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Masters Degrees (Distilling)

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This programme (See http://www.postgraduate.hw.ac.uk/prog/msc-brewing-and-distilling/ ) prepares candidates for entry into the malting, brewing or distilling industries, or to conduct research. Read more

Overview

This programme (See http://www.postgraduate.hw.ac.uk/prog/msc-brewing-and-distilling/ ) prepares candidates for entry into the malting, brewing or distilling industries, or to conduct research.

For more information also visit http://www.icbd.hw.ac.uk/

Programme duration

MSc programmes last for one year (September to August inclusive) and include a substantial research project.

The Diploma covers the same classes as the MSc and includes a short project but lasts for just 9 months (September to May inclusive). Students admitted to the Diploma programme and who perform well in the taught courses may be invited to transfer to the appropriate MSc programme.

Professional recognition

The Postgraduate Diploma/MSc programme is accredited by the Institute of Brewing & Distilling.

Core Courses

- Cereals, Malting and Mashing
- Wort Boiling, Fermentation and Beer Maturation
- Project Studies
- Distillation and Whisky Maturation
- Filtration and Packaging
- Production Management

English language requirements

If your first language is not English, or your first degree was not taught in English, we’ll need to see evidence of your English language ability. The minimum requirement for English language is IELTS 6.5 or equivalent. We offer a range of English language courses (See http://www.hw.ac.uk/study/english.htm ) to help you meet the English language requirement prior to starting your masters programme:
- 14 weeks English (for IELTS of 5.5 with no more than one skill at 4.5);
- 10 weeks English (for IELTS of 5.5 with minimum of 5.0 in all skills);
- 6 weeks English (for IELTS 5.5 with minimum of 5.5 in reading & writing and minimum of 5.0 in speaking & listening)

Postgraduate Taught Funded places

This programme has been selected to support the skills demand in Scotland's key economic growth areas. A number of full fee bursaries are available to applicants permanently resident in Scotland. Download an application form (http://www.hw.ac.uk/student-life/scholarships/postgraduate-funded-places.htm ) and submit to .

Find information on Fees and Scholarships here http://www.postgraduate.hw.ac.uk/prog/msc-brewing-and-distilling/

Contacts
Dr Hill A E
+44(0)131 451 3458
+44 (0)131 451 3009

http://www.icbd.hw.ac.uk

Dr Bryce J H
+44(0) 131 451 3453
+44(0) 131 451 3009


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The MSc in Operational Research aims to realise the potential of graduates, so that you immediately can play an effective role in providing model-based support to managers helping them to make better decisions at an operational/technical level. Read more

Why this course?

The MSc in Operational Research aims to realise the potential of graduates, so that you immediately can play an effective role in providing model-based support to managers helping them to make better decisions at an operational/technical level.

You’ll develop a rigorous academic understanding of advanced analytical methods that are used to provide structured and analytical approaches to decision-making.

You’ll also develop practical skills in using operational research models to support decision-makers.

Study mode and duration:
- MSc: 12 months full-time or 24 months part-time
- PgDip: 9 months full-time or 21 months part-time
- Distance learning options available

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/operationalresearch/

You’ll study

Study for the Postgraduate Diploma degree lasts nine months, following the same taught classes as for the MSc. As well as allowing you to complete a recognised course in a shorter time, the Diploma provides the opportunity for a wider range of applicants to enter the operational research world. Students demonstrating sufficient progress may be allowed to transfer in-course to study for the MSc.

The course is structured comprising four classes each semester, with the ‘Becoming an Effective Operational Researcher’ module running through both semesters. The first semester involves only core classes, whereas the second semester involves only one core class and three electives.

- Dissertation
MSc students undertake a three-month project. This is typically for an external organisation. You’ll apply the concepts and theories studied on the course.
Subject to demand, the MSc can also be obtained part-time, over two or three years. The same topics are studied, normally 1 to 2 days per week. Most part-time students are already in employment and are sponsored by their employers. They carry out their project work within their own organisations.

Distance learning option

All classes are taught using material presented online. Classes are supported by faculty members who also teach on the full-time course and who guide and support discussion via discussion forums.

This is a flexible degree and duration can vary. Minimum durations are PgCert: 13 months; PgDip: 20 months; MSc: 26 months.

Work placement

The apprenticeship scheme forms a vital component of the MSc in Operational Research. Through the scheme, many of our students spend an invaluable three weeks in January working in the analytical function of their host organisation.

Last year, more than 35 selected students worked with over 25 different organisations based all over the UK, including Capita, Department of Health, Diageo, Doosan Babcock, First Scotrail, Glasgow City Council, NHS, RBS, Scottish Enterprise, SEP, Scottish Water, and Tesco Bank.

Students work on all manner of projects that link directly to their semester 1 classes, allowing them to deliver real work that can make an immediate impact to their host organisations. Every year, our students gain not only valuable experience that is relevant to their job hunt, but also make contacts that can be of assistance throughout their career.

The scheme has a highly competitive selection process, where the students with the strongest generic skills and academic capabilities are chosen for external placements. Other students are also given invaluable opportunities to work with external organisations in this three week period, for example in the form of group projects analysing their operations.

In addition, many MSc projects are carried out for an external organisation. Students spend the three months from July to September working on a project of importance to their clients. The aim is to gain direct experience in applying the concepts and theories studied on the course. Projects may be carried out individually or in small teams of two or three students. Project clients include many major concerns, in fields ranging from aerospace to whisky distilling.

Major projects

Most of the taught modules on the programme introduce you to a variety of techniques, methods, models and approaches. However, the practical reality of applying analytical methods in business is often far removed from the classroom. Working with decision-makers on real issues presents a variety of challenges. For example, data may well be ambiguous and hard to come by, it may be far from obvious which business analysis methods can be applied and managers will need to be convinced of the business merits of any suggested solutions. While traditional teaching can alert students to such issues, understanding needs to be reinforced by experience.

This is primarily addressed by the core module ‘Becoming an Effective Business Analyst’, which takes place over both semesters and also involves the ‘apprenticeship scheme’. Every year, case studies and challenging projects are presented to the students by various organisations such as Accenture, British Airways, RBS and Simul8.

Facilities

Strathclyde’s Business School is one of the largest institutions of its kind in Europe. We have around 200 academic staff and more than 3,000 full-time students.

The departments and specialist units work together to provide a dynamic, fully-rounded and varied programme of specialist and cross-disciplinary postgraduate courses.

Course awards

Strathclyde MSc Operational Research students were awarded the May Hicks Prize of the OR Society three years in a row:
- Christoph Werner (2013)
- Geraint Roberts (2012)
- Rutger Albrink (2011)

The prize recognizes the best industry-based student projects in operational research and has an award of £1,000.

Student competitions

Every year, the best overall performance in the MSc Operational Research course is recognised by the Tony Christer Prize. The prize involves a formal recognition by the department and an award of £100.

English language requirements

If you’re a national of an English speaking country recognised by UK Border Agency (please check most up-to-date list) or you have successfully completed an academic qualification (at least equivalent to a UK bachelor's degree) in any of these countries, then you do not need to present any additional evidence.
For others, the department requires a minimum overall IELTS score of 6.5 (with no individual component below 5.5 (or equivalent)). Pre-sessional courses in English are available.
If you are from a country not recognised as an English speaking country by the United Kingdom Border Agency (UKBA), please check English requirements before making your application.

Pre-Masters preparation course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options

To find out more about the courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future. You can also complete the online application form. To ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

Careers

In the department, we have very good links with business and have hosted recruitment events for many companies including Barclay’s Wealth, British Airways, Deloitte, Morgan Stanley, Rolls Royce, Sopra and SIMUL8, to name a few.

The skills you learn in the MSc make you very marketable to potential employers. Other employers where our graduates have found work include Clydesdale Bank, HSBC, PWC, RBS, Roland Berger and the Scottish Government.

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/index.jsp

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The programme gives you practical skills to provide model-based support to managers. You’ll develop an understanding of key quantitative business analysis methods. Read more

Why this course?

The programme gives you practical skills to provide model-based support to managers.

You’ll develop an understanding of key quantitative business analysis methods. You’ll also be introduced to business models used to support the development of strategy for organisations and to help them to monitor and measure strategic processes.

You’ll also develop key consulting skills to effectively support management.

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/businessanalysisconsulting/

You’ll study

Compulsory modules include Foundations of Operational Research & Business Analysis, Quantitative Business Analysis and Managing Business Operations.

You'll also choose three optional modules from a range including Business Simulation Methods, Risk Analysis & Management and Business Information Systems.

- Dissertation
MSc students undertake a three-month project, typically for an external organisation. This gives you the opportunity to apply the concepts and theories you've studied on the course.

Work placement

The apprenticeship scheme forms a vital component of this course. Many of our students spend an invaluable three weeks in January embedded in the analytical function of their host organisation.

Last year, more than 35 selected students worked with over 25 different organisations based all over the UK, including Capita, Department of Health and Tesco Bank.

The scheme has a highly competitive selection process, where the students with the strongest generic skills and academic capabilities are chosen for external placements.

In addition, many MSc projects are carried out for an external organisation. Students spend the three months from July to September working on a project of importance to their clients. The aim is to gain direct experience in applying the concepts and theories studied on the course.

Project clients include many major concerns, in fields ranging from aerospace to whisky distilling.

Project: Becoming an Effective Business Analyst

This takes place over both semesters and also involves the ‘apprenticeship scheme’. Every year, case studies and challenging projects are presented to the students by various organisations such as Accenture, British Airways, RBS and Simul8, to name a few from last year.

Student competition

Every year, the best full-time MSc mark in the ‘Becoming an Effective Business Analyst’ module is recognised by the DSTL Prize. The prize involves a formal recognition by the department and an award of £100, which is kindly provided by the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory.

Guest lecturers

Last year, we were honoured with the visit of Alex Scharaschkin, the Director of the National Audit Office and Christopher Bray, Head of Environmental Risk Policy Management at the Barclays group.

Distance learning

The course can be done through distance learning. All classes are taught using material presented via the internet. Classes are supported by faculty members who also teach on the full-time course. They will guide and support discussion via discussion forums. This is a flexible degree and duration can vary.

Minimum durations are:
- PgCert: 13 months
- PgDip: 20 months
- MSc: 26 months

English language requirements

If you’re a national of an English speaking country recognized by UK Border Agency (please check most up-to-date list) or you’ve successfully completed an academic qualification (at least equivalent to a UK bachelor's degree) in any of these countries, then you do not need to present any additional evidence. For others, the department requires a minimum overall IELTS score of 6.5 (with no individual component below 5.5 (or equivalent)). Pre-sessional courses in English are available.

If you are from a country not recognised as an English speaking country by the United Kingdom Border Agency (UKBA), please check English requirements before making your application.

Pre-Masters preparation course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at the University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options.
To find out more about the courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future. You can also complete the online application form , or to ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

Learning & teaching

The course can be done through distance learning.
All classes are taught using material presented via the internet. Classes are supported by faculty members who also teach on the full-time course. They'll guide and support discussion via forums.

Assessment

Every module has its own methods of assessment appropriate to the nature of the material; these include written assignments, exams, practical team projects, presentations and individual projects.
Many modules involve more than one method of assessment.

Careers

The skills you’ll learn on the MSc make you very marketable to potential employers.
We’ve very good links with business and have hosted recruitment events for many companies, including Barclays Wealth, British Airways, Deloitte, Morgan Stanley, Rolls Royce, Sopra and SIMUL8, to name a few.

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/engineering/studywithus/scholarships/

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MA Communication Design at Falmouth is a transformative, intensive studio based course, enabling you to develop your individual critical voice in communication design. Read more
MA Communication Design at Falmouth is a transformative, intensive studio based course, enabling you to develop your individual critical voice in communication design. The course prepares you for the demands of a rapidly changing, complex media world, where the ability to create meaningful and effective ideas is paramount.

Benefits:
- Learn from leading global design provocateurs and teachers in project challenges and study set
- Gain commercial experience through internships
- Work in a multi-million pound studio environment that mirrors leading contemporary design studios
- Specialist skills training, relevant for your project interests
- Final semester London show
- Digital final exhibition for global recognition and launch

Visit the website https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/communication-design-ma

How the course is taught

The course is structured over 45 weeks, across three semesters: deconstruction, reconstruction and reinvention.

You'll be in the studio most weekdays working on outcomes rooted in design process and the development of meaningful and innovative ideas. The experience is designed to be supportive yet provocative, so you can take your ideas and practice into new and exciting realms, that challenge you and the wider communications world.

Your learning is delivered across a mixture of set lectures, tutorials, workshops, and peer and tutor review.

Contact hours vary across the course, being most intensive during the first two semesters, with more self directed study as you develop your final project in the third semester. We expect some students to be away at points during the final semester, either working on research and project feedback, or attending internships.

Course outline

The course prioritises fresh and fearless thinking, developing students who see no boundaries to their work, curious to engage and discover while pursuing the highest level of innovation in communication design.

You'll gain an understanding of the global framework of communication design, and an approach to design process that delivers great ideas across diverse media platforms.

Mirroring the success of longstanding programmes at our School of Communication Design, you'll benefit from frequent industry contact, enabling you to stretch and question your practice, gaining inspiration from within and beyond your immediate boundaries.

Attracting a range of applicants, the course prepares you for independent or studio practice, in the applied creative industries, broader arts, or further academic research.

Our priority is to encourage your development by distilling and building your creative voice and ambition. We do so via three semesters, deconstruction, reconstruction and reinvention, with project outcomes mirroring a design process structure.

What you'll do

Semester 1: Deconstruction
- MACD 101: Process
(20 credits)
This module introduces the components of design process in relation to your own personal practice. Through provocation and critical debate you'll reflect on and challenge what you do, seeing how global, experiential and experimental insights can generate the most appropriate process models for a contemporary communications problem.

- MACD 102: Intersections
(20 credits)
This module examines the fundamental components to the production of design: human interaction and collaboration. Whether this interaction is between client and designer, object and user, or experience and emotion, it allows you to experience provocative challenges that hone your own standpoint. You'll learn how social engagement, polar tension or friction can inspire new thinking.

- MACD 103: Boundaries
(20 credits)
This module allows you to take more radical entry points into your understanding of practice; taking project interest into new forms or creating critical design response from more theorised or experimental catalysts.
Provocateurs will continue to challenge and stretch the limits of your enquiry, exploring new theoretical models and examining the debate of 'designer as author'; how works are translated or used; and how they or their work become the provocateur.

Semester 2: Reconstruction
- MACD 104: Curate and build
(40 credits)
You'll deep dive into your emergent interests, exploring how technology and an increasingly complex consumer and cultural landscape may effect your enquiry. Thinking by doing, you'll elect and develop skill sets and a depth of study in both practice and theory. With the module running across the whole semester, it allows you to fully prepare and test ideas and craft, sectors and media as you begin to prepare your main MA project.

- MACD 105: Compete
(20 credits)
Ahead of the final semester, you'll begin to look at avenues and insights for your own practice and from a business or funding perspective. You'll build professional skills relevant to individual need and examine components of design development including publishing, presentations, production and IP.

The module will also examine other methodologies of delivering work around the world, whether through commission or employment, working in known fields of the creative industries or with museums, arts organisations or universities and research bodies.
Student will also engage in competitive projects set by external bodies.

Semester 3: Reinvention
- MACD 106, MA project
(60 credits)
This module allows you to realise your final major project, in a largely self directed semester, bringing together practice, theory and an evaluation phase that provides reflection and potential industry or funding opportunities to be negotiated ahead of graduating.

The first phase leads to exhibiting at a key industry or cultural event, with an interim show. The second sees you gather insights, industry or critical feedback, or undertake an internship, or preparing for the launch of your project. This final phase sees the production of an essay or strategic report, depending on future plans.

Facilities

- Dedicated MA studio space
- Lecture theatres, design lab, break out spaces and meeting rooms
- Digital printing facilities, Risograph machine, woodblock printing and presses, workshop and negotiated access to screen-printing studios
- Apple suite, with Adobe CS and full collection of Monotype typefaces
- Extensive library facilities and digital collections
- Negotiated use of other facilities such as film, photographic, textiles and product design studios

Staff

You'll be taught by staff with backgrounds spanning design, academic, writing and research careers. They offer decades of experience teaching and working for leading studios, working with international clients, arts and cultural organisations, exhibiting and publishing work and research. They are enaged with many of the world's top creative universities and organisations as keynote speakers, external examiners and consultants. Overall they are all inspired by design, teaching, nurturing and encouraging great and motivated students.

Assessment

- Individual project briefs
- Design research journal
- Essay
- Oral presentations, individually and in groups
- Critical review or business plan

Careers

Communication design is a broad field of study, with career choices depending largely on your own personal project focus.

Options include:

- Graphic design
- Advertising
- Packaging and brand design
- Service design
- Photography and film
- Type design or illustration
- Editorial design
- Motion graphics, interactive or digital design
- Information or UX design
- Design criticism and writing
- Teaching, research or PhD study
- Allied fields: television, the heritage sector or exhibition design

Interview and selection process

Please apply via submission of an application form, an outline of your key interest or masters proposal and a portfolio. Details about our portfolio requirements can be found on the application form.

Interviews are held in person at the School, online via Skype or by phone.

Find out how to apply here - https://myfalmouth.falmouth.ac.uk/urd/sits.urd/run/siw_ipp_lgn.login?process=siw_ipp_app&code1=MACODEFC_SEP&code2=0001

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