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On this cutting-edge course, we specialise in giving our students an advanced and comprehensive understanding of the relationship between conflict, displacement and human insecurity. Read more
On this cutting-edge course, we specialise in giving our students an advanced and comprehensive understanding of the relationship between conflict, displacement and human insecurity.

We will help you to develop the skills and understanding to prepare for employment in the fields of conflict management and resolution, humanitarian assistance and displacement, human rights and development initiatives. The key aspects of your learning will be the focus on conflict and displacement. We value a people-centred approach and an emphasis on human security which combines both human rights and human development.

The course approaches development as an important security strategy and considers displacement a measure of human security. We will encourage you to adopt an independent critical approach to contemporary theories of conflict, human rights and human security.

You will work with academics involved in the latest research and have access to wide-ranging expertise in our research centres, covering human rights in conflict, social justice and change, migration, refugees and belonging and gender research.

WHAT YOU WILL LEARN

This course will help you to develop important skills for a key role in the area of conflict, displacement and human security.
By the time you complete it, you should have acquired advanced critical and evaluative abilities, research management skills, the ability to design and deliver substantial written reports and social research projects, and high levels of competence in library and bibliographical research.

You will also have gained skills in data collection and analysis. You will have enhanced abilities in verbal presentation, familiarity with means of dissemination and mobilising research findings, and an advanced ability to collaborate in research groups and teams.
The course provides an inter-disciplinary approach to the study of the conflict, generalised violence and social inequality in contemporary global contexts. It examines the complexities of global, regional and local structures, and the relationships to the changing character of conflict.

Your studies will focus on two core modules: Conflict; Displacement and Human Security, and Research Methods and two specialist option modules in the areas of displacement, development, human rights, global environmental politics and community development. This will prepare you to begin a dissertation during the summer term for submission in September.

YOUR FUTURE CAREER

Our course is specifically aimed at giving you the skills, knowledge and understanding for a career in the fields of conflict management and resolution, humanitarian assistance and displacement, human rights and development initiatives.

You will develop the critical thinking skills and flexibility for a role in an NGO or in a government department or agency, both in developing and developed countries.

The course will also develops your skills for further academic research in conflict, displacement, development and human rights fields, as well as in associated areas of social and political theory.

MODULES

The following are the core and optional requirements for this programme:

• Conflict, Displacement and Human Security ( Core)
• Qualitative Research Methods (Social Sciences) (Core)
• Dissertation (Core)
• Introduction to Forced Migration (Option)
• Development in the International Context (Option)
• Current Issues in Forced Migration (Option)
• Global Environmental Politics (Option)
• War and Human Rights (Option)

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The degree has been developed to meet the needs of people working, or hoping to work, in international agencies, humanitarian organisations, and NGOs and students intending to go on to carry out PhD research.The programme attracts applicants with a variety of academic and working backgrounds. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The degree has been developed to meet the needs of people working, or hoping to work, in international agencies, humanitarian organisations, and NGOs and students intending to go on to carry out PhD research.The programme attracts applicants with a variety of academic and working backgrounds. We welcome those who have worked in the field of migration and / or development, but we also welcome applications from students without relevant work experience who can demonstrate a strong interest in the major themes of the programme and a strong first degree, preferably in a social science.

This innovative new programme in the Department of Development Studies offers students the opportunity to combine study and analysis of critical perspectives on development and the increasingly important and related field of migration studies.

The MSc in Migration, Mobility and Development will focus attention on the political economy of migration from a historical perspective, major trends in migration theories, and different forms of and approaches to the study of migration and displacement. The programme draws on the expertise of staff in development, migration and forced migration contexts from the Development Studies department, and encourages inter-disciplinary dialogue with other relevant departments and centres within SOAS.

The programme’s 20-week core modules will focus on the migration–development nexus, broadly conceived and defined. It will also expose students to a range of interlocking theoretical approaches which set out to account for constructions of and responses to migration and migrants, as well as to the scope and scale of migratory processes. Broadly, Term 1 provides analysis of the institutional, political, social and economic contexts where migration takes place and considers differentiated/mitigated effects. Term 2 builds on this to discuss types of migration via case study and other material, placing more emphasis on migrants’ perspectives and how these are mitigated by ‘contexts’.

Topics and themes include:

Sedentarism and the study of migration
Polities & economies of migration
Colonialism
Nations, states and territory
Globalisation
(Illegal) workers in the global economy
Place and emplacement
Assimilation/acculturation/discrimination
Transnational migrants & mobile lives
Trafficking
Development and migration
Diasporas and development
Refugees and internally displaced persons
Development-induced displacement
Environment and refugees/displacement
Climate change-related migration
Policy responses to migration
Transformations North and South

The MSc in Migration, Mobility and Development will provide a thorough analytical grounding in international migration including different types of forced and voluntary migration, facilitating the development of specialized knowledge of particular case studies, as well as overall trends and theoretical frameworks. A rigorous academic programme, it will also give students the confidence to think in policy relevant terms and will be equally valuable to those proceeding to professional employment in the sector with international organizations, NGOs and government bodies, and for students intending to go on to carry out PhD research.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/prog/

Structure

- Overview
There are four main components to this degree: three taught modules and a 10,000 word dissertation. All students take a core module, Migration, Mobility and Development. A distinctive feature of the core module is that students work together in small groups to produce a migration related research report. They then select one of two further modules: Political Economy of Development or Theory, Policy and Practice of Development. Through these modules students build their analytical skills and knowledge of the main issues and debates in Development Studies.

- Specialisation
Students also take optional modules (one full module or two half modules), allowing them to specialise in particular areas of development and possibly use them to develop a dissertation in a related theme. By tying these to their individual dissertation topic, students design their degree to suit their own interests and career development goals.

Students should be aware that not all optional modules may run in a given year. Modules at other institutions are not part of the approved programme structure.

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2015/16 (pdf; 78kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/prog/file101784.pdf

Materials

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Teaching & Learning

The MSc programme consists of three taught modules (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation. Courses are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars, collaborative research projects and supervised individual study projects.

- Lectures

Most modules involve a two hour lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes.

- Seminars

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work.

- Dissertation

A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Dissertation work requires students to make use of theoretical and empirical material and relate this to a migration related topic.

Employment

A postgraduate degree in Migration, Mobility and Development from SOAS provides graduates with a portfolio of widely transferable skills sought by employers, including analytical skills, the ability to think laterally and employ critical reasoning, and knowing how to present materials and ideas effectively both orally and in writing. Equally graduates are able to continue in the field of research, continuing their studies either at SOAS or other institutions.

An MSc in Migration, Mobility and Development is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Research within this area centres on ethnobiological knowledge systems and other systems of environmental knowledge and is supported by members of the Centre for Biocultural Diversity (http://www.kent.ac.uk/sac/research/research-centres/cbcd/index.html). Read more
Research within this area centres on ethnobiological knowledge systems and other systems of environmental knowledge and is supported by members of the Centre for Biocultural Diversity (http://www.kent.ac.uk/sac/research/research-centres/cbcd/index.html).

We research local responses to deforestation, climate change, natural resource management, medical ethnobotany, the impacts of mobility and displacement and the interface between conservation and development. The Centre has an Ethnobiology Lab and Ethnobotanical Garden, and extensive collaborative links, including with the Royal Botanic Gardens (Kew), and Eden Project.

MSc by Research
This course is a one-year full time or two-year part-time programmes. You research and write a thesis under the supervision of one or two academic staff.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/204/ethnobiology

Course structure

The first year may include coursework, especially methods modules for students who need this additional training. In general, you work closely with one supervisor throughout your research, although you have a committee of three (including your primary supervisor) overseeing your progress.

Study support

- Postgraduate resources

The School has a lively postgraduate community drawn together not only by shared resources such as postgraduate rooms, computer facilities (with a dedicated IT officer) and laboratories, but also by student-led events, societies, staff/postgraduate seminars, weekly research student seminars and a number of special lectures.

The School houses well-equipped research laboratories for genetics, ecology, visual anthropology, virtual paleoanthropology, Animal Postcranial Evolution, biological anthropology, anthropological computing, botany, osteology and ethnobiology. The state-of-the-art visual anthropology laboratory is stocked with digital editing programmes and other facilities for digital video and photographic work, and has a photographic darkroom for analogue developing and printing. The biological anthropology laboratory is equipped for osteoarchaeological and forensic work. It curates the Powell-Cotton collection of human remains, together with Anglo-Saxon skeletons from Bishopstone, East Sussex. The ethnobiology laboratory provides equipment and specimens for teaching ethnobiological research skills, and serves as a transit station for receiving, examining and redirecting field material. It also houses the Powell-Cotton collection of plant-based material culture from Southeast Asia, and a small reference and teaching collection of herbarium and spirit specimens (1,000 items) arising from recent research projects.

Kent has outstanding anthropology IT facilities. Over the last decade, the School has been associated with many innovatory projects, particularly in the field of cognitive anthropology. It provides an electronic information service to other anthropology departments, for example by hosting both the Anthropological Index Online and Experience-Rich Anthropology project. We encourage all students to use the Centre’s facilities (no previous experience or training is necessary).

Anthropology at Kent has close links with the nearby Powell-Cotton Museum, which has one of the largest ethnographic collections in the British Isles and is particularly strong in sub-Saharan African and Southeast Asian material. It also houses an extensive comparative collection of primate and other mammalian material. Human skeletal material is housed at the Kent Osteological Research and Analysis Centre within the School.

Anthropology, together with the Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology (DICE) form the School of Anthropology and Conservation.

- Researcher Development Programme

Kent's Graduate School co-ordinates the Researcher Development Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/tstindex.html) for research students, which includes workshops focused on research, specialist and transferable skills. The programme is mapped to the national Researcher Development Framework and covers a diverse range of topics, including subjectspecific research skills, research management, personal effectiveness, communication skills, networking and teamworking, and career management skills.

Research areas

Work in these areas is focused on the Centre for Biocultural Diversity. We conduct research on ethnobiological knowledge systems, ethnoecology, and other systems of environmental knowledge, as well as local responses to deforestation, climate change, natural resource management, medical ethnobotany, the impacts of mobility and displacement and the interface between conservation and development. The Centre has an Ethnobiology Lab and Ethnobotanical Garden, and extensive collaborative links, including with the Royal Botanic Gardens (Kew), and Eden Project.

Careers

As a School recognised for its excellence in research we are one of the partners in the South East Doctoral Training Centre, which is recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). This relationship ensures that successful completion of our courses is sufficient preparation for research in the various fields of social anthropology. Many of our students go on to do PhD research.

The School has a very good record for postgraduate employment and academic continuation. Studying anthropology, you develop an understanding of the complexity of all actions, beliefs and discourse by acquiring strong methodological and analytical skills. Anthropologists are increasingly being hired by companies and organisations that recognise the value of employing people who understand the complexities of societies and organisations.

Many of our alumni teach in academic positions in universities across the world, whilst others work for a wide range of organisations.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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LLM - full time 1 year, part time 2 years. PGDip - 7 months. On this course you’ll examine the theories and practices of development, social justice and human rights within and across nations. Read more

Mode of study

LLM - full time 1 year, part time 2 years
PGDip - 7 months

Course details

On this course you’ll examine the theories and practices of development, social justice and human rights within and across nations. Among the themes explored are the implications of globalisation and its governance regimes, the feminisation of impoverishment, humanitarian and displacement issues, development and human rights, and the implications of environmental degradation.

You’ll develop knowledge, theory and practical skills across the field of international development and human rights law, with the option to specialise further in particular areas. We benefit from close associations with the Centre for Human Rights in Practice, providing you with opportunities to undertake research, capacity-building and other project work aimed at the global promotion of human rights.

Our graduates have developed careers as lawyers and activists in the areas of social justice and human rights; governmental and NGO policy-making; or as academics in law, politics and related fields.

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This online course reviews recent developments in the field of psychosocial programming in humanitarian contexts and examines the evidence-base for effective, quality programming. Read more

Psychosocial Interventions for Displaced Populations by Distance Learning - Short Course

This online course reviews recent developments in the field of psychosocial programming in humanitarian contexts and examines the evidence-base for effective, quality programming. It is suitable for professional development both for those wishing to explore this rapidly developing area of humanitarian response and for those with significant experience in the field who wish to consolidate their understanding of effective practice.

The material builds upon the substantial research, field experience and networks of the two course facilitators, Professor Alastair Ager and Dr Rebecca Horn, to create a lively, interactive learning approach that draws upon the diverse backgrounds and perspectives of our global participants.

Participants registered on the course will work through ten units of material – featuring readings, narrated PowerPoints, videos etc. - over a six week period. A discussion board provides a context for interaction between participants as well as with course facilitators. Those wishing to gain academic credit for study will then complete a written assignment.

Course Dates: 27 February to 07 April 2017

The content of the module will include:

1: The Developing Field of Mental Health and Psychosocial Support (MHPSS)
2: The MHPSS Guidelines
3: Current Policy and Practice Developments:
4: Approaches to Psychosocial Support: Child Friendly Spaces
5: Approaches to Psychosocial Support: Gender, Conflict and Displacement
6: Approaches to Psychosocial Support: Community-Based Approaches
7: Approaches to Psychosocial Support: Mainstreaming into Other Sectors
8: Approaches to Psychosocial Support: Humanitarian Staff Care
9: Design, Monitoring and Evaluation of Psychosocial Programming
10: Capacity Building for Psychosocial Support

All units involve discussion of principles and frameworks, evidence-base and emerging best practice.

Credit Rating: 15 SCOTCAT/5 ECTS

Participants of the professional development courses will receive a certificate of attendance from the Institute.

However, participants wishing to gain an award may register for a post graduate certificate. The modules are then taken for credit on a part-time basis each year. A PG Cert requires 60 credits and a post graduate diploma requires 120 credits. If you do a dissertation in addition to the short courses, you will gain 180 credits.

If you register for an award, you can have up to 4 years for a PG Cert, 5 years for a PG Dip and 7 years for a MSc to complete in part-time mode.

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Study International Politics to get behind the headlines as you discover structures and ideas that shape global affairs. The International Politics MA programme is for students who want to explore international politics more widely and then drill down to follow their unique interests and specialise their knowledge. Read more
Study International Politics to get behind the headlines as you discover structures and ideas that shape global affairs.

Who is it for?

The International Politics MA programme is for students who want to explore international politics more widely and then drill down to follow their unique interests and specialise their knowledge. The MA is designed to give you the chance to pursue your own questions about the way the world works – and to shape arguments where you feel it doesn’t.

Objectives

This is a course where you will challenge your own point of view. We probe the ideas that structure the way we think about the world and examine the institutions that determine events. We then focus on how you can use this new understanding to judge global affairs for yourself.

International Politics is an expansive and ever-changing subject so you learn about the broad contours of the field while developing specialisms backed by real-world research. The department’s academics are actively shaping policy, sitting on the advisory board for the Corbyn shadow cabinet, hosting talks on the human right to housing in London, and engaging in study groups around the Obama presidency. This keeps the content of the course effective and current, giving students a contemporary lens from which to view rapid political change.

These are some of the questions the course poses:
-Is the USA a benevolent global leader or a neo-imperial power?
-How does the shift in power from the West to the Rest reshape international politics in the 21st century?
-Can states act effectively in a world increasingly shaped by international institutions and global economic actors?

Placements

You may have the opportunity to undertake a placement, but it is not a formal requirement of the course. We encourage students to create their own, by fostering connections offered by the Careers Service. There is also the International Politics Careers Day, which explores career opportunities with international politics degrees and includes:
-Talks by speakers within the field (including alumni now working within the UK Department for International Development, the UK Ministry of Justice), UNESCO and the EU Commission.
-Talks by careers consultants and volunteering coordinators.
-Drop-in sessions with careers professionals focusing on CV writing, applications and volunteering.

Academic facilities

As part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

Teaching and learning

The course is taught by academics within the department with industry professionals offering insight in the form of talks for the Practitioner Series. This is a programme of talks from visiting speakers and alumni working within organisations such as The Refugee Council and Amnesty International.

The staff within our Department of International Politics are research active, enthusiastic and passionate about their work. Often this research and influence leads to policy change and many media appearances. Find out more about International Politics staff.
You can follow our staff’s activity through their Twitter feed: @cityintpolitics

Assessment

Each taught module is assessed by an essay, either a 5,000-word essay for 30 credit modules or a 3,000-word essay for 15 credit modules. Your final MA marks are derived from a combination of your essay and dissertation grades.

You are required to submit a dissertation of 15,000 words in an area linked to the MA degree. Your dissertation topic will be agreed with your personal tutor/supervisor.

Your work will be assessed by coursework alone, there are no exams. Many students develop their key interest first when they choose their elective modules, then when they write their essays, and finally when they write their dissertation over the summer term.

Modules

The structure of this MA means you can design your own degree. The core module 'Theories of International Politics' is taught in the first term. Throughout the year you can choose elective modules that suit your interests. You can also opt to study across departments with optional modules from the Department of Sociology and The City Law School.

Core modules
-Theories of International Politics (30 credits)
-International Politics Research Workshop
-International Politics Dissertation (60 credits)

Elective modules - choose 60 credits
Typical modules offered by the Department of International Politics:
-Understanding security in the 21st century (15 credits)
-International organisations in global politics (15 credits)
-Development and international politics (15 credits)
-Religion in global politics (15 credits)
-Global capitalism: past, present and future (30 credits)
-Global political economy (30 credits)
-Political economy of global finance (15 credits)
-The politics of forced displacement and resettlement (15 credits)
-Global governance (15 credits)
-International politics of the Middle East (15 credits)
-Global financial governance (15 credits)
-Strategy, diplomacy and decision-making (30 credits)
-US foreign policy (15 credits)
-Foreign policy analysis (15 credits)
-Economic diplomacy (15 credits)

Typical modules offered by the Sociology Department:
-Developments in communication policy (30 credits)
-Transnational media and communication (30 credits)
-Criminal minds (15 credits)
-Crime news (15 credits)

Typical modules offered by The City Law School:
-International human rights in law and practice (30 credits)
-Human rights in the EU (30 credits)
-International criminal law: crimes & institutions (30 credits)
-Law and war (30 credits)
-Minorities and indigenous people in international law (30 credits)
-International law & the use of force (30 credits)

Career prospects

The skills you will take away from this programme – those of research, analysis and presentation – are highly valued by employers. In 2014-15, 87.5% of City's International Politics graduates were in employment or further study six months after graduation. Current graduates now work within the following organisations:
-Amnesty International
-European External Action Service
-International Crisis Group
-Ministry of Economy and Finance
-The Open Rights Group
-The Grass Roots Group
-The United Nations
-UNESCO
-US Embassy

From government agencies to NGOs and human rights organisations, the course gives you the perfect foundation to prepare for a career in a wide range of fields. You will graduate with the ability to undertake in-depth research, challenge received explanations of topics in social and political life and to examine and critically evaluate the complex structure of relationships between governments, transnational actors, transnational networks and intergovernmental or governmental organisations.

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Do you have a passion and talent for writing? Want to develop your confidence and ability as a writer and dream of being published?. Read more
Do you have a passion and talent for writing? Want to develop your confidence and ability as a writer and dream of being published?

Our MA in Creative Writing at Northumbria offers you the opportunity to explore your writing craft at an advanced level. You’ll gain a solid grounding in the techniques and skills of writing fiction, learn how to critique your own work and experiment with your writing voice.

A combination of core and option modules gives you the chance to develop your critical and analytical thinking. This course builds on your passion for creative writing, enhancing your career prospects as you develop a portfolio that reflects a broad range of genres.

You’ll graduate as a critical thinker with skills that will help you make a big difference in your chosen area of work and creative practice.

This course can also be taken part time, for more information, please view this web-page: https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/creative-writing-dtpcwr6/

Learn From The Best

Creative Writing at Northumbria enjoys international recognition for the quality of teaching and research, and our publications in Creative Writing and English Studies are ranked 15th in the country for their quality, by the 2014 Research Excellence Framework.

Our Creative Writing team is made up of award-winning novelist and poets, who are major figures in their field. Furthermore, through our partnership with New Writing North, the foremost literary promotion agency in the north of England, we give you opportunities to meet and learn from agents, publishers, and writers from across the country.

Teaching And Assessment

We aim to challenge you, to offer new insights and ways of thinking, while providing a firm grounding in creative writing techniques. You’re encouraged to experiment with and develop your own writing voice while being aware of the demands of the writing industry.

Workshops, seminars, critiquing sessions and small groups led by writers and editors provide an intellectually stimulating environment within which you can develop confidence in literary forms and techniques.

You’ll produce a portfolio of creative writing, including an accompanying commentary for assessment for each module. This is a substantial body of work that demonstrates your ability to develop your own writing voice and edit your own work.

You will build up your skills through core and option modules assessed by formative (non-graded) and summative (graded) assignments. A virtual learning platform (Blackboard) offers you space to share ideas, engage with interactive tasks and access online resources including reading lists.

Module Overview
EF0126 - E.S.A.P. in FADSS Level 7 (Optional, 0 Credits)
EL7010 - Approaches to Writing (Optional, 30 Credits)
EL7011 - Creativity (Core, 30 Credits)
EL7012 - Experiments in Form (Optional, 30 Credits)
EL7020 - Professional Practice: Writing in an Industry Context (Core, 30 Credits)
EL7023 - Writing Research 1 (Optional, 30 Credits)
EL7024 - Writing Portfolio (Core, 60 Credits)
EL7025 - Writing Research 2 (Optional, 30 Credits)

Learning Environment

Humanities at Northumbria is composed of three subject teams: History, Literature & Creative Writing, and English Language & Linguistics, and is also developing strengths in the fields of American Studies and Heritage Studies.

The Humanities department is made up of a community of learners all the way through from first year undergraduate to final year PhD level. All Humanities staff are engaged in research and actively create the knowledge that is taught in the department. Our Creative Writing team are all published and highly acclaimed for their work.

Creative Writing students, as part of Northumbria’s Humanities department, have access to the new Institute for Humanities which houses a range of specialist research resources. You’ll also get the chance to work with a range of cultural partners including New Writing North, who provide unique opportunities for creative writers.

The research of the Institute brings together the disciplines of Art History, American Studies, Creative Writing, English Language and Linguistics, English Literature, History and Media Studies.

Research-Rich Learning

We are recognised for world-leading research in all our Humanities’ disciplines. Our staff have attracted major funding from Research Councils UK as well as the British Academy, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

Northumbria is rated in the UK top 15 for the quality of its English Literature, Language and Creative Writing publications. You can explore some of the key themes here.

The Creative Writing team work across a range of genres and their interests encompass everything from identity, displacement and narratives of cultural difference to astronomy and visual perception, and how we represent animals in language.

You will join a lively community that regularly gives public readings and, through our association with the regional writing agency New Writing North, is formally involved with the Durham Book Festival and the Northern Writers' Awards.

Furthermore, you will have the opportunity to engage with the activities of the Institute for Humanities, which is home to five international journals and which regularly hosts an exciting range of seminars, symposia and conferences on topics as varied as Memory, Heritage and Identity; Transnationalism and Societal Change; Digital Humanities; Medical Humanities; and American Studies.

Give Your Career An Edge

Employability, in the form of critical and creative skills, presentation skills and reflective and evaluative abilities, is embedded into your course. You will be able to demonstrate that you are self-motivated, show initiative and personal responsibility, and possess a thirst for independent learning.

During your course, you’ll be in constant contact with a range of professionals working in the arts and creative industries, helping you to build up networks and gain relevant experience.

All modules play a crucial role in developing the advanced skills and attributes necessary for employment, including effective time and workload management, oral and written communication, teamwork and creative analysis of complex problems. The core module, Professional Practice, is designed to give you insight into the world of literary publishing.

You will graduate with a qualification which may enhance your promotion prospects in professions such as the literary industries, partnerships and agencies, marketing and advertising.

Your Future

Given the postgraduate nature of this course the tutors (all published writers themselves) will be looking for signs of the ability to write at a professional level.

MA graduates have achieved notable success. Dan Smith publishes novels for adults and younger readers, most recently Boy X. Celia Bryce is an acclaimed novelist whose book Anthem for Jackson Dawes was nominated for the Carnegie Medal in 2014.

Helen Laws is a highly successful TV scriptwriter who originated 32 Brinkburn Street for BBC TV and has written for Casualty, Eastenders, Two Pints of Lager and a Packet of Crisps, Shameless and Doctors. She says the MA taught her the importance of story and gave her the confidence to keep trying.

There are also opportunities for you to advance your studies further with advice in writing PhD and funding applications available.

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MA Peace and Conflict studies is delivered by the Centre for Trust, Peace and Social Relations. It is the centre’s flagship programme building on the legacy of Coventry as a city for peace and reconciliation. Read more
MA Peace and Conflict studies is delivered by the Centre for Trust, Peace and Social Relations. It is the centre’s flagship programme building on the legacy of Coventry as a city for peace and reconciliation. You will not only learn about the value of peace and conflict studies but will also be inspired by the city’s reputation and legacy.

This programme provides students with in-depth knowledge and understanding of peace and conflict theories, issues and practices, and an ability to apply theory and case studies to the practices of peacebuilding in complex situations. With opportunities to develop critically reflective peace-making practices in a friendly and supporting learning environment, the programme promotes breadth and depth of intellectual enquiry and is underpinned with a concern for integrity and courage.

You will also develop a valuable range of transferable key skills and personal attributes for a wide variety of careers in related field such as international development, in charities and policy settings.

Qualifications available:
-Postgraduate Certificate in Peace and Conflict Studies (8 months by blended/distance-learning)
-Postgraduate Diploma in Peace and Conflict Studies (16 months by blended/distance-learning)
-Full Term MA Peace and Conflict Studies (24 months by blended/distance-learning)
-Fast-Track MA (APEL) Peace and Conflict Studies (15 months)

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

The MA Peace and Conflict Studies is a high-quality postgraduate qualification, shaped by research-active staff and informed by a concern for the real world, providing an opportunity to study in a highly interactive and supportive learning environment. You will develop a reflective learning skill for both intellectual enquiry and professional development.

We will provide you:
-An opportunity to achieve an MA in 15 months with accreditation of prior experiential learning (APEL). Enabling professionals to obtain academic credits based on their professional experience
-Access to a professional network of individuals working in various roles related to peacebuilding internationally
-Research informed curriculum and teaching. Our courses are global, from the content of the programme and the staff leading them, to the diverse backgrounds of our participants
-A flexible blended learning approach, combining intensive workshops, online learning and small group tutorials, allowing you to fit your studies around other commitments
-Access to Coventry University e-learning resources

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

Alongside the MA-route (180M credits), this programme can also be studied at Postgraduate Certificate (60M credits) and Postgraduate Diploma level (120M credits), and is offered via blended learning or distance learning. The three different qualifications on offer are sequential, and can therefore lead into one another, following the successful completion of the earlier portion.

At Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert) stage, you will study three mandatory modules:
-Peace, Conflict and Security in the 21st Century
-Philosophies of Non-Violence and Reconciliation
-Peacebuilding: Theories into Practice

At Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) stage you will undertake one core module, Project Management in Practice, and two elective modules from the following list:
-Environment, Peace and Conflict
-Religion, Peace and Conflict
-Gender, Peace and Conflict.
-Migration, Displacement and Belonging
-Privatisation of International Security
-Comparative Peace Processes

At MA Stage, you will undertake a dissertation in an area of study which you would like to explore in more depth, with support from a supervisor.

CTPSR BURSARIES

Centre for Trust, Peace and Social Relations are pleased to offer a limited number of partial bursaries towards tuition fees, available to overseas students who wish to pursue an MA in Maritime Security or Peace and Conflict Studies.

Eligibility
-Complete a bursary application form including a detailed statement of support which should not exceed 500 words by 28 April 2017.
-Demonstrate capacity and commitment to undertake and complete the programme.
-Explain how the programme is aligned to your future aspirations and how it will benefit your professional development.

Limitations
-Please note that this scholarship cannot be combined with any other CTPSR scholarship.
-The decision to award is at the sole discretion of the Centre. The Centre reserves the right to determine the number of scholarships to award from this category.
-Bursaries will only be awarded if your admissions application is successful.

How to Apply
Students wishing to apply for a bursary should complete an application form and submit this to by no later than 28 April 2017.

HOW WILL THIS COURSE ENHANCE MY CAREER PROSPECTS?

The MA in Peace and Conflict Studies is taught by experts in the broad field of peace and conflict studies and is informed by their research, practice and activism. As such, the programme is able to provide a deeper insight into both theoretical and practical perspectives of the contemporary peacebuilding challenges.

Further to this, the course ultimately seeks to create a learning community, where ideas can be interchanged and debated amongst academic staff, alumni, and current students, lasting well beyond the timespan of the academic programme itself.

If you are already a practitioner, you will have the opportunity to broaden your professional network, which is very likely to be useful to you in the workplace, whilst also gaining a formal accredited postgraduate qualification, which may be required for further progression in your career. If you are an individual with an interest in peace and conflict, this course will equip you with the skills and knowledge necessary to enter into jobs within a broad spectrum of organisations, including: international non-government organisations, multi-national government organisations like the United Nations, regional communities such as the European Union or the Economic Community of West African States, faith group organisations, community organisations, the private sector, think tanks, and indeed also academia.

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This course combines the teaching and research strength of our geoscience and chemical engineering schools. The oil industry has clear objectives to maximise recovery from oil and gas fields, and to extend the life of existing fields. Read more
This course combines the teaching and research strength of our geoscience and chemical engineering schools. The oil industry has clear objectives to maximise recovery from oil and gas fields, and to extend the life of existing fields. This course aims to meet the need for skilled personnel by training graduates that specialise in appraisal / development / production geoscience and the fundamentals of reservoir engineering. The course concentrates on characterization and modeling of the reservoir, fluid flow, and the impact of recovery mechanisms and dynamic displacement. There are also courses in seismic interpretation.

Semester 2 comprises four specialist modules:

Integrated Subsurface Description: 3D Seismic Interpretation and Visualisation, Trapping Framework, Reservoir Framework, Reservoir Properties, Fluid Properties, Uncertainty & Risk,

Oil & Gas Reservoir Dynamics: Reservoir Compartments, Reservoir Energy and Recovery Mechanisms, Geological Reservoir Modelling, Reservoir simulation, Well Testing

Group Development Project : working in groups of 4 or 5, mentored by research students and staff, and using a typical dataset to undertake a field evaluation.

Field Depletion Planning: Resource Assessment, Rate & Production Profile Prediction, Depletion Plan, Operating an Oil & Gas Field, HSE, Petroleum Economics and Risk Analysis, Reservoir Management, Base Management

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This programme provides core teaching in the ideas and approaches of sociology as applied to understanding social order and social change globally and internationally. Read more

Programme description

This programme provides core teaching in the ideas and approaches of sociology as applied to understanding social order and social change globally and internationally. It explores the local impacts of global processes, and global impacts of local processes.

This programme will give you a better understanding of global processes of social change, and allow you to explore topics of personal interest in depth, both in coursework and in a supervised dissertation project.

It will appeal to those concerned about some of the key social problems and dynamics of our day, providing a thorough grounding in approaches to social research on global issues.

It presents sociology as the study of a dynamic and globalising world, around such issues as:

sustainable development
migration, refugees and displacement
global financial markets
social network analysis
China
human rights and citizenship
digital and global popular cultures
inequality

You will become part of a community led by international experts working on globally involved topics, in one of the UK’s best departments for research and teaching.

Programme structure

You will take compulsory courses that give you a sociological perspective and prepare you for independent dissertation research.

Your four further option courses can address global topics, social theory and research training, as you prefer.

The dissertation, a piece of self-designed research with supervisory support, allows you to put your personal stamp on your studies.

Learning outcomes

When you complete the degree you will:

have a comprehensive overview of Sociology and its key theoretical and research concerns and approaches
be able to design, conduct and present a substantial piece of empirical research
be able to contribute to the key debates in the specific areas you have chosen to study through the optional courses

Career opportunities

This programme is extremely relevant if you are seeking employment in consultancy, the public sector, UN agencies, non-governmental organisations, the private sector or think-tanks, or as an academic, practitioner or policy maker.

Past students have gone on to undertake roles in development and international aid, the public sector, academia/think-tanks, migration NGOs, environment and conservation, law and journalism.

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Our Social Anthropology group forms an international centre of excellence for postgraduate training, recognised as one of the premier research departments in the UK. Read more

Research profile

Our Social Anthropology group forms an international centre of excellence for postgraduate training, recognised as one of the premier research departments in the UK.

Applied research includes policy-related work on asylum seekers, non-governmental organisations, sustainable development and participatory rights. Our regional expertise is not confined to Scotland and the UK but includes Europe, Africa, the Middle East, South Asia, Southeast Asia, East Asia, and North and South America.

Particular research strengths include:

law and justice
politics, governance and the state
nationalism and citizenship
war, violence and displacement
medicine and health
science and technology studies
history and theory of anthropology
development and environment
kinship and relatedness
death and the limits of the body
material culture, identity and memory
contemporary hunter-gatherers
linguistic anthropology
urban anthropology
anthropology of landscape

Training and support

The PhD programme combines work on your thesis project, usually based on long-term fieldwork, with systematic training in anthropological and social research skills. Research training is also available in the form of our MSc by Research.

The Graduate School provides a suite of ESRC-recognised research training courses for social science students across the University. We are developing an exciting package of flexible web-based training courses in line with the increased emphasis on ongoing training throughout the course of doctoral studies.

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Maritime Security is one of the most dynamic and expanding sectors in the security industry with an impact on development efforts, insurance, international law, global shipping, the broader global economy, as well as transnational security. Read more
Maritime Security is one of the most dynamic and expanding sectors in the security industry with an impact on development efforts, insurance, international law, global shipping, the broader global economy, as well as transnational security. It encompasses the headline issue of piracy alongside other security challenges such as trafficking by sea, illegal fishing, and security at port.

Qualifications available:
-Postgraduate Certificate in Maritime Security (8 months by blended/distance-learning)
-Postgraduate Diploma in Maritime Security (16 months by blended/distance-learning)
-Full Term MA Maritime Security (24 months by blended/distance-learning)
-Fast-Track MA (APEL) Maritime Security (15 months)

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

MA Maritime Security is a high-quality postgraduate qualification, shaped by research-active staff and informed by real world events, providing an opportunity to study in a friendly and supportive learning environment.

The MA is open to anyone with the requisite qualifications, and is targeted at preparing people to enter into a career in fields relating to Maritime Security (e.g. shipping, the security sector, law, insurance, development, international relations, and diplomacy) or to enhance the career opportunities of those already working within such fields.

If you are interested in Maritime Security, Coventry University is the place to learn more about it.

Course benefits:
-An opportunity to achieve an MA in 15 months with accreditation of prior experiential learning (APEL). Enabling professionals to obtain academic credits based on their professional experience
-Access to a professional network of individuals working in various roles related to peacebuilding internationally
-Research informed curriculum and teaching. Our courses are global, from the content of the programme and the staff leading them, to the diverse backgrounds of our participants
-A flexible blended learning approach, combining intensive workshops, online learning and small group tutorials. Allowing you to fit your studies around other commitments
-Access to Coventry University e-learning resources and CU Online

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

Alongside the MA-route (180M credits), this programme can be studied at Postgraduate Certificate (60M credits) and Postgraduate Diploma level (120M credits), and is offered via blended learning or distance learning. The three different qualifications on offer are sequential, and can therefore lead into one another, following the successful completion of the earlier portion.

At Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert) stage, you will study three mandatory modules:
-Introduction to Maritime Security: Theory, Concepts and Key Perspectives
-Maritime Security in the 21st Century: Challenges and Responses
-Peace, Conflict and Security in the 21st Century

At Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) stage you will undertake one core module, Project Management in Practice, and two elective modules from the following list:
-Privatisation of International Security
-Environment, Peace and Conflict
-Migration, Displacement and Belonging
-Religion, Peace and Conflict
-Gender, Peace and Conflict.
-Comparative Peace Processes

At MA Stage, you will undertake a dissertation in an area of study which you would like to explore in more depth, with support from a supervisor.

FERGUSON TRUST SCHOLARSHIP

Ferguson Trust Scholarships are made available through the generosity of The Allan and Nesta Ferguson Charitable Trust to support students wishing to pursue our Peace and Conflict Studies and Maritime Security academic streams. The scholarships are designed for candidates from low-income countries and lower middle-income countries, which, ordinarily, are conflict-affected. We apologise to everyone from the EU, Japan, USA and areas with comparable incomes, we are not allowed to offer these scholarships no matter how strong your application.

The competition for funding is intense and the applications are of a very high standard, prior to applying for a scholarship please ensure you have a formal offer letter.

After checking your eligibility you should refer to the scholarship terms & conditions, complete the application form with great care and return this to by 28 April 2017.

CTPSR BURSARIES

Centre for Trust, Peace and Social Relations are pleased to offer a limited number of partial bursaries towards tuition fees, available to overseas students who wish to pursue an MA in Maritime Security or Peace and Conflict Studies.

Eligibility
-Complete a bursary application form including a detailed statement of support which should not exceed 500 words by 28 April 2017
-Demonstrate capacity and commitment to undertake and complete the programme
-Explain how the programme is aligned to your future aspirations and how it will benefit your professional development

Limitations
-Please note that this scholarship cannot be combined with any other CTPSR scholarship
-The decision to award is at the sole discretion of the Centre. The Centre reserves the right to determine the number of scholarships to award from this category
-Bursaries will only be awarded if your admissions application is successful

How to Apply
Students wishing to apply for a bursary should complete an application form and submit this to by no later than 28 April 2017.

HOW WILL THIS COURSE ENHANCE MY CAREER PROSPECTS?

The MA in Maritime Security is the only programme of its kind in the world, and therefore offers an unparalleled opportunity to gain a deeper insight through both theoretical and practical perspectives of the present security challenges at sea. The course is taught by experts in the field of Maritime Security and is informed by their research. The programme is also evolving alongside the dynamism of these challenges, as they exist in the real world, and being tailored to the needs of practitioners.

Further to this, the course ultimately seeks to create a learning community, where ideas can be interchanged and debated amongst academic staff, alumni, and current students, lasting well beyond the timespan of the academic programme itself.

These are the benefits that the MA in Maritime Security can offer you, and will thus enhance your career prospects in the following ways. If you are already a practitioner, you will have the opportunity to broaden your professional network, which is very likely to be useful to you in the workplace, whilst also gaining a formal accredited postgraduate qualification, which may be required for further progression in your career. If you are an individual with an interest in Maritime Security, this course will equip you with the skills and knowledge necessary to enter into jobs within a broad spectrum of organisations, including: international non-government organisations, multinational government organisations like the United Nations, regional communities such as the European Union or the Economic Community of West African states, the shipping industry, oil and gas, think tanks, and indeed also academia.

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Anthropology prides itself on its inclusive and interdisciplinary focus. It takes a holistic approach to human society, combining biological and social perspectives. Read more
Anthropology prides itself on its inclusive and interdisciplinary focus. It takes a holistic approach to human society, combining biological and social perspectives.

All of our Anthropology Master’s programmes are recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as having research training status, so successful completion of these courses is sufficient preparation for research in the various fields of social anthropology. Many of our students go on to do PhD research. Others use their Master’s qualification in employment ranging from research in government departments to teaching to consultancy work overseas.

We welcome students with the appropriate background for research. If you wish to study for a single year, you can do the MA or MSc by research, a 12-month independent research project.

If you are interested in registering for a research degree, you should contact the member of staff whose research is the most relevant to your interests. You should include a curriculum vitae, a short (1,000-word) research proposal, and a list of potential funding sources.

About the School of Anthropology and Conservation

Kent has pioneered the social anthropological study of Europe, Latin America, Melanesia, and Central and Southeast Asia, the use of computers in anthropological research, and environmental anthropology in its widest sense (including ethnobiology and ethnobotany).

Our regional expertise covers Europe, the Middle East, Central, Southeast and Southern Asia, Central and South America, Amazonia, Papua New Guinea, East Timor and Polynesia. Specialisation in biological anthropology includes forensics and paleopathology, osteology, evolutionary psychology and the evolutionary ecology and behaviour of great apes.

Course structure

The first year may include coursework, especially methods modules for students who need this additional training. You will work closely with one supervisor throughout your research, although you have a committee of three (including your primary supervisor) overseeing your progress. If you want to research in the area of applied computing in social anthropology, you would also have a supervisor based in the School of Computing.

Research areas

- Social Anthropology

The related themes of ethnicity, nationalism, identity, conflict, and the economics crisis form a major focus of our current work in the Middle East, the Balkans, South Asia, Amazonia and Central America, Europe (including the United Kingdom), Oceania and South-East Asia.

Our research extends to inter-communal violence, mental health, diasporas, pilgrimage, intercommunal trade, urban ethnogenesis, indigenous representation and the study of contemporary religions and their global connections.

We research issues in fieldwork and methodology more generally, with a strong and expanding interest in the field of visual anthropology. Our work on identity and locality links with growing strengths in customary law, kinship and parenthood. This is complemented by work on the language of relatedness, child health and on the cognitive bases of kinship terminologies.

A final strand of our research focuses on policy and advocacy issues and examines the connections between morality and law, legitimacy and corruption, public health policy and local healing strategies, legal pluralism and property rights, and the regulation of marine resources.

- Environmental Anthropology and Ethnobiology

Work in these areas is focused on the Centre for Biocultural Diversity. We conduct research on ethnobiological knowledge systems and other systems of environmental knowledge as well as local responses to deforestation, climate change, natural resource management, medical ethnobotany, the impacts of mobility and displacement and the interface between conservation and development. Current projects include trade in materia medica in Ladakh and Bolivia, food systems, ethno-ornithology, the development of buffer zones for protected areas and phytopharmacy among migrant diasporas.

- Digital Anthropology: Cultural Informatics, Social Invention and Computational Methods

Since 1985, we have been exploring and applying new approaches to research problems in anthropology – often, as in the case of hypermedia, electronic and internet publishing, digital media, expert systems and large-scale textual and historical databases, up to a decade before other anthropologists. Today, we are exploring cloud media, semantic networks, multi-agent modelling, dual/blended realities, data mining, smart environments and how these are mediated by people into new possibilities and capabilities.

Our major developments have included advances in kinship theory and analysis supported by new computational methods within field-based studies and as applied to detailed historical records; qualitative analysis of textual and ethnographic materials; and computer-assisted approaches to visual ethnography. We are extending our range to quantitative approaches for assessing qualitative materials, analysing social and cultural invention, the active representation of meaning, and the applications and implications of mobile computing, sensing and communications platforms and the transformation of virtual into concrete objects, institutions and structures.

- Biological Anthropology

Biological Anthropology is the newest of the University of Kent Anthropology research disciplines. We are interested in a diverse range of research topics within biological and evolutionary anthropology. These include bioarchaeology, human reproductive strategies, hominin evolution, primate behaviour and ecology, modern human variation, cultural evolution and Palaeolithic archaeology. This work takes us to many different regions of the world (Asia, Africa, Europe, the United States), and involves collaboration with international colleagues from a number of organisations. We have a dedicated research laboratory and up-to-date computing facilities to allow research in many areas of biological anthropology.

Currently, work is being undertaken in a number of these areas, and research links have been forged with colleagues at Kent in archaeology and biosciences, as well as with those at the Powell- Cotton Museum, the Budongo Forest Project (Uganda) and University College London.

Kent Osteological Research and Analysis (KORA) offers a variety of osteological services for human remains from archaeological contexts.

Careers

Higher degrees in anthropology create opportunities in many employment sectors including academia, the civil service and non-governmental organisations through work in areas such as human rights, journalism, documentary film making, environmental conservation and international finance. An anthropology degree also develops interpersonal and intercultural skills, which make our graduates highly desirable in any profession that involves working with people from diverse backgrounds and cultures.

Many of our students go on to do PhD research. Others use their Master’s qualification in employment ranging from research in government departments to teaching to consultancy work overseas.

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The MA Education. International Education offers the opportunity to work with researchers who have developed leading perspectives in understanding comparative and international education policy and practice. Read more
The MA Education: International Education offers the opportunity to work with researchers who have developed leading perspectives in understanding comparative and international education policy and practice. The programme is particularly relevant to students from developed and developing countries who plan to work in professional, management, and education roles in both national education systems and internationally.

The programme situates the study of international education within a complex and changing world where education and education professionals are called upon to play equally complex and challenging roles in promoting economic growth and competition, while at the same time supporting the development of sustainable and cohesive societies and promoting equity and social justice.

Course structure

The course is structured over three trimesters and totals 180 credits (90 ECTS). It is available in campus-based mode, low-residency mode or online-only. You can start in September or February and will study for 60 credits per trimester. In your first trimester you will study the MA Education core module Education: Economics, Politics and Society (30 credits) plus your award core module (30 credits). In the second trimester you will study the core module Social Science Research (30 credits), plus two 15-credit elective modules, one of which may be a shared elective from another MA award. In your third trimester you will research and write your Dissertation (60 credits) on a topic relevant to your award. If you take the low residency option, the face-to-face teaching of all modules will take place during two 2-week intensive blocks (typically in September and February).

Modules

Trimester 1
In your first trimester you will study two compulsory core modules totalling 60 credits.
Core Module:
Education: Economics, Politics and Society (30 credits) explores how education can be understood in a complex and globalised world where it is seen by many governments as a significant factor in economic growth and competition. You will learn how to question the policies and organisations involved in defining the purposes, content and outcomes of education.
Award Core Module:
International Education and Globalisation (30 credits) looks at education within a global context and deals with issues such the role of international organisations, anti-globalisation critiques, cultural hegemony and the political economy of education within the global knowledge economy.
Trimester 2
In your second trimester you will study one compulsory core module, and two 15 credit elective modules, one of which may be a shared elective from another MA award. This will total 60 credits.
Compulsory Core Module:
Social Science Research (30 credits) sets educational research within the broader context of the social sciences and introduces a range of qualitative and quantitative methodologies and methods from which you can select the most appropriate for your dissertation.
Elective Modules:
Education and Development (option 15 credits) considers the relationship between education and international economic, social and human development. It focuses on patterns of international investment in education, key aspects of the discourses of education policy and key challenges to ensuring a quality education for all in both developed and developing countries.
Education, Conflict and Peace (option 15 credits) looks at the role of education in violent conflict before moving on to consider humanitarian and development initiatives to deliver education in conflict and emergencies. It explores issues of gender, displacement, children’s experience of conflict, and educational policy for peace and citizenship.
International Higher Education (shared option 15 credits) develops understanding of contemporary international higher education. Specific aspects of policy (widening participation; research, creativity and innovation; New Public Management) are explored through case studies of international Higher Education reform and management.
Trimester 3
In your third trimester you will research and write your Dissertation (60 credits) on a topic relevant to your award.
Dissertation (60 credits) enables you to study and research an aspect of education theory, policy or practice in depth, guided by an expert to arrive at your own synthesis of a topic to take forward into your career.

Teaching methods

For the campus-based mode of study, some lectures and seminars will take place during the day, whilst others may be in the evening or at weekends. For low-residency students the teaching will be concentrated into two 2-week blocks (typically around 6 hours per day). The course also makes extensive use of online teaching, particularly for the low-residency and online only modes. This will include a combination of individual and shared learning using the Bath Spa University virtual learning environment.

Staff / Tutors

-Dr Peter Jones: Senior Lecturer in International and Global Education: Peter has an extensive research and teaching background in International and Comparative Education. His research has addressed the role of the European Union in developing education policy for Higher Education, Early School Leaving and the Knowledge Economy. He is interested in Education in Post-Socialist and Transition Countries as well as the role of the EU in Central Asia.

-Dr. Julia Paulson: Lecturer in Education Studies: Julia’s research interests are in education and conflict and in education and development. She has worked on these issues with NGOs in Latin America, West Africa, the UK and Canada. She has also worked as an education consultant for international organisations like UNICEF, UNESCO and the World Bank. She has published on education and reconciliation, transitional justice, teaching about violent conflict and education in emergencies. She is editor of Education and Reconciliation published by Bloomsbury in 2012 and she completed her doctoral research at the University of Oxford on the role of Peru’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission in educational reform in 2011.

Course assessment

There are no written exams on this course; each module is assessed through coursework. This typically involves an essay of 2,500 words for a 15-credit module or 5,000 words for a 30-credit module. For some modules assessment may be by verbal presentation or online activity. The dissertation is 15,000 – 20,000 words and focuses on an area agreed with a specialist tutor.

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The MA in Refugee Protection and Forced Migration Studies provides a rigorous theoretical and practical understanding of the field of international refugee law and forced migration. Read more

Gain a prestigious MA in Refugee Protection & Forced Migration Studies

by distance learning

The MA in Refugee Protection and Forced Migration Studies provides a rigorous theoretical and practical understanding of the field of international refugee law and forced migration. It is unique in being the only programme of its type offered by distance learning.

An introduction

The MA degree will enable you to acquire a solid legal, practical and theoretical understanding of refugee protection and forced migration, developing expertise through a choice of elective modules. You will hone your self-reliance in dealing with - and critiquing - law, policy and practice in the field, and will also learn how to gather, organise and deploy evidence to form balanced judgements and develop policy recommendations.

Who is the course for?

This Masters is relevant to those who already work in the area, for whom a Masters qualification would enable them to progress to higher level work within the sector, whether in multilaterals, governments or NGOs.

It will also appeal to people hoping to establish themselves in the sector - these could be people making a career change or those at an early stage of their careers.

It is also relevant to sector professionals, to provide a deeper understanding of the issues facing refugees and refugee aid organisations.

We are hoping to create a virtual meeting place for students, academics and practitioners from all parts of the globe.

How will the course benefit me?

The programme is designed to develop both academic and vocational skills and experience.

It will enable you not only to think constructively about related policy and law, but to develop actual policy recommendations.

The 'practice based' module provides the opportunity to explore of some of the key vocational aspects relevant to the sector including topics such as advocacy, campaigning, fundraising, policy, law and communications. You can then choose to focus on a specific area for your examined piece of work. In the case of fundraising, for example, you could submit a funding bid that will be assessed by a tutor with significant practical experience in the grants and trusts sector.

Other modules on the course focus on asylum law and policy in specific regions of the world, such as Latin America and Africa or the European Union, whilst others focus on specific thematic issues such as statelessness, internal displacement, healthcare, gender and sexual identity.

Overall the course seeking to provide students with a solid legal, practical and theoretical understanding of refugee protection and forced migration.

How you study

You study this online programme wherever you are in the world and access the course content through a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE). The VLE also gives you access to:

- Associate Tutors who provide expert academic guidance throughout your studies
- academically rigorous and up-to-date learning materials and resources
- online tasks and assessments ('e-tivities') plus seen examinations for each of the modules
- peer to peer learning in online discussion forums
- world-class online library facilities.

Ask a question

To ask a question about this programme, please contact out Student Advice Centre using this form:
https://enquiries.londoninternational.ac.uk/aspx_shared/newuser.aspx?CourseCode=PMA-RPFMS-LN

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