exploit knowledge and skills gained to exhibit critical and original thinking based on a period of independent study and learning.

Career prospects

Recent graduates from the MSc Computing and IT Management course have gained employment in roles such as systems and business analysts, quality assurance testers, IT consultants and project managers.

Graduates are employed by organisations of all sizes locally, nationally, and internationally.

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The MSc in Computing (Distributed Systems) is a full-time degree of 12 months duration starting in October. It allows graduates who have already studied Computing Science in their degree, but perhaps not exclusively, to focus their further studies in a particular area. Read more
The MSc in Computing (Distributed Systems) is a full-time degree of 12 months duration starting in October. It allows graduates who have already studied Computing Science in their degree, but perhaps not exclusively, to focus their further studies in a particular area. The typical entrant to this track has a good upper-second class or a first class honours degree in a science or engineering discipline, including Computing.

The programme provides opportunities for postgraduate students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding and practical skills in a wide variety of specialised topics in Computing. Students are also able to develop and demonstrate the qualities and skills needed for literature research, technical presentation and report writing. The degree provides a good foundation for PhD study.

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Designed for graduates who want to move into computing from another discipline, MSc Computing and IT Management provides you with a broad technical knowledge and a sound business context for managing IT systems. Read more
Designed for graduates who want to move into computing from another discipline, MSc Computing and IT Management provides you with a broad technical knowledge and a sound business context for managing IT systems.

Through this course you will learn the skills needed to develop business applications through a fundamental understanding of software and web development, e-commerce and database management. You will also gain an understanding of the professional skills required to lead IT managers by working as a part of a team on a business change project.

You will have the option of learning about new and emerging technologies, such as cloud computing, that are radically changing the opportunities and threats for the provision of IT systems. You may also opt for human-centric computing which focuses on defining and delivering effective information systems from a human-centric perspective. You also have the option of learning the knowledge and skills required to create interactive visualisations and explanations of data.

Students may choose to apply for a paid 7-12 month professional work placement to be undertaken on completion of Spring semester and before completing the MSc course with a 60-credit dissertation. This provides valuable work experience to develop your IT Professional skills.

The dissertation provides the opportunity of developing your research skills and applying technical and management concepts and techniques to solve a complex computing problem.

This two-year course offers a balanced combination of theory and practice, and can serve either as preparation for a career as an IT professional, doctoral research, or as a self-contained advanced qualification in its own right.

Distinctive features

• The opportunity to undertake a conversion course in Computing and IT.

• It provides an intensive course specifically designed for those who wish to move into computing and IT management from another discipline.

• Professionally accredited by the BCS, the Chartered Institute for IT.

• The opportunity to learn the technical knowledge and skills needed to develop business applications.

• Working in a team on a business change project to develop IT management skills.

• The facility to tailor the course to your interests by the selection of an advanced option module.

• 7-12 month experience as an IT Professional for students who successfully find a suitable placement.

Structure

Students will undertake a placement following the taught stage of the course and prior to undertaking their individual project and dissertation. Most students start their placement in the summer of Year 1. The breakdown is as follows:

Year 1: 100 credits core modules, 20 credit optional modules.
Year 2: 120 credits placement, 60 credits core module.

Year ONE core modules:

Information Processing in Python
Web Application Development
Information Modelling & Database Systems
Business and IT Management
E-Commerce and Innovation

Year ONE optional modules:

Distributed and Cloud Computing
Human Centric Computing
Visual Communication and Information Design

Year TWO core modules:

Placement
Dissertation

Teaching

The School of Computer Science and Informatics has a strong and active research culture which informs and directs our teaching. We are committed to providing teaching of the highest standard and received an excellent report in the most recent Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) review.

A diverse range of teaching and learning styles are used throughout the MSc in Computing and IT Management. Students will attend lectures, participate in seminars, workshops and tutorials, and carry out practical and laboratory work.

Students obtain support materials usually via Learning Central (Cardiff University’s Virtual Learning Environment).

You will also undertake a project and independent study to enable you to complete a dissertation. Dissertation topics may be suggested by you or chosen from a list of options proposed by academic staff reflecting their current interest.

Support

As a School, we pride ourselves on providing a supportive environment in which we are able to help and encourage our students.

All students are allocated a personal tutor who will monitor your progress throughout your time at university and will support you in your personal development planning. You will see your Personal Tutor at least once each semester.

Our Senior Personal Tutor can also advise and respond to any personal matters as they arise. The School also has a formal student-staff panel to discuss topics or issues of mutual interest.

Students are responsible for obtaining their placement. The School actively assists students on “with Placement” courses in finding a suitable placement.

Feedback:

Feedback on coursework may be provided via written comments on work submitted, by provision of ‘model’ answers and/or through discussion in contact sessions.

Assessment

The taught modules are assessed through examinations and a wide range of in-course assessments, such as written reports, extended essays, practical assignments and oral presentations.

The placement is assessed through a reflective report that demonstrates that the student has developed skills as an IT Professional.

The individual project and dissertation will enable you to demonstrate your ability to build upon and exploit knowledge and skills gained to exhibit critical and original thinking based on a period of independent study and learning.

Career prospects

Recent graduates from the MSc Computing and IT Management course have gained employment in roles such as systems and business analysts, quality assurance testers, IT consultants and project managers.

Graduates are employed by organisations of all sizes locally, nationally, and internationally.

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This MSc Computing offers students from diverse career and subject areas a balance of software engineering skills and technical abilities required for a career in Software Development. Read more
This MSc Computing offers students from diverse career and subject areas a balance of software engineering skills and technical abilities required for a career in Software Development.

Through this one-year programme you will get a first-hand understanding of the vital problem-solving role of software, the interdisciplinary opportunities available, and what computational systems can achieve.

Through a gentle introduction and intensive support, you will be introduced to programming skills using important languages such as Java and Python. Emphasis is placed on handling data and you will develop essential skills in SQL (Structured Query Language) for advanced database functionality using industry standard products such as Oracle™.

A choice of taught optional modules allows you to further develop skills in areas of your choice.

Graduates from these programmes will be ideally placed for employment in the computing industry or for careers requiring a combination of their graduate discipline with computing expertise.

Distinctive features:

• An opportunity to take a conversion course which is also an accredited course recognised by BCS, the Chartered Institute for IT.

• The opportunity to complement the discipline in which you graduated with the discipline of Computing.

• The facility to tailor the course to your interests by the selection of advanced option modules.

• Flexible choice of project topic, for example: associated with the research activity of the School fulfilling a business need reflecting your own interest.

Structure

You will study core modules to a total of 80 credits, with two optional modules worth a total of 40 credits. Students will also undertake an individual project and dissertation (worth 60 credits).

This course is a full-time programme undertaken over one calendar year. It is also available as a part-time programme over three years, and with placement.

Core modules:

Information Processing in Python
Web Application Development
Object-Oriented Development with Java
Software Engineering
Dissertation

Optional modules:

Computational Systems
Computer Science Topic 1: Web and Social Computing
Distributed and Cloud Computing
Human Centric Computing
Information Modelling & Database Systems
Visual Communication and Information Design
E-Commerce and Innovation

Teaching

The School of Computer Science and Informatics has a strong and active research culture which informs and directs our teaching. We are committed to providing teaching of the highest standard and received an excellent report in the most recent Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) review.

A diverse range of teaching and learning styles are used throughout the MSc in Computing and the MSc in Computing with Placement. Students will attend lectures, participate in seminars, workshops and tutorials, and carry out practical and laboratory work.

Students obtain support materials either via Learning Central (Cardiff University’s Virtual Learning Environment) or from study packs specially developed for selected modules.

Students will also undertake a project and independent study to enable them to complete their dissertation. Dissertation topics may be suggested by the student or chosen from a list of options proposed by academic staff reflecting their current interest.

Support

As a School, we pride ourselves on providing a supportive environment in which we are able to help and encourage our students.

All students are allocated a personal tutor who will monitor your progress throughout your time at university and will support you in your Personal Development Planning. You will see your Personal Tutor at least once each semester.

Outside of scheduled tutor sessions, our Senior Personal Tutor runs an open door policy, being on hand to advise and respond to any personal matters as they arise.

The School has a formal student-staff panel to discuss topics or issues of mutual interest, in addition we schedule fortnightly informal gatherings over coffee for all students and staff associated with MSc Programmes.

Feedback:

Feedback on coursework may be provided via written comments on work submitted, by provision of ‘model’ answers and/or through discussion in contact sessions.

Assessment

The taught modules within the programmes are assessed through examinations and a wide range of in-course assessments, such as written reports, extended essays, practical assignments and oral presentations.

The individual project and dissertation will enable students to demonstrate their ability to build upon and exploit knowledge and skills gained to exhibit critical and original thinking based on a period of independent study and learning.

Career prospects

Recent graduates have gained employment in roles such as software developers, systems analysts, business analysts, IT consultants, and support engineers.

MSc Computing graduates are employed by organisations of all sizes locally, nationally, and internationally. For example, recent graduates have taken up positions with local NHS Trusts, Logica, Sun Microsystems, BT, and the National Library of Medicine in the USA, as well as undertaking further doctoral study.

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This MSc Computing offers students from diverse career and subject areas a balance of software engineering skills and technical abilities required for a career in Software Development. Read more
This MSc Computing offers students from diverse career and subject areas a balance of software engineering skills and technical abilities required for a career in Software Development.

Through this two-year programme you will get a first-hand understanding of the vital problem-solving role of software, the interdisciplinary opportunities available, and what computational systems can achieve.

Through a gentle introduction and intensive support, you will be introduced to programming skills using important languages such as Java and Python. Emphasis is placed on handling data and you will develop essential skills in SQL (Structured Query Language) for advanced database functionality using industry standard products such as Oracle™.

A choice of taught optional modules allows you to further develop skills in areas of your choice.

Students may choose to apply for a paid 7-12 month professional work placement to be undertaken on completion of Spring semester and before completing the MSc course with a 60-credit dissertation. This provides valuable work experience to develop your IT Professional skills.

Graduates from these programmes will be ideally placed for employment in the computing industry or for careers requiring a combination of their graduate discipline with computing expertise.

Distinctive features

• A conversion course as well as an accredited course recognised by BCS, the Chartered Institute for IT.

• The opportunity to complement the discipline in which you graduated with the discipline of Computing.

• The facility to tailor the course to your interests by the selection of advanced option modules.

• Flexible choice of project topic, for example: associated with the research activity of the School; fulfilling a business need; reflecting your own interest.

• 7-12 month experience as an IT Professional for students who successfully find a suitable placement.

Structure

You will undertake a placement following the taught stage of the course and prior to undertaking your individual project and dissertation. Most students start their placement in the summer of Year 1. The breakdown is as follows:

Year 1: 80 credits core modules, 40 credit optional modules.

Year 2: 120 credits placement, dissertation.
This is a full-time course undertaken over two calendar years. It is also available as a full-time course over one year or a part-time course over three years, both without placement.

Year ONE core modules:

Information Processing in Python
Web Application Development
Object-Oriented Development with Java
Software Engineering

Year ONE optional modules:

Computational Systems
Computer Science Topic 1: Web and Social Computing
Distributed and Cloud Computing
Human Centric Computing
Information Modelling & Database Systems
Visual Communication and Information Design
E-Commerce and Innovation

Year TWO core modules:

Placement
Dissertation

Teaching

The School of Computer Science and Informatics has a strong and active research culture which informs and directs our teaching. We are committed to providing teaching of the highest standard and received an excellent report in the most recent Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) review.

A diverse range of teaching and learning styles are used throughout the MSc in Computing and the MSc in Computing with Placement. Students will attend lectures, participate in seminars, workshops and tutorials, and carry out practical and laboratory work.

Students obtain support materials either via Learning Central (Cardiff University’s Virtual Learning Environment) or from study packs specially developed for selected modules.

You will also undertake a project and independent study to enable you to complete a dissertation. Dissertation topics may be suggested by you or chosen from a list of options proposed by academic staff reflecting their current interest.

Support

As a School, we pride ourselves on providing a supportive environment in which we are able to help and encourage our students.

All students are allocated a personal tutor who will monitor your progress throughout your time at university and will support you in your Personal Development Planning. You will see your Personal Tutor at least once each semester.

Outside of scheduled tutor sessions, our Senior Personal Tutor runs an open door policy, being on hand to advise and respond to any personal matters as they arise.

The School has a formal student-staff panel to discuss topics or issues of mutual interest, in addition we schedule fortnightly informal gatherings over coffee for all students and staff associated with MSc Programmes.

Students are responsible for obtaining their placement. The School actively assists students on “with Placement” courses in finding a suitable placement.

Feedback:

Feedback on coursework may be provided via written comments on work submitted, by provision of ‘model’ answers and/or through discussion in contact sessions.

Assessment

The taught modules within the programmes are assessed through examinations and a wide range of in-course assessments, such as written reports, extended essays, practical assignments and oral presentations.

The placement is assessed through a reflective report that demonstrates that the student has developed skills as an IT Professional.

The individual project and dissertation will enable you to demonstrate your ability to build upon and exploit knowledge and skills gained to exhibit critical and original thinking based on a period of independent study and learning.

Career prospects

Recent graduates have gained employment in roles such as software developers, systems analysts, business analysts, IT consultants, and support engineers.

MSc Computing graduates are employed by organisations of all sizes locally, nationally, and internationally. For example, recent graduates have taken up positions with local NHS Trusts, Logica, Sun Microsystems, BT, and the National Library of Medicine in the USA, as well as undertaking further doctoral study.

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The Masters in Computing Science provides you with a thorough grounding in advanced computing science, together with experience of conducting a development project, preparing you for responsible positions in the IT industry. Read more
The Masters in Computing Science provides you with a thorough grounding in advanced computing science, together with experience of conducting a development project, preparing you for responsible positions in the IT industry.

Why this programme

◾The School of Computing Science is consistently highly ranked achieving 2nd in Scotland and 10th in the UK (Complete University Guide 2017)
◾The School is a member of the Scottish Informatics and Computer Science Alliance: SICSA. This collaboration of Scottish universities aims to develop Scotland's place as a world leader in Informatics and Computer Science research and education.
◾You will have opportunities to meet employers who come to make recruitment presentations, and often seek to recruit our graduates during the programme.
◾You will benefit from having 24-hour access to a computer laboratory equipped with state-of-the-art hardware and software.
◾With a 92% overall student satisfaction in the National Student Survey 2015, computing at Glasgow continues to meet student expectations combining both teaching excellence and a supportive learning environment.

Programme structure

Modes of delivery of the MSc in Computing Science include lectures, seminars and tutorials and allow students the opportunity to take part in lab, project and team work.

Core courses
◾Research methods and techniques
◾Masters team project

Optional courses
◾Advanced networking and communications
◾Advanced operating systems
◾Algorithmics
◾Artificial intelligence
◾Big data: systems, programming and management
◾Computer architecture
◾Computer vision methods and applications
◾Cryptography and secure development
◾Cyber security forensics
◾Cyber security fundamentals
◾Distributed algorithms and systems
◾Enterprise cyber security
◾Functional programming
◾Human computer interaction
◾Human computer interaction: design and evaluation
◾Human-centred security
◾Information retrieval
◾Internet technology
◾IT architecture
◾Machine learning
◾Mobile human computer interaction
◾Modelling reactive systems
◾Safety critical systems.
◾Software project management
◾Theory of Computation
◾Web Science

Depending on staff availability, the optional courses listed here may change.

If you wish to engage in part-time study, please be aware that dependent upon your optional taught courses, you may still be expected to be on campus on most week days.

Accreditation

MSc Computing Science is accredited by the British Computer Society (BCS) and the Institution of Engineering & Technology (IET)

Our specialist MSc graduates in Computing Science, Software Engineering and Information Security are recognised by the British Computer Society (BCS), The Chartered Institute for IT, for the purposes of fully meeting the further learning academic requirement for registration as a Chartered IT Professional (CITP Further Learning) and partially meeting the academic requirement for registration as a Chartered Scientist (CSci). These programmes have also been awarded the Euro-Info Master Label.

[[Industry links and employability ]]

◾The School of Computing Science has extensive contacts with industrial partners who contribute to several of their taught courses, through active teaching, curriculum development, and panel discussion. Recent contributors include representatives from IBM, J.P. Morgan, Amazon, Adobe and Red Hat.
◾Employers are interested in graduates who have a combination of good technical skills and well-developed personal skills, and in this respect graduates of the MSc in Computing Science from the University of Glasgow are particularly well placed.
◾During the programme students have an opportunity to develop and practice relevant professional and transferrable skills, and to meet and learn from employers about working in the IT industry.

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Visual Computing at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Visual Computing at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MRes Visual Computing is an ideal preparation for following a career of research or specialism within the area of study. In particular the MRes in Visual Computing seeks to prepare you for further research in the areas of Computer Graphics, Computer Vision, Medical Imaging, and Scientific Visualisation.

We seek strongly motivated students who are able to carry out substantial individual study. Such students are likely to want to control their own time, carry out curiosity driven research to an advanced level, and follow self-study material in advanced topics.

You will decide upon your topic of research in discussion with your supervisor in an exciting and recent area of Visual Computing. In collaboration with your supervisor you will evaluate current research and carry your own research programme based on the contribution you will make. The research programme is supported by taught courses covering useful literature and skills.

Course Content

Research Component

The main part of the MRes in Visual Computing is a substantial and challenging project involving cutting edge research. The project is an exciting opportunity for you to carry out research in the area of Visual Computing. You will produce an abstract of your work, a scientific paper, carry out a presentation and produce your final dissertation.

Taught Component

In addition to the research project, you can choose from a range of modules that provide skills and development training in different areas.

Modules available currently include:

Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (compulsory)

Data Visualisation (compulsory)

Graphics Processor Programming (compulsory)

Research Methodology (compulsory)

Visual Computing Project Development (compulsory)

Distributed Object-Oriented Programming

Interaction Technologies: Information Retrieval

High Performance Computing in C/C++

Interaction Technologies: Hardware and Devices

Facilities

The Department of Computer Science is well equipped for teaching, and is continually upgrading its laboratories to ensure equipment is up-to-date – equipment is never more than three years old, and rarely more than two. Currently, our Computer Science students use three fully networked laboratories: one, running Windows; another running Linux; and a project laboratory, containing specialised equipment. These laboratories support a wide range of software, including the programming languages Java, C# and the .net framework, C, C++, Haskell and Prolog among many; integrated programme development environments such as Visual Studio and Netbeans; the widely-used Microsoft Office package; web access tools; and many special purpose software tools including graphical rendering and image manipulation tools; expert system production tools; concurrent system modelling tools; World Wide Web authoring tools; and databases.

As part of the expansion of the Department of Computer Science, we are building the Computational Foundry on our Bay Campus for computer science and mathematical science.

Careers

All Computer Science courses will provide you the transferable skills and knowledge to help you take advantage of the excellent employment and career development prospects in an ever growing and changing computing and ICT industry.

94% of our Postgraduate Taught Graduates of Computer Science were in professional level work or study [DLHE 14/15]

Research

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that we lead Wales in the field of Computer Science and are in the UK Top 20.

We are ranked 11th in the UK for percentage of world-leading research, and 1st in Wales for research excellence. 40% of our submitted research assessed as world-leading quality (4*).



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Distributed and networked computation is now the paradigm that underpins the software-enabled systems that are proliferating in the modern world, with huge impact in the economy and society, from the sensor and actuator networks that are now connecting cities, to cyberphysical systems, to patient-centred healthcare, to disaster-recovery systems. Read more
Distributed and networked computation is now the paradigm that underpins the software-enabled systems that are proliferating in the modern world, with huge impact in the economy and society, from the sensor and actuator networks that are now connecting cities, to cyberphysical systems, to patient-centred healthcare, to disaster-recovery systems.

This new Masters course will educate and train you in the fundamental principles, methods and techniques required for developing such systems. Given the number of elective modules offered, you will be able to acquire further skills in one or more of Cloud Computing, Data Analytics and Information Security.

Facilities include a laboratory where you can experiment with physical devices that can be interconnected in a network, and a cluster facility configured to run the Hadoop MapReduce stack.

A Year in Industry option is also available for this course.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/computerscience/coursefinder/msc-distributed-and-networked-systems.aspx

Why choose this course?

This course will develop a highly analytical approach to problem solving and a strong background in distributed and networked systems, fault-tolerance and data replication techniques, distributed coordination and time-synchronisation techniques (leader-election, consensus, and clock synchronisation), data communication protocols and software stacks for wireless, sensor, and ad hoc networking technologies in virtualisation, and cloud computing technologies.

The course develops an advanced understanding of principles of failure detection and monitoring, principles of scalable storage, and in particular NoSQL technology.

Students will acquire the ability to:
- apply well-founded principles to building reliable and scalable distributed systems
- analyse complex distributed systems in terms of their performance, reliability, and correctness
- design and implement middleware services for reliable communication in unreliable networks
- work with state-of-the-art wireless, sensor, and ad hoc networking technologies
- design and implement reliable data communication and storage solutions for wireless, sensor, and ad hoc networks
- detect sources of vulnerability in networks of connected devices and deploy the appropriate countermeasures to information security threats.
- enforce privacy in “smart” environments
- work with open source and cloud tools for scalable data storage (DynamoDB) and coordination (Zookeeper)
- work with modern network management technologies (Software-Defined Networking) and standards (OpenFlow)
- design custom-built application-driven networking topologies using OpenFlow, and other modern tools
- work with relational databases (SQL), non-relational databases (MongoDb), as well as with Hadoop/Pig scripting and other big data manipulation techniques.

Department research and industry highlights

Royal Holloway is recognised for its research excellence in Machine Learning, Information Security, and Global Ubiquitous Computing.
We work closely with companies such as Centrica (British Gas, Hive), Cognizant, Orange Labs (UK), the UK Cards Association, Transport for London and ITSO.
We host a Smart Card Centre and we are a GCHQ Academic Centre of Excellence in Cyber Security Research (ACE-CSR).

Course content and structure

You will take taught modules during Term One (October to December) and Term Two (January to March). Examinations are held in May. If you are in the Year-in-Industry pathway, you then take an industrial placement, after which you come back for your project/dissertation (12 weeks).

Core course units are:
Interconnected Devices
Advanced Distributed Systems
Wireless, Sensor and Actuator Networks
Individual Project

Elective course units are:

Computation with Data
Databases
Introduction to Information Security
Data Visualisation and Exploratory Analysis
Programming for Data Analysis
Semantic Web
Multi-agent Systems
Advanced Data Communications
Machine Learning
Concurrent and Parallel Programming
Large-Scale Data Storage and Programming
Data Analysis
On-line Machine Learning
Smart Cards, RFIDs and Embedded Systems Security
Network Security
Computer Security
Security Technologies
Security Testing
Software Security
Introduction to Cryptography

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, practical projects and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different [department]-related areas, including This taught masters course equips postgraduate students with the subject knowledge and expertise required to pursue a successful career, or provides a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

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Our Computer Science MPhil and PhD programme gives you an opportunity to make a unique contribution to computer science research. Read more
Our Computer Science MPhil and PhD programme gives you an opportunity to make a unique contribution to computer science research. Your research will be supported by an experienced computer scientist within a research group and with the support of a team of advisers.

Research supervision is available under our six research areas, reflecting our strengths, capabilities and critical mass.

Advanced Model-Based Engineering and Reasoning (AMBER)

The AMBER group aims to equip systems and software engineering practitioners with effective methods and tools for developing the most demanding computer systems. We do this by means of models with well-founded semantics. Such model-based engineering can help to detect optimal, or defective, designs long before commitment is made to implementations on real hardware.

Digital Interaction Group (DIG)

The Digital Interaction Group (DIG) is the leading academic research centre for human-computer interaction (HCI) and ubiquitous computing (Ubicomp) research outside of the USA. The group conducts research across a wide range of fundamental topics in HCI and Ubicomp, including:
-Interaction design methods, eg experience-centred and participatory design methods
-Interaction techniques and technologies
-Mobile and social computing
-Wearable computing
-Media computing
-Context-aware interaction
-Computational behaviour analysis

Applied research is conducted in partnership with the DIG’s many collaborators in domains including technology-enhanced learning, digital health, creative industries and sustainability. The group also hosts Newcastle University's cross-disciplinary EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Digital Civics, which focusses on the use of digital technologies for innovation and delivery of community driven services. Each year the Centre awards 11 fully-funded four-year doctoral training studentships to Home/EU students.

Interdisciplinary Computing and Complex BioSystems (ICOS)

ICOS carries out research at the interface of computing science and complex biological systems. We seek to create the next generation of algorithms that provide innovative solutions to problems arising in natural or synthetic systems. We do this by leveraging our interdisciplinary expertise in machine intelligence, complex systems and computational biology and pursue collaborative activities with relevant stakeholders.

Scalable Computing

The Scalable Systems Group creates the enabling technology we need to deliver tomorrow's large-scale services. This includes work on:
-Scalable cloud computing
-Big data analytics
-Distributed algorithms
-Stochastic modelling
-Performance analysis
-Data provenance
-Concurrency
-Real-time simulation
-Video game technologies
-Green computing

Secure and Resilient Systems

The Secure and Resilient Systems group investigates fundamental concepts, development techniques, models, architectures and mechanisms that directly contribute to creating dependable and secure information systems, networks and infrastructures. We aim to target real-world challenges to the dependability and security of the next generation information systems, cyber-physical systems and critical infrastructures.

Teaching Innovation Group

The Teaching Innovation Group focusses on encouraging, fostering and pursuing innovation in teaching computing science. Through this group, your research will focus on pedagogy and you will apply your research to maximising the impact of innovative teaching practices, programmes and curricula in the School. Examples of innovation work within the group include:
-Teacher training and the national Computing at School initiative
-Outreach activities including visits to schools and hosting visits by schools
-Participation in national fora for teaching innovation
-Market research for new degree programmes
-Review of existing degree programmes
-Developing employability skills
-Maintaining links with industry
-Establishing teaching requirements for the move to Science Central

Research Excellence

Our research excellence in the School of Computing Science has been widely recognised through awards of large research grants. Recent examples include:
-Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), Centre for Doctoral Training in Cloud Computing for Big Data Doctoral Training Centre
-Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), Centre for Doctoral Training in Digital Civics
-Wellcome Trust and Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) Research Grant: a £10m project to look at novel treatment for epilepsy, confirming our track record in Systems Neuroscience and Neuroinformatics.

Accreditation

The School of Computing Science at Newcastle University is an accredited and a recognised Partner in the Network of Teaching Excellence in Computer Science.

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