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This programme looks at language from a sociocultural perspective. It's designed for anyone with an interest in the relationship between language, culture and society but also provides a solid understanding of English language and linguistics- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-sociocultural-linguistics/. Read more
This programme looks at language from a sociocultural perspective. It's designed for anyone with an interest in the relationship between language, culture and society but also provides a solid understanding of English language and linguistics- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-sociocultural-linguistics/

The MA develops your understanding of historical and contemporary debates in (socio)linguistics and discourse analysis and enhances your analytic and linguistic skills by introducing different approaches to the analysis of written and spoken language use from a range of everyday and institutional contexts.

Topics covered include:

language and ideology
linguistic performances of identity (particularly language and gender, sexuality, ethnicity and social class)
language and the media
talk at work
English in a multilingual world
intercultural communication
multilingualism and code-switching
varieties of English
You're encouraged to engage with these topics by drawing on your own social, cultural and occupational backgrounds in class discussions and in your written work.

You're also encouraged to collect your own samples of written and spoken language use and learn to subject those to in-depth critical analysis.

This MA will draw on findings, theories and methodologies from: sociolinguistics, semantics, pragmatics, spoken and written discourse analysis, ethnography, semiotics, feminist stylistics; multimodal analysis; interactional sociolinguistics, conversational analysis, membership categorisation analysis, performativity and narrative analysis.

The programme’s distinct interdisciplinary ethos is also reflected in your opportunity to choose from a selection of relevant option modules in other departments in Goldsmiths.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Maria Macdonald.

Modules & Structure

On this programme you will complete two core modules, two option modules and one dissertation.

Core modules:
Core Issues in English Language & Linguistics- 30 credits
Language in its Sociocultural Context- 30 credits

Option modules:
You may choose two linguistic options or one linguistic option and one option from other MA programmes within the College, where specifically approved by the Programme Co-ordinator.

Option modules from other departments:
You may also choose one non-linguistics module, either from our own department (English and Comparative Literature) or from another department. Please note that availability of options across the College varies, but typically you can choose from the following selection. Please note that your choice of option module from another deparment needs to be discussed with the Programme Co-ordinator of the MA Sociocultural Linguistics in advance.

Dissertation:
You also produce a dissertation. Dissertation topics in the past have included:

discursive construction of religious identities in interviews with British Muslim converts
code-switching practices in a Tunisian family
discourse and identities in the SLA classroom
language and gender in dream narratives
pauses and silences on Talk Radio
attitudes towards bilingual signs in Thailand
representations of parenthood in UK parenting magazines
political debates on Irish TV
lifetime narratives of older Asian immigrants in the UK
the language of text messaging
language and literacy practices on Facebook
attitudes to non-standard language use
discursive analysis of EFL textbooks
gendered speech style in an all-female group of Iranian friends
The best (UG or MA) linguistics dissertation is rewarded every year with the Hayley Davis Prize.

Approach to teaching

Our lecture/seminar sessions are designed to combine discussions of preparatory reading materials with tutor-led input and hands-on analyses of data/texts by students. We also tend to invite guest lectures for our option modules and introduce you to a number of linguistics talk series across the University of London.

Our MA group is usually very tight-knit, students and student reps organise study/revision groups, online discussion forums, outings to lectures across London, and a number of social events.

Assessment

Coursework; essays; examinations; dissertation.

Skills

Transferable skills, including enhanced communication and discussion skills in written and oral contexts; the ability to analyse and evaluate a wide variety of spoken and written texts from informal as well as institutional settings; an understanding of the concept of communicative competence; the ability to organise information, and to assimilate and evaluate competing arguments.

Careers

Publishing, journalism, british council roles, public relations, teaching, research, translation, advertising, the civil service, business, industry, the media.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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OVERVIEW. The Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Writing Development offers a new type of qualification aimed at graduates and professionals interested in studying, researching and teaching writing. Read more
OVERVIEW

The Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Writing Development offers a new type of qualification aimed at graduates and professionals interested in studying, researching and teaching writing. The course focuses on writing, rhetoric and literacies research and on the ways this research informs the teaching of writing. The programme is based upon Coventry University’s international reputation in the teaching of academic writing at the Centre for Academic Writing.

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

Mandatory modules

Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Writing Development

- Teaching academic writing;
- Supporting academics, postgraduates and professionals in writing for publication;
- Forms and practices of disciplinary writing;
- Writing programme development and management.

Teaching Academic Writing

This module aims to introduce students to the foundations of teaching academic writing at tertiary level. It develops expertise in approaches to writing (both taught and tutored), argumentation, intertextuality, and strategies for motivating writers. It presents an overview of issues involved in the design and delivery of academic writing instruction, and invites students to interrogate the factors that influence the teaching of writing in different institutional contexts. It will also discuss the impact of digital tools on writing, from visual literacy to intertextuality to on-line delivery of writing support. This module will provide increased awareness of the choices and challenges facing tertiary-level writing developers.

Supporting Academics, Postgraduates and Professionals in Writing for Publication

This module aims to provide students with a repertoire of skills for facilitating research publication in English, in academic and applied settings. It focuses on the challenges experienced by postgraduates, academics and other professionals, both with English-speaking or other language backgrounds, throughout the process of publication. The module explores coaching strategies and ways of motivating writers to produce rigorous scholarly prose and negotiate the culture of publication, especially in international peer reviewed journals. The main benefit of taking this module is an increased awareness of the writing and publishing experience of native and non-native language speakers, in and outside of academia, which is an essential starting point for the design and implementation of research writing consultancy for academics and professionals.

Forms and Practices of Disciplinary Writing

Understanding and evaluating the discursive formations and practices of disciplinary writing are significant ingredients of writing research and the refinement of writing pedagogies. Based on this premise, this module is designed to articulate the relationship between the forms and practices of disciplinary genres and its implications for teaching, learning and researching academic writing. The context for this debate is meant to help formulate an international perspective on academic writing that will also draw upon students’ own experience of teaching, learning or simply producing writing in/across various disciplines. Questions related to (non-)standardisation and the production of master genres, such as the essay or the report, will be addressed in tandem with issues concerning writerly and readerly discursive projections, intertexts and the use of sources, and argument/problem constructions in the disciplines.

Writing Programme Development and Management

In this module, students will become familiar with key theories and pedagogies underpinning the development and management of university and college-level academic writing programmes, centres, and initiatives. Students will gain an overview of how various types of writing support have evolved historically and in different national contexts, and will have an opportunity to evaluate models of academic writing provision, both in terms of theoretical coherence and practicability (including an appraisal of their effectiveness, reach, and value-for-money). Students will compare the strengths and weaknesses of current practices internationally and consider the extent to which these practices support or modify the theories on which they purport to be based. The module will also guide students in considering important constraints (such as cost, sustainability, local institutional needs) involved in establishing or further developing an academic writing programme, centre, initiative, or other form of academic writing provision.

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

As part of the programme, you will be:

teaching academic writing;
supporting the research writing of academics and other professionals;
developing professional academic writing development techniques;
writing programme management and development.
As students on the Academic Writing course you will be able to:

teach academic writing to students;
develop and manage a writing programme;
support professional academic writing for publication, including publication-writing in English as an additional language.

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The School has a long tradition of high-quality research among its staff and students. The School’s vibrant research culture attracts students from all over the world who conduct research at the forefront of our discipline. Read more
The School has a long tradition of high-quality research among its staff and students. The School’s vibrant research culture attracts students from all over the world who conduct research at the forefront of our discipline.

Our research programmes provide a combination of formal research training and individual supervision within a supportive environment, with regular interaction between staff and students. For example, the School runs a weekly Graduate Research Training Seminar, where students are encouraged to present their work and receive feedback from peers and staff. Students enjoy regular meetings with a supervisor and supervisory team, and are also given opportunities to collaborate with other members of staff through the staff research seminar and the activities of the Centre for Critical Thought (http://www.kent.ac.uk/cct/).

Students are encouraged to participate in the annual postgraduate research conference, during which various staff members discuss the work of research students, and outside speakers offer plenary lectures. Research students will also be able to benefit from the skills training offered by the University’s Graduate School (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/).

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/61/political-and-social-thought

Course structure

The breadth of expertise (http://www.kent.ac.uk/politics/research/about.html) within the School enables us to provide research supervision on a very wide range of topics across the area of Political and Social Thought.

Current projects of students studying in this area include: Europe’s New Violence: Multiculturalism and the Politics of Externalisation, Federalism as a Discursive System, Federalism as a Discursive System, A Critique of Post-Industrial Subjectivity.

Study support

- Postgraduate resources

Students have access to an excellent library and extensive computing facilities. You also have access to online resources; inter-library loans; video library; online book renewals and reservations; laptop and netbook loan facilities; more than 1,300 study spaces/seats; more than 27,500 books and 10,500 bound periodicals catalogued under politics and international relations and related class marks plus British Government Publications and 50,000 online journals also available off-campus. The School’s resources include a European Documentation Centre, with all official publications of the EU institutions, and a specialised collection on international conflict and federal studies as well as the University’s collection of political cartoons. In addition, postgraduate research students have their own designated room with 12 computer terminals.

- Dynamic publishing culture

Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. Recent contributions include: Contemporary Political Theory; International Political Sociology; Journal of Human Rights; New Political Economy; Political Studies; Telos.

- Researcher Development Programme

Kent's Graduate School co-ordinates the Researcher Development Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/tstindex.html) for research students, which includes workshops focused on research, specialist and transferable skills. The programme is mapped to the national Researcher Development Framework and covers a diverse range of topics, including subjectspecific research skills, research management, personal effectiveness, communication skills, networking and teamworking, and career management skills.

Careers

The School of Politics and International Relations has a dedicated Employability, Placements and Internships Officer who works with students to develop work-based placements in a range of organisations. Centrally, the Careers and Employability Service can help you plan for your future by providing one-to-one advice at any stage of your postgraduate studies.

Many students at our Brussels centre who undertake internships are offered contracts in Brussels immediately after graduation. Others have joined their home country’s diplomatic service, entered international organisations, or have chosen to undertake a ‘stage’ at the European Commission, or another EU institution.

Our graduates have gone on to careers in academia, local and national government and public relations.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This is a two-year programme designed for postgraduates who wish to become social work practitioners. The initial qualification for social work is generic, preparing you to work in a range of settings and with a wide range of user groups. Read more
This is a two-year programme designed for postgraduates who wish to become social work practitioners. The initial qualification for social work is generic, preparing you to work in a range of settings and with a wide range of user groups. The curriculum framework, based on the Professional Capabilities Framework (PCF), ensures the development of specific skills, common to all kinds of social work intervention.

You will get experience of working with two different service user groups in two different practice settings.

The academic and practice curriculum, associated learning outcomes and the award of MA/Postgraduate Diploma in Social Work will enable you to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) as ready and safe to practice social work. On successful completion, you will be able to enter employment as newly qualified social workers with a range of statutory and voluntary agencies and service user groups. At the end of the programme, you will have your own Professional Development Portfolio, which you can take forward into your Assessed and Supported Year in Employment (ASYE), which is the next step for a newly qualified social worker.

The MA in Social Work will:
- provide you with challenging academic and practice learning opportunities that will enable you to critically evaluate, apply and integrate knowledge, understanding and skills in core areas specified by QAA subject benchmarks, the nine capabilities outlined in the Professional Capabilities Framework (at qualifying level) and the HCPC Standards of Proficiency for Social Workers.
- equip you to understand critique and contribute to the political, social and moral debate about the contested nature, scope and purpose of social work while practising competently in the context of contested knowledge and uncertainty.
- equip you to think and work creatively in collaboration with other professionals and agencies and to negotiate different professional values, areas of knowledge and skills and critically evaluate how these may contribute to inter-disciplinary assessment, intervention and service provision.
- enable you to understand and critically reflect on the relationship between social work values, ethical and legal imperatives and their code of practice in responding positively to cultural diversity and the relationship between social inequality/discrimination, changes through the life course and social context as this impacts upon people's lives.
- enable you to understand and critically reflect on the relationship between social work values, ethical and legal imperatives and their code of practice in responding positively to service users' rights to (re)gain and maintain their autonomy, via a process of complex analysis and evaluation of the relative rights, needs, risks to self and others and respect for service users' autonomy.
- enable you to develop and practice high level transferable skills in critical reasoning and complex problem-solving as well as more generic skills such as time-management, written and verbal communication, IT skills and collaborative problem-solving and planning.
- enable you to develop and refine their research, analytical and intellectual skills and their understanding of the relationship between methodological issues and the creation and interpretation of knowledge, through undertaking a limited piece of research with a focus on social work policy and/or practice.
- develop your abilities to organise and critically discuss complex information and argument and provide an opportunity for students to think in creative and original ways about their area of research, within the parameters of reasoned argument and relevant evidence sources.
- develop your confidence and ability to take responsibility for their learning and work-load management, while making appropriate use of supervision to support, challenge and debate their work using high developed critical reasoning and discursive skills.

At initial qualifying level, graduates will be at the start of their journey through the Professional Capabilities Framework, which will be used to guide them as they progress through different stages of their career.

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This MFA, described as one of the most influential MFA programmes in the world, subjects art-making to critical scrutiny. Artists on the programme strengthen the motivation, self-reflection and ambition of their practice and its leading ideas. Read more
This MFA, described as one of the most influential MFA programmes in the world, subjects art-making to critical scrutiny. Artists on the programme strengthen the motivation, self-reflection and ambition of their practice and its leading ideas. http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mfa-fine-art/

While on the programme you will continually engage with what it means to practise as an artist today and the position taken by an art-practice in relation to art's complex history and its currency in wider social and cultural processes.

Given the wide international breadth of artists on the programme and the open range of media welcomed in it, a primary concern in discussion is how a particular artist's work and ideas are understood in and across different social, artistic and intellectual contexts.

Our primary emphasis is on how artists look to shift prevalent expectations and whether their work does so – perhaps then transforming what art might be. We place a strong emphasis on student-centred learning, particularly in the studio seminars and personal tutorials based on your art-making, its key concerns and ideas and their mutual interdevelopment. A lecture programme will in addition contribute to your understanding of concerns relating to contemporary art in broader contexts.

The degree has been described as one of the most influential MFA programmes in the world.

Visit us

Why not visit one of our Postgraduate Art Open Days? You can also explore our exhibitions and events archive.

You can also view our programme activities and projects on art.gold, follow staff, student and alumni activity on Facebook, and get course announcements on Twitter.

Guest Research Student

If you are an international student and would like to study a 'tailor-made' programme (for up to a year), you may be interested in applying as a Guest Research Student.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Sadie Murdoch.

Structure

The programme is divided into two parts:

Year One (Diploma stage) can be taken either full-time for one year (until late July) or part-time for two years (until late July in both years). This year seeks to establish the core conecerns and ambitions of your art.

Year Two (MFA stage) can be taken either full-time for one year (until late August) or part-time for two years (until late July, and then until late August in the final year). This stage of the programme enables you to address your ambitions for your art with an awareness of how it is situated.

Applicants who are already in possession of 120 grade credits for postgraduate study from another programme are able to apply for direct entry into Year Two of the programme on either a full or part-time basis. You may also take advantage of an exit point at the end of Year One of the programme and graduate with the Postgraduate Diploma in Fine Art.

What you study

This two-stage programme is designed to subject the making of art work, the ideas and concepts involved, and the works of art themselves, to artistic and critical scrutiny. This will include individually directed research to review, consolidate and strengthen your individual position as an artist. Students accepted onto the programme work in media areas including painting, sculpture, printmaking, installation, performance, art writing, textiles, digital media and video. The programme places a strong emphasis on student-centred learning – especially on your individual response to the divergent views you will experience in relation to your practice.

Among other qualities, you are expected to: contribute actively in tutorial and seminar discussions; to welcome and encourage sustained analysis of your practice by tutors and fellow students; to understand that the production of contemporary art takes place in a demanding and testing environment; and to take an independent path in developing your practice and its concerns.

Learning on the programme is primarily achieved through an appropriate combination of self-initiated and directed work in studio-practice and Critical Studies. Individual tutorials, seminars, lectures, workshops and research laboratories support this work. All parts of the programme are mandatory for all students. There are no optional modules on the programme. Modules and assessments are structured similarly on both parts of the programme.

Studio seminars

Seminars help you develop the confidence and ability to discuss your own work and the work of others, and to use the combined knowledge and experience of the group to assist in understanding and developing your own practice. This element of the programme is student-led with tutors responding to the needs and concerns of the participants. Studio seminars are organised by groups and take place weekly. Each student presents work for a seminar once in each term.

Tutorials and group tutorials

These develop your practice within contemporary art and current debate. You receive scheduled one-to-one tutorials with your Group Tutors and other staff from the study area. Two tutorials a term are scheduled with the core studio staff. In addition, you are expected to select a number of visiting tutors relevant to your practice for tutorials. These tutors are chosen in consultation with your Group Tutor, and cover a wide range of specialisms – discussion with them should further your understanding of your work in terms of the development of your practice. You are expected to write a report immediately after each tutorial summarising what took place and recording your considered responses to it.

Critical Studies

You are expected to identify and initiate the discussion of the critical concerns and interests of your practice. These concerns are developed through studio-based teaching and in discussions with your Critical Studies tutors, and developed further through the Critical Studies seminar and essay. For this reason, and in contrast to many other programmes, Critical Studies for the MFA Fine Art at Goldsmiths does not offer a series of subjects taught and learnt through seminars, group reading and discussion, but bases the teaching and learning of Critical Studies primarily in relation to your own practice.

Lectures

These introduce and develop issues of critical significance in contemporary culture and fine art by presenting arguments and discursive frameworks for contemporary practice. Lectures run through the first two terms on a weekly basis. They provide an opportunity for you to critically engage with your own practice in terms of wider cultural debates with which they may be unfamiliar. The lectures also provide an occasion for all members of the postgraduate programmes to meet on a regular basis.

Taught workshops

Each workshop will comprise four staff-led discussion-based sessions on a philosophical, theoretical or historical topic relevant to contemporary art practice, and will involve texts to be read in advance. Each student takes two workshops during the first year (students may apply to substitute part of this requirement with structured independent study).

Collaborative seminars

Student-led collaborative seminars, supported by staff and teaching assistants around a topic of mutual interest, are held during the second year. These will involve engagement with the professional art community, may take place outside the college in collaboration with other institutions such as museums and galleries, and may culminate in an open event or publication.

Assessment

The three examination elements for both Year One and Year Two are: Collection of Tutorial Reports, Exhibition, and Critical Studies Essay. All three elements must be passed to successfully complete each part of the programme. Each element of examination has both progression and final points of assessment.

Skills & Careers

Graduates from the MFA in Fine Art Goldsmiths go on to success in a range of fields. As well as the many internationally reknown artists who have studied at Goldsmiths, others have gone onto become gallerists or curators or have entered the fields of art administration, education and other cultural industries.

The course at Goldsmiths enables you to focus on the development of your own skills and aspirations and to equip you with the resources to succeed in your chosen profession.

Other entry requirements

Requirement for part-time study: you need to have your own studio space in which to work over the four years of the programme.

You might also be considered for some programmes if you aren’t a graduate or your degree is in an unrelated field, but have relevant experience and can show that you have the ability to work at postgraduate level.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Taught in both part time and full time modes, MA Graphic and Media Design is concerned with establishing a distinct understanding of the fields of graphic design and visual culture, as well as those that infect, destabilise and unravel it. Read more

Introduction

Taught in both part time and full time modes, MA Graphic and Media Design is concerned with establishing a distinct understanding of the fields of graphic design and visual culture, as well as those that infect, destabilise and unravel it. We invite thoughtful, critical, productive individuals interested in the effective articulation of design.

Content

Students of this course are situated within a thriving, active and progressive site of award winning pedagogic development and critical debate. MA Graphic and Media Design has evolved from LCC's highly regarded MA Graphic Design course, renowned for its excellence in teaching and learning for postgraduate study in the subject and practice of graphic design.

Practice-based inquiry will drive the programme of study in collaboration with the course tutors, fellow students and external partners. Working with students to establish the priorities of their practice, the course team will acknowledge prior experiences and future agendas.

MA Graphic and Media Design runs alongside a suite of established and newly developed post-graduate courses spanning the rich and diverse spectrum of the current and emergent practices in the fields of visual communication, illustration, interaction design, service design, branding and identity, advertising, documentary, journalism, photography, publishing, public relations, sound arts and screenwriting. This diversity of individual and collective pursuits promotes a rich discursive arena for all engaged.

Structure

MA Graphic and Media Design is delivered in two modes to accommodate those interests and external commitments, full-time (45 weeks) and part-time (90 weeks). This is a particularly distinctive feature, as we are one of the only courses in the United Kingdom to offer this option for postgraduate study in the subject.

Unit 1

Critical Perspectives & Methodologies (60 credits)

Unit 2

Collaborative Unit (20 credits)

Unit 3

Design Inquiry & Definition (40 credits)

Unit 4

Final Major Project or Major Project: Thesis (60 credits)

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The Education and International Development MA will introduce students to the concepts of development and educational development, and help them assess the role of education and learning in the development process by examining theory and research. Read more
The Education and International Development MA will introduce students to the concepts of development and educational development, and help them assess the role of education and learning in the development process by examining theory and research. It will examine contemporary policy issues regarding education in low- and middle-income countries.

Degree information

This programme provides students with the opportunity to develop professional skills for working in international education, and skills and knowledge in research methods. Students benefit from being taught by renowned researchers of international education and international guest speakers. Students will also meet a diverse student group: our alumni are from more than 80 countries.

Students on the programme can apply for a place on an optional study visit to Paris (not included in the course fee). The Paris Study Tour introduces students to the work of key international organisations in education and development. In the past, the trip has included visits to UNESCO, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP).

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (30 credits) and either three optional modules (90 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits) or four optional modules (120 credits) and a report (30 credits).

Core modules
-Education and International Development: Concepts, Theories and Issues

Optional modules - three optional modules (90 Credits) or, if a report is presented, four optional modules (120 Credits) can be chosen. At least two of the modules must be chosen from within the EID Cluster below:
-Gender, Education and Development
-Education, Conflict and Fragility
-Planning for Education and Development
-Learners, Learning and Teaching in the Context of Education for All
-Promoting Health and Wellbeing: Planning, Practice and Participation
-Education and Muslim Communities
-Gender, Sexuality and Education
-Development Education in the Era of Globalisation
-Principles and Practices of Development Education
-North-South Educational Partnerships

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a 20,000-word dissertation or 10,000-word report.

Teaching and learning
Teaching on the MA EID is intended to provide learners with a critical perspective on a range of different frameworks through which they can understand their experiences and practice. A range of teaching and learning methods are used including lectures, participant-led presentations, group work, workshops, online activities. Assessment is via various forms of coursework including discursive essays, critical analysis of empirical research, reviews of literature, and the dissertation or report.

Careers

Graduates of this programme are currently working across a broad range of areas. For example, one is an education adviser for the UK Department for International Development, while another is an education programme manager for an international NGO.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Teacher (Maths), UWC South East Asia
-Project Support Officer, Fairtrade Foundation
-Programme Development and Funding Officer, CAFOD
-Primary School Deputy Head Teacher, Success Academy Charter Schools
-Research Consultant, British Council and studying MA Education and International Development, Institute of Education, University of London (IOE)

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Education, Practice and Society at the IOE is the well-established home of an interdisciplinary grouping bringing together high-quality teaching and research in the history, sociology and philosophy of education and international development.

The department has extensive experience and expertise in education planning and policy; health; education in Africa, Asia and Latin America; education, equality and human rights; issues of gender, race, sexuality, disability, and social class; and education in conflict and emergencies.

Linking research, policy and practice, the result is an extraordinarily powerful learning community.

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The Education, Gender and International Development MA will develop a student's understanding of the gender dimensions of research, analysis, policy and practice in relation to education in low- and middle-income countries. Read more
The Education, Gender and International Development MA will develop a student's understanding of the gender dimensions of research, analysis, policy and practice in relation to education in low- and middle-income countries. It will encourage them to consider how developing countries connect with more affluent and powerful regions of the world.

[Degree information]]
The programme provides students with the opportunity to follow a course of study unique in the UK, looking at a range of current issues and debates, including discussions about girls’ access to and achievements in school; femininities, masculinities and gender relations within education; the ways in which the state and society shapes the politics of gender and education; and approaches to social justice and education.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (60 credits), and either two optional modules (60 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits), or three optional modules (90 credits) and a report (30 credits).

Core modules
-Education and International Development: Concepts, Theories and Issues
-Gender, Education and Development

Optional modules - students select either two or three optional modules from a range across UCL Institute of Education (IOE) Master's-level offering, including:
-Economic Perspectives of Education Policy
-Education and Development in Asia
-Education and Muslim Communities
-Education, Conflict and Fragility
-Gender, Sexuality and Education
-Learners, Learning and Teaching in the Context of Education for All
-Planning for Education and Development
-Promoting Health and Wellbeing: Planning, Practice and Participation

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in either a 20,000-word dissertation (60 credits) or 10,000-word report (30 credits).

Teaching and learning
Teaching is delivered by lectures or other structured inputs by staff; participant-led presentations and discussions based on selected readings or a clearly specified project; tutor-led seminars; workshops; problem/issue-based paired and small-group work; occasional debates and occasional invited speakers; reflections on film and video inputs. Assessment is via various forms of coursework including discursive essays, critical analysis of empirical research, reviews of literature, and the dissertation or report.

Fieldwork
Students may undertake fieldwork in relation to their research for their dissertation or report, but it is not a requirement. If undertaken, fieldwork must be self-funded.

Careers

Graduates of this programme are currently working across a broad range of areas. Some are working as specialist professionals in NGOs and international development organisations, while others have jobs as teachers and education managers. Graduates can also be found working as government officials, civil servants and university lecturers worldwide.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Director of Strategic Partnerships, Olusegun Obasanjo Foundation
-Gender and Communications Officer, Concern Worldwide
-Reports Officer, World Food Programme (WFP)
-Operations Analyst, Business Monitor International
-Research and Evaluation Officer, Coffey International Development

Employability
It is intended that students who have participated fully in the programme will be able to:
-Reflect critically on debates concerning education, gender and international development.
-Understand the ways in which knowledge forms, and is formed by, education politics, policy, practice and research in national settings in low- and middle-income countries, and in transnational organisations.
-Consider the implications of theory, research and analyses developed through class discussions for their own future practice and professional development.
-Use oral and written communication skills in order to make arguments, examine evidence and creatively advance this area of inquiry.
-Understand processes entailed in research and conduct a small research study.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Department of Education, Practice and Society at UCL Institute of Education is the well-established home of an interdisciplinary grouping bringing together high-quality teaching and research in the history, sociology and philosophy of education and international development.

The department has extensive experience and expertise in education planning, health and gender in Africa, Asia and Latin America; 'policy sociology'; education, equality and human rights; issues of gender, 'race', sexuality, disability and social class. Visits to international organisations, policy seminars and a vibrant student/alumni group provide excellent networking opportunities.

Linking research, policy and practice, students benefit from an extraordinarily powerful learning community.

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This course will further the knowledge, skills and abilities of sports rehabilitators, sport therapists, physiotherapists and other allied health professionals currently working in the area of sports injury rehabilitation and prevention. Read more
This course will further the knowledge, skills and abilities of sports rehabilitators, sport therapists, physiotherapists and other allied health professionals currently working in the area of sports injury rehabilitation and prevention.

This is the only exercise rehabilitation masters in Europe which is recognised by the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) through their education recognition programme. The online theoretical content includes lectures from some of the worlds leading experts. The contact “in university” sessions are applicable immediately to professional practice and involve a high practical content.

Key benefits:

• This programme will give you the opportunity to take a lead role in sports injury rehabilitation
• Theoretical content is delivered entirely online so you can study at a time convenient to you
• High practical content means you’ll develop the skills that will impress employers

Visit the website: http://www.salford.ac.uk/pgt-courses/sports-injury-rehabilitation

Suitable for

This programme is aimed at a wide range of sports professionals including strength and conditioning coaches, sport science graduates, physiotherapists, chiropractors, osteopaths, sports therapists and sports rehabilitators, sport medical physicians and physical education teachers.

Programme details

This is the only exercise rehabilitation masters in Europe which is recognised by the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) through their education recognition programme. The online theoretical content includes lectures from some of the world’s leading experts. The contact “in university” sessions are applicable immediately to professional practice and involve a high practical content.

The MSc programme is offered as either a full-time or part-time programme. Please note: international applicants are only able to apply for the full-time route).

The full time course runs over three academic semesters (October through to September the following year), whilst giving you the chance to exit with the following awards:

• Postgraduate Certificate: completion of one module
• Postgraduate Diploma: completion of two modules
• Masters: completion of two modules plus a dissertation

In order to achieve an award of MSc Sports Injury Rehabilitation you must successfully complete the modules Rehabilitation of Musculoskeletal Injuries and Injury Prevention and Performance Management, along with producing a thesis for the dissertation module.

Format

• Workshops (3 days per module, per semester)

These are interactive, discursive, reflective, participatory, collaborative and practice related and employ a variety teaching and learning methods. As the programme progresses these will become progressively more student led, with you presenting case studies for peer and tutor review.

• Individual Scholarly Activity

Self directed learning, personal reflection, practice based application and reflection, including peer and tutor review.

• Distance Learning Resources

Delivery of supporting resources such as study guides and lecture material online. Facilitated group work, including tutor and peer evaluation are a key component of this course.

• Personal Tutor and Peer Support

To provide an academic, practice based and personal support mechanism alongside facilitated networking.

Module titles

• Rehabilitation of Musculoskeletal Injuries
• Injury Prevention and Performance Measurement
• Dissertation

Assessment

Assessment methods will vary depending on the module, they includes:

• Case Studies (written and oral presentations)
• Viva vocé
• Literature review
• Practical assessments
• Journal articles (research reports written in the format of a journal article)
• Research proposal

Career potential

Take a lead role in sports injury rehabilitation with this practice-based course and make a difference to your clients with higher level skills. You’ll also learn how to conduct research and then apply it to the real world, with numerous students successfully publishing their research in peer reviewed journals.

How to apply: http://www.salford.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/applying

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This course has a strong practice-based element, which means you'll develop the skills you need to pursue a lead role in the field. Read more
This course has a strong practice-based element, which means you'll develop the skills you need to pursue a lead role in the field.

Theoretical content is delivered online, so you won't have to attend University every week. You'll be able to apply your learning to your job and use case studies from your current area of practice. Our staff are experts in the field of strenght and conditioning and they often work in partnership with professional sports teams and individual athletes.

This is one of only two postgradaute courses in Europe to receive international recognition though the NSCA Education Recognition Program (ERP).

Key benefits:

• Gain a higher degree that will enable you to take a lead role in strength and conditioning
• Theoretical content is delivered online giving you the flexibility to study at a time convenient to you
• High practical content means you’ll develop the skills that will impress employers

Visit the website: http://www.salford.ac.uk/pgt-courses/strength-and-conditioning

Suitable for

This programme is aimed at a wide range of sports professionals including strength and conditioning coaches, sport science graduates, physiotherapists, chiropractors, osteopaths, sports therapists and sports rehabilitators, sport medical physicians and physical education teachers.

Programme details

This is the only Strength and Conditioning Masters Degree in Europe which is recognised by the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) through their education recognition programme. The online theoretical content includes lectures from some of the world’s leading experts. The contact sessions on campus are applicable immediately to professional practice and involve a high practical content.

The MSc course is offered on both a full-time and part-time basis. Please note: international applicants are only able to apply for the full-time route.

The full-time course runs over three academic semesters (October through to September the following year), whilst giving you the chance to exit with the following awards:

• Postgraduate Certificate: completion of one module
• Postgraduate Diploma: completion of two modules
• Masters: completion of two modules plus a dissertation

In order to achieve an award of MSc Strength and Conditioning you must successfully complete the modules Strength and Conditioning and Injury Prevention and Performance Management, along with producing a thesis for the dissertation module.

Format

• Workshops (3 days per module, per semester)

These are interactive, discursive, reflective, participatory, collaborative and practice related sessions that employ a variety of teaching and learning methods. As the course progresses these will become progressively more student led, with you presenting case studies for peer and tutor review.

• Individual scholarly activity

Self directed learning, personal reflection, practice based application and reflection, including peer and tutor review.

• Distance learning resources

Delivery of supporting resources such as study guides and lecture material online. Facilitated group work, including tutor and peer evaluation are a key component of this course.

• Personal tutor and peer support

To provide an academic, practice based and personal support mechanism alongside facilitated networking.

Module titles

• Injury Prevention and Performance Management (60 credits)
• Strength and Conditioning (60 credits)
• Dissertation (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment methods will vary depending on the module. They include:

• Case studies (written and oral presentations)
• Viva vocé
• Literature review
• Practical assessments
• Journal articles (research reports written in the format of a journal article)
• Research proposal

Career potential

With the skills you’ll learn on this course, you can take a lead role in the field and make a real difference to the training of your clients. This course will significantly increase your chances of getting a high profile role in top-flight sport.

Graduates are now employed in Premier League and Championship football, and paralympic weightlifting. Some graduates have also progressed on to lecturing and doctoral-level study.

How to apply: http://www.salford.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/applying

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Contemporary Japanese culture is a dazzling fusion of western and eastern traditions adapted to a hypermodern way of life. And although these traditions remain resilient, Japan is also firmly in the vanguard of post-industrial nations facing a wide range of domestic issues and diverse global challenges. Read more

Programme description

Contemporary Japanese culture is a dazzling fusion of western and eastern traditions adapted to a hypermodern way of life. And although these traditions remain resilient, Japan is also firmly in the vanguard of post-industrial nations facing a wide range of domestic issues and diverse global challenges.

This programme will help students acquire the in-depth knowledge of Japanese history, culture and society required to understand the challenges Japan faces today, while also placing Japan within the international context as a leading nation in East Asian regional and global developments.

This programme caters for students with or without Japanese language skills. It builds on existing experience, using Japanese source materials and secondary literature for research purposes, while also providing an extensive understanding of scholarship on Japanese society and culture written in English.

With support from staff with proven expertise, you will have the opportunity to enhance your language skills – whatever your current level – and acquire specialist knowledge of Japanese culture, and awareness of the interaction of Japanese and other cultures in the contemporary context.

Programme structure

The programme is taught through a combination of seminars and tutorials. You will take one compulsory and four option courses, as well as a compulsory research skills and methods course. After two semesters of taught courses you will conduct your own research for your dissertation.

Compulsory courses:

State, Society and National Identity in Japan after 1989

Option courses may include:

The Buddhist Brush: Discursive and Graphic Expressions of Japanese Buddhism
Language Communities and Variation in Japanese
Japanese Performing Arts
Japanese Religions in the Modern Era
Japanese Cyberpunk
East Asian International Relations
Portfolio of Written Translation Exercises in Japanese

Learning outcomes

Students who follow the programme will:

develop critical awareness of at least two specific areas of Japanese Studies, both in terms of the indigenous literary and/or critical traditions and in comparison with Western critical thinking
acquire specialist knowledge of Japanese culture and awareness of the interaction of Japanese and other cultures in the contemporary context
use the bibliographic, internet and other relevant resources to advanced level
develop the ability to read and evaluate critically core texts in the specific areas studied

Those with previous experience in Japanese language learning will have the opportunity to develop the necessary linguistic skills to conduct research in defined areas within Japanese Studies by retrieving, selecting, translating and assimilating information from Japanese sources.

Career opportunities

The flexibility of focus this programme offers makes it an ideal foundation for advanced study, potentially leading to an academic career. Teaching or curatorship roles in cultural institutions are alternative career pathways

The transferable skills you gain in communication, project management and presentation will prove a valuable asset to employers in any field.

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This is the only degree which offers students the opportunity to specialise as a translation expert in audiovisual translation and in the translation of popular culture. Read more
This is the only degree which offers students the opportunity to specialise as a translation expert in audiovisual translation and in the translation of popular culture.

Who is it for?

This course is for you if you:
-Are interested in popular culture, films, TV, literature, comics or graphic novels
-Love languages, other cultures and their differences
-Are interested in translation and want to learn about systematic decision-making
-Know about translation and want to specialise
-Have an amateur or fan background in translation and want to become a professional
-Have studied foreign languages, linguistics, literature, media, film, theatre, drama or cultural studies.
-Are looking for a thorough grounding in the theory and practice of translation.
-Want to gain an insight into professional practice in audiovisual translation or in literary translation.

The course aims to make students fit for the market as properly trained and highly qualified translation experts.

Objectives

This course:
-Provides you with training in audiovisual translation techniques.
-Uses industry-standard software for subtitling, dubbing and voice over.
-Specialises in the translation of children’s literature; crime fiction; science fiction and fantasy; comics, graphic novels, manga and video games.
-Introduces you to the different conventions and styles associated with popular culture in its varied forms and genres.
-Focuses on the specifics of genre translation and how these shape translation decisions.
-Provides a theoretical framework for the practical application of translation, working with a wide range of source texts from different popular genres and media.

The course:
-Aims to give you a secure foundation in theoretical strategies underpinning and supporting the practice of translation.
-Develops your awareness of professional standards, norms and translational ethics.
-Works closely with professional translators and the translation industry helping you to develop a professional identity.
-Has optional modules in dubbing, translation project management, screenplay translation and publishing.

Placements

There are no course-based placements on this course. Literary translation does not offer placements, while audiovisual companies offer internships which are competitive.

We support and guide our students through the application process for audiovisual translation internships and have a very good record of achievement. Each year, several of our students win one of these very competitive internships and they tend to be offered full time work on completion.

The course is very industry-oriented and we work closely with the translation industry. Industry professionals teach on the course, supervise students or give guest seminars and lectures.

Academic staff have run Translation Development courses, for example in genre translation for professional translators for the Chartered Institute of Linguists, and they are involved in running Continuing Professional Development courses in specialised translation.

We run a preparatory, distance learning course for the professional Diploma in Translation examined by the Chartered Institute of Linguists. We organise a Literary Translation Summer School each July which is taught by professional, literary translators and with lectures by prestigious translators, academics or writers.

The Translation department runs the John Dryden Translation Competition for the British Comparative Literature Association. The competition is sponsored by the British Centre for Literary Translation and the Institut Français. We offer one internship per year in working on this Translation Competition, interacting with translators, translation judges, managing competition entries and learning about the judging process.

Teaching and learning

The course is taught by academics, industry professionals (for example, audiovisual translation project manager) and translation professionals (for example, award winning literary translators, experienced subtitlers).

Teaching is delivered in a combination of lectures, seminars, practical workshops and lab-based sessions for audiovisual translation. In workshop sessions students work individually, in pairs, group work or plenary forum in a multilingual and multicultural environment.

In all translation modules, there is also a translation project prepared in independent guided study under the supervision of a translation professional in the student’s language pair and language directionality. You can expect some on-line learning, supported by seminar sessions, and industry visits to audiovisual translation companies.

In the Translation project management module, students work in project groups performing real-life translation roles and tasks in a collaborative environment.

Assessment

Assessment is 100% coursework – there are no examinations.

Coursework assignments are a mixture of essays, translation projects, translation commentaries, subtitling and voice over files or project work. The dissertation is 12,000 to 15,000 words long and can either be a research project on any topic relevant to Audiovisual Translation or Popular Literary Translation / Culture or it can be practice oriented: a translation of an extended text or AV clip with critical introduction to and analysis of the translation.

Coursework assignments: 66.6% (120 credits)

Dissertation: 33.3% (60 credits)

Modules

There are five compulsory taught modules plus three elective taught modules, selected by the student from a pool of module choices, plus a dissertation which can be a research dissertation or a practice-oriented dissertation of an extended translation with critical introduction and analysis.

Each taught module is an estimated 150 hours of study. Teaching consists of lectures, seminars and workshops plus independent individually supervised work.

The first part of the translation modules is taught in three-hour sessions (lecture + seminar + practical workshop). In the second part of each translation module, students work on a translation project which is individually supervised by a translation professional who gives written feedback on drafts and provides tailored advice and guidance in individual supervision sessions.

Students can expect between ten and 12 hours of classroom-based study per week, plus time spent on preparatory reading, independent study and research, preparation of assignments.

The dissertation is 60 credits and an estimated 600 hours of study. There are four two-hour research method seminars guiding students through the process of writing a dissertation, plus individual supervision sessions.

All taught modules are in term 1 and term 2 (January – April). Term 3 is dedicated to the dissertation (and completion of assignments from term 2 modules).

Core modules
-Principles and practice of translation theory (15 credits)
-Translating children’s literature (15 credits)
-Subtitling (15 credits)
-Translating crime fiction (15 credits)
-Translating science fiction and fantasy (15 credits)

Elective modules - choose three:
-Principles of screenwriting and the translation of screenplays (15 credits)
-Creating and managing intellectual property (15 credits).
-Dubbing and voice over (15 credits)
-Translation project management (15 credits)
-Translating multimodal texts (comics, graphic novels, manga, video games) (15 credits)
-International publishing case studies (20 credits)

Dissertation - 60 credits
-Dissertation option A (discursive/research)
-Dissertation option B (extended translation with critical introduction and analysis)

Career prospects

The degree is designed to produce graduates who are fit for the market, either working in translation agencies / companies or as a freelancer, addressing the need for properly trained and highly qualified translation experts.

Career options come in a wide range of jobs in the translation industry, ranging from self-employed translator, staff translator or localisation expert to editor, researcher or project manager.

Recent graduate destinations include: video game testing and localisation at Testronic Laboratories; video game translation at Sega; Dubbing, subtitling and voice over at VSI London; translation at the World Health Organisation; project management at Maverick Advertising and Design and at Deluxe Media Europe; freelance translator creative and literary texts.

The degree also lays the foundation to continue to a research degree / doctoral study in any area of translation studies. Currently, graduates from the course are pursuing doctoral study at City, specialising in crime fiction translation.

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MRes Art. Moving Image focuses on the history, theory and practice of contemporary artist moving image. The programme is dedicated to the development of new discourses within an expanded field of practice, encompassing artists, curators, writers and scholars. Read more

Introduction

MRes Art: Moving Image focuses on the history, theory and practice of contemporary artist moving image. The programme is dedicated to the development of new discourses within an expanded field of practice, encompassing artists, curators, writers and scholars. As a collaboration delivered in association with LUX, the programme offers a critical engagement with, and the professional development of, ideas around artists' moving image, in terms of exhibition, distribution, publishing, education, and research.

Content

MRes Art allows you to address a specialist area of fine art research and to explore the relationships between your chosen specialism and the broader fine art community in the context of our Fine Art Programme.

Synergies in our Fine Art Programme - incorporating MA Fine Art, MA Art and Science, MA Photography, MRes Art: Exhibition Studies, MRes Art: Moving Image, and MRes Art: Theory and Philosophy - create a dynamic context for exploring practices and issues within contemporary culture.

In its extended full-time mode MRes Art gives you the flexibility to access London's richly varied opportunities for work and study while maximising your personal and professional development.

MRes Art prepares you to work particularly in the academic and research contexts of professional environments, to undertake PhD study, or pursue independent research. The course benefits from links with relevant professional and academic organisations in London and internationally and from the varied expertise of its research staff.

The three pathways provide a focus for your study while also enabling you to explore shared ground and questions of disciplinary territories and boundaries.

MRes Art: Moving Image is the first course of its kind. Founded on a strong link with LUX, a key UK agency (based in London) for the support and promotion of artists' moving image practice, the pathway provides an opportunity to focus on theoretical and historical study of artists' moving image. Despite artists' moving image being one of the most visible and fastest growing contexts for visual arts practice, there is no existing centre of scholarship in this area and, at this time, practice runs far ahead of discourse. While huge amounts of work are being made and shown, the specific language to describe and respond to it critically remains underdeveloped.

MRes Art: Moving Image develops in-depth knowledge and exploration of artists' moving image as an evolving and discursive field of study. The postgraduate course presents an integrated series of screenings, seminars and set readings of key works, which together address a range of theoretical positions and historical contexts.

Structure

MRes Art: Moving Image lasts 60 weeks structured as two consecutive periods of 30 weeks each (i.e. two academic years) in its 'extended full-time mode.'

MRes Art: Moving Image is credit rated at 180 credits, and comprises four units:

Unit 1 (40 credits) and Unit 2 (20 credits) run concurrently and last 15 weeks.
Unit 3 (40 credits) follows after the completion of Units 1 and 2 and runs for a further 15 weeks up to the end of year one.
Unit 4 (80 credits) runs for 45 weeks, concurrently with Unit 3 to the end of year one, and then continuing to the end of year two.

All four units must be passed in order to achieve the MRes but the classification of the award of MRes is derived from the marks for units 3 and 4 only.

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Developed in the Centre for the Advanced Study of the Arab World (CASAW) – a ground breaking UK government initiative established here at Edinburgh – and housed in the department of Islamic & Middle Eastern Studies (IMES), this two-year programme offers a unique opportunity for in-depth study of Arabic language and region-specific culture, history and politics. Read more

Programme structure

Developed in the Centre for the Advanced Study of the Arab World (CASAW) – a ground breaking UK government initiative established here at Edinburgh – and housed in the department of Islamic & Middle Eastern Studies (IMES), this two-year programme offers a unique opportunity for in-depth study of Arabic language and region-specific culture, history and politics.

Formed with the aim of creating the UK’s leading resource for Arab world expertise, the resources and high profile of CASAW and IMES will see you graduate with a strong and prestigious qualification.

You will have access to some of the UK’s leading experts in the field of Arab-world social and political sciences, arts and humanities, and will experience a four-month immersion in language and culture in an Arab country.

Programme structure

The first eight months of the programme are delivered in Edinburgh, with an intensive focus on language skills and a discursive core providing a survey of the field of Islamic and Middle Eastern studies. You then spend four months at an approved institution in an Arab country, further developing your skills. The second year includes training in research skills and completion of your dissertation. Throughout the programme you will participate in seminars and tutorials.

Career opportunities

As the West’s engagement with the Arab world deepens, graduates with expertise in the field are increasingly sought after. This degree will give you the opportunity to take your interest to the doctoral level with further research, and perhaps an academic career. You could also pursue a career in an area such as education, policy or any of the social sciences.

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The study of how history is engaged with outside academia is a major growth area of research. The MA History and Heritage at Aberystwyth has been developed both for those who are interested in the academic study of this interplay and those who are interested in pursuing careers in the heritage industry itself. Read more
The study of how history is engaged with outside academia is a major growth area of research. The MA History and Heritage at Aberystwyth has been developed both for those who are interested in the academic study of this interplay and those who are interested in pursuing careers in the heritage industry itself. It offers you the opportunity to explore key concepts and debates in heritage studies, to acquire some heritage business related skills, and to participate for academic credit in a work placement with a leading heritage organisation.

See the website http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/history-and-heritage-masters/

Suitable for

This degree will suit you:

- If you wish to interrogate historical and heritage practises at an advanced level;
- If you desire a strengthen your critical and scholarly abilities through engagement with historical sources;
- If you wish develop practical skills and gain hands-on experience in Heritage issues;
- If you aim to foster transferable skills and engage in professional and personal development for entering employment.

Course detail

Our Masters programme in History and Heritage draws on expertise from across the university to provide a wide-ranging engagement with the concept of ‘heritage’ and ‘public history’.

All our lecturers are active researchers who publish their work, and you will benefit from being taught the latest historical theories and techniques. In the most recent Research Excellence Framework (2014) assessment the university was placed in the top 50 institutions for research power and intensity. It submitted 77% of eligible staff and 95% of the university's research was of an internationally recognised standard.

Format

In Semester 1 you’ll follow a core module that addresses the theory and practice behind heritage studies. This is followed in Semester 2 either by a module on heritage organisations and the presentation of the past, or by one of the option modules offered on our other schemes, where you will be encouraged to focus in particular on the uses of the past in the countries and eras in question.

Alongside this study you will also have the opportunity to develop your practical skills and experiences through a range of skills and research training modules, including courses in basic accountancy and marketing, and through a work placement module where you get to take a full part in the work of one of the major heritage agencies based here in Aberystwyth.

There are also classes to help you research and write your MA dissertation, an original research project (15,000 words) undertaken by you and written over the course of the year under the close supervision of a specialist within the Department.

Contact time is approximately 6 hours a week in the first two semesters. During semester three you will arrange your level of contact time with your assigned supervisor.

Assessment

The course is assessed through a diverse range of assignments, including the 15,000 word MA dissertation.

Employability

Many of our Masters graduates go on to PhD study and academic careers. Others apply their skills directly within the heritage industry, in tourism, museums and archives, or related branches of public administration, the civil service and local government, or go on to careers in related fields such as teaching, journalism or the broadcast media.

Work placements in collaboration with the National Library of Wales, the Royal Commission on Ancient and Historic Monuments in Wales, or another of the heritage agencies based in and around Aberystwyth, are an integral feature of this MA scheme and give you the experience of applying your skills in a workplace environment.

Every element of the Aberystwyth Master’s in Heritage and History enhances your employability in both vocational and more generic work situations. Alongside the development of your subject-specific knowledge and experience, an especially noteworthy strength of this course is the emphasis on personal development. As an emerging Master historian and heritage expert, your strengthened research and critical faculties will make you a strong candidate for any post where ideas and topics need research, analysis, discussion, expansion and classification.

The inclusion of an optional work placement within this course is highly significant. It balances the best of theory and practice, giving you subject-specific and practical expertise, which will set you above your competitors upon entering the jobs market where experience is at a premium. The study skills, technical knowledge and hands-on experience of heritage and historical processes will give you a tremendous advantage in employment within the discipline.

Beyond Heritage and History-related work contexts, employers in any industry value creativity, research, analysis and discursive skills that you will gain in this course. You will develop highly marketable skills which will, upon graduation, stand you in excellent stead for entry into the general jobs market. The organisational skills you will learn on this course will help you direct and therefore make the most of your individual flair, bringing a balance of skills that prospective employers will find attractive.

- Advanced Skills in Research, Writing and Reporting:
Upon completion of this degree, you will have mastered the diverse skills needed in many employment situations which require thoroughness, flair and clarity in your work disciplines. As the assessment for this Master’s course is done through essay-writing, tutorial and seminar presentation, culminating in the dissertation of up to 20,000 words, you will receive much practise in writing and reporting, as well as rigorous feedback on your submissions. This will develop in you a thorough knowledge of the structure, conventions and development of written communications, which will, in turn, make your writing clear, accurate and authoritative.

A host of employers look for accuracy, thoroughness, an eye for detail and the ability to find and prove connections across broad subject matter, and you certainly will have proven yourself, simply by graduating from this prestigious MA course.

Find out how to apply here https://www.aber.ac.uk/en/postgrad/howtoapply/

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