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The LLM in Commercial and Corporate Law covers a broad range of commercially focussed modules that draw on the wealth of commercial expertise across the School of Law. Read more
The LLM in Commercial and Corporate Law covers a broad range of commercially focussed modules that draw on the wealth of commercial expertise across the School of Law.

LLM in Commercial and Corporate Law deals with the global and regional regulation of international trade, structuring and managing international business transactions, and the economic foundations of trade and corporate law.

Professional Module Exemptions

The Chartered Banker Institute (CBI) has recognised masters programmes offered by the School of Economics and Finance for advanced standing for the Chartered Banker Diploma. Graduates can proceed directly to the Chartered Banker Diploma with no requirement for prior underpinning study, recognising the high level of commonality of elements within LLM programme content against the CBI’s Diploma modules.

Students on the LLM programme who take both the QLLM136 Ethics in Business and in Finance and QLLM007 Banking Law modules will be eligible for exemption from the Chartered Banker Diploma compulsory module: Professionalism Regulation and Ethics.

Taught modules

Modules

To specialise in this area, you must select 90 credits of modules from this list and do your compulsory dissertation in the field of Commercial and Corporate Law (45 credits). The additional 45 credits of taught modules can be in this area or can be unrelated and therefore selected from the full list of available LLM modules.

All modules are 22.5 credits unless otherwise stated.

Note: Not all of the modules will be available in any one year and semesters listed can be subject to change.

Please refer the toe QMUL Law website for a full list and information on the modules for this programme.

Below is an example of some of the modules for this programme .
◦◦ QLLM011 Company Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM021 Corporate Governance (45 credits)
◦ QLLM025 E-Commerce Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM050 International Commercial Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM060 International Merger Control (45 credits)
◦ QLLM062 International Tax Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM068 Law of Economic Crime (45 credits)
◦ QLLM069 Law of Finance and Foreign Investment in Emerging Economies (45 credits)
◦ QLLM076 Media Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM080 Multinational Enterprises and the Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM087 Taxation Principles and Concepts (45 credits)
◦ QLLM095 Intellectual Property and the Creative Industries (45 credits)
◦ QLLM120 Business Taxation (45 credits)
◦ QLLM124 European Union Competition Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM128 Telecommunications Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM138 General Principles of Insurance Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM139 Insurance Regulation (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM141 Insurance Contracts (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM142 Reinsurance Law (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM145 Intellectual Property in Business (45 credits)
◦ QLLM150 Strategic Decision Making for Lawyers (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM151 Negotiation Theory and Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM155 Principles of Regulation (Sem1)
◦ QLLM164 Elements of Islamic Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM165 Islamic Finance and Commercial Law (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM179 International and Comparative Petroleum Law and Contracts (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM180 US International Taxation (45 credits)
◦ QLLM181 Legal Aspects of Paperless Trade (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM182 / QLLG006 Charterparties: Law and Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM191 Competition and Regulation in EU Healthcare Markets (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM192 Market Integration and Regulation in the European Internal Market (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM300 / QLLG001 Marine Insurance Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM302 / QLLG004 Carriage of Goods (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM305 Cartels, Collusion and Competition Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM306 Competition enforcement: From investigation to sanctions (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM314 Transnational Law and Governance (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM315 Transnational Law and Governance in Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM316 Chinese Business Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM324 Comparative Contract Law (sem 2)
◦ QLLM328 Digital Intellectual Property Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM329 Informational Technology Transactions (sem 2)
◦ QLLM330 Comparative Copyright Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM331 International Copyright: International Treaties and Cross-Border Litigation (sem 1)
◦ QLLM332 Comparative Law of Patents and Trade Secrets (sem 1)
◦ QLLM333 International Law of Patents and Related Rights (sem 2)
◦ QLLM334 Licensing Intellectual Property (sem 1)
◦ QLLM335 Intellectual Property and Fashion: Art and Design (sem 1)
◦ QLLM337 Design and Intellectual Property: EU and US
◦ QLLM338 International and Comparative Law of Unfair Competition (sem 1)
◦ QLLM339 The Law of Registered Trade Marks (sem 2)
◦ QLLM340 Global Intellectual Property: Fundamental Principles (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM341 Global Intellectual Property: Technology and Policy (sem 2)
◦ QLLM342 Interactive Entertainment and Intellectual Property Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM343 Interactive Entertainment Law: Contracts and Regulation (sem 2)
◦ QLLM345 The Business of Film (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM348 Music Industry Contracts (sem 2)
◦ QLLM354 Information Security and the Law (sem 2)
◦ QLLM360 Banking Law: International (sem 1)
◦ QLLM361 Banking Law (sem 2)
◦ QLLM362 International Finance Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM363 International Finance Law Applied (sem 2)
◦ QLLM366 Regulation of Financial Markets (sem 1)
◦ QLLM368 Corporate Rescue and Cross-border Insolvency (sem 1)
◦ QLLM369 Financial Distress and Debt Restructuring (sem 2)
◦ QLLM370 WTO Law: Market Access and Non-Discrimination (sem 1)
◦ QLLM371 WTO Law: Trade Remedies and Regulatory Issues (sem 2)
◦ QLLM372 Corporate Finance Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM373 Mergers and Acquisitions (M and As) (sem 2)
◦ QLLM376 International Economic Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM377 EU Financial and Monetary Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM378 Securities Regulation (sem 2)
◦ QLLM385 Alternative Dispute Resolution: Theory and Context (sem 1)
◦ QLLM386 Alternative Dispute Resolution: Selected Issues (sem 2)
◦ QLLM391 International Construction Contracts and Dispute Resolution (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM392 International Commercial Arbitration (sem 1)
◦ QLLM395 International Commercial Litigation (sem 1)
◦ QLLM396 Commercial Conflicts of Laws (sem 2)
◦ QLLM400 United States Energy Law, Regulation and Policy (sem 1)
◦ x CCLE019 Accounting for Lawyers (Sem 1)
◦ x CCLE021 International Macroeconomics for Lawyers (Sem 1)
◦ x CCLE026 Financial Models and Derivatives in a Legal Context (45 credits)
◦ x CCLE027 Financial Models and Application to Corporate Finance (45 credits)

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The LLM in International Business Law offers a comprehensive range of modules relevant to international trade law, business law, competition law, corporate governance, intellectual property and market regulation. Read more
The LLM in International Business Law offers a comprehensive range of modules relevant to international trade law, business law, competition law, corporate governance, intellectual property and market regulation.

Taught Modules

Modules

To specialise in this area, you must select 90 credits of modules from this list and do your compulsory dissertation in the field of International Business Law (45 credits). The additional 45 credits of taught modules can be in this area or can be unrelated and therefore selected from the full list of LLM available modules.

All modules are 22.5 credits unless otherwise stated below.

Note: Not all of the modules listed will be available in any one year and semesters listed can be subject to change. Any modules not available in the forthcoming academic session will be marked as soon as this information is confirmed by teaching academics.

The updated module list below represents the result of our ongoing modularisation of the LLM which is intended to offer students greater flexibility and choice of module options.
◦ QLLM011 Company Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM013 Comparative Commercial Law (45 credits) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM021 Corporate Governance (45 credits)
◦ QLLM025 E-Commerce Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM044 International and Comparative Competition Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM050 International Commercial Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM060 International Merger Control (45 credits)
◦ QLLM062 International Tax Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM068 Law of Economic Crime (45 credits)
◦ QLLM080 Multinational Enterprises and the Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM087 Taxation Principles and Concepts (45 credits)
◦ QLLM094 UK Competition Law (45 credits) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM122 European Union Tax Law (45 credits) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM124 European Union Competition Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM138 General Principles of Insurance Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM139 Insurance Regulation (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM141 Insurance Contracts (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM142 Reinsurance Law (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM150 Strategic Decision Making for Lawyers (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM151 Negotiation Theory and Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM155 Principles of Regulation (Sem1)
◦ QLLM156 Introduction to Insurance Regulation (Sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM164 Elements of Islamic Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM165 Islamic Finance and Commercial Law (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM179 International and Comparative Petroleum Law and Contracts (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM180 US International Taxation (45 credits)
◦ QLLM181 Legal Aspects of Paperless Trade (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM182 / QLLG006 Charterparties: Law and Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM183 / QLLG005 Protection and Indemnity Clubs: Law and Practice (Sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM184 US Comparative Corporate Law (Sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM187 International Investment Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM188 Regulation of International Investment and Public Policy (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM191 Competition and Regulation in EU Healthcare Markets (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM192 Market Integration and Regulation in the European Internal Market (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM314 Transnational Law and Governance (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM315 Transnational Law and Governance in Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM316 Chinese Business Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM324 Comparative Contract Law (sem 2)
◦ QLLM328 Digital Intellectual Property Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM329 Informational Technology Transactions (sem 2)
◦ QLLM330 Comparative Copyright Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM331 International Copyright: International Treaties and Cross-Border Litigation (sem 1)
◦ QLLM332 Comparative Law of Patents and Trade Secrets (sem 1)
◦ QLLM333 International Law of Patents and Related Rights (sem 2)
◦ QLLM337 Design and Intellectual Property: EU and US
◦ QLLM338 International and Comparative Law of Unfair Competition (sem 1)
◦ QLLM339 The Law of Registered Trade Marks (sem 2)
◦ QLLM354 Information Security and the Law (sem 2)
◦ QLLM362 International Finance Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM363 International Finance Law Applied (sem 2)
◦ QLLM366 Regulation of Financial Markets (sem 1)
◦ QLLM367 International Financial Regulation (sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM368 Corporate Rescue and Cross-border Insolvency (sem 1)
◦ QLLM369 Financial Distress and Debt Restructuring (sem 2)
◦ QLLM370 WTO Law: Market Access and Non-Discrimination (sem 1)
◦ QLLM371 WTO Law: Trade Remedies and Regulatory Issues (sem 2)
◦ QLLM372 Corporate Finance Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM373 Mergers and Acquisitions (M and As) (sem 2)
◦ QLLM374 Law and Ethics in Finance (Sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM375 Corporate Governance and Responsibility in Finance (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM376 International Economic Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM377 EU Financial and Monetary Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM378 Securities Regulation (sem 2)
◦ QLLM385 Alternative Dispute Resolution: Theory and Context (sem 1)
◦ QLLM386 Alternative Dispute Resolution: Selected Issues (sem 2)
◦ QLLM389 Copyright and Trademark in China (sem 1)
◦ QLLM390 Patent and Design in China (sem 2)
◦ QLLM391 International Construction Contracts and Dispute Resolution (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM392 International Commercial Arbitration (sem 1)
◦ QLLM395 International Commercial Litigation (sem 1)
◦ QLLM396 Commercial Conflicts of Laws (sem 2)
◦ QLLM397 Investment Treaty Arbitration (sem 1)
◦ QLLM400 United States Energy Law, Regulation and Policy (sem 1)

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The LLM in Public International Law will offer you a unique opportunity to study a wide range of courses on the role and place of law in international affairs. Read more
The LLM in Public International Law will offer you a unique opportunity to study a wide range of courses on the role and place of law in international affairs. Questions of international Law are increasingly an important part of domestic litigation in almost all jurisdictions. The modules are designed to equip you for a career in private legal practice, diplomatic service, or work with non-governmental organisations. All courses are taught by top class academics with extensive experience in the study and application of international law.

Taught Modules

To specialise in this area, you must select 90 credits of modules from this list and do your compulsory dissertation in the field of Public International Law (45 credits). The additional 45 credits of taught modules can be in this area or can be unrelated and therefore selected from the full list of LLM modules.

All modules are 22.5 credits unless otherwise stated.

Note: Not all of the modules listed will be available in any one year and semesters listed can be subject to change. Any modules not available in the forthcoming academic session will be marked as soon as this information is confirmed.

The updated module list below represents the result of our ongoing modularisation of the LLM which is intended to offer students greater flexibility and choice of module options.


◦ QLLM023 Courts in Comparative Perspective (45 credits) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM047 International and Comparative Social Justice (45 credits)
◦ QLLM053 International Criminal Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM055 International Environmental Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM057 International Law of Armed Conflict and the Use of Force (45 credits)
◦ QLLM058 International Law of the Sea (45 credits)
◦ QLLM059 International Law on the Rights of the Child (45 credits)
◦ QLLM062 International Tax Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM068 Law of Economic Crime (45 credits)
◦ QLLM069 Law of Finance and Foreign Investment in Emerging Economies (45 credits)
◦ QLLM071 Law of Treaties (45 credits)
◦ QLLM096 Climate Change Law and Policy (45 credits) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM097 International Natural Resources Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM127 International Human Rights Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM167 Indigenous Rights: Selected Issues in Practice and Theory (Sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM168 International Law and Indigenous Peoples (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM173 Terrorism and Human Rights: Constitutional Perspectives (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM174 Migration, Security and Human Rights (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM176 International Refugee Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM177 International Migration Law (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM187 International Investment Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM188 Regulation of International Investment and Public Policy (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM314 Transnational Law and Governance (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM315 Transnational Law and Governance in Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM323 State Crime (sem 2)
◦ QLLM347 The Law of Geographical Indications (GIs) (sem 2)
◦ QLLM351 Cybercrime: Substantive Offences (sem 1)
◦ QLLM352 Cybercrime: International Co-operation and Digital Investigations (sem 2)
◦ QLLM358 Cyberspace Law: Internet Jurisdiction and Dispute Resolution (sem 2) (not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM365 Legal Aspects of Financing Development (sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM370 WTO Law: Market Access and Non-Discrimination (sem 1)
◦ QLLM371 WTO Law: Trade Remedies and Regulatory Issues (sem 2)
◦ QLLM376 International Economic Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM377 EU Financial and Monetary Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM382 Energy Law and Ethics (sem 1)
◦ QLLM383 / QLLG008 International Regulation of Shipping (sem 1)
◦ QLLM384 Law of the Sea, Navigational Freedoms and Practice (sem 2)
◦ QLLM387 International Trade and Investment Law of the EU (sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM388 Trade, Climate Change and Energy: EU and International Perspectives (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM397 Investment Treaty Arbitration (sem 1)
◦ QLLM398 Investment Arbitration: Substantive Protection (sem 2)
◦ QLLM400 United States Energy Law, Regulation and Policy (sem 1)

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In today’s global competitive marketplace, the successful corporate executive needs to understand how the legal system and legal regulation can impact on their own area of expertise. Read more
In today’s global competitive marketplace, the successful corporate executive needs to understand how the legal system and legal regulation can impact on their own area of expertise. Accordingly, the BangorBusinessSchool and the Bangor School of Law have combined to offer an innovative suite of interdisciplinary MBA and MA programmes.

The MA in Banking and Law is an interdisciplinary programme that will enable the student to study key legal and regulatory developments affecting the financial sector. This includes the regulation of financial services, security instruments, corporate finance, arbitration and other issues affecting modern banks at UK, EU and international level. As well as the general principles of International Banking Law, you will also choose from a wide range of law and business. The programme will equip candidates with higher level knowledge in both the Banking and Law areas, as global Banking practice today is heavily influenced by the Law. In particular the financial and regulatory lessons to be drawn from the so-called ‘credit crunch’ in the USA and the UK will be examined. The MA degree is suitable for those who wish to adopt a predominantly non-quantitative approach to their studies.

Course Structure
January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Compulsory modules:

Research Methods: This module develops knowledge of intermediate and advanced research methods, and provides a basis in research methodology for those who may eventually wish to pursue research degrees.

Bank Financial Management: This module provides a grounding in the nature, strategic context and managerial functions of financial management in banks, and other financial services firms.

International Banking: This module examines the origins of international banking, the activities of international banks, the markets in which they participate, and the sources of risk.

Financial Institutions Strategic Management: This module examines the main theoretical and practical issues concerning banking business. You will develop a critical awareness of the theory of the banking firm, the motives for international banking, and regulatory and structural issues impacting on bank behaviour.

Financial Crises and Bank Regulation: This module examines why banks and financial markets are inherently vulnerable to crises, and analyses the role of policy makers and institutions. The roles of monetary policy, bank supervision and regulation, corporate governance and ratings agencies in mitigating or exacerbating crises are considered.

International Banking and Capital Markets Law: This module will provide a sound understanding of the law and practice of modern international banking, including the regulation and prudential supervision of banks in the UK and EU in the areas of capital adequacy and risk management.

Optional Law modules (choose 2):

Comparative Corporate Governance: Major corporate scandals in the US, Europe and the UK in recent years have raised questions about the organisation and governance of companies, in particular large multinational organisations. The growth of private equity buy-outs has also raised issues of transparency and accountability.

Credit and Security Law: The supply of credit is the lifeblood of industry but of course a lender will require security. This module will examine in detail the provisions relating to the regulation of the supply of credit to consumers and business.

International Corporate Finance Law and Merger Regulation Law: This module focuses on the study of leading case law and selected legislation, relating to international mergers and their financing from several common law countries such as the USA, Britain, Ireland, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, as well as China, India and the EU.

International Commercial Arbitration: This module considers the theoretical and institutional structure of arbitration and alternative dispute resolution, examines the legal framework within which disputes are resolved and reviews the practice of international commercial arbitration.

Consumer Law: This module focuses on the main areas of legal liability and the pitfalls that can arise if an organisation does not comply with the relevant consumer protection rules both in the UK and Europe.

Intellectual Property Law: This module addresses the fundamentals of intellectual property law, the definition and scope of copyright; the authorship, ownership, duration and qualification for copyright protection.

Competition Law: This module focuses on the theory and law of competition, focusing on UK competition law, and EU competition law relating to the control of restrictive practices, vertical and horizontal restraints and abuse of a dominant position. Comparative regimes, in particular that of the US, are examined.

Industrial Property Law: This module examines the history and development of industrial property law in the UK, EU and internationally. It covers the law relating to trade secrets, patents, copyrights, design rights and trademarks.

World Trade Law: This module studies aspects of the regulation of international trade through the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and the World Trade Organisation.

International Insurance Law: Insurance plays an important role in commerce and risk management. Insurance contracts are governed by the rules of general law of contract. The module explores the nature and scope of the contract of insurance, considers the general principles of insurance, and examines the relationships between parties to a contract.

International Taxation Law: This module studies the basic principles of income taxation of international transactions involving taxpayers of several European countries (including the UK, the Netherlands, France, Germany, Ireland), the US, Australia, Canada and Japan.

Employment Law: Modern employment law is complex, and imposes major compliance costs on employers. This module covers contract of employment, minimum wage legislation, discrimination against employees, and unfair dismissal actions before Employment Tribunals.

International Environmental Law: This module focuses on internationally recognised principles and values concerning environmental protection, and how they are translated into legally enforceable tools. Methods of environmental regulation are analysed and compared.

Read less
In today’s global competitive marketplace, the successful corporate executive needs to understand how the legal system and legal regulation can impact on their own area of expertise. Read more
In today’s global competitive marketplace, the successful corporate executive needs to understand how the legal system and legal regulation can impact on their own area of expertise. Accordingly, the BangorBusinessSchool and the Bangor School of Law have combined to offer an innovative suite of interdisciplinary MBA and MA programmes.

The MA in Banking and Law is an interdisciplinary programme that will enable the student to study key legal and regulatory developments affecting the financial sector. This includes the regulation of financial services, security instruments, corporate finance, arbitration and other issues affecting modern banks at UK, EU and international level. As well as the general principles of International Banking Law, you will also choose from a wide range of law and business. The programme will equip candidates with higher level knowledge in both the Banking and Law areas, as global Banking practice today is heavily influenced by the Law. In particular the financial and regulatory lessons to be drawn from the so-called ‘credit crunch’ in the USA and the UK will be examined. The MA degree is suitable for those who wish to adopt a predominantly non-quantitative approach to their studies.
Course Structure

January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Compulsory modules:

Research Methods: This module develops knowledge of intermediate and advanced research methods, and provides a basis in research methodology for those who may eventually wish to pursue research degrees.

Bank Financial Management: This module provides a grounding in the nature, strategic context and managerial functions of financial management in banks, and other financial services firms.

International Banking: This module examines the origins of international banking, the activities of international banks, the markets in which they participate, and the sources of risk.

Financial Institutions Strategic Management: This module examines the main theoretical and practical issues concerning banking business. You will develop a critical awareness of the theory of the banking firm, the motives for international banking, and regulatory and structural issues impacting on bank behaviour.

Financial Crises and Bank Regulation: This module examines why banks and financial markets are inherently vulnerable to crises, and analyses the role of policy makers and institutions. The roles of monetary policy, bank supervision and regulation, corporate governance and ratings agencies in mitigating or exacerbating crises are considered.

International Banking and Capital Markets Law: This module will provide a sound understanding of the law and practice of modern international banking, including the regulation and prudential supervision of banks in the UK and EU in the areas of capital adequacy and risk management.

Optional Law modules (choose 2):

Comparative Corporate Governance: Major corporate scandals in the US, Europe and the UK in recent years have raised questions about the organisation and governance of companies, in particular large multinational organisations. The growth of private equity buy-outs has also raised issues of transparency and accountability.

Credit and Security Law: The supply of credit is the lifeblood of industry but of course a lender will require security. This module will examine in detail the provisions relating to the regulation of the supply of credit to consumers and business.

International Corporate Finance Law and Merger Regulation Law: This module focuses on the study of leading case law and selected legislation, relating to international mergers and their financing from several common law countries such as the USA, Britain, Ireland, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, as well as China, India and the EU.

International Commercial Arbitration: This module considers the theoretical and institutional structure of arbitration and alternative dispute resolution, examines the legal framework within which disputes are resolved and reviews the practice of international commercial arbitration.

Consumer Law: This module focuses on the main areas of legal liability and the pitfalls that can arise if an organisation does not comply with the relevant consumer protection rules both in the UK and Europe.

Intellectual Property Law: This module addresses the fundamentals of intellectual property law, the definition and scope of copyright; the authorship, ownership, duration and qualification for copyright protection.

Competition Law: This module focuses on the theory and law of competition, focusing on UK competition law, and EU competition law relating to the control of restrictive practices, vertical and horizontal restraints and abuse of a dominant position. Comparative regimes, in particular that of the US, are examined.

Industrial Property Law: This module examines the history and development of industrial property law in the UK, EU and internationally. It covers the law relating to trade secrets, patents, copyrights, design rights and trademarks.

World Trade Law: This module studies aspects of the regulation of international trade through the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and the World Trade Organisation.

International Insurance Law: Insurance plays an important role in commerce and risk management. Insurance contracts are governed by the rules of general law of contract. The module explores the nature and scope of the contract of insurance, considers the general principles of insurance, and examines the relationships between parties to a contract.

International Taxation Law: This module studies the basic principles of income taxation of international transactions involving taxpayers of several European countries (including the UK, the Netherlands, France, Germany, Ireland), the US, Australia, Canada and Japan.

Employment Law: Modern employment law is complex, and imposes major compliance costs on employers. This module covers contract of employment, minimum wage legislation, discrimination against employees, and unfair dismissal actions before Employment Tribunals.

International Environmental Law: This module focuses on internationally recognised principles and values concerning environmental protection, and how they are translated into legally enforceable tools. Methods of environmental regulation are analysed and compared.

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Are you passionate about human rights? Would you like to enhance your skills in this diverse field? If so the Master of Human Rights Law provides a thorough theoretical and practical grounding in the laws governing this field. Read more
Are you passionate about human rights? Would you like to enhance your skills in this diverse field? If so the Master of Human Rights Law provides a thorough theoretical and practical grounding in the laws governing this field.

You will develop advanced professional skills and knowledge, enhancing your specialist career within non-government organisations, government sectors, community groups or human rights-related organisations such as international development agencies. You will also gain an understanding of the Australian legal system and will investigate contemporary law issues, practice and scholarship, and evaluate complex issues relevant to the field from theoretical, international and interdisciplinary perspectives.

As one of the most prestigious law schools in Australia we offer this course at our Monash University Law Chambers, in the heart of the legal district of Melbourne.

The course offers choice from a broad range of human rights law areas, or you can select from across the range of Masters law elective units. With units covering areas such discrimination, international refugee law, advocacy, genocide and the law, human trafficking, humanitarian law and children's rights —to name a few, you will gain specialist knowledge and understanding of recent developments in areas of human rights law and the practice of human rights law. It provides the flexibility to tailor a program of study to suit your interests, skills and professional goals. Full-time or part-time study allows to you to continue to work and meet personal commitments while you study.

The course enhances your capacity to undertake independent research, and includes options for a pathway to doctoral studies.

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/human-rights-law-l6002?domestic=true

Course Structure

The course is structured in two parts. Part A: Human Rights law knowledge and Part B Extending specialist knowledge electives and research.

PART A: Human rights law knowledge
These studies enable you to develop specialised knowledge and advanced skills in areas human rights law that suit your interests, skills and career goals.

PART B: Extending specialist knowledge electives and research
These studies will provide you with in-depth knowledge of a wide range of areas of human rights law or you can select from across the range of Masters law elective units. You will focus on sources of information relevant to human rights law and the application of research methods and specialist discipline knowledge and skills necessary to support law-related work in those closely interrelated fields. Depending on your interests and motivation, you can choose a program of study in which you plan and execute a major research-based project with a high level of personal autonomy and accountability.

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/law

Faculty of Law

- Who we are

Monash Law is one of the largest and most prestigious law schools in Australia. We have a broad teaching base, strong international links and offer our students a variety of experiential learning opportunities. We are proud to offer a range of Undergraduate, Masters and Research degrees and provide legal education and training to over 3500 undergraduate and postgraduate students at any one time.

- Study with us

Studying a Law degree with Monash, your qualification will be internationally recognised as one of the world's best. We have a long established reputation as one of Australia's leading law schools and are a member of the prestigious Group of Eight universities, recognised globally for excellence in research, teaching and scholarship.

When you commence your Law degree with us, you commence your study of Law from day one. You can gain tangible, real legal experience in our two Clinical Legal Education Centres or undertake an international law program in Italy and Malaysia. Whatever your choice, a Law degree from Monash equips you with practical and transferable skills that you can take to your future career.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/human-rights-law-l6002?domestic=true#making-the-application

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The MBA in Banking and Law will develop knowledgeable and capable banking executives and banking lawyers who will move quickly into key positions in the financial sector. Read more
The MBA in Banking and Law will develop knowledgeable and capable banking executives and banking lawyers who will move quickly into key positions in the financial sector. The degree focuses on the financial and strategic management of banks and other financial institutions as well as the increasingly complex legal and regulatory structures within which banks and their executives have to operate. The legal issues will cover a wide range of topics at UK, EU and international level with which a modern banker needs to be familiar. As well as the general principles of International Banking Law, you will also choose from a wide range of law and business options. You will gain practical insight and skills in a range of financial, legal and strategic management topics in the supply of international financial services as well as key Law subjects which have a direct impact on Banking practice. Case studies and contemporary issues figure prominently in the programme, particularly focusing on the lessons to be learnt from the recent ‘credit crunch’ and the issues for international financing and regulation that this has thrown up.

Compulsory modules:

Organisations and People: This module examines key issues arising from contemporary research in organisational behaviour (OB) and human resource management (HRM). It provides an integrated analysis of management, organisations and people, developing the conceptual, strategic and practical skills necessary for managers in complex, global organisational contexts.

Management Research: This module analyses the philosophical basis for research in the management sciences, and examines a number of key methodological issues and approaches. Research designs for both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies are developed, including interviews, case studies, focus groups, surveys and experiments.

Bank Financial Management: This module provides a grounding in the nature, strategic context and managerial functions of financial management in banks and other financial services firms. Three key themes are: identification and management of the trade-off between risk and return; improvement of a bank’s value using market models; and external market-based tests of bank performance.

International Banking: This module examines the origins of international banking, the activities of international banks, the markets in which they participate, and the sources of risk. You will investigate the determinants of the efficiency of international banks, and evaluate the implications for banks’ strategic decision-making.

Financial Institutions Strategic Management: This module examines the main theoretical and practical issues concerning banking business. You will develop a critical awareness of the theory of the banking firm, the motives for international banking, and regulatory and structural issues impacting on bank behaviour.

International Banking and Capital Markets Law: This module will provide a sound understanding of the law and practice of modern international banking, including the regulation and prudential supervision of banks in the UK and EU in the areas of capital adequacy and risk management.

Optional modules (choose 2):

Comparative Corporate Governance: Major corporate scandals in the US, Europe and the UK in recent years have raised questions about the organisation and governance of companies, in particular large multinational organisations. The growth of private equity buy-outs has also raised issues of transparency and accountability.

Credit and Security Law: The supply of credit is the lifeblood of industry but of course a lender will require security. This module will examine in detail the provisions relating to the regulation of the supply of credit to consumers and business.

International Corporate Finance Law and Merger Regulation Law: This module focuses on the study of leading case law and selected legislation, relating to international mergers and their financing from several common law countries such as the USA, Britain, Ireland, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, as well as China, India and the EU.

International Commercial Arbitration: This module considers the theoretical and institutional structure of arbitration and alternative dispute resolution, examines the legal framework within which disputes are resolved and reviews the practice of international commercial arbitration.

Consumer Law: This module focuses on the main areas of legal liability and the pitfalls that can arise if an organisation does not comply with the relevant consumer protection rules both in the UK and Europe.

Intellectual Property Law: This module addresses the fundamentals of intellectual property law, the definition and scope of copyright; the authorship, ownership, duration and qualification for copyright protection.

Competition Law: This module focuses on the theory and law of competition, focusing on UK competition law, and EU competition law relating to the control of restrictive practices, vertical and horizontal restraints and abuse of a dominant position. Comparative regimes, in particular that of the US, are examined.

Industrial Property Law: This module examines the history and development of industrial property law in the UK, EU and internationally. It covers the law relating to trade secrets, patents, copyrights, design rights and trademarks.

World Trade Law: This module studies aspects of the regulation of international trade through the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and the World Trade Organisation.

International Insurance Law: Insurance plays an important role in commerce and risk management. Insurance contracts are governed by the rules of general law of contract. The module explores the nature and scope of the contract of insurance, considers the general principles of insurance, and examines the relationships between parties to a contract.

International Taxation Law: This module studies the basic principles of income taxation of international transactions involving taxpayers of several European countries (including the UK, the Netherlands, France, Germany, Ireland), the US, Australia, Canada and Japan.

Employment Law: Modern employment law is complex, and imposes major compliance costs on employers. This module covers contract of employment, minimum wage legislation, discrimination against employees, and unfair dismissal actions before Employment Tribunals.

International Environmental Law: This module focuses on internationally recognised principles and values concerning environmental protection, and how they are translated into legally enforceable tools. Methods of environmental regulation are analysed and compared.

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In a world facing unique economic, environmental and social challenges of a scale not seen before, promoting sustainable development has become a pressing priority. Read more

Why this course?

In a world facing unique economic, environmental and social challenges of a scale not seen before, promoting sustainable development has become a pressing priority.

The course will give you a solid grounding in the structures, rules and principles of aspects of public international law that impact on sustainable development.

This programme is designed specifically for graduates who want to work in the international development sector in management, planning or policy-related areas.

The course has a flexible structure. You’ll have the opportunity to pursue your own interests and tailor your degree to your chosen career path. You can select elective classes from other Masters Programmes in Law as well as related programmes across the University.

It is not necessary that you hold a law degree before embarking on this course of study however law content in your previous course may be useful.

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/internationallawsustainabledevelopment/

You’ll study

This programme is available full-time and part-time with three potential exit points. You can choose to study for a:
- Postgraduate Certificate (PgCert)
- Postgraduate Diploma (PgDip)
- Master’s degree (LLM)

Core classes:
- Research Methods (compulsory for LLM)
- The World Trading System: Law & Policy
- International Environmental Law

Elective classes
Choices may include:
- Comparative Law of Obligations
- Business & Human Rights
- Comparative Company Law & Regulation
- Competition Law & Policy in the EU
- Legal Process & the Law of Contract & Other Obligations (for non-lawyers)
- UK & EU Environmental Law
- Intellectual Property
- Global Water Policy
- International Trade Theory, Policy and Institutions
- Fundamentals of Environmental Forensics
- Energy Resources and Policy

Please note that the classes offered may change from year to year.

A limited number of students will be given the opportunity to choose elective classes from the optional modules offered in the LLM in Climate Change Law and Policy. This allows those students to combines sustainable development law and policy with climate change. The programme is delivered off campus on an intensive three-day basis in January. For further information, please contact the Law School.

- Field dissertation
A unique aspect of this programme is the opportunity for you to undertake a field dissertation within a governmental or non-governmental organisation with an international focus. It can be either in the UK, or more likely, overseas.
This opportunity is offered on a competitive basis. It lasts for up to 12 weeks between July and September. Work completed for the placement will focus on a specific area of law and will form the subject of your dissertation.
Previous students have undertaken placements in countries including Sri Lanka, Tanzania, South Africa, India and Kenya. Examples of projects which our students have undertaken include:
- assessing the extent to which Indian environmental and energy laws promote the development of micro-renewables
- an analysis of whether Tanzanian land law discriminates against women and what reforms would be needed to address the discrimination
- an exploration of the low take-up of Clean Development Mechanism [CDM] in Sub-Saharan Africa and how the situation could be improved
- an assessment of environmental justice in Nigeria and South Africa

The project/field work is organised and supported by Challenges Worldwide. Challenges Worldwide is an innovative, award-winning, social enterprise working in international development.

The University of Strathclyde provides comprehensive travel and health insurance for all participants in the Field Dissertation. We also pay for the costs of your placement. Students are responsible for the costs of flights, visas, and accommodation and living expenses while overseas. Such costs have tended to be in the region of £1,500 to £2,500 per student.

Facilities

Our library has a wide range of law reports, legislation, serials and monographs. It also has duplicate sets of key law report series, houses extensive collections in government publications and other related areas.

You will have access to a wide range of electronic information sources which can be accessed from home, including all the major legal databases.

The Law School is home to Scotland’s first Law Clinic. It provides a ‘real life’ learning experience for students and an invaluable service to members of the public who do not qualify for legal aid, and cannot otherwise afford legal advice.

Strathclyde Centre for Environmental Law & Governance

You're encouraged to engage with the activities of the centre. These include guest lectures and international conferences. The Strathclyde Centre for Environmental Law and Governance is a centre of excellence in environmental law and governance and boasts a vibrant research community.

You'll also have the opportunity to participate in the organisation of the annual postgraduate Colloquium on Environmental Law and Governance. This has a session devoted to the presentations of highly qualified LLM students.

English language requirements

If your first language is not English, documentary evidence of an appropriate level of competency of written and spoken English must be provided. The minimum standards [at the date of writing] are an IELTS minimum overall band score of 6.5 (with no individual test score below 6.0). Tests are valid for two years.

The University's English Language Teaching department offers pre-entry and pre-sessional courses for new international students from April each year. Full fee paying students are entitled to one month of the pre-sessional English course free of charge.

Pre-Masters Preparation Course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at the University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options.
To find out more about the courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future. You can also complete the online application form, or to ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

Learning & teaching

As a general rule, classes taught within the Law School will normally be taught over a ten-week teaching period with one two-hour seminar per week.
However in some cases, classes will be offered intensively over a shorter time period because of the availability of staff teaching them.

Assessment

A variety of assessment methods and weightings are used on Law School Masters programmes. The classes developed specifically for this programme generally follow this format:
- two 4,000-word essays or one final examination together with a 4,000-word essay
Each component of assessment is generally worth 50% of the final mark of a module. To pass each module, you need an average overall score of 50% across all assessments as well as a minimum score of 40% in each individual component of assessment.

Careers

Increasingly, lawyers and other related professionals are operating in environments that demand an understanding of sustainable development, and its relationship with other rights and norms.

Studying on this programme will equip you with the knowledge, understanding and analytical skills relevant to working or planning a career with an international focus.

Students on this programme and the LLM in International Economic Law have gone on to take up varied positions including:
- Analyst in the Private Wealth division of a multinational bank
- Policy Officer with the Scottish Environmental Protection Agency
- Logistical Coordinator with Oxfam America
- Legal counsel for an energy utility company based in Switzerland
- Responsible Investment Analyst for a leading global provider of research into corporate environmental, social and governance performance
- Project Associate for an international non-profit organization working to advance global public health
- Senior manager at Ofgem
- Lecturer at a technical college in Bahrain

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/index.jsp

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International law in the broadest sense is concerned not only with inter-state relations, but also with relations between states, individuals, international organisations and other non-state actors. Read more
International law in the broadest sense is concerned not only with inter-state relations, but also with relations between states, individuals, international organisations and other non-state actors. It encompasses issues relating to the creation of legal obligations, recognition of states, the role of international organisations, liability for international crimes and dispute settlement, as well as questions such as the use of force, environmental protection, human rights and regulation of international trade and investment.

This course provides a wide choice of subjects and topics, enabling students to tailor the course to their areas of particular interest to facilitate their career aspirations. It is open to both law and non-law graduates.

As well as the LLM in International Law, we offer four specialised international law LLM courses along with an LLM by Research.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/llm-in-international-law/

Why choose this course?

- All members of the LLM course team are active researchers and encourage students to become involved in their respective areas of research by teaching specialist modules in which they have expertise and by supervising dissertations in their specialist subjects.

- You can enhance your CV and career prospects by developing specialisations that go beyond the standard law subjects of a LLB or other law degree.

- Your course tutors, fellow students and alumni are drawn from countries around the world giving you the opportunity to build a truly international network of contacts.

- Special support is provided for international students, particularly those whose first language is not English, to ensure that they find their feet quickly and are able to participate fully.

- The 2015 Times/ Sunday Times Good University Guide places the School of Law at Oxford Brookes in the top 30 of all the UK’s university Law Schools.

- You will benefit from a range of teaching and learning strategies, from case studies to interactive seminars, presentations and moots.

- Oxford has much to offer lawyers and as one of the world's great academic cities, it is a key centre of debate, with conferences, seminars and forums taking place across a range of international law topics within the University, the city of Oxford and in nearby London. In addition to our own excellent libraries and resource centres, LLM students have access to the unparalleled legal holdings at the Bodleian Law Library.

Teaching and learning

A wide diversity of teaching methods are employed throughout the LLM courses in order to provide a high-quality learning experience. These include lectures, seminar discussions, individual and small group tutorials, case studies, and group and individual presentations.

Particular emphasis is placed on skills training, with opportunities provided to acquire and practise legal reasoning as well as research and IT skills. Assessment methods include coursework and individual and group presentations.

All the members of the LLM course team are active researchers and encourage students to become involved in their respective areas of research by teaching specialist modules in which they have expertise and by supervising dissertations in their specialist subjects.

Careers

Graduates from the LLM succeed across an impressive range of careers from policy makers and human rights activists through to diplomats and commercial lawyers. LLM staff can advise you and direct you to possible careers and employers depending on your particular needs and ambitions.

"I have joined a corporate law team at a leading multinational law firm in Beijing, thanks to my LLM."
- LLM Alumna, Lin Zheng

- Pursuing an academic career in law
Rsearch is fundamental to the Law School and is one of the reasons we performed so well in the last REF. Your own interests will be reflected in the modules you choose and many students feel moved to continue their academic studies and become specialists themselves. Several former LLM students have chosen to become researchers, publishing and lecturing on their work and graduating to do a PhD.

"The grounding that I now have in international law has allowed me to take on work that I would not previously have been qualified for. For example, I am currently developing a programme of litigation on the issue of counter-terrorism and human rights for an international organisation. I have lectured at Harvard Law School and been invited to contribute to an edited volume produced by Harvard."
- LLM Alumnus Richard Carver, Associate Lecturer and Human Rights Consultant

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

Professor Peter Edge researches in the interaction of religion and law, and the law of small jurisdictions including International Finance Centres.

Recent projects exploring these at the transnational level have included a study of foreign lawyers working in small jurisdictions, and a comparative study of the status of ministers of religion in employment law. Past PhD students have worked on projects such as a comparison of the European Convention on Human Rights and Shariah, and a comparative study of how criminal law treats religion.

Professor Lucy Vickers’ research into the religious discrimination at work has led to consultancy work for Equality and Human Rights Commission, as well invitations to speak at United Nations with the UN Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Religion and Belief.

Sonia Morano-Foadi, interviewed and quoted in The Economist, secured £12,000 from the European Science Foundation to fund exploratory work into the effects of EU directives on migration and asylum.

Professor Ilona Cheyne has been invited to participate in the EU COST group on 'Fragmentation, Politicisation and Constitutionalisation of International Law', working on standards of review in international courts and tribunals.

Research areas and clusters

Oxford Brookes academics who are at the forefront of a wide range of internationally recognised and world-leading research and projects. In the 2014 REF 96% of the School of Law’s research was internationally recognised.

The LLM course team consists of researchers working within the International Law and Fundamental Rights and Equality research groups. LLM students can attend the programmes of research seminars and other events that underpin the research culture of the School of Law.

Read less
The LLM in International Trade and Commercial Law provides the opportunity to study how the law relates to commercial endeavours within a globalised economy from the perspective of the private business actor. Read more
The LLM in International Trade and Commercial Law provides the opportunity to study how the law relates to commercial endeavours within a globalised economy from the perspective of the private business actor. It enables you to specialise in areas such as international commercial arbitration, cross-border transactions, international investment law, intellectual property law, anti-corruption, corporate governance and corporate social responsibility.

This course combines rigorous legal education with a contemporary and global perspective. It is ideally suited to students from a commercial law, business, management, or economics background, providing advanced knowledge of the application of legal principles and mechanisms to the world of international commerce.

The course is designed to provide you with the specialist skills and in-depth knowledge that will be attractive to employers in the areas of international and commercial legal practice, import-export, insurance, investment, shipping and freight and commodities.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/llm-in-international-trade-and-commercial-law/

Why choose this course?

- As well as being attractive to employers in the areas of international and commercial legal practice, import-export, insurance, investment, shipping and freight, and commodities, this course is also ideal for those who intend to pursue careers in emerging markets jurisdictions, international and national trade bodies, as well as in government and academic posts.

- Enhance your CV and career prospects by developing specialisations that go beyond the standard commercial and trade law subjects of a LLB or other law degree.

- All members of the LLM course team are active researchers and encourage students to become involved in their respective areas of research by teaching specialist modules in which they have expertise and by supervising dissertations in their specialist subjects.

- Your course tutors, fellow students and alumni are drawn from countries around the world giving you the opportunity to build a truly international network of contacts.

- Special support is provided for international students, particularly those whose first language is not English, to ensure that they find their feet quickly and are able to participate fully.

- The 2015 Times/ Sunday Times Good University Guide places the School of Law at Oxford Brookes in the top 30 of all the UK’s university Law Schools.

- You will benefit from a range of teaching and learning strategies, from case studies to interactive seminars, presentations and moots.

- In addition to our own excellent libraries and resource centres, LLM students have access to the unparalleled legal holdings at the Bodleian Law Library.

Course length

Full-time: LLM: 12 months; PGDip: 9 months
Part-time: LLM: 24 months; PGDip:18 months

Teaching and learning

A wide diversity of teaching methods are employed throughout the LLM courses in order to provide a high-quality learning experience. These include lectures, seminar discussions, individual and small group tutorials, case studies, group and individual presentations, and moots.

Particular emphasis is placed on skills training, with opportunities provided to acquire and practise legal reasoning as well as research and IT skills. Assessment methods include coursework, and individual and group presentations.

Careers

Graduates from the LLM succeed across an impressive range of careers from policy makers and human rights activists through to high flying diplomats and commercial lawyers. LLM staff can advise you and direct you to possible careers and employers depending on your particular needs and ambitions.

"I have joined a corporate law team at a leading multinational law firm in Beijing, thanks to my LLM."
- LLM Alumna, Lin Zheng

- Pursuing an academic career in law:
Research is fundamental to the Law School and is one of the reasons we performed so well in the last REF. Your own interests will be reflected in the modules you choose and many students feel moved to continue their academic studies and become specialists themselves. Several former LLM students have chosen to become researchers - publishing and lecturing on their work and graduating to do a PhD.

"The grounding that I now have in international law has allowed me to take on work that I would not previously have been qualified for. For example, I am currently developing a programme of litigation on the issue of counter-terrorism and human rights for an international organisation. I have lectured at Harvard Law School and been invited to contribute to an edited volume produced by Harvard."
- LLM Alumnus Richard Carver, Associate Lecturer and Human Rights Consultant.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

Professor Peter Edge researches in the interaction of religion and law, and the law of small jurisdictions including International Finance Centres. Recent projects exploring these at the transnational level have included a study of foreign lawyers working in small jurisdictions, and a comparative study of the status of ministers of religion in employment law. Past PhD students have worked on projects such as a comparison of the European Convention on Human Rights and Shariah, and a comparative study of how criminal law treats religion.

Professor Lucy Vickers’ research into the religious discrimination at work has led to consultancy work for Equality and Human Rights Commission, as well invitations to speak at United Nations with the UN Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Religion and Belief.

Sonia Morano-Foadi, interviewed and quoted in The Economist, secured £12,000 from the European Science Foundation to fund exploratory work into the effects of EU directives on migration and asylum.

Professor Ilona Cheyne has been invited to participate in the EU COST group on 'Fragmentation, Politicisation and Constitutionalisation of International Law', working on standards of review in international courts and tribunals.

Research areas and clusters

Oxford Brookes academics who are at the forefront of a wide range of internationally recognised and world-leading research and projects. In the 2014 REF 96% of the School of Law’s research was internationally recognised. The LLM course team consists of researchers working within the International Law and Fundamental Rights and Equality research groups. LLM students can attend the programmes of research seminars and other events that underpin the research culture of the School of Law.

Read less
In today’s global competitive marketplace, the successful corporate executive needs to understand how the legal system and legal regulation can impact on their own area of expertise. Read more
In today’s global competitive marketplace, the successful corporate executive needs to understand how the legal system and legal regulation can impact on their own area of expertise. Accordingly, the Bangor Business School and the Bangor School of Law have combined to offer an innovative suite of interdisciplinary MBA and MA programmes. The MBA in Banking and Law will develop knowledgeable and capable banking executives and banking lawyers who will move quickly into key positions in the financial sector.

Course Structure

January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Compulsory modules:

Organisations and People: This module examines key issues arising from contemporary research in organisational behaviour (OB) and human resource management (HRM). It provides an integrated analysis of management, organisations and people, developing the conceptual, strategic and practical skills necessary for managers in complex, global organisational contexts.

Management Research: This module analyses the philosophical basis for research in the management sciences, and examines a number of key methodological issues and approaches. Research designs for both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies are developed, including interviews, case studies, focus groups, surveys and experiments.

Bank Financial Management: This module provides a grounding in the nature, strategic context and managerial functions of financial management in banks and other financial services firms. Three key themes are: identification and management of the trade-off between risk and return; improvement of a bank’s value using market models; and external market-based tests of bank performance.

International Banking: This module examines the origins of international banking, the activities of international banks, the markets in which they participate, and the sources of risk. You will investigate the determinants of the efficiency of international banks, and evaluate the implications for banks’ strategic decision-making.

Financial Institutions Strategic Management: This module examines the main theoretical and practical issues concerning banking business. You will develop a critical awareness of the theory of the banking firm, the motives for international banking, and regulatory and structural issues impacting on bank behaviour.

International Banking and Capital Markets Law: This module will provide a sound understanding of the law and practice of modern international banking, including the regulation and prudential supervision of banks in the UK and EU in the areas of capital adequacy and risk management.

Optional modules (choose 2):

Comparative Corporate Governance: Major corporate scandals in the US, Europe and the UK in recent years have raised questions about the organisation and governance of companies, in particular large multinational organisations. The growth of private equity buy-outs has also raised issues of transparency and accountability.

Credit and Security Law: The supply of credit is the lifeblood of industry but of course a lender will require security. This module will examine in detail the provisions relating to the regulation of the supply of credit to consumers and business.

International Corporate Finance Law and Merger Regulation Law: This module focuses on the study of leading case law and selected legislation, relating to international mergers and their financing from several common law countries such as the USA, Britain, Ireland, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, as well as China, India and the EU.

International Commercial Arbitration: This module considers the theoretical and institutional structure of arbitration and alternative dispute resolution, examines the legal framework within which disputes are resolved and reviews the practice of international commercial arbitration.

Consumer Law: This module focuses on the main areas of legal liability and the pitfalls that can arise if an organisation does not comply with the relevant consumer protection rules both in the UK and Europe.

Intellectual Property Law: This module addresses the fundamentals of intellectual property law, the definition and scope of copyright; the authorship, ownership, duration and qualification for copyright protection.

Competition Law: This module focuses on the theory and law of competition, focusing on UK competition law, and EU competition law relating to the control of restrictive practices, vertical and horizontal restraints and abuse of a dominant position. Comparative regimes, in particular that of the US, are examined.

Industrial Property Law: This module examines the history and development of industrial property law in the UK, EU and internationally. It covers the law relating to trade secrets, patents, copyrights, design rights and trademarks.

World Trade Law: This module studies aspects of the regulation of international trade through the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and the World Trade Organisation.

International Insurance Law: Insurance plays an important role in commerce and risk management. Insurance contracts are governed by the rules of general law of contract. The module explores the nature and scope of the contract of insurance, considers the general principles of insurance, and examines the relationships between parties to a contract.

International Taxation Law: This module studies the basic principles of income taxation of international transactions involving taxpayers of several European countries (including the UK, the Netherlands, France, Germany, Ireland), the US, Australia, Canada and Japan.

Employment Law: Modern employment law is complex, and imposes major compliance costs on employers. This module covers contract of employment, minimum wage legislation, discrimination against employees, and unfair dismissal actions before Employment Tribunals.

International Environmental Law: This module focuses on internationally recognised principles and values concerning environmental protection, and how they are translated into legally enforceable tools. Methods of environmental regulation are analysed and compared.

Read less
In today’s global competitive marketplace, the successful corporate executive needs to understand how the legal system and legal regulation can impact on their own area of expertise. Read more
In today’s global competitive marketplace, the successful corporate executive needs to understand how the legal system and legal regulation can impact on their own area of expertise. Accordingly, the BangorBusinessSchool and the Bangor School of Law have combined to offer an innovative suite of interdisciplinary MBA and MA programmes.

The MBA in Law and Management emphasises both professional and vocational development as well as an awareness of key legal and regulatory issues that play a central role in the successful management of modern enterprises of all types and sizes. You will develop an understanding of higher-level managerial skills and concepts, and their application in practical situations. You will have the opportunity to examine the law and regulation that affects business in a wide range of key areas.

Course Structure

Compulsory modules:

Organisations and People: This module examines key issues arising from contemporary research in organisational behaviour (OB) and human resource management (HRM). It provides an integrated analysis of management, organisations and people, developing the conceptual, strategic and practical skills necessary for managers in complex, global organisational contexts.

Management Research: This module analyses the philosophical basis for research in the management sciences, and examines a number of key methodological issues and approaches. Research designs for both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies are developed, including interviews, case studies, focus groups, surveys and experiments.

Comparative Corporate Governance: Major corporate scandals in the US, Europe and the UK in recent years have raised questions about the organisation and governance of companies, in particular large multinational organisations. The growth of private equity buy-outs has also raised issues of transparency and accountability.

Finance for Managers: This module is designed for those who aim to achieve a basic understanding of financial management and control, and who require an understanding of finance in order to manage an organisation effectively. Financial planning and control are central themes, as well as the appraisal techniques of investment projects.

Optional modules+ (choose 4):

Marketing Strategy: This module critically evaluates the contributions of various schools of thought in marketing, and examines the relevant analytical models and management practices, with emphasis on the strategic importance of marketing to all organisations.

International Strategic Management: This module introduces the language of strategy and explores the link between strategic and operational management.

Knowledge Management: This module examines the processes whereby organisations and individuals develop and utilise their knowledge bases. Successful knowledge management hinges on people, culture and technology. As such it has professional and academic links with organisational behaviour and organisational learning.

Contemporary Issues in Management: This module analyses strategic decision-making within business. You will develop a critical understanding of the strategic processes of business management, the interconnections with the functional domains of marketing, human resource management and corporate finance, and the management of knowledge systems.

New Venture Creation: This module examines the advantages and disadvantages of the various routes to business start-up, including new venture creation, or establishing a business based on your own expertise, experience and ideas; buying an established business; purchasing a franchise; and succession through a family firm, an increasingly common way of becoming involved in entrepreneurial activity.

Credit and Security Law: The supply of credit is the lifeblood of industry but of course a lender will require security. This module will examine in detail the provisions relating to the regulation of the supply of credit to consumers and business.

International Corporate Finance Law and Merger Regulation Law: This module focuses on the study of leading case law and selected legislation, relating to international mergers and their financing from several common law countries such as the USA, Britain, Ireland, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, as well as China, India and the EU.

International Commercial Arbitration: This module considers the theoretical and institutional structure of arbitration and alternative dispute resolution, examines the legal framework within which disputes are resolved and reviews the practice of international commercial arbitration.

Consumer Law: This module focuses on the main areas of legal liability and the pitfalls that can arise if an organisation does not comply with the relevant consumer protection rules both in the UK and Europe.

Intellectual Property Law: This module addresses the fundamentals of intellectual property law, the definition and scope of copyright; the authorship, ownership, duration and qualification for copyright protection.

Competition Law: This module focuses on the theory and law of competition, focusing on UK competition law, and EU competition law relating to the control of restrictive practices, vertical and horizontal restraints and abuse of a dominant position. Comparative regimes, in particular that of the US, are examined.

Industrial Property Law: This module examines the history and development of industrial property law in the UK, EU and internationally. It covers the law relating to trade secrets, patents, copyrights, design rights and trademarks.

World Trade Law: This module studies aspects of the regulation of international trade through the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and the World Trade Organisation.

International Insurance Law: Insurance plays an important role in commerce and risk management. Insurance contracts are governed by the rules of general law of contract. The module explores the nature and scope of the contract of insurance, considers the general principles of insurance, and examines the relationships between parties to a contract.

International Taxation Law: This module studies the basic principles of income taxation of international transactions involving taxpayers of several European countries (including the UK, the Netherlands, France, Germany, Ireland), the US, Australia, Canada and Japan.

Employment Law: Modern employment law is complex, and imposes major compliance costs on employers. This module covers contract of employment, minimum wage legislation, discrimination against employees, and unfair dismissal actions before Employment Tribunals.

International Environmental Law: This module focuses on internationally recognised principles and values concerning environmental protection, and how they are translated into legally enforceable tools. Methods of environmental regulation are analysed and compared.

+ Your optional modules must include either International Strategic Management or Marketing Strategy, and at least 2 Law options.

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This course will develop your understanding of key areas in business law and international business law. It is designed for business executives and professionals, and is particularly suitable for lawyers, accountants, managers and human resources professionals. Read more

Flexible distance learning for the busy professional

This course will develop your understanding of key areas in business law and international business law. It is designed for business executives and professionals, and is particularly suitable for lawyers, accountants, managers and human resources professionals.
•Informa
This course is delivered in partnership with Informa Professional Academy, an organisation dedicated to working with leading academic bodies to provide high-calibre and well respected distance learning postgraduate courses
•Develop your own personal pathway
This course combines one core module with a diverse range of optional modules
•Study at your own pace
Enjoy flexible distance learning, with the option to exit at one of several points with a postgraduate award
•Differentiate yourself in the job market
Gain a competitive edge by increasing your knowledge of business law
•Boost your employability
Improve your career and employability options in a globalised job market

Teaching and assessment

The LLM is studied by distance learning and is fully assessed by coursework and a dissertation. The distance learning mode involves optional attendance at Leicester De Montfort Law School, for a maximum of ten Saturday study days during the period of study. The course is structured in a way that allows you to exit at one of several points, if desired, each with a postgraduate award.

Choose your own modules!

Business Law in the UK and EU – in this module you will examine the sources of UK law and EU law and the status and consequences within them. You will also cover the single market and the free movement of goods within Europe. You will explore the classification and characteristics of personal property rights, examine business responsibility for goods and service and investigate the freedom of contract, public policy and business contracting. You will also examine the state regulation and self-regulation of business and their licensing activity.

Plus optional modules which may include:

• Aspects of Discrimination in Business

• Business Taxation

• Civil Liberties in the Workplace

• Collective Labour Law

• Company Law

• Consumer Law

• Corporate Insolvency Law

• EU Competition Law

• European e-Commerce Law

• Individual Labour Law

• Intellectual Property Law

• Law of Health and Safety

• Laws of International Trade

• Negotiated Study

• Personal Insolvency Law

• Private International Law

• Sale and Supply of Goods

Note: All modules are subject to change in order to keep content current.

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The LLM in International Human Rights Law offers the opportunity to gain a critical understanding of the history and theoretical underpinnings of international human rights, international and regional human rights systems, and the practical application of human rights norms in a range of contexts. Read more
The LLM in International Human Rights Law offers the opportunity to gain a critical understanding of the history and theoretical underpinnings of international human rights, international and regional human rights systems, and the practical application of human rights norms in a range of contexts.

This course combines rigorous legal education with a contemporary and global perspective and is ideally suited to students from a law, history, politics, or other social sciences background.

It is designed to provide the specialist skills and in-depth knowledge that will be attractive to employers in the areas of international legal practice and international development as well as those who intend to pursue careers in international governmental and non-governmental organisations.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/llm-in-international-human-rights-law/

Why choose this course?

- It enables you to specialise in areas such as international criminal law, the laws of armed conflict, humanitarian intervention and post-conflict reconstruction, international development and globalisation, refugee and migrant law, and the promotion and application of human rights as part of legal reform in the developing world.

- It is ideal for those who intend to pursue careers in international governmental and non-governmental organisations, as well as in government and academic posts. Recent graduates from this course have gained positions in international organisations, such as UNICEF.

- You can enhance your CV and career prospects by developing specialisations that go beyond the standard human rights law subjects of a LLB or other law degree.

- Your course tutors, fellow students and alumni are drawn from countries around the world giving you the opportunity to build a truly international network of contacts.

- All members of the LLM course team are active researchers and encourage students to become involved in their respective areas of research by teaching specialist modules in which they have expertise and by supervising dissertations in their specialist subjects.

- Special support is provided for international students, particularly those whose first language is not English, to ensure that they find their feet quickly and are able to participate fully.

- The 2015 Times/ Sunday Times Good University Guide places the School of Law at Oxford Brookes in the top 30 of all the UK’s university Law Schools.

- You will benefit from a range of teaching and learning strategies, from case studies to interactive seminars, presentations and moots.

- Oxford has much to offer lawyers and as one of the world's great academic cities, it is a key centre of debate, with conferences, seminars and forums taking place across a range of international law topics within the University, the city of Oxford and in nearby London.

Teaching and learning

A wide diversity of teaching methods are employed throughout the LLM courses in order to provide a high-quality learning experience. These include lectures, seminar discussions, individual and small group tutorials, case studies, and group and individual presentations.

Particular emphasis is placed on skills training, with opportunities provided to acquire and practice legal reasoning as well as research and IT skills. Assessment methods include coursework and individual and group presentations.

All the members of the LLM course team are active researchers and encourage students to become involved in their respective areas of research by teaching specialist modules in which they have expertise and by supervising dissertations in their specialist subjects.

Careers

Graduates from the LLM succeed across an impressive range of careers from policy makers and human rights activists through to high flying diplomats and commercial lawyers. LLM staff can advise you and direct you to possible careers and employers depending on your particular needs and ambitions.

"I have joined a corporate law team at a leading multinational law firm in Beijing, thanks to my LLM."
- LLM Alumna, Lin Zheng

- Pursuing an academic career in law
Research is fundamental to the Law School - one of the reasons we performed so well in the latest REF. Your own interests will be reflected in the modules you choose and many students feel moved to continue their academic studies and become specialists themselves. Several former LLM students have chosen to become researchers, publishing and lecturing on their work and graduating to do a PhD.

"The grounding that I now have in international law has allowed me to take on work that I would not previously have been qualified for. For example, I am currently developing a programme of litigation on the issue of counter-terrorism and human rights for an international organisation. I have lectured at Harvard Law School and been invited to contribute to an edited volume produced by Harvard."
- LLM Alumnus Richard Carver, Associate Lecturer and Human Rights Consultant

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

Professor Peter Edge researches in the interaction of religion and law, and the law of small jurisdictions including International Finance Centres. Recent projects exploring these at the transnational level have included a study of foreign lawyers working in small jurisdictions, and a comparative study of the status of ministers of religion in employment law. Past PhD students have worked on projects such as a comparison of the European Convention on Human Rights and Shariah, and a comparative study of how criminal law treats religion.

Professor Lucy Vickers’ research into the religious discrimination at work has led to consultancy work for Equality and Human Rights Commission, as well invitations to speak at United Nations with the UN Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Religion and Belief.

Sonia Morano-Foadi, interviewed and quoted in The Economist, secured £12,000 from the European Science Foundation to fund exploratory work into the effects of EU directives on migration and asylum.

Professor Ilona Cheyne has been invited to participate in the EU COST group on 'Fragmentation, Politicisation and Constitutionalisation of International Law', working on standards of review in international courts and tribunals.

Research areas and clusters

Oxford Brookes academics are at the forefront of a wide range of internationally recognised and world-leading research and projects. In the 2014 REF 96% of the School of Law’s research was internationally recognised. The LLM course team consists of researchers working within the International Law and Fundamental Rights and Equality research groups. LLM students can attend the programmes of research seminars and other events that underpin the research culture of the School of Law.

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The LLM in International Economic Law provides the opportunity to study the international law of trade and finance from the public policy perspective of the regulator. Read more
The LLM in International Economic Law provides the opportunity to study the international law of trade and finance from the public policy perspective of the regulator. It enables the student to specialise from, a wide range of subjects and topics in areas such as the regulatory framework of the global trading system, the resolution of trade disputes, and the legal and policy mechanisms affecting foreign direct investment.

The course combines rigorous legal education with a contemporary and global perspective, and is ideally suited to students from a law, politics, business, economics or other social sciences background.

It is designed to provide the specialist skills and in-depth knowledge that will be attractive to employers in the areas of international legal practice, international development, trade, finance, and banking.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/llm-in-international-economic-law/

Why choose this course?

- It provides a wide choice of subjects and topics, exploring international economic relations in the context of business practices, human rights, global security and the pursuit of sustainable development.

- All members of the LLM course team undertake original and internationally-recognised research in their subjects and encourage students to become involved in their respective areas of research by teaching specialist modules in which they have expertise and by supervising dissertations in their specialist subjects.

- Enhance your CV and career prospects by developing specialisations that go beyond the standard commercial and trade law subjects of a LLB or other law degree.

- As well as providing the specialist skills and in-depth knowledge that will be attractive to employers in the areas of international legal practice, international development, trade, finance, and banking, it would also appeal to those who intend to pursue careers in emerging markets, jurisdictions, international and national trade bodies, as well as in government and academic posts.

- Your course tutors, fellow students and alumni are drawn from countries around the world giving you the opportunity to build a truly international network of contacts.

- Special support is provided for international students, particularly those whose first language is not English, to ensure that they find their feet quickly and are able to participate fully.

- The 2015 Times/ Sunday Times Good University Guide places the School of Law at Oxford Brookes in the top 30 of all the UK’s university Law Schools.

- You will benefit from a range of teaching and learning strategies, from case studies to interactive seminars, presentations and moots.

- Oxford has much to offer lawyers and as one of the world's great academic cities, it is a key centre of debate, with conferences, seminars and forums taking place across a range of international law topics within the university, the city of Oxford and in nearby London. In addition to our own excellent libraries and resource centres, LLM students have access to the unparalleled legal holdings at the Bodleian Law Library.

Teaching and learning

A wide diversity of teaching methods are employed throughout the LLM courses in order to provide a high-quality learning experience. These include lectures, seminar discussions, individual and small group tutorials, case studies, and group and individual presentations.

Particular emphasis is placed on skills training, with opportunities provided to acquire and practise legal reasoning as well as research and IT skills. Assessment methods include coursework and individual and group presentations.

Careers

Graduates from the LLM succeed across an impressive range of careers from policy makers and human rights activists through to high-flying diplomats and commercial lawyers.

LLM staff can advise you and direct you to possible careers and employers depending on your particular needs and ambitions.

"I have joined a corporate law team at a leading multinational law firm in Beijing, thanks to my LLM."
- LLM Alumna, Lin Zheng

- Pursuing an academic career in law
Research is fundamental to the School of Law and is one of the reasons we performed so well in the latest REF. Your own interests will be reflected in the modules you choose and many students feel moved to continue their academic studies and become specialists themselves. Several former LLM students have chosen to become researchers, publishing and lecturing on their work and graduating to do a PhD.

"The grounding that I now have in international law has allowed me to take on work that I would not previously have been qualified for. For example, I am currently developing a programme of litigation on the issue of counter-terrorism and human rights for an international organisation. I have lectured at Harvard Law School and been invited to contribute to an edited volume produced by Harvard."
- LLM Alumnus Richard Carver, Associate Lecturer and Human Rights Consultant

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

Professor Peter Edge researches in the interaction of religion and law, and the law of small jurisdictions including International Finance Centres. Recent projects exploring these at the transnational level have included a study of foreign lawyers working in small jurisdictions, and a comparative study of the status of ministers of religion in employment law. Past PhD students have worked on projects such as a comparison of the European Convention on Human Rights and Shariah, and a comparative study of how criminal law treats religion.

Professor Lucy Vickers’ research into the religious discrimination at work has led to consultancy work for Equality and Human Rights Commission, as well invitations to speak at United Nations with the UN Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Religion and Belief.

Sonia Morano-Foadi, interviewed and quoted in The Economist, secured £12,000 from the European Science Foundation to fund exploratory work into the effects of EU directives on migration and asylum.

Professor Ilona Cheyne has been invited to participate in the EU COST group on 'Fragmentation, Politicisation and Constitutionalisation of International Law', working on standards of review in international courts and tribunals.

Research areas and clusters

Oxford Brookes academics are at the forefront of a wide range of internationally recognised and world-leading research and projects. In the 2014 REF 96% of the School of Law’s research was internationally recognised. The LLM course team consists of researchers working within the International Law and Fundamental Rights and Equality research groups. LLM students can attend the programmes of research seminars and other events that underpin the research culture of the School of Law.

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