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The MSc Professional Practice (Learning Disability) is open to all professionals working with people who have a learning disability. Read more
The MSc Professional Practice (Learning Disability) is open to all professionals working with people who have a learning disability. Professionals working with this client group need to keep up-to-date with the latest developments in order to meet the clients’ changing needs.

The aim of this degree is to transform your practice and thus improve the quality of care for service users. Module content and delivery is underpinned by the latest research evidence, which ensures that this award meets the challenges of the demanding and dynamic environments that health and social care practitioners work in today.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/609-msc-professional-practice-learning-disability

What you will study

Modules
Core modules:
- Research methods
- Dissertation

Specialist modules:
There modules relate directly to this degree.

- Autistic Spectrum Disorder
This 20 credit module covers areas such as Introduction to Autistic Spectrum Disorders; autism; Asperger’s syndrome; incidence and prevalence, diagnosis; assessment strategies; related syndromes and conditions; bio-psycho-social factors; diet; pharmacotherapy; environmental considerations; communication methods; TEACCH; therapeutic approaches;

- Contemporary Issues in Learning Disability
This 20 credit module covers areas such as local, national and international policy developments; inter-professional practice; quality of life; frameworks and philosophies of care; anti-discriminatory practice; vulnerability and abuse issues; stake holder involvement; developments in research and service delivery; person centred approaches; developments in technology.

- Advocacy
This 20 credit module covers areas such as – What is Advocacy and the different types of advocacy- independent; self; group; citizen and professional; Legislation and duties; Mental Capacity Act 2005 and consent; the role of the IMCA; DOLS; Human Rights Act 1998 and Equalities Act 2010; Power, Empowerment and Participation; Practical skills – supporting people to self advocate; Communicating concepts; listening, negotiation skills; Developing, marshalling and presenting coherent arguments on behalf of others; Policy and Guidance e.g. POVA; advocacy within the policy process; ethical principles, frameworks and decision making; interagency working, confidentiality and sharing information; thresholds for intervention/referral; creating an advocacy culture.

Learning and teaching methods

To gain the MSc Professional Practice (Learning Disability) degree you will need to study at least 80 credits (including your dissertation of 60 credits) relating to the support and care of people with learning disabilities. This means that you must choose to study at least one of the specialist modules. To graduate from a masters’ degree course you must study a total of 180 credits which must include a 40 credit research module.

These modules run yearly depending on demand and are usually delivered via weekly four-hour sessions throughout the academic year.

Teaching methods include facilitated discussions, seminars, workshops and presentations. You will be required to undertake background reading to develop a broad knowledge base and encouraged to become a critical thinker, enabling you to question theories and develop your own ideas informed by evidence and research.

We offer a range of support services for students with a disability. We encourage you to discuss your individual requirements with an adviser as early as possible when you apply.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

To date, students undertaking this course have normally been qualified nurses. However, other professionals such as psychologists, speech and language therapists, occupational therapists and social workers have undertaken modules. Currently, there are attempts being made to include this pathway or elements of it in the post qualified social work framework and childrens nursing post registration programme. Feedback received from students undertaking modules has so far been very positive especially the use of service users and carers as well as specialist practitioners and leading academics.

Assessment methods

Assessments will take the form of written assignments (one linked to publication).

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This programme will equip you with the skills, knowledge and ability to plan and carry out academic research relevant to disability studies. Read more
This programme will equip you with the skills, knowledge and ability to plan and carry out academic research relevant to disability studies. You will gain a particular awareness and skill set associated with emancipatory and participatory models of research, where disabled people themselves take active roles in the research process. Parts of the programme are delivered by, or co-taught with, people with disabilities, including those with learning difficulties.

You will take core units about research design, quantitative methods and qualitative methods along with students on the MSc in Policy Research and the MSc in Social Work Research, plus an additional core unit about inclusive research with disabled people. The core units are part of the ESRC South West Doctoral Training Centre at Bristol, and as such are a good grounding for those who wish to carry on to a PhD or take up research posts. The optional units will give you a chance to consider research about inclusion for disabled people in relation to international rights, as well as UK structures in society.

Programme structure

Core units
-Philosophy and Research Design in the Social Sciences
-Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods in the Social Sciences
-Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods in the Social Sciences
-Inclusive Research with Disabled People

Optional units
-Global Contexts of Rights and Disability
-Disabled Childhoods
-Health and Social Care Research
-Researching Poverty, Inequality and Social Exclusion

Dissertation
In order to gain an MSc, you will undertake a research dissertation, which is the equivalent of a further three units. Part-time students will normally take two core units and one optional unit in year one, and two core units and one optional unit in year two.

Careers

This programme is primarily about research, which means successful graduates often move on to PhD research. Some graduates are already employed in the disability sector, and use their qualification to progress their career or makes changes in their own organisation. For example, social care managers or self-advocacy group coordinators have gone on to carry out research with the disabled people their organisation works with.

Other graduates gain employment in social and health care, self-advocacy and user-led organisations, education, universities or academic research.

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The MA in Inclusive Special Education has been designed to encourage greater understanding and a critical appreciation of the trends and developments in special educational needs and disability (SEND) provision in our schools. Read more
The MA in Inclusive Special Education has been designed to encourage greater understanding and a critical appreciation of the trends and developments in special educational needs and disability (SEND) provision in our schools.

You will have the opportunity to engage in the conceptual, philosophical and ethical debates relating to the education of children and young people who have a special educational need and/or disability both nationally and globally.

There will be a strong emphasis on promoting equality of opportunity, valuing diversity and social justice.

The Programme will therefore be relevant for educators working in any educational phase and in mainstream, special and specialist setting and has been designed to achieve a close connection between your studies at Masters level and your workplace practice.

Indicative modules
There will be two modules in each academic year and you will be able to begin the dissertation in either Semester 1 which starts in September or in Semester 2 which starts in February. While the course content in each module will cover a range of topics you will be encouraged and supported to develop your research in your specific area of interest in SEND and inclusive practice.

Critical Disability Studies (30 credits)

In this module you will be critically evaluating the discourses and models of disability and inclusive practice through relevant literature and develop insights into the interrelationship between social policy, political frameworks and ideological perspectives on SEND. You will investigate disability rights; equality of opportunity and advocacy in a global and political context, cultural representations of disability; SEN and ethnicity; the impact on families; social exclusion; ethics and disability. You will be encouraged to engage professionally and academically with a review of relevant literature into educational practices for pupils with SEND with the aim of evincing change within your workplace practice.

Communication and Interaction (30 credits)

This module aims to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the range of speech, language and communication needs (SLCN) experienced by children and young people, including; dyslexia, autism; specific learning difficulties, selective mutism; sensory impairments; bilingualism, and pupils with English as an additional language (EAL) and a SEND. You will critically examine the latest research and legislation on the education of children and young people who have a speech, language, communication difficulties and evaluate the range of educational and therapeutic interventions that are currently being used in schools and settings. You will gain knowledge and understanding of the links between research and educational practice by undertaking a case study in your workplace.

Exploring Inclusive Pedagogy (30 credits)

The aim of this module is to critically examine the concepts of inclusion in education and how special educational needs and disability is positioned within different establishments and phases of education. You will debate the social and educational implications for different types of inclusive provision and critically examine policies and practices that promote partnership with families and multiagency collaboration. Other topics will include teachers and TA/LSAs working together; partnership with parents; evaluating educational and therapeutic interventions; personalising learning; equality and diversity; the role of the SENCO; transitions from Early Years through to FE; SEND legislation and the political agenda and inclusive leadership. You will undertake an action research project to inform and change inclusive practices and promote school improvement.

Engaging Learners with Complex Needs (30 credits)

In this module you will develop your knowledge of a range of complex medical, developmental and psychological difficulties and how they affect learning and development. You will critically examine motivational and psychological theories; neuroscience and learning; complex medical needs; multisensory teaching for pupils with complex needs; mental health in children and young people; foetal alcohol spectrum disorder; attachment needs in children and young people; the legal and ethical frameworks for safeguarding children; the role of specialist and alternative provision, and multi-agency collaboration. For the assessment in this module you will critically evaluate teaching and learning strategies and alternative provision that supports pupils’ access to the curriculum through an observational study.

Dissertation (60 credits):

The dissertation represents the culmination of your study for the MA in Inclusive Special Education degree. It is divided into two 30 credit modules (Part 1 and Part 2) that focus on research methods for practitioner inquiry and developing an article for publication.

Part 1 (30 credits): You will design a medium scale enquiry with the intention of understanding and / or intervening to improve inclusive practice for children and young people with a SEND in the workplace on a topic of your choice. You will need to demonstrate a critical awareness of the ethical issues underpinning educational research and clearly justify choices in the research design, methodology and methods to address these issues. You will design, apply and critically evaluate data gathering and analysis methods to investigate a chosen aspect of SEND and/or inclusive practice and interpret your findings to inform the development of practice and the achievement of children and young people with a SEND.

Part 2 (30 credits): You will need to successful complete Part 1 before continuing with Part 2. Part 2 will give you the opportunity to problematise practitioner research within the wider context of educational concerns in the education of children and young people with a SEND, and the application of ideas from literature to school-based inquiry. You will achieve this through a critical review of the research including international research and professional literature around a chosen area of practitioner inquiry to inform your understanding of how to select relevant data and provide justification for the methods used and the implications future action. This will culminate in a greater understanding of the approaches and techniques for writing and disseminating work of publishable quality.

Teaching assessment
The MA in Inclusive Special Education can normally be completed in 3 years on a part-time basis, as follows:Two years (four semesters) with one module per semester, plus a further year (two semesters) for the dissertation.

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Drawing on current research across the social sciences, government guidance, and legislative frameworks, this degree focuses on the issues that are key in facilitating your professional and academic development as a social worker- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-social-work/. Read more
Drawing on current research across the social sciences, government guidance, and legislative frameworks, this degree focuses on the issues that are key in facilitating your professional and academic development as a social worker- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-social-work/

Why study MA Social Work at Goldsmiths?

-This Masters programme is ideal if you are a graduate, with relevant experience, interested in pursuing a professional career in social work

-It prepares you according to the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) Standards of Proficiency – Social Workers in England and the Professional Capabilities Framework (PCF), the Quality Assurance Agency subject benchmark for social work, and the Department of Health's requirements for social work training

-Social work education at Goldsmiths has a long and distinguished record – we house one of the most respected social work units in the UK, and you will be taught by established social work academics and associate lecturers who have considerable research and/or practice experience in their fields

-Our social work programmes are highly regarded by potential employers within London and further afield, and our graduates have an excellent record of securing employment; they've gone on to work in local authority children's services departments, adult services departments, and independent sector and voluntary sector agencies such as the NSPCC, Family Action and Mind, and a recent graduate was named Newly Qualified Social Worker of the Year

-We'll equip you with the knowledge, values and skills you'll need to practise as a reflective and ethical social worker, equipped for the challenges of contemporary social work practice

-You will cover areas of human growth and development; community; needs and services; law and organisational contexts of social work; and research methods. Specific learning will include mental health and disability, and social work processes of assessment, planning, intervention and review

-The Masters includes practice placements in two settings and with different service user groups, so you'll be able to gain invaluable real world experience

-We'll encourage you to think deeply about human rights and social justice, and to embed these values in your practice

-You will develop your skills for reflective and evidence-based practice and will be able to further your research mindedness

This programme is approved by the Health & Care Professions Council.

Excellence in practice and teaching

Goldsmiths has a long tradition of social work education, and our programmes are internationally regarded as excellent in both practice learning and critical studies. They also have a strong focus on anti-discriminatory and anti-oppressive practice.

We have a lively programme of research taking place in areas as diverse as:

-the links between child abuse and domestic violence
-multi-family group work with teenage parents
-service user perspectives and transnational adoption
-mental health social workers' use of mental health laws and coercion
-equality and diversity in social work education
-the effects of political conflict on social work practice and education
-reflective professional social work practice
-evaluative approaches to service provision

Our research informs and underpins our teaching and students are invited to share our interests as well as develop their own through undertaking a small scale research project and developing their research mindedness in a final year extended essay.

Find out more about service user and carer involvement in social work education at Goldsmiths.

South East London Teaching Partnership

The Department of Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies at Goldsmiths has recently entered into a formal Teaching Partnership with the Royal Borough of Greenwich, the London Borough of Southwark and the London Borough of Lewisham for the delivery of social work education at Goldsmiths.

We are one of only four sites across the country to have received government funding to develop and test new and innovative approaches to social work qualifying education, early career training and continuing professional development programmes. As a result, a significant number of social work practitioners, from all levels within these three local authorities, are involved in the MA Social Work programme, delivering or co-delivering lectures, workshops and seminars. This means that there is a very close relationship with practice to ensure that by the end of the programme students are equipped to deliver authoritative, compassionate, social work practice that makes a positive difference to people’s lives.

You will be encouraged to make links between anti-oppressive practice, social work values, the legal framework, theories, methods and skills of intervention and social work practice throughout the course.

Intake

The programme has an intake of around 35-40 students each year. Goldsmiths is committed in its policy and practice to equal treatment of applicants and students irrespective of their race, culture, religion, gender, disability, health, age or sexual orientation. We particularly welcome applications from members of minority groups.

The teaching includes lectures and workshops with the entire student group and small study groups, reflective practice discussion groups and seminars of between 10 and 14 students. A significant proportion of the course takes the form of small study groups and seminars.

The MA is a full-time course. It is not possible to study the course part-time. It is not possible for students to transfer from a social work course at another university onto the second year of the Goldsmiths MA in Social Work course.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact the Admissions Tutor.

Modules & Structure

Successful applicants on the MA in Social Work commit to studying on a full-time taught course over two years. On successful completion you will receive a MA in Social Work which is the professional entry qualification to be a social worker and it enables you to apply for registration as a social worker with the Health and Care Professions Council.

The curriculum aims to provide you with the value, knowledge and skill base for practice and is organised around study units, workshops, lectures/seminar modules, projects and private study. The teaching and learning opportunities centre on the key areas of the social sciences and their application to Social Work practice, as well developing your intellectual capacity, and the skills necessary to get you ready for practice. There is an expectation that you attend at least 85% of all aspects of the programme.

The structured learning includes specific learning in:

human growth and development, mental health and disability
social work theories and methods; assessment, planning, intervention and review
communication skills with children, adults and those with particular communication needs
law, and partnership working across professional disciplines and agencies
social science research methods, including ethical issues
Practice is central to the programme, and there will be practice placements in two settings and with different service user groups (eg child care and mental health). The learning on the programme builds over the two years and prepares you to apply your knowledge to practice situations. We work closely with a range of practice organisations in the Greater London Area. The placements are allocated by our placement tutor and matched with individual profiles. In some instances you may have to travel long distances to your placement organisation. You will need to cover the cost of travel to your placement. You will be expected to work the core hours.

At Goldsmiths we recognise:

the unique contribution that all students bring as individuals to the programme in terms of their personal qualities and life experiences
that professional training builds on the uniqueness of each individual by facilitating the student’s exploration of the values, knowledge base and skills of Social Work practice
that it is the student’s responsibility not only to develop a technical acquaintance with the framework of Social Work practice but also to demonstrate competence through its application in practice
that Social Workers are at the interface of society’s attempts to promote welfare
Social workers have a dual responsibility to act within the state’s welfare framework and also to recognise the pervasive influence of oppression and discrimination at an individual and a structural level in most of the situations in which they work. We will prepare you for this professional responsibility.

Year 1

In year 1 you are introduced to social work as a professional activity and an academic discipline. You consider key concepts such as the nature of need, community, social work services, and the significance of the service user perspective.

You are also provided with an introduction to: life-span development, assessment in social work and a range of social work intervention approaches. Your assessed practice consists of 70 days spent as a social worker; this gives you the chance to develop your communication and social work practice skills with service users, and to work in partnership across professional disciplines and agencies.

Year 2

Year 2 provides you with an overview of the legal and organisational context of social work, and extends your knowledge and skills in one of the two main specialist areas of social work practice: working with children and families, or working with adults in need. You will work in small groups to explore methods of intervention, research and theories which are relevant to a particular area of social work, while another assessed practice element enables you to meet the professional requirements for social work training via 100 days of practice under the guidance of a practice assessor.

You are expected to demonstrate competence across a range of standards and this is formally assessed. The learning on the MA Social Work programme builds over the two years and prepares you to apply that knowledge to practice situations.

Practice placements

You are required to spend 170 days in practice settings.

In Year 1 there is a practice placement lasting 70 days and in Year 2 the practice placement lasts 100 days. These placements are arranged through the allocation system devised by the College. The practice placements will be supported by 30 days for the development of practice skills.

You have an identified Practice Educator for each of the two practice placements. Most of our placements are located in South East London, so if you live elsewhere you will need to travel.

We have partnership agreements with the following organisations for placements in social work:

London Borough of Brent – Childrens Services
London Borough of Brent – Adults Services
Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea – Adults Services
London Borough of Lambeth – Childrens Services
London Borough of Southwark – Childrens Services
London Borough of Southwark – Adults Services
London Borough of Lewisham – Childrens Services
London Borough of Lewisham – Adults Services
London Borough of Croydon – Adults Services
Royal Borough of Greenwich – Childrens Services
Royal Borough of Greenwich – Adults Services
London Borough of Bromley – Childrens Services
London Borough of Bromley – Adults Services
NSPCC (London Region)

We also work with about 20-30 voluntary/private social care agencies each year. Here are some that we've worked with recently:

Equinox Care Mental Health Services
Body and Soul HIV Service
Jamma Umoja Family Assessment Services
Advocacy in Greenwich Learning Disability Service
Lewisham Refugee Network
Turning Point Mental Health Services
Carers Lewisham

Assessment

The programme is assessed by a range of methods including essays, assessed role plays, take home papers, project work, a practice based case study, a final year dissertation, and the production of a practice portfolio for each placement.

Assessment of practice is by reports by your Practice Educator. This includes direct observation of your work with service users as well as your practice portfolio, and a narrative giving an evaluation of your work.

Professional standards

Social work is a regulated profession. From 1 August 2012, the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) took on the regulation of social workers and the regulation of the performance of social work courses. This means that social work students will need to adhere to the standards set out in the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) Guidance on conduct and ethics for students (HCPC 2009), and work towards meeting the HCPC Standards of Proficiency - Social workers in England (HCPC 2012). These are the standards social work students are expected to demonstrate at the end of their last placement/ qualifying level.

Skills

You'll develop the ability to practise social work in a wide variety of settings with different service user groups.

Careers

The programme will enable you to register and practise as a qualified social worker.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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This Masters degree is designed to produce graduates who can take charge of mental health service provision at a global level. The MSc in Global Mental Health is unique to Scotland and one of only two in the UK. Read more
This Masters degree is designed to produce graduates who can take charge of mental health service provision at a global level. The MSc in Global Mental Health is unique to Scotland and one of only two in the UK.

Why this programme

◾You will develop the capacity to think critically about the potential risks of globalising notions of mental illness. You will gain the skills to develop and implement policies aimed at reducing the burden of mental health difficulties worldwide.
◾The MSc Global Mental Health programme will help you develop the knowledge to integrate your initiatives into the wider aims of international development, and address the global inequities in the provision of mental health services.
◾The Global Mental Health MSc can offer two student placements with Compass. We offer an internal selection process whereby students are invited to submit a one page document detailing: ◾What they would hope to gain from a placement with the service
◾Why they are a suitable candidate for the placement

These two parts can each be scored out of 10 by members of the programme team. The top two scoring submissions are then viewed and approved by the clinician at Compass and if deemed appropriate these two applicants are offered the placement opportunites.

◾The learning outcomes (ILOs) for the programme are based on the Grand Challenges in Global Mental Health that were identified in a 2011 issue of Nature.
◾Students will have an opportunity to complete research projects with organisations doing mental health related work both nationally and internationally.
◾The MSc Global Mental Health programme at the University of Glasgow places specific emphasis on the important role that social and cultural factors play in how mental health difficulties can be understood and treated across the globe.
◾Contributors to the MSc Global Mental Health teaching come from a diverse range of disciplines including: clinical psychology, social work, anthropology, sociology, law and psychiatry. Teaching also includes contribution from those with a lived experience of mental health difficulties.
◾The Global Mental Health programme at the University of Glasgow has a formal collaboration with the College of Medicine and Health Sciences at the University of Rwanda. This partnership has fostered a range of research and teaching activities that have been jointly coordinated by staff at the respective universities. It is hoped that this partnership will continue to grow and that MSc Global Mental Health students will avail of opportunities that it provides.
For more information, click the following link: Collaboration with the University of Rwanda

Programme structure

The core teaching is based around lectures. There is a strong emphasis on discussion and debate with your academic staff and fellow students, focusing on relevant research literature and policy documents. The Global Mental Health MSc has expert international contributors who provide lectures, via video linking. These are part of the teaching timetable. Blended learning and peer support learning is promoted in this course.

Core courses
◾Introduction to mental health and disability
◾The global burden of mental health difficulties
◾Cultural, social and biological determinants of mental health
◾Research methods (qualitative, quantitative and health economics)
◾Mental health promotion across the life-span
◾Improving access to mental health care in the global context (online course)
◾Mental health and disability: international law and policy
◾Dissertation.

Career prospects

Graduates of the MSc Global Mental Health programme establish careers in national mental health policy and planning, epidemiological and mental health services research, as well as advisory and advocacy roles in governments, international agencies and non-governmental organisations.

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The Global Mental Health academic programmes are designed to produce graduates who can take charge of mental health service provision at a global level. Read more
The Global Mental Health academic programmes are designed to produce graduates who can take charge of mental health service provision at a global level. The Global Mental Health academic programmes offered by the University of Glasgow are unique to Scotland and are the only online Global Mental Health Postgraduate courses offered anywhere in the world. These online programmes are intended for people who are unable to come to Glasgow to complete on-campus delivery of the programmes.

Why this programme

-You will develop the capacity to think critically about the potential risks of globalising notions of mental illness. You will gain the skills to develop and implement policies aimed at reducing the burden of mental health difficulties worldwide.
-The Global Mental Health academic programmes will help people to develop the knowledge to integrate innovative initiatives related to mental health and wellbeing into the wider aims of international development, and address the global inequities in the provision of mental health services.
-The learning outcomes (ILOs) for the programme are based on the Grand Challenges in Global Mental Health that were identified in a 2011 issue of Nature.
-We have collaborative partnerships with organisations working in low and middle income countries. You will have opportunities to complete placements and projects with them.
-The Global Mental Health academic programmes at the University of Glasgow place specific emphasis on the important role that social and cultural factors play in how mental health difficulties can be understood and treated across the globe.
-Contributors to the Global Mental Health teaching come from a diverse range of disciplines including: clinical psychology, social work, anthropology, sociology, law and psychiatry. Teaching also includes contribution from those with a lived experience of mental health difficulties.
-The Institute of Health and Wellbeing at the University of Glasgow has a formal collaboration with the College of Medicine and Health Sciences at the University of Rwanda. This partnership has fostered a range of research and teaching activities that have been jointly coordinated by staff at the respective universities. It is hoped that this partnership will continue to grow and that Global Mental Health students will avail of opportunities that it provides.

Programme structure

The core teaching is based around lectures. There is a strong emphasis on discussion and debate with your fellow students, focusing on relevant research literature and policy documents.

Year 1 (exit with PgCert Global Mental Health)
-Introduction to mental health and disability
-The global burden of mental health difficulties
-Cultural, social and biological determinants of mental health
-Improving access to mental health care in the global context

Year 2 (exit with PgDip Global Mental Health)
-Research methods (qualitative, quantitative and health economics)
-Mental health promotion across the life-span
-Mental health and disability: international law and policy

Year 3 (exit with MSc Global Mental Health)
-Dissertation

Career prospects

Graduate of the Global Mental Health academic programmes establish careers in national mental health policy and planning, epidemiological and mental health services research, as well as advisory and advocacy roles in governments, international agencies and non-governmental organisations.

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The LLM Gender, Conflict and Human Rights draws on the established research excellence of the Transitional Justice Institute to deliver a world-leading masters programme in the field. Read more
The LLM Gender, Conflict and Human Rights draws on the established research excellence of the Transitional Justice Institute to deliver a world-leading masters programme in the field.

Key benefits

• Opportunity to undertake an LLM programme with a specific focus on gender and transitional justice – the only LLM programme of its type in the UK or Ireland;

• Teaching is delivered by active researchers in the TJI, many of whom have received international recognition for their work;

• Gain unique insights into the differential legal protection of human rights of women and men in transitional contexts, while studying in a society currently in a process of transition;

• Take advantage of the opportunities to specialise in identified areas e.g. human rights, transitional justice, peace and conflict research in divided societies;

• Enhance the skills you need for working with gender and human rights in a range of sectors;

• Internship opportunities with a range of organizations including the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission, Disability Action (Centre on Human Rights), Human Rights Consortium, Law Centre (NI) and Northern Ireland Council for Ethnic Minorities (NICEM), all based in Belfast;

• Extensive events programme (TJI Seminar Series, International Conferences) and distinguished Visiting Scholars programme.

• Excellent library facilities on campus. Students also have sole access to a dedicated LLM computer suite;

• Fully equipped LLM teaching rooms with integrated audio visual and video conferencing facilities.

Visit the website: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/course/llm-gender-conflict-and-human-rights-ft-jn

Course detail

- Description -

This programme has been developed to enable students to:

• Gain a systematic understanding, in-depth knowledge and critical awareness of the differential experiences of women and men of human rights norms and institutions, especially in conflict and post-conflict situations;
• Understand foundational concepts in gender theory and their application to human rights, international law and transitional justice
• Develop skills highly relevant to legal practice, and to gender policy, research and advocacy roles in the voluntary, public and private sectors in the UK, Ireland and beyond;
• Successful completion may also open up further study and research options.

- Work placement / study abroad -

The LLM offers a range of internships with local human rights organisations.

Career options

Previous graduates have gone onto positions in the local human rights sector and public sector in Northern Ireland, to legal practice in areas related to the LLM and to PhD research. Further, previous graduates have secured work in the United Nations and in international non-governmental organisations.

How to apply: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/apply/how-to-apply#pg

Why Choose Ulster University ?

1. Over 92% of our graduates are in work or further study six months after graduation.
2. We are a top UK university for providing courses with a period of work placement.
3. Our teaching and the learning experience we deliver are rated at the highest level by the Quality Assurance Agency.
4. We recruit international students from more than 100 different countries.
5. More than 4,000 students from over 50 countries have successfully completed eLearning courses at Ulster University.

Flexible payment

To help spread the cost of your studies, tuition fees can be paid back in monthly instalments while you learn. If you study for a one-year, full-time master’s, you can pay your fees up-front, in one lump sum, or in either five* or ten* equal monthly payments. If you study for a master’s on a part-time basis (e.g. over three years), you can pay each year’s fees up-front or in five or ten equal monthly payments each year. This flexibility allows you to spread the payment of your fees over each academic year. Find out more by visiting https://www.ulster.ac.uk/apply/fees-and-finance/postgraduate

Scholarships

A comprehensive range of financial scholarships, awards and prizes are available to undergraduate, postgraduate and research students. Scholarships recognise the many ways in which our students are outstanding in their subject. Individuals may be able to apply directly or may automatically be nominated for awards. Visit the website: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/apply/fees-and-finance/scholarships

English Language Tuition

CELT offers courses and consultations in English language and study skills to Ulster University students of all subjects, levels and nationalities. Students and researchers for whom English is an additional language can access free CELT support throughout the academic year: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/international/english-language-support

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This MSc takes a unique cross-disciplinary approach to global health and attracts students from a range of academic and professional backgrounds. Read more
This MSc takes a unique cross-disciplinary approach to global health and attracts students from a range of academic and professional backgrounds. Students can craft a programme of study that suits their interests and which will help them become better global health practitioners wherever they work in the world.

Degree information

The programme challenges students to understand the complex forces that shape health worldwide, by developing their understanding of the principles underlying research, policy and practice in global health, fostering critical thinking, and building transferable skills.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of four core modules (60 credits), four optional modules (60 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits, nine months full-time, two to five years flexible study) is offered. Students take four core modules (60 credits) and four optional modules (60 credits). A Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits, three months full-time, two years' flexible study) is offered. Students take four core modules (60 credits)

Core modules
-Concepts and Controversies in Global Health
-Research Methods and Evidence for Global Health
-Power and Politics in Global Health
-Health Systems in a Global Context

Optional modules - IGH reserves the right not to run modules with less than 10 students registered. Options may include the following:
-Anthropological Perspectives on Global Health
-Conflict, Humanitarianism and Health
-Climate Change and Health
-Disability and Development
-Economic Evaluation in Health Care
-Essentials of International Child Health
-Evaluating Interventions
-Global Health Promotion
-Health Management: Planning and Programme Design
-Infectious Diseases Epidemiology and Global Health Policy
-Key Principles of Health Economics
-Law and Governance of Global Health
-Nutrition and Public Health
-Perinatal Epidemiology and Maternal Health
-Research in Action: the Qualitative Approach
-Collecting and Using Data: Essentials of Quantitative Survey Research
-Social Determinants of Health
-Urban Health

Dissertation/report
All MSc students undertake an individual research project on a topic relevant to future work in global health and development which includes a presentation and culminates in a dissertation of 7,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is taught with an emphasis on collaborative and co-operative learning to ensure that students enter the workforce capable of joining projects and programmes where working in teams is important. Assessment is through written assignments, unseen written examinations, projects, oral presentations, group work, and the written dissertation.

Careers

The programme equips students with the knowledge and transferable skills they will need in their future careers in global health. Career routes include research, programme management, policy advice and advocacy, at national and international levels, and in public, private and not-for-profit sectors.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Research Assistant, University of Oxford
-Research and Policy Assistant, British Medical Association (BMA)
-Director of Citizen Participation, Morelos Ministry of Sustainable Development
-Health Policy Analyst, Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation
-Statistical Information Officer, Cancer Research UK

Employability
This wide-ranging programme strives to create students who will be able to look at health problems from different angles and think analytically and critically – all key transferable skills in the job market. The diversity of approaches to global health taken by the programme helps expand students' employment horizons and options.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL offers a multidisciplinary approach to studying global health. Students work alongside teachers, researchers and other students from a diverse range of disciplines and are taught by experts from several of UCL's faculties. These include health policy specialists, economists, philosophers, lawyers, political scientists, geographers, clinicians, nutritionists, anthropologists, and epidemiologists.

We place particular emphasis on research-based teaching, and our academics use their current research as case studies.

The programme is taught with an emphasis on collaborative and co-operative learning to ensure that students enter the workforce capable of joining projects and programmes where working in teams is important. Assessment is through written assignments, unseen written examinations, projects, oral presentations, group work, and the written dissertation.

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Global Health and Development. tropEd is a route through the Global Health and Development MSc, which combines UCL modules with modules taken at tropEd network institutions in the UK, Europe and around the world. Read more
Global Health and Development: tropEd is a route through the Global Health and Development MSc, which combines UCL modules with modules taken at tropEd network institutions in the UK, Europe and around the world. This route maximises professional and educational networking opportunities and international experiences that enhance employability.

Degree information

The programme challenges students to understand the complex forces that shape health worldwide, by developing their understanding of the principles underlying research, policy and practice in global health, and their ability to critically evaluate the issues that are important for today's developing countries and common to the whole world.

MSc students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core UCL modules (60 credits), optional modules taken at UCL and partner trop-Ed institutions (60 credits), and the research dissertation completed at UCL (60 credits). All UCL taught modules are 15 credits. To gain the tropEd MSc you should take 15 credits (6 ECTS) of optional modules outside UCL in a partner tropEd institution.

UCL core modules
-Concepts and Controversies in Global Health
-Research Methods and Evidence for Global Health
-Power and Politics in Global Health
-Health Systems in a Global Context

Optional modules - IGH reserves the right not to run modules with less than 10 students registered. There are more than 150 modules available that have been approved and accredited by tropEd. UCL module options may include the following:
-Anthropological Perspectives on Global Health
-Climate Change and Health
-Conflict, Humanitarianism and Health
-Collecting and Using Data: Essentials of Quantitative Survey Research
-Disability and Development
-Economic Evaluation in Health Care
-Essentials of International Child Health
-Evaluating Interventions
-Global Health Promotion
-Health Management: Planning and Programme Design
-Infectious Diseases Epidemiology and Global Health Policy
-Key Principles of Health Economics
-Law and Governance of Global Health
-Nutrition and Public Health
-Perinatal Epidemiology and Maternal Health
-Research in Action: The Qualitative Approach

Dissertation/report
All MSc students undertake an individual research project on a topic relevant to future work in global health and development which includes a presentation and culminates in a dissertation of 7,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is taught with an emphasis on collaborative and co-operative learning. This is to ensure that students enter the workforce capable of joining projects and programmes with a supportive network of peers. Assessment is through written assignments, unseen written examinations, projects, oral presentations, group work and the written dissertation.

Careers

The programme equips students with knowledge and transferable skills they will need in their future careers in global health. Career routes include research, programme management, policy advice and advocacy, at national and international levels, and in public, private and not-for-profit sectors.

Employability
This wide-ranging programme strives to create students who will be able to look at health problems from different angles and think analytically and critically – all key transferable skills in the job market. The diversity of approaches to global health taken by this programme helps expand students' employment horizons and options.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Education at the UCL Institute for Global Health is cross-disciplinary, with teaching led by experts drawn from health policy, economics, philosophy, political science, anthropology, epidemiology and medicine.

The tropEd MSc consists of core and optional modules and a dissertation. The tropEd degree allows for optional modules to be selected from tropEd network affiliated institutions around the world that the Global Health and Development MSc does not.

tropEd provides networking opportunities and international experiences which enhance tropEd graduate employability. Mobility across leading international institutions prepares students for effective work in multicultural and multidisciplinary environments. Students also experience diverse learning styles and perspectives on global health problems.

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The programme is delivered by two internationally recognised centres of excellence and provides an integrated, strongly interdisciplinary, education in mental health, ethics and law. Read more
The programme is delivered by two internationally recognised centres of excellence and provides an integrated, strongly interdisciplinary, education in mental health, ethics and law. It will equip students to become leaders in healthcare, mental health law or policy.

Key benefits

- In-depth and integrated clinical, philosophical and legal analysis of key issues presented in the field of mental health.

- Supported by the UK's first centre of medical law and ethics (CMLE) and Europe’s largest centre for research and teaching in psychiatry, psychology and neuroscience (IoPPN).

- Located in central London and maintains close links with national and international policy formers and leading legal and clinical practitioner communities.

- Generous scholarships are available to support the brightest and best students.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/mental-health-ethics-and-law-msc.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

The interface between the law and the mental health disciplines raises fundamental questions concerning our very human nature. Concepts such as autonomy, responsibility, decision making capacity and risk are central and have come under increasing scrutiny in the literature. While each discipline approaches the debate from its own perspective and understanding of the world, increasingly connections have been made and relationships recognised. At a theoretical level this has led to a growing and vibrant literature. At the level of practice the close interaction between law and psychiatry, which had been evident across the centuries, has become increasingly significant and sensitive. In the context of evolving societal attitudes to mental ill health and disability and the expanding influence of international human rights norms the role of the law is becoming both more complex and more contentious.

Building on the experience gained from working across our disciplinary boundaries we have developed a strongly interdisciplinary programme, designed to investigate the interface between mental health, law and ethics at a theoretical level and to engage directly with the dilemmas and experience of illness encountered in practice. The course will expand students’ understanding, both within and beyond their own disciplines, and will provide them with the skills necessary to analyse and critique current law, practice and policy in relation to mental health.

- Course purpose -

A joint programme between The Dickson Poon School of Law and Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience. This integrated MSc is for anyone concerned with mental health who wishes to study the clinical, ethical and legal thinking behind current law, policy and clinical practice. It has been designed for health professionals, lawyers, policy makers, and all those with a relevant first degree who are keen to consider the difficult questions raised by mental ill health and society’s response. Students will be able to study alongside others from a wide range of academic and professional disciplines at the heart of London’s legal and psychiatric world.

- Course format and assessment -

Teaching is predominantly by seminar to encourage active student participation in critical enquiry. Case studies will be held as part of each taught core module.

Full-time students are required to complete the programme over one academic year. Some modules will be assessed by examinations held in January or May of that year, while others will be assessed by coursework. Dissertations are due by late August the same year.

Part-time students are required to complete the programme over two academic years, with dissertations due by late August of the second/final year of study.

Career prospects

Employers value interdisciplinary skills and graduates of MHEL will be able to use the degree for many different career opportunities. These include:

- Leadership roles in relevant policy-related areas including positions in mental health advocacy groups nationally and internationally, professional regulatory organisations and governmental departments in UK and overseas;

- For clinical practitioners, evidence of professional development in order to obtain promotion, or to take their career in a more specialist direction in clinical management, education or research;

- For legal practitioners, opportunities for specialisation in mental health and mental capacity law;

- A stepping stone to a career in clinical psychology or other clinical roles within the NHS or other healthcare settings;

- Possibilities to move into the private sector, into areas such as scientific publishing, human resources, occupational health, management consultancy or roles;

- A stepping stone to purse doctoral-level research (PhD or MD(Res)), including at King's;

- Research students may find academic positions in law schools, health schools and other research centres within a range of humanities departments.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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Taught at our Riverside Campus in Chester, this course fulfills the training requirements of The Special Educational Needs Code of Practice (2015) which envisages that a SENCO will provide leadership and professional guidance to colleagues and will work closely with staff, parents and carers, etc. Read more
Taught at our Riverside Campus in Chester, this course fulfills the training requirements of The Special Educational Needs Code of Practice (2015) which envisages that a SENCO will provide leadership and professional guidance to colleagues and will work closely with staff, parents and carers, etc. It challenges SENCOs to promote person-centred, inclusive, practice in which the interests and needs of pupils with SEN and/or disabilities are at the heart of everything that they do.

Why Study NASENCo with us?

At Chester the NASENCo also forms part of the MA in Special Educational Needs and Disability.

It takes as its ideology the notion that person-centred, inclusive thinking that foregrounds individual interests and needs of children, young people and adults with SEN and/or disabilities is at the heart of all practice. It is based on the premise that parents and carers are equal partners in securing achievement, progress and well-being, and that value-free understanding of social and familial contexts is crucial in responding to a child, young person or vulnerable adult with SEN.

What will I learn?

Learning alongside experts from the field, you will enjoy lively debate and discussions around policy and practice.

The modules of this course cover the impact of statutory regulatory contexts for SEND in relation to the candidates work setting; leadership and management and personal and professional qualities, learner voice and statutory arrangements including advocacy/dispute resolution. These are then evidenced in a portfolio.

How will I be taught?

Teaching approaches are designed to engage you as a self-directed learner, and include lectures, group work, discussion, independent research, personal contextualised reflection, tutorials, and use of the University’s Moodle virtual learning environment.
You will attend two weekends per module on a Friday evening and Saturday. Contact hours are 5-7pm on Fridays and 9.30am-4.30pm on Saturdays. You will also be expected to undertake 184 hours’ non-contact-guided study per module.

How will I be assessed?

Assessment tasks include essays, small-scale practitioner enquiry, analytical case study and a professional portfolio with a critical commentary.

Postgraduate Visit Opportunities

If you are interested in this courses we have a number of opportunities to visit us and our campuses. To find out more about these options and to book a visit, please go to: https://www1.chester.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/postgraduate-visit-opportunities

Request a Prospectus

If you would like to know more about the University please request a prospectus at: http://prospectus.chester.ac.uk/form.php

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