• Northumbria University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
  • Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Bristol Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
  • Aberystwyth University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses

Postgrad LIVE! Study Fair

Birmingham | Bristol | Sheffield | Liverpool | Edinburgh

Kingston University Featured Masters Courses
Cranfield University Featured Masters Courses
FindA University Ltd Featured Masters Courses
University of Cambridge Featured Masters Courses
Teesside University Featured Masters Courses
"discourse" AND "studies"…×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Discourse Studies)

We have 273 Masters Degrees (Discourse Studies)

  • "discourse" AND "studies" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 273
Order by 
This MA is an innovative programme specifically designed to give you the competence to undertake empirical work in discourse studies by drawing on both linguistic and social theory. Read more

This MA is an innovative programme specifically designed to give you the competence to undertake empirical work in discourse studies by drawing on both linguistic and social theory. The MA enables you to explore discourse in areas such as politics, law, business, media and health, whilst developing skills in a range of analytical methods. Support for your studies is provided by the non-credit Postgraduate Academic Study Skills module which runs in terms 1, 2 and 3.

Modules

Core modules:

• Introduction to Discourse Studies

• Critical Discourse Analysis

• Pragmatics

• Research Methods in Linguistics and English Language

Optional modules:

◾Corpus Linguistics

◾English Grammar: A Cognitive Approach

◾Language, Literacies and Digital Communication

◾Principles of Language Teaching

◾Second Language Acquisition

◾Sociolinguistics

◾Using Corpora in Language Teaching

◾Experimental Approaches to Language and Cognition

◾Cognitive Linguistics

◾Teaching Languages to Students with Specific Learning Differences

◾Bilingualism

◾Content-Based Approaches to Language Education

◾Curriculum Design in Language Education

◾Forensic Linguistics

◾Language Test Construction and Evaluation

◾Sociophonetics

◾Stylistics



Read less
Research in the Centre focuses on the relationships between Applied Linguistics and professional practice in a range of international and multinational contexts, especially in the areas of English Language teaching and learning, professional discourse, and working across cultures. Read more
Research in the Centre focuses on the relationships between Applied Linguistics and professional practice in a range of international and multinational contexts, especially in the areas of English Language teaching and learning, professional discourse, and working across cultures. We are one of the leading centres nationally and internationally for work in these areas, and our aim is to continue to nurture and carry out high quality research.

This course can develop into a PHD.

Read less
Conflict Studies and Human Rights. Theoretical analysis and grounded research. Read more

Conflict Studies and Human Rights: Theoretical analysis and grounded research

Why has ’nationalist’ violence erupted in Ukraine? Will cities become the war zones of the future? How is the term ‘human rights’ used and abused in times of violent conflict? What role did social media play in the rise and subsequent collapse of the Arab Spring? What are the ethical and political issues associated with the use of drones in zones of conflict - and what impact does this have on the subjects of surveillance? Who defines ‘evil’ and what does ‘doing good’ mean? How do ‘humanitarian wars’ affect the everyday lives of the ‘victims’ they protect?

These are just some of the pressing questions arising from the complex interconnectedness of today’s world. A solution to these questions can only be found through systematic analysis of processes of inclusion and exclusion, mobilisation, and collective violence. Addressing these topics properly demands critical reflection on the national and international policies developed to contain, manage, resolve, or transform violent conflict.

Our Master's programme in Conflict Studies and Human Rights is a selective, international graduate programme combining the study of theory with in-depth case study analysis.

The programme focuses on both the dynamics of violent conflicts and the problems associated with national and international military or humanitarian intervention by agencies such as the UN, NATO, or non-governmental organisations.

The Master's programme in Conflict Studies and Human Rights will equip you with the necessary analytical and theoretical skills to engage with global and local challenges in insightful and innovative ways. You will acquire solid theoretical, analytical, and methodological expertise in Conflict Studies and Human Rights, as well as field experience in conflict and post-conflict regions.

You will learn about and develop mastery in three key areas:

Subject knowledge 

You will gain in-depth knowledge of theoretical approaches to understanding and explaining contemporary conflict and human rights. You will also obtain a general understanding of international policy approaches to contemporary conflict and human rights, as well as an understanding of the political contexts in which they are used. 

Evidence-based social research 

You will learn to undertake research that consists of systematic analysis and synthesis and is based on a dialogue between ideas and evidence. In the course of this dialogue, you will be able to identify “sensitising concepts” from theory to facilitate your data collection. You will also use theory to gain an understanding of the evidence you gather and to explain your findings.

Critical attitude towards received wisdom

You will have the conceptual and analytical skills necessary to question conventional ideas and accepted courses of action while defining your own viewpoint. You will also be able to assess the problem of violent conflict and human rights by considering interrelated issues of identity, perception, discourse, and practice.

After graduation

The Master’s programme in Conflict Studies and Human Rights offers good preparation for careers in any sector involving conflict analysis, including the public sector, business, non-governmental and international organisations. Read more about possible career prospects.

Judged best in the field

The highly regarded Keuzegids Master’s Selection Guide 2017 ranked Utrecht University’s Conflict Studies and Human Rights programme as the best in the field in the Netherlands.

In this year's Elsevier Best Studies Survey, students have also rated Conflict Studies as the best programme.



Read less
Would you like to become a translator or interpreter? The Master of Interpreting and Translation Studies will develop your skills in translation and interpreting in English and another language, with an understanding of both practice and theory. Read more
Would you like to become a translator or interpreter? The Master of Interpreting and Translation Studies will develop your skills in translation and interpreting in English and another language, with an understanding of both practice and theory.

Not only is our course approved at the Professional Interpreter, Professional Translatorand Conference Interpreterlevels by the National Accreditation Authority for Translators and Interpreters (NAATI); Monash is the only university in Australia to be a member of the Conference Internationale d'Instituts Universitaires de Traducteurs et Interpretes (CUITI), the world's oldest and most prestigious international association of tertiary institutions offering degrees in translation and interpreting.

Aimed at students with advanced bilingual proficiency, the course offers a foundation in the theories of translation and interpreting, as well as training in research in the field. Upon completion of this course, you will be able to conceptualise translation and interpreting studies as an academic discipline in its historical, cross-disciplinary and intercultural contexts.

There are two specialisations available in the course:

- Translation (offered for Chinese, French, German, Indonesian, Italian, Japanese, Korean, and Spanish), and

- Interpreting and translation (offered for Chinese, French, German, Indonesian, Italian, Japanese, Korean, and Spanish).

Through professional internships, you will gain real-world experience, pick up useful skills to prepare for the transition from university to the workplace, and build professional networks, improving your graduate employability prospects. Participating employers and industry partners may become a useful recruitment resource for graduates of the program.

This degree is also available in a double degree course with Jean Moulin Lyon III (France), with Kobe City University of Foreign Studies (Japan), with Southeast University (China) and with University of Trieste (Italy). In each case you will study one year in Australia and one year in the country of the partner university; and in each case you will receive two master's degrees, one from each university. (Note that the double degree with Southeast University is only available for enrolment in China). For further information regarding the double degree course, please contact the faculty (http://future.arts.monash.edu/).

This course provides an academic qualification for those intending to pursue careers as professional interpreters and translators working in a broad range of fields, such as business, law, science, technology, and cross-cultural communication, or as conference interpreters in international conferences or diplomatic meetings. Translation qualifications can also open the door to any language or communication-related area including publishing, editing, journalism, technical and other writing, or public relations.

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/interpreting-and-translation-studies-a6007?domestic=true

Course Structure

The course is structured in two parts. Part A. Foundations for advanced interpreting and translation studies and Part B. Core Masters study. Depending upon prior qualifications, students in the Translation specialisation (only) may receive credit for Part A.

[Note that if you are eligible for credit for prior studies you may elect not to receive the credit.]

PART A. Foundations for advanced interpreting and translation studies
The focus of these studies is the theory and practice of both translation and interpreting and familiarising you with current research models and methodologies in translation studies. Students in the interpreting and translation specialisations will also focus on more recent research issues in the emerging field of interpreting studies.

PART B. Core Master's study
These studies draw on best practices within the broad realm of interpreting and translation practice, providing intensive language-specific practice in written and oral transfer skills to the National Accreditation Authority for Translators and Interpreters (NAATI) Professional level. In addition to the relevant theoretical frameworks, the core units will also provide you with the discourse analysis, ethical and professional frameworks that are essential for professional interpreting and translation practice.

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/arts

Find out how to apply here - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/interpreting-and-translation-studies-a6007?domestic=true#making-the-application

Read less
Research profile. Religious Studies or the Study of Religion/s is a vibrant research cluster, based in theoretically informed and comparative studies of religion. Read more

Research profile

Religious Studies or the Study of Religion/s is a vibrant research cluster, based in theoretically informed and comparative studies of religion.

You can specialise in a variety of areas which include contemporary and historical topics and fields such as Asian Studies, History of Religions/New Religions, and Jewish Studies.

You will be encouraged to frame your research using a range of theoretical and methodological approaches, from the classic to the cutting-edge. You will be able to draw on methodological expertise which includes biographical analysis, discourse analysis, ethnography, historical and textual studies, memory studies and narrative studies. The thematic interests of academic staff include ethnicity, gender, indigeneity, nationalism, textuality and the transnational.

You can find out more and identify a potential supervisor by looking at the School’s staff profiles, which give details of research interests and publications, and email addresses.

You are encouraged to contact a potential supervisor to discuss your research project before making a formal application.

At the School of Divinity you will join a community of around 150 research students, drawn from around the world, and from a variety of religious and non-religious backgrounds.

You will study in a stimulating environment. The Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 ranked the School’s research environment at 100% world-leading / internationally excellent, second in the UK on this front in theology and religion. This outstanding result reflects the vibrancy of the School’s research culture.

Masters by Research

If you have academic training in theology or religious studies (or another relevant subject), and would like to develop your interest with a focus on a particular area, the Masters by Research may interest you.

You can study full-time (one year) or part-time (two years). Your pattern of study can either be three supervised research essays followed by a 15,000 word dissertation, or a 30,000 word dissertation. Most students take the ‘research essays + shorter dissertation’ path. All students receive research training.

Training and support

The ethos of the Graduate School is to promote excellence in postgraduate study, within a stimulating and supportive environment. We value equality and diversity in the School community, and an academic culture that is both critical and constructive.

  • At the start of the academic year, you will be invited to Welcome Week, an intensive introduction to study and life in Edinburgh. Some events are especially for international students new to Scotland and the UK, but everything is open to all.
  • In the first weeks, the School provides a general orientation to research skills and to wider opportunities for training and support.
  • From your first days as a student, you will work one-to-one with your primary research supervisor.
  • Your progress will be tracked, through regular supervisions and milestone reviews, to ensure that you get the support you need to bring your project to fruition.
  • You will be part of the research seminar in Religious Studies, to which visiting speakers are invited and to which postgraduates present work-in-progress.
  • You will be able to follow taught courses that contribute to your interests and research needs, and can also take advantage of opportunities to learn ancient and modern languages.

A University review (2015) commended the Graduate School for providing excellent support: responsive to student feedback; proactive in helping new postgraduates to adjust to their studies and to life in Scotland; enthusiastic and practical in promoting career development. The postgraduate student committee works closely with the School to make the research student experience the best it can be.

Facilities

Resources for research are excellent. You can draw on the outstanding holdings of New College Library, the University of Edinburgh’s main library, and the nearby National Library of Scotland. New College Library has one of the largest theology collections in the UK, with more than a quarter of a million items and a large and rich manuscript collection. The University library exceeds 2.25 million volumes. The National Library of Scotland – a ‘legal deposit’ library like the British Library in London and the university libraries of Oxford and Cambridge – is just around the corner.

The School provides an extensive programme of weekly research seminars and special guest lectures. In addition, three research centres provide a special focus for activity: the Centre for the Study of Christian Origins; the Centre for Theology and Public Issues; the Centre for the Study of World Christianity.

You will have access to excellent study facilities, dedicated to postgraduates. PhD and MPhil students have access 24/7, and can request an allocated desk. Masters by Research students have shared study space. All areas have printing/scanning and computer facilities. The main postgraduate study wing has a kitchen. New College has an on-site cafe that is open during term-time.



Read less
Students in this graduate program have a core set of requirements in theory and method courses, which provide foundations in three research areas. Read more

Program Areas

Students in this graduate program have a core set of requirements in theory and method courses, which provide foundations in three research areas: Communication and Culture, Organizational and Interpersonal Communication, and Rhetoric and Political Discourse. In addition, students complete their plans of study, with elective courses from among any graduate courses in the department (see link below) or outside of the department, with the approval of their academic advisors.

Visit the website https://comstudies.ua.edu/graduate-program/

COMMUNICATION STUDIES (COM)

COM 500 Introduction to Graduate Studies. One hour.
The primary goal is to orient new graduate students to the expectations and procedures of graduate study in the department. Topics covered include developing the plan of study, thesis prospectus, comprehensive examination, and choosing advisors and committees.

COM 501 Introduction to Teaching Public Speaking. No hours.
The primary goal of this course is to facilitate the instruction of COM 123 Public Speaking. Students enrolled in this course will provide lesson plans for their classes and discuss options for improving classroom learning.

COM 513 Communication and Diversity. Three hours.
Study and analysis of issues of diversity as they relate to groups in society and in communication fields. Emphasis is on the media's treatment of various groups in society. Approved as a communication and cultural diversity elective.

COM 515 African American Rhetoric. Three hours.
A historical-critical investigation of African American public discourse from the Revolutionary era to the present, exploring rhetorical strategies for social change and building community.

COM 521 Political Communication. Three hours.
An exploration of rhetorical, media, and cross-disciplinary theories and literature related to political communication as expressed in campaigns and institutional governance.

COM 525 Gender and Political Communication. Three hours.
Study of the impact of gender on political communication activities. Topics include gender differences in political messages and voter orientation, masculine ideals of leadership, women’s roles and advancement in the political sphere, and media representations.

COM 536 Independent Study. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Written permission.
Students who want to count this course toward their Plans of Study must complete the official request form and submit it for the approval of their faculty advisor and the Graduate Program Director.

COM 541 Contemporary Rhetorical Theory. Three hours.
A survey of major contributions to rhetorical theory from the 20th century up to the present.

COM 545 Classical Rhetorical Theory. Three hours.
A systematic inquiry into the development of Greek and Roman rhetorical theory during the classical period (ca. 480 B.C.E.–400 C.E.).

COM 548 Seminar in Rhetorical Criticism. Three hours.
An examination of various methodological perspectives of rhetorical criticism. Specifically, the course aims to familiarize students with both traditional and alternative critical methods and to encourage students to perceive the rhetorical dimensions of all manner of public discourse, ranging from speeches, advertising, film, popular music to discursive forms in new media and the Internet.

COM 560 Group Leadership. Three hours.
An advanced study of small-group behavior, examining in detail theories of leadership as they relate to problem solving in group situations.

COM 550 Qualitative Research Methods. Three hours.
An introduction to qualitative research methods in communication, including data collection and analysis. The goals of the course are to provide exposure to a broad array of qualitative methods, help students learn to use some of these methods, and to help them to understand the role of research in our field. The course is designed to help student actually conduct research, resulting in two conference-worthy papers.

COM 555 Conflict and Negotiation. Three hours.
Negotiation is fundamentally a communicative activity. The main objective of this course is to understand processes of formal conflict management in mixed motive settings. Students will apply negotiation theory and skills to simulated negotiation cases that include buyer-seller transactions, negotiating through an agent or mediator, salary negotiations, deal making, resolution of workplace disputes, multiparty negotiations, international and intercultural negotiations, and ethical decision making and communication in negotiation. The skills and theory introduced in this course will help students manage integrative and distributive aspects of the negotiation process to achieve individual and collective goals.

COM 561 Human Communication Theory. Three hours.
A detailed review of selected theories of speech communication with a focus on the critical examination of the foundation of social scientific theories.

COM 562 Theories of Persuasion. Three hours.
A critical review of social-influence theories in the area of persuasion and human action.

COM 563 Relational Communication. Three hours.
Prerequisite: COM 220 or permission of the instructor.
Focused investigation of to communication in close personal relationships, with primary emphasis on contemporary concepts and theories of romantic relationships and friendships.

COM 565 Intercultural Communication. Three hours.
Survey and analysis of major concepts, theories, and research dealing with communication between people of different cultural backgrounds in multicultural and international settings.

COM 567 Seminar: Public Address. Three hours.
A topical consideration of individual case studies from public discourse, designed to probe problems of the nature of the audience, the ethics of persuasion, and the power of public advocacy in mass society. Topics may vary.

COM 569 Communication and Gender. Three hours.
Explores the role of communication in the construction of gender. Covers feminist theoretical approaches in communication and other disciplines, the intersections of gender with other marginalities, and the role of gender in various communication contexts. Approved as a communication and cultural diversity elective.

COM 571 Seminar in Organizational Communication. Three hours.
An introductory examination of historical and contemporary issues in organizational communication scholarship from a variety of theoretical and methodological perspectives.

COM 572 Organizational Assessment and Intervention. Three hours.
Examines the theoretical issues inherent in the study of organizational communication, the primary factors requiring assessment and intervention, the impact of on-going changes and new information techniques, current challenges facing the organizational consultant, and the practical application of communication processes for improving organizations.

COM 575 Technology, Culture, and Human Communication. Three hours.
Study of the complexity of technologically-mediated communication across cultures. This course combines literature and concepts from intercultural communication with human communication and technology and addresses the challenges of interacting with others via technology, working in global virtual teams and organizations, and participating as a citizen and consumer in the technology age.

COM 590 Internship in Communication Studies. One to three hours.
Prerequisite: Written permission from the graduate program director.
Proposal for supervised field experience in communication studies must be submitted and approved.

COM 595 Special Topics. Three hours. Topics vary by instructor.

COM 598 Professional Project. Three hours.

COM 599 Thesis Research. One to three hours.

Career Options

A Master of Arts degree in Communication Studies can offer many career options. Communication skills — oral, written, electronic — are now recognized as critical aspects in all major professions in the United States. Both in education and in the work force, there is a growing need for those who not only understand how human communication functions in its various forms, but also can analyze and advise others on ways to improve human communication. Graduates typically pursue one of three career paths: teaching public speaking, working in professional communication positions, or continuing with advanced academic study, such as in doctoral or law degree programs.

Find out how to apply here - https://comstudies.ua.edu/graduate-program/admissions/

Read less
This flexible programme will give you a sophisticated understanding of theories and methods at the forefront of Theology and Religious Studies. Read more

This flexible programme will give you a sophisticated understanding of theories and methods at the forefront of Theology and Religious Studies. You’ll study diverse religious traditions in the UK and beyond, as well as their impact on the world around us.

Core modules explore the relationship between religion, theology and the public sphere in areas such as human rights, wealth and wealth creation, terrorism and social justice. You’ll also gain an understanding of research methods in the humanities and social sciences.

Then you’ll select from optional modules focusing on topics that suit your interests such as philosophy of religion, the links between religion and global development or gender, multiculturalism and more.

With the support of leading researchers, including those working in our Centre for Philosophy of Religion and Centre for Religion and Public Life, you’ll develop a wide range of skills while exploring a subject that is vital for understanding the world we live in.

You’ll find plenty of resources at Leeds to inspire and inform your studies. The Special Collections housed in our world-class Brotherton Library include extensive collections of archive and early printed material, including hundreds of theological works from the 17th century onwards.

We also hold the library of Ripon Cathedral and the archives of the Dean and Chapter, spanning from the late Middle Ages to the 20th century, as well as extensive archives relating to Quaker history. There are even a large number of early printed books and manuscripts connected with Jewish theology and history. All the major world religions are also fully represented in our excellent library resources.

This programme is also available to study part-time over 24 months. You can also study for a postgraduate certificate (PGCert) or diploma (PGDip) qualification, where you take fewer modules overall.

Course content

Your first semester will equip you with the knowledge and skills to study theology and religion. You’ll take core modules introducing you to research methods in the subject, using approaches from across the humanities and social sciences, as well as exploring the relationship between theology and public life. You’ll learn about political, urban, systematic and practical theologies among many others, focusing on issues such as racism, criminal justice and social cohesion.

This foundation will enable you to gain specialist knowledge in the areas that suit your interests. You’ll choose two optional modules from the range we offer, allowing you to focus on topics such as Muslims and multiculturalism, or philosophical approaches to spirituality.

During the programme you’ll acquire skills in research and interpretation and good social and cultural awareness. You’ll demonstrate this with your dissertation – an independent study on a research topic of your choice – which you’ll submit by the end of the programme in August. You can even go into greater depth if you swap one optional module for an extended dissertation.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

If you study for the PGCert or PGDip qualification, you’ll take fewer modules. You’ll also specialise in either theology or religious studies, depending on the modules you choose.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

There are three compulsory modules throughout the year including the Dissertation (60 credits). You’ll then choose two optional modules, or just one if you select the Extended Dissertation (90 credits).

  • Religion and Society: Research Process and Methods 30 credits
  • Theology and Public Life 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Philosophy and Spiritual Practice 30 credits
  • Sin, Public Discourse and Public Life 30 credits
  • Religions and Global Development 30 credits
  • Contemporary Issues in Religion and Gender 30 credits
  • Muslims, Multiculturalism and the State 30 credits
  • Religion, Politics and the Future: From Apocalypse to Utopia 30 credits
  • Religion, Society and Public Life 30 credits
  • Philosophy and the Spiritual Life: Contemporary Perspectives 30 credits
  • Special Options in Theology and Religious Studies 30 credits
  • Theology & Religious Studies: Extended Dissertation 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Theology and Religious Studies MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Theology and Religious Studies MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use a variety of teaching and learning methods including lectures, seminars and tutorials where you can discuss the issues arising from your reading in greater depth. Independent study is also an important element of the programme, allowing you to develop your skills and pursue your own interests more closely.

Assessment

To help you gain and demonstrate a range of skills, you’ll be assessed using a range of different methods. These include essays and assignments as well as literature reviews, project reports and presentations.

Career opportunities

This programme will give you a range of in-depth subject knowledge, as well as valuable transferable skills in research, analysis, interpretation, communication and cultural awareness. All of these qualities are valuable in a wide range of careers.

Graduates pursue careers in a variety of sectors including the charity sector, NGOs, education, local government, civil service and policy work, business and legal services, the media and social work. Many also continue their studies at PhD level, and even pursue academic careers after this.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



Read less
The Central and South-East European Studies MA is a multidisciplinary programme that enables students to gain specialist knowledge and understanding of the complex culture, history, literature, politics and society of the region from Western Bohemia to Wallachia and from Mazuria to Macedonia. Read more

The Central and South-East European Studies MA is a multidisciplinary programme that enables students to gain specialist knowledge and understanding of the complex culture, history, literature, politics and society of the region from Western Bohemia to Wallachia and from Mazuria to Macedonia.

About this degree

Students develop an advanced knowledge of central and south-eastern Europe from a multidisciplinary perspective, focusing on aspects of history, politics and culture. They develop generic research skills, interdisciplinary and discipline-specific research skills, area specific research skills and language skills oriented towards carrying out research in the region.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of a choice of one of three compulsory modules (30 credits), and a research dissertation (60 credits). 90 credits can then be selected from a range of options across SSEES.

Core modules

This is a multidisciplinary programme. Nevertheless, students are required to gain a thorough methodological and theoretical grounding in disciplinary study and hence must choose one of the following three:

  • Literary and Cultural Theory
  • Historical Methods and Approaches
  • Political Analysis AND Political Sociology

Optional modules

Total of 90 credits from options below. Subject to approval, optional modules up to the value of 30 credits may be taken from another SSEES MA programme or from another MA programme within UCL (Anthropology, History, European Studies, Comparative Literature etc.).

  • All Quiet on the Eastern Front: Culture, Politics and Everyday Life in Central & Eastern Europe from Stalin to Present
  • Little Hitlers? Right Radicalism in Central and Eastern Europe, 1900-1945
  • Introduction to Discourse Analysis
  • Beyond Stereotypes: The Jews in Polish Culture
  • Cities in Eastern Europe
  • Contemporary Cultural Studies: Between Post-Communism and Post-Modernism
  • The Crisis Zone: Central Europe 1900-1990
  • How to Read/Interpret Texts: Introduction to Hermeneutics
  • 'Metropolis': History of Berlin, 1871-1990
  • Nation, Identity and Power in Central and Eastern Europe
  • Baltic Politics and Society
  • Making of the Modern Ukraine
  • Security, Identity, Polarity
  • Language Module
  • Ethno-Political Conflict in Central and Eastern Europe
  • Informal Practices in Post-Communist Societies

Dissertation/report

All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000-12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, laboratory sessions and workshops. Students are assessed by a variety of methods including unseen examinations, long essays, coursework and the research dissertation.

Detailed module information

See full details of modules for this programme.

Careers

With their specialist knowledge and language skills, SSEES Master's graduates can be found in business, finance, the media, international agencies, charities, diplomacy, international security organisations, the law, and academia.

Employability

Students who have successfully completed this programme have progressed to further academic research on the region, or have obtained employment in such organisations as the European Parliament and the Ministry of Defence, as well as roles in business, think tanks, NGOs, or similar, both in Britain and abroad. Networking is facilitated by two major collaborations led by SSEES: CEELBAS and the International Master's (IMESS). Scholarships, internship opportunities and excellent links with other universities in the region provide further benefits.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL School of Slavonic & East European Studies (SSEES) is one of the world's leading specialist institutions, and the largest national centre in the UK, for the study of central, Eastern and south-east Europe and Russia.

Located on the edge of Bloomsbury, SSEES offers an ideal location for scholars. The British Library, British Museum, University of London Library and other similar research centres are all close by.

The SSEES Library is unequalled in Britain for the depth and breadth of its collections, the majority of which are on open access in the SSEES building.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: SSEES - School of Slavonic & East European Studies

64% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



Read less
How do ideologies form and sustain political identities and interests? What are the main ideologies and political discourses that frame and organise our lives today? How do theories of ideology and discourse inform contemporary political analysis? How can these theories help us to explain and evaluate key political processes?. Read more
How do ideologies form and sustain political identities and interests? What are the main ideologies and political discourses that frame and organise our lives today? How do theories of ideology and discourse inform contemporary political analysis? How can these theories help us to explain and evaluate key political processes?

Questions concerning the impact of ideological and symbolic processes on the formation of political discourses, identities and communities are of crucial importance. All of these are covered within our MA Ideology and Discourse Analysis.

You explore topics including:
-Poststructuralist, post-Marxist and psychoanalytic theories of ideology and discourse
-Research methods in critical political theory and analysis
-Key concepts for political analysis
-Mass media and democracy
-Philosophy of social science

Our Department of Government is one of the most prestigious in Europe, with an outstanding record of teaching, research and publication. We are rated top in the UK for research (REF 2014), and have consistently been the highest-rated politics department in the country since national assessments began. Ranked top 10 in the world for political science and international relations according to the Centre for World University Rankings (2017)

Our expert staff

Some of the biggest names in the field work at Essex, giving you unparalleled access to some of the best minds in politics. Our staff are advising the CIA on counter-terrorism, training politicians and civil servants in democratising countries, and commentating on political events in national and international media.

Our academic staff work on topics ranging from international conflict and violence to British elections, and from the obligations of the younger generation to why authoritarian leaders welcome natural disasters.

You join an active and prolific research team, with the opportunity to work alongside a member of staff on their research instead of completing a dissertation; some of these projects have even resulted in joint staff/student publications.

Specialist facilities

-Laboratories of networked computers featuring extensive software for political analysis
-The ESSEXLab provides opportunities for experimental lab research
-Student societies for politics, debating, and Model UN
-We organise the Essex Summer School in Social Science Data Analysis
-A programme of seminars and events run by the department

Your future

All Essex politics graduates have the distinction of a qualification from one of the world’s leading politics departments.

Our MA Ideology and Discourse Analysis will help you secure a solid grasp of key debates in social and political thought, give you a strong foundation in theoretical principles whose relevance and application goes well beyond politics, and instil a wide range of analytical, critical, and communication skills that will enable you to pursue the career of your choice, whether in the public, private, or third sector, whether with a domestic or international focus.

Recent graduates have gone on to work for the following high-profile organisations:
-The Civil Service
-Local government
-The World Bank
-The United Nations
-NATO
-YouGov and YouGov America

We also offer supervision for PhD and MPhil in the following fields: government; ideology and discourse analysis; international relations; political behaviour; and politics.

Our academic reputation is illustrated by the fact that many of our graduates now teach or research at universities, colleges of higher education and schools. For example, recent graduates are now research fellows and academic staff at: Mannheim, Germany; ETH Zurich, Switzerland; Duke University, USA; NATO/SHAPE, Belgium; and University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.

We also work with the university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-Ideology and Political Discourse
-MA Dissertation
-Research Seminar in Political Theory and Methods
-Advanced Research Methods (optional)
-Comparative European Politics (optional)
-Conflict Resolution (optional)
-Contemporary Theories of Justice (optional)
-International Security Studies (optional)
-Political Economy (optional)
-Political Explanation (optional)
-Political Parties in Britain and Europe (optional)
-Political Theory (optional)
-Public Opinion and Political Behaviour (optional)
-Research Design (optional)
-Theories of International Relations (optional)
-Theory and Explanation in Political Science (optional)
-Environmental Politics (optional)
-Survey Measurement and Question Design

Read less
The Russian Studies MA draws on the unique area studies expertise at the UCL School of Slavonic & East European Studies (SSEES) to offer a choice of modules unparalleled in depth and breadth, ranging from Russia's medieval history to its contemporary politics, from 19th-century literature to 21st-century film. Read more

The Russian Studies MA draws on the unique area studies expertise at the UCL School of Slavonic & East European Studies (SSEES) to offer a choice of modules unparalleled in depth and breadth, ranging from Russia's medieval history to its contemporary politics, from 19th-century literature to 21st-century film.

About this degree

Russian culture is explored from a variety of perspectives. Students specialise in literature and culture, social sciences or history, or combine modules into an interdisciplinary programme. They are encouraged to develop their research skills, and many choose to learn Russian, or improve their command of Russian, through a language course.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one of a choice of three core modules (30 credits), a choice of a Russian language module (30 credits) and/or optional modules (to a total of 90 credits), and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

This is a multidisciplinary programme. Nevertheless, students are required to gain a thorough methodological and theoretical grounding in disciplinary study and hence must choose between one of the following three modules:

  • Literary and Cultural Theory
  • Historical Methods and Approaches
  • Political Analysis AND Political Sociology

Optional modules

90 credits from a range of options, which may include:

  • Advanced Qualitative Methods
  • Contemporary Cultural Studies: Between Post-Communism & Post-Modernism
  • The Reflecting Screen: Russian and Soviet Cinema in its Cultural Context, 1896 to the Present
  • The Nineteenth-Century Russian Novel
  • Beyond Stereotypes: The Jews in Polish Culture
  • Causes, Consequences and Control: Corruption and Governance
  • Linguistic Methods
  • How to Read/Interpret Texts: Introduction to Hermeneutics
  • Informal Practices in Post-Communist Societies
  • Russian Foreign Policy
  • Russian Monarchy: Court Ritual and Political Ideas, 1498-1917
  • Russian Language Module
  • Introduction to Discourse Analysis

Dissertation/report

All MA students undertake an independent research project, which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, workshops, film viewings, tutorials and specialist language courses. Assessment is carried out through unseen examinations, long essays, coursework and the research dissertation.

Detailed module information

See full details of modules for this programme.

Funding

AHRC Scholarships may be available.

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

With their specialist knowledge and language skills, SSEES Master's graduates can be found in business, finance, the media, international agencies, charities, diplomacy, international security organisations, the law, and academia.

Some graduates advise the Russian, Polish, American, and other governments, and the European Commission.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Diplomat/Third Secretary, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of The Kingdom of Thailand
  • Editorial Intern, openDemocracy
  • Marketing Planner, Waterstones
  • Support Officer, Refugee Council
  • Principal Examiner for GCE and GCSE, Pearson-Edexcel

Employability

Russia is one of the most exciting and important countries in the world, and SSEES is the ideal place in which to study it. Students who have successfully completed the programme have progressed to further academic research on the region, or have obtained employment in such organisations as the European Parliament and the Ministry of Defence, as well as roles in business, think tanks, NGOs, or similar, both in Britain and abroad. Networking is facilitated by two major collaborations led by SSEES: CEELBAS and the International Master's (IMESS). Scholarships, internship opportunities and excellent links with other universities in the region provide further benefits.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

SSEES is a world-leading specialist institution, and the largest national centre in the UK, for the study of central, Eastern and south-east Europe and Russia.

Located in Bloomsbury, SSEES offers an ideal location for scholars. The British Library, British Museum, University of London Library and other similar research centres are all close by.

The SSEES Library is unequalled in Britain for the depth and breadth of its collections, the majority of which are on open access in the SSEES building.



Read less
If you’re a native speaker or you have substantial training in Chinese, Japanese or Thai, this programme will prepare you for a career in research with an area specialism. Read more

If you’re a native speaker or you have substantial training in Chinese, Japanese or Thai, this programme will prepare you for a career in research with an area specialism.

Half of the programme will give you a solid foundation in East Asian studies and research methodologies, equipping you with a range of subject knowledge, consolidating your language skills and preparing you to conduct independent, theory-driven research. In the other half, you’ll apply all of this to your own research project comprising 50% of the MRes, supervised by a member/members of the Faculty.

You’ll study in a stimulating research environment with plenty of opportunities to attend research events and conferences, not just within East Asian Studies but also at School and University level.

Our tutors are conducting world-class research in diverse fields across East Asian Studies, and you’ll benefit from teaching that’s informed by their own work. It’s a great opportunity to prepare for a career in academic or professional research.

By choosing to study East Asian Studies at Leeds you will be joining a leading centre for research in the region, with over 50 years of history. In addition to the academic strengths that we have accrued over this time, we have developed an extensive and active international network of alumni. Leeds is also home to very substantial and world-renowned specialist library collections.

Course content

The programme is divided in half, with 50% advanced research training and 50% independent research on a specialist topic of your choice.

Advanced methodological training will cover the key stages of the research process and equip you to conduct independent research informed by a sound theoretical understanding. You’ll also practice skills such as writing abstracts, papers and proposals as well as verbal presentations and group discussions, preparing you to present and share your research.

The remainder of the programme will be spent working with a supervisor in the faculty on your own research project, focusing on a topic that interests you perhaps laying the foundations for future academic research.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Principles and Practices of Research 30 credits
  • Dissertation 90 credits

Optional modules

  • Chinese Politics 15 credits
  • China's Development 15 credits
  • China and the Developing World 15 credits
  • Japan in the Discourse of International Development 15 credits
  • Japan: Politics and International Relations 15 credits
  • Political Economy of the Pacific Rim 15 credits
  • International Politics of the Asia Pacific Region 15 credits
  • Modern Documentary Chinese: Politics and Law 15 credits
  • Post-Cultural Revolution Chinese Literature 15 credits
  • Contemporary Chinese Literature 15 credits
  • Chinese Literature 1912 - 1949 15 credits
  • Japanese 3A: Written Communication Skills 30 credits
  • Advanced Japanese in Context 1: Politics and International Relations 15 credits
  • Advanced Japanese in Context 4: Literature 15 credits
  • Advanced Japanese in Context 5: Japanese Diplomacy and Foreign Policy in Historical Context 15 credits
  • Advanced Japanese in Context 6: Japanese Religion and Culture in Historical Context 15 credits
  • Advanced Japanese in Context: Culture and Identity 15 credits
  • Specialised Readings 15 credits
  • The Rise of China 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read East Asian Studies MRes in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use a range of teaching and learning methods such as lectures and seminars. You’ll be expected to participate fully in these by giving presentations and conducting your own research and reading before taught sessions. Of course, independent research is vital to this programme, allowing you to develop your skills and explore your own ideas and interests.

Assessment

You’ll also experience a range of assessment methods, depending on the taught modules you choose. These may include exams and essays as well as presentations, literature reviews, project work and in-course assessment among others. Language modules may also include different forms of assessment such as translation tests. Your dissertation will be assessed based on the final, submitted piece of work.

Career opportunities

The emphasis on independent research and advanced methodological training on this programme means it offers ideal preparation for PhD study, or professional research roles in government, media, business or the charity and voluntary sectors.

You’ll also gain important skills such as analysis, problem-solving, oral and written communication as well as cultural awareness, all of which are valuable in a wide range of careers in different sectors.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



Read less
Gender, Society and Representation is an inter-faculty programme drawing on the unusual breadth of disciplines for which UCL is renowned, including development studies, law, anthropology, literary scholarship, geography and queer studies. Read more

Gender, Society and Representation is an inter-faculty programme drawing on the unusual breadth of disciplines for which UCL is renowned, including development studies, law, anthropology, literary scholarship, geography and queer studies. UCL offers students an opportunity to develop their own interests within this broad intellectual landscape.

About this degree

Students gain the advanced skills, methods, concepts and theories required for the study of gender in an interdisciplinary context at graduate level. Optional modules offer students a genuine opportunity to develop their own interests in a wide range of disciplines, and the dissertation provides opportunities for independent research.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme offers two pathways: Taught and Research. The taught pathway consists of three core modules (60 credits), optional modules (60 credits), and a dissertation (60 credits). The research pathway consists of three core modules (60 credits), optional modules (30 credits) and a dissertation (90 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma, three core modules (60 credts), two to four optional modules (60 credits), full-time one year, part-time two years, is offered.

Core modules

All three of these modules are compulsory.

  • Gender, Society and Representation
  • Gender, Politics and Feminism
  • Research and Writing Skills

Optional modules

Options may include the following (not all will be available in a given year, and some have prerequisites such as existing studies in the field):

  • Equality, Justice and Difference
  • Critical Introduction to Sexuality Studies
  • Feminism and Philosophy
  • Gender, Race and Sexuality: New Readings in Francophone Literature and Visual Culture
  • Gendering the Study of Politics: Theory and Practice
  • Gender in Policy and Planning
  • Gender and Sexuality in Education
  • Gender, Sexuality and Cultural Politics
  • The Global Politics of Gender and Sexuality
  • Hollywood Genres
  • The Human and Non-Human in Medieval Art
  • Public and Private Modernities
  • Readings in 20th Century Chinese Culture: Family, Childhood, Gender
  • Reproduction, Sex and Sexuality
  • Sex and the Body in Early Modern Europe
  • Sexuality and Society in Russia and Eastern Europe
  • Theories of Childhood and Society
  • Tracing the Body: Technologies of Representation in 18th and 19th Century France
  • Women in the Jewish Tradition
  • Elective modules from the School of Oriental and African Studies

Other UCL Master's modules may be chosen, subject to the convenor's approval, if their relevance to the programme of study is demonstrated.

Dissertation/report

Students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 12,000 words (taught pathway) or 18,000 words (research pathway).

Teaching and learning

Teaching sessions are interactive, with a limited amount of lecturing and an emphasis on student participation and critical discussion. Assessment is through a variety of methods, including essays, coursework, written papers, oral examination and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Gender, Society and Representation MA

Careers

Engaging with gender and sexuality concerns is now an integral aspect of research and planning activities in a wide range of fields. The need to address different forms of discrimination has created a demand in both public and private sectors for highly qualified graduates with a broad theoretical background in gender and sexuality studies, a familiarity with the intersectional nature of inequality, and a commitment to social change. Our graduates have gone on to careers as researchers, administrators and communications officers for charities, cultural institutions, NGOs and the private sector, and in academic research in related disciplines.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Academic Researcher, University of Oxford
  • Front of House and Marketing Manager, Benjamin Franklin House
  • SCITT (School-Centred Initial Teacher Training), Unspecified Secondary School specialising in the Performing Arts, Westminster
  • Events / Programmes Co-ordinator, International Women's Initiative
  • Research Centre Assistant, Overseas Development Institute

Employability

Students graduating from this Master's programme will possess a broad understanding of gender issues in social practice and discourse. They will have demonstrated intellectual flexibility in engaging successfully with a diverse and challenging range of subject areas and disciplinary approaches to gender. They will be able to develop and sustain a convincing argument on a variety of complex subjects, supporting their conclusions with appropriate evidence, clearly expressed. They will have experience in researching a topic from scratch, learning to identify and choose between different routes into exploring that topic and producing a coherent account of their research and findings.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Gender and sexuality studies have expanded rapidly in recent decades, to emerge as dynamic interdisciplinary field of study.

As a multi-faculty institution located in the heart of cosmopolitan London and covering an exceptionally wide range of disciplines, UCL offers an ideal environment for gender studies, enabling students to tailor their degrees according to their specific interests and providing a wealth of opportunities for interdisciplinary work.

Staff contributing to MA level and research work in gender studies are drawn from different faculties including Arts & Humanities, Social & Historical Sciences, Laws, and Life Sciences.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



Read less
This taught programme is organised around aspects of British, American, European, and Eastern Cinemas. You will examine how film texts relate to their historical, social, and cultural contexts through a variety of critical and theoretical approaches. Read more
This taught programme is organised around aspects of British, American, European, and Eastern Cinemas. You will examine how film texts relate to their historical, social, and cultural contexts through a variety of critical and theoretical approaches. These include, for example, aspects that examine the recent re-emergence of aesthetics as an important cinematic discourse, or the implications of 9/11 for film and its audiences.

You will also participate in a Writing for Academic Success module, which will enable you independently to conduct a research project to a publishable standard as part of your MA programme. You will be encouraged to participate in postgraduate conferences and have opportunities to contribute to the University’s seminar programme.

By agreement with your course tutor, it is possible to study a combination of modules from other pathway routes, including Media, Popular Culture, and Conflict Studies and so focus on particular areas relevant to your research interests.
The programme provides the opportunity to engage in cross-disciplinary investigation of various aspects of cinema and moving image culture, drawing on a variety of theoretical perspectives.

It offers opportunities for more specialised study, e.g. European Art Cinema

As well as developing students’ abilities for independent critical thinking, and academic writing, the MA Film Studies at Wolverhampton draws on the research activities of its highly specialised staff who are well established in the field.
Overall, this course therefore engages with contemporary issues and emerging new cinemas as well as established film theory.

It also offers unique training for teachers and lecturers in Film and Media Studies as well as providing opportunities for progression to MPhil/ PhD in Film Studies.

Read less
Gain theoretical and practical insights into law through an interdisciplinary approach to legal theory, systems, policymaking, history, and ethics. Read more
Gain theoretical and practical insights into law through an interdisciplinary approach to legal theory, systems, policymaking, history, and ethics.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

Through the master’s degree in the field of legal studies you gain:
-An understanding of the impact of legal issues on diverse fields and institutions.
-Deeper insight on how concepts of justice have evolved and how the law functions within diverse segments of society.
-Solid grounding in the rhetoric of legal discourse.

PROGRAM OVERVIEW

The degree includes nine courses—at least three taken on campus—and a thesis.

-Get started. You begin with three admission courses from the program curriculum. This is your opportunity to demonstrate your commitment and ability to perform well as a Harvard student
-Apply to the program. While you are completing your third admission course, you submit your application. We have application periods in the fall, spring, and summer.
-Continue your studies, online and on campus. As you progress through the program, you choose from courses offered on campus or online, in the fall, spring, or summer. To fully experience Harvard, you take at least three courses on campus as part of your degree.
-Complete your thesis. Working with a thesis director, you conduct in-depth research on a topic relevant to your work experience or academic interests, producing publishable quality results. You’ll emerge with a solid understanding of how research is executed and communicated.
-Graduate with your Harvard degree. You participate in the annual Harvard Commencement, receiving your Harvard University degree: Master of Liberal Arts (ALM) in extension studies, field: Legal Studies.

COST

Affordability is core to our mission. Our 2016–17 graduate tuition is $2,550 per course; the total tuition cost of earning the graduate degree is approximately $25,500.

FINANCIAL SERVICES

The Student Financial Services staff can assist you in identifying funds that will help you meet the costs of your education. You can find more information here: http://www.extension.harvard.edu/tuition-enrollment/financial-aid

Read less
If you are interested in studying for a research degree in the social sciences, or want to learn about research methods, you may consider our innovative MSc in Social Research Methods, run by the ESRC Doctoral Training Centre. Read more

Course Description

If you are interested in studying for a research degree in the social sciences, or want to learn about research methods, you may consider our innovative MSc in Social Research Methods, run by the ESRC Doctoral Training Centre. If you want to study for a PhD, and are seeking ESRC funding, you will be required to take this or one of our other ESRC-recognised research-training Masters degrees, unless you have already achieved a similar level of research training at a university elsewhere.

At the end of your first year, you graduate with a Masters degree before proceeding to the PhD (this is called 1+3 study).

In the fields of economics, psychology and science, technology and innovation, our specialist Masters degrees are recognised by the ESRC as providing research training suitable for 1+3 study. All other social sciences at Sussex offer research training through the MSc in Social Research Methods. This is for students in the fields of anthropology, contemporary European studies, development studies, education, gender studies, human geography, international
relations, politics, law, migration studies, social work and social care, and sociology.

The degree is designed to provide research training for those intending to move directly to doctoral study. It can also be taken as a standalone one-year degree if you wish to apply advanced research methodologies to an area of academic or policy interest without continuing to a doctorate.

Course Structure

We continue to develop and update our modules for 2016 entry to ensure you have the best student experience. In addition to the course structure below, you may find it helpful to refer to the Modules tab.

During the MSc you study the philosophical underpinnings of research, research design, research ethics, and both quantitative and qualitative methods. You also take a series of options on advanced research methods, which provide the key skills necessary for carrying out doctoral-level research. You also take a research option in your chosen discipline or interdisciplinary area, which comprises independent reading, attendance at research seminars, and regular individual supervisions with a dedicated member of academic faculty.

Autumn term: you take modules in introductory quantitative and qualitative methods, as well as Philosophy of Science and Social Scientific Research Practice or a theoretical core module within your chosen discipline.

Spring term: you take Research Design and Ethics and either three intermediate methods modules or one intermediate methods module and a subject-specific module. Intermediate methods modules include Action Research • Comparative Method • Discourse Analysis • Ethnographic Methods • Evidence for Policy and Practice • Participatory Methods • Policy and Programme Evaluation Research • Researching Childhood and Youth.

Summer term: you take a series of advanced methods options and undertake supervised work on a dissertation focused on research methods. This dissertation can be the full research outline for doctoral study.

Assessment

Taught modules are variously assessed by term papers of 3,000-5,000 words or equivalent coursework portfolios. The research option is assessed by a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Scholarships

The University of Sussex aims to attract the most talented students to postgraduate study and offers one of the most generous scholarship programmes of any UK university. For full details of our scholarships please visit: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/study/money/scholarships/pgt2016/

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X