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Masters Degrees (Disability Advocacy)

We have 19 Masters Degrees (Disability Advocacy)

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This programme will equip you with the skills, knowledge and ability to plan and carry out academic research relevant to disability studies. Read more
This programme will equip you with the skills, knowledge and ability to plan and carry out academic research relevant to disability studies. You will gain a particular awareness and skill set associated with emancipatory and participatory models of research, where disabled people themselves take active roles in the research process. Parts of the programme are delivered by, or co-taught with, people with disabilities, including those with learning difficulties.

You will take core units about research design, quantitative methods and qualitative methods along with students on the MSc in Policy Research and the MSc in Social Work Research, plus an additional core unit about inclusive research with disabled people. The core units are part of the ESRC South West Doctoral Training Centre at Bristol, and as such are a good grounding for those who wish to carry on to a PhD or take up research posts. The optional units will give you a chance to consider research about inclusion for disabled people in relation to international rights, as well as UK structures in society.

Programme structure

Core units
-Philosophy and Research Design in the Social Sciences
-Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods in the Social Sciences
-Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods in the Social Sciences
-Inclusive Research with Disabled People

Optional units
-Global Contexts of Rights and Disability
-Disabled Childhoods
-Health and Social Care Research
-Researching Poverty, Inequality and Social Exclusion

Dissertation
In order to gain an MSc, you will undertake a research dissertation, which is the equivalent of a further three units. Part-time students will normally take two core units and one optional unit in year one, and two core units and one optional unit in year two.

Careers

This programme is primarily about research, which means successful graduates often move on to PhD research. Some graduates are already employed in the disability sector, and use their qualification to progress their career or makes changes in their own organisation. For example, social care managers or self-advocacy group coordinators have gone on to carry out research with the disabled people their organisation works with.

Other graduates gain employment in social and health care, self-advocacy and user-led organisations, education, universities or academic research.

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The M.Sc. in Disability Studies provides students with a deep understanding of disability from social, historical, cultural, economic and political perspectives. Read more
The M.Sc. in Disability Studies provides students with a deep understanding of disability from social, historical, cultural, economic and political perspectives. Graduates of the M.Sc. are equipped with the knowledge, analytical skills and perspectives to help translate rights into reality in the field of disability. The programme offers:

Immersion in the policy and practice implications of the critically important United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and related human rights instruments.
Familiarisation with the key global issues in the field of disability.
A thorough grounding in the principles and practice of programme planning and evaluation.
An internship in a cutting edge disability organisation in the public, private, or voluntary sectors.
Access to the unique expertise of the National Institute for Intellectual Disability and the Centre for Deaf Studies, both located in Trinity College Dublin and closely associated with the programme.
Academic interaction with the students of the Certificate in Contemporary Living, the first third level education programme for people with intellectual disabilities in Ireland.
Exposure to teaching from a range of disciplinary perspectives.

The programme aims to prepare graduates for employment or career development in areas such as disability advocacy, quality assurance in disability services, programme planning and evaluation in the field of disability, disability research, and disability policy analysis.

Admission Requirements

The M.Sc. in Disability Studies offers admission to full-time (TRT69) and part-time (TRT79) students. EU and Non-EU applicants are required to hold at least an upper second class honours degree in a relevant area (e.g., Social Sciences, Health Sciences, Humanities, Education, Deaf studies, Law, and Psychology). Applications are taken on a yearly basis from January to July.

The following are required as part of the application:

Application form
Official transcripts
2 reference letters (at least one academic)
Curriculum Vitae
Statement of purpose addressing the following (1,000 words):
Your interest in the MSc in Disability Studies at TCD
A research topic in the area of disability you would like to examine in your dissertation
How the programme best suits your career development
Your preference for elective modules and placement

Successful applicants will be invited for an interview.

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This programme is known for its grounding in a social justice model of inclusive community and educational practice and is relevant for a variety of professionals working in community organisations and schools, and those concerned with disability advocacy and rights. Read more

This programme is known for its grounding in a social justice model of inclusive community and educational practice and is relevant for a variety of professionals working in community organisations and schools, and those concerned with disability advocacy and rights.

Studying the Master of Disability and Inclusion Studies (MDInS) you'll gain a stronger understanding of social life and the differences between us, and challenge current approaches used in the education sector and beyond.

The programmes takes on an interdisciplinary approach which draws from education, psychology and social science.

As a graduate, you'll demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of concepts, issues and debates in the area of disability studies, particularly in your own research. Thinking critically and creatively, you will evaluate current issues, research and advanced scholarship in the field of disability studies and work proactively to develop professional relationships with others in the field.

Complete coursework at a pace that suits you – part-time while you work, or full-time over 18 months.

The Faculty of Education offers a postgraduate study award to associate teachers in recognition of their work in supporting the Faculty’s initial teacher education programmes and students. More information on Associate Teacher Postgraduate Study Award

Course Structure

Students are required to complete 180 points and there are three options regarding how study can be planned.

Required

Research Methods/Research

OR

OR

And at least one from:

Optional

Other papers can be substituted with approval. These may include 15 and 30 point papers from other discipline areas such as Psychology, Sociology/Social Policy, Cultural Geography and Women's Studies. The MDInS Programme Advisor will assist you in developing your programme of study.



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Take your social policy study to the next level. Prepare for a meaningful career with Massey’s MA in social policy. What Is It Like?. Read more

Take your social policy study to the next level

Prepare for a meaningful career with Massey’s MA in social policy.

What Is It Like?

If you are fascinated by how and why power, resources and opportunities are distributed within society, then Massey’s MA Social Policy (MA(SocPol)) is for you.

You will gain an understanding of the political, economic, social and cultural factors that influence the development, implementation and evaluation of social policy in Aotearoa New Zealand.

You will study law, politics, and the roles of central and local government in a democratic society. This will lead to insights into the relationship between the state, political parties, the judiciary, the legal system, and the public in shaping legislation and developing policy.

Careers

Your MA (SocPol) will give you the knowledge and competencies you need in your career as a policy analyst and researcher. You will learn a range of intellectual and practical skills that will stand you in good stead in the job market.

This qualification opens up a world of opportunity to be involved in influencing a broad number of social issue outcomes (e.g healthy housing, youth development, Maori wellbeing, health promotion, gender analysis of policy), not only from a Government-down position, but also from an individual-, community- and society-up perspective.

You will learn to apply your critical social policy analysis skills to a number of decision-making scenarios to result in better social outcomes. This decision-making can take many forms including a policy, a project plan, submission, or even the strategic direction of an organisation.

You could work in areas such as:

  • Research
  • Communications
  • Project management
  • Governance
  • Charitable trusts
  • Social marketing
  • Journalism (critical analysis of social issues)
  • Advocacy
  • Teaching and lecturing
  • Policy analysis - public, private and third sector (NGOs, PPPs, not-for-profit, voluntary and charity organisations)
  • Youth development
  • Community development
  • Politics
  • Government agencies - local, regional and central
  • NGOs - trusts etc (housing, Maori land trusts, health service providers, disability advocacy and support, youth development).


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This refreshed programme explores issues, concepts, and debates in social and public policy research to gain an insight into policy making and its social impacts on individuals and communities. Read more

This refreshed programme explores issues, concepts, and debates in social and public policy research to gain an insight into policy making and its social impacts on individuals and communities.

Core modules will explore social theories, issues and research methods relevant to social policy and welfare. You will also develop core skills in critical policy analysis and policy evaluation. There will be opportunities to study and debate current policy issues, such as work and welfare, child and family policy or the challenges of ageing populations, with a focus on real-life examples.

Supported by our well-known research centres and taught by expert tutors, you’ll tailor the programme to suit your own interests and career aspirations. With a range of optional modules to choose from, you could pursue further advanced research skills or study complementary social topics such as disability studies, gender studies, racism and ethnicity studies, or globalisation.

You’ll gain an insight into some of the most sensitive and complex social issues affecting governments worldwide.

Research insight

You’ll learn in a research-intensive, stimulating environment. As well as the Leeds Social Sciences Institute which fosters collaboration, you’ll benefit from the interdisciplinary expertise hosted by the Centre for Disability Studies, Centre for Ethnicity and Racism Studies, Centre for Interdisciplinary Gender Studies and many others. All of these centres run their own calendars of events such as workshops and seminars.

From the start of the programme you’ll study core modules that introduce you to the social contexts and social problems that challenge policy makers, understanding society and social research. As the course develops you will focus more specifically on the welfare state, the process of social policy formation, and the kinds of evidence on which new policies and programmes are founded, and against which their effectiveness is evaluated.

You’ll gain a thorough understanding of research methods, the theoretical assumptions which underpin them and how these affect the way the findings are interpreted. You’ll also focus on specific examples such as welfare reform or employment activation policies.

With this foundation, you’ll choose from optional modules to specialise in topics that suit you. You could study contemporary social thought to contextualise your work, or look at issues such as labour mobility, care, healthcare, disability or ‘race’ and ethnicity. You could study further data analysis and research methods to prepare for future research.

At the end of the programme, you’ll submit your dissertation – an independent piece of research on a related topic of your choice, which allows you to demonstrate and apply the knowledge and skills you’ve acquired during the year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Dissertation (Social Policy) 60 credits
  • Researching Culture and Society 30 credits
  • Social Policy Analysis 15 credits
  • Policy and Programme Evaluation 15 credits
  • Understanding Society and Culture 30 credits

Optional modules

  • China's Development 15 credits
  • Environmental Assessment 15 credits
  • European Human Rights 15 credits
  • Human Resource Management: An International Perspective 15 credits
  • Managing Change 15 credits
  • Understanding and Managing Effective Groups and Teams 15 credits
  • Social Media Marketing 15 credits
  • Management of Finance for Health 15 credits
  • Policing Post-Conflict Cities 15 credits
  • Development Management Techniques 15 credits
  • 'Race', Identity and Culture in the Black Atlantic 15 credits
  • Disability and Development 15 credits
  • Contested Bodies 15 credits
  • Que(e)rying Sexualities 15 credits
  • Social Policy Debates 15 credits
  • Quantitative Research Methods 15 credits
  • Qualitative Research Methods 15 credits
  • Power, Critique & Global Transformations 15 credits
  • Standards and Tools for Business, Environment and Corporate Social Responsibility 15 credits
  • Climate Change Mitigation 15 credits
  • System Dynamics: Modelling Policy 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Social and Public Policy MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Social and Public Policy MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use a range of teaching and learning methods including presentations, seminars, workshops, tutorials and lectures. Optional modules may also use other methods such as online learning. However, independent study is crucial to this degree – it allows you to prepare for taught sessions, develop your research interests and build a range of skills.

Assessment

Your core modules will be assessed using essays. Optional modules may use other forms of assessment that reflect the diversity of the topics you can study, including presentations, book and literature reviews, research proposals and reports among others.

Career opportunities

You’ll gain a wide range of knowledge and skills throughout this programme, including sophisticated skills in research, communication and analysis that will be useful in a variety of careers.

Social and Public Policy graduates have gone on to a wide range of posts across the third-sector public services, government and business. These have included central and local government departments, community bodies, housing and health organisations, research consultancies and advocacy or campaigning.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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A Master of Science in Developmental Disabilities is designed to prepare researchers, advocates, administrators and policy makers to be leaders in community-based or governmental agencies that address the confluence of issues associated with developmental disabilities throughout the life span. Read more

A Master of Science in Developmental Disabilities is designed to prepare researchers, advocates, administrators and policy makers to be leaders in community-based or governmental agencies that address the confluence of issues associated with developmental disabilities throughout the life span. This degree program's body of knowledge will allow graduates of the M.S. program to pursue doctoral-level training in human services, counseling, and public policy, among others. In addition, this degree will provide professionals from disciplines such as nursing and education with the necessary skills to be effective leaders and advance in the field.

The successful graduate of the M.S. in Developmental Disabilities program is expected to:

  • Apply knowledge of effective administrative and other leadership skills in the field of developmental disabilities through the use of case study analyses, research papers, and in-class assignments.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the different developmental disabilities and the challenges faced by these individuals across the lifespan.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the impact of the family, the educational system, and community services on the successful integration of individuals with developmental disabilities into the community.
  • Apply ethical and legal principles related to working with individuals who have developmental disabilities to real-world cases and settings.
  • Apply knowledge of developmental disabilities, organizational behavior, and strategic planning to the design and/or administration of human services organizations which provide services to individuals and families with developmental disabilities. 
  • Demonstrate research, analytic thinking, and writing skills when creating a program design or evaluation project on a relevant topic in the field.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the impact of health disparities experienced by individuals with developmental disabilities and the implications for healthcare and human services organizations.

This program is designed for individuals seeking a career in or as:

  • Program Director (non-profit)
  • Program Coordination
  • Early Childhood Interventionist
  • Transition Specialist
  • Job Coach
  • Child Life Specialist (with Child Life Specialist concentration)
  • Developmental Specialist
  • Case Manager
  • Vocational Counselor
  • Advocate
  • Behavior Analyst or Assistant Behavior Analyst (with ABA concentration)

Program Format

The master's program is offered entirely online. The online format allows for students to participate in courses from anywhere in the world where Internet access is available. In addition, it allows for the flexibility of completing your master's degree without interrupting your career.

Master's students are provided NSU computer accounts including email and Blackboard, but must obtain their own Internet service providers, use their own computer systems and have a usable web camera. Online students use the web to access course materials, announcements, email, distance library services, subscription library databases, and other information, and for interaction with faculty and fellow students. Online, interactive learning methods are based on the use of Blackboard as a course management system. Online activities facilitate frequent student-to-faculty and student-to-student interaction. They are supported by threaded discussion boards, white boards, chat rooms, email, and multimedia presentations. In addition, Blackboard enables students to submit assignments online in multimedia formats and to receive their professors' reviews of assignments online in the same formats.

Curriculum

Students enrolled in the Masters of Science in Developmental Disabilities are required to complete 18 credit hours of foundational coursework, 9 credit hours in one of the Concentrations, and 3 credit hours of a Developmental Disabilities Master's Research Project.

Foundational coursework:

  • HSDD 5000: Survey of Developmental Disabilities (3 credits)
  • HSDD 5100: Program Design and Evaluation (3 credits)
  • HSDD 5200: Disability and the Family Life Cycle (3 credits)
  • HSDD 5300: Legal and Ethical Issues in Disability (3 credits)
  • HSDD 5400: Healthcare Issues in Developmental Disabilities (3 credits)
  • HSDD 5500: Disability Services Administration (3 credits)
  • HSDD 6000: Developmental Disabilities Masters Project (3 credits)

Concentrations



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This Masters degree is designed to produce graduates who can take charge of mental health service provision at a global level. The MSc in Global Mental Health is unique to Scotland and one of only two in the UK. Read more
This Masters degree is designed to produce graduates who can take charge of mental health service provision at a global level. The MSc in Global Mental Health is unique to Scotland and one of only two in the UK.

Why this programme

◾You will develop the capacity to think critically about the potential risks of globalising notions of mental illness. You will gain the skills to develop and implement policies aimed at reducing the burden of mental health difficulties worldwide.
◾The MSc Global Mental Health programme will help you develop the knowledge to integrate your initiatives into the wider aims of international development, and address the global inequities in the provision of mental health services.
◾The Global Mental Health MSc can offer two student placements with Compass. We offer an internal selection process whereby students are invited to submit a one page document detailing: ◾What they would hope to gain from a placement with the service
◾Why they are a suitable candidate for the placement

These two parts can each be scored out of 10 by members of the programme team. The top two scoring submissions are then viewed and approved by the clinician at Compass and if deemed appropriate these two applicants are offered the placement opportunites.

◾The learning outcomes (ILOs) for the programme are based on the Grand Challenges in Global Mental Health that were identified in a 2011 issue of Nature.
◾Students will have an opportunity to complete research projects with organisations doing mental health related work both nationally and internationally.
◾The MSc Global Mental Health programme at the University of Glasgow places specific emphasis on the important role that social and cultural factors play in how mental health difficulties can be understood and treated across the globe.
◾Contributors to the MSc Global Mental Health teaching come from a diverse range of disciplines including: clinical psychology, social work, anthropology, sociology, law and psychiatry. Teaching also includes contribution from those with a lived experience of mental health difficulties.
◾The Global Mental Health programme at the University of Glasgow has a formal collaboration with the College of Medicine and Health Sciences at the University of Rwanda. This partnership has fostered a range of research and teaching activities that have been jointly coordinated by staff at the respective universities. It is hoped that this partnership will continue to grow and that MSc Global Mental Health students will avail of opportunities that it provides.
For more information, click the following link: Collaboration with the University of Rwanda

Programme structure

The core teaching is based around lectures. There is a strong emphasis on discussion and debate with your academic staff and fellow students, focusing on relevant research literature and policy documents. The Global Mental Health MSc has expert international contributors who provide lectures, via video linking. These are part of the teaching timetable. Blended learning and peer support learning is promoted in this course.

Core courses
◾Introduction to mental health and disability
◾The global burden of mental health difficulties
◾Cultural, social and biological determinants of mental health
◾Research methods (qualitative, quantitative and health economics)
◾Mental health promotion across the life-span
◾Improving access to mental health care in the global context (online course)
◾Mental health and disability: international law and policy
◾Dissertation.

Career prospects

Graduates of the MSc Global Mental Health programme establish careers in national mental health policy and planning, epidemiological and mental health services research, as well as advisory and advocacy roles in governments, international agencies and non-governmental organisations.

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The Global Mental Health academic programmes are designed to produce graduates who can take charge of mental health service provision at a global level. Read more

The Global Mental Health academic programmes are designed to produce graduates who can take charge of mental health service provision at a global level. The Global Mental Health programmes offered by the University of Glasgow are unique to Scotland and are the only online Global Mental Health Postgraduate courses offered anywhere in the world. These online programmes are intended for people who are unable to come to Glasgow to complete on-campus delivery of the programmes.

Why this programme

  • You will develop the capacity to think critically about the potential risks of globalising notions of mental illness. You will gain the skills to develop and implement policies aimed at reducing the burden of mental health difficulties worldwide.
  • The MSc Global Mental Health programme will help you develop the knowledge to integrate your initiatives into the wider aims of international development, and address the global inequities in the provision of mental health services.
  • The learning outcomes (ILOs) for the programme are based on the Grand Challenges in Global Mental Health that were identified in a 2011 issue of Nature.
  • We have collaborative partnerships with organisations working in low and middle income countries. You will have opportunities to complete placements and projects with them.
  • The Global Mental Health academic programmes at the University of Glasgow place specific emphasis on the important role that social and cultural factors play in how mental health difficulties can be understood and treated across the globe.
  • Contributors to the Global Mental Health teaching come from a diverse range of disciplines including: clinical psychology, social work, anthropology, sociology, law and psychiatry. Teaching also includes contribution from those with a lived experience of mental health difficulties.
  • The Institute of Health and Wellbeing at the University of Glasgow has a formal collaboration with the College of Medicine and Health Sciences at the University of Rwanda. This partnership has fostered a range of research and teaching activities that have been jointly coordinated by staff at the respective universities. It is hoped that this partnership will continue to grow and that Global Mental Health students will avail of opportunities that it provides. 

Programme structure

The core teaching is based around lectures. There is a strong emphasis on discussion and debate with your fellow students, focusing on relevant research literature and policy documents.

Global Mental Health courses offered at the University of Glasgow:

Year 1 (exit with PgCert Global Mental Health)

  • Introduction to Mental Health and Disability
  • The Global Burden of Mental Health Difficulties
  • Cultural, Social and Biological Determinants of Mental Health
  • Improving Access to Mental Health Care in the Global Context

Year 2 (exit with PgDip Global Mental Health)

  • Research Methods (qualitative, quantitative and health economics)
  • Mental Health Promotion Across the Life-span
  • Mental Health and Disability: International Law and Policy

Year 3 (exit with MSc Global Mental Health)

  • Dissertation

Please note: the order of the courses above will vary dependent on your start date.

Career prospects

Graduate of the Global Mental Health academic programmes establish careers in national mental health policy and planning, epidemiological and mental health services research, as well as advisory and advocacy roles in governments, international agencies and non-governmental organisations.



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The Durham MSW is a 21 month programme engaging students with the knowledge, skills and values that underpin social work practice with individuals, groups and communities. Read more

The Durham MSW is a 21 month programme engaging students with the knowledge, skills and values that underpin social work practice with individuals, groups and communities. Academic study is complemented by two practice placements with different service user groups. Practice experience of statutory interventions with children and families or ‘vulnerable adults’ is complemented by opportunities for innovative practice in the voluntary and independent sectors in areas such as family justice, homelessness, substance use, domestic violence, sexual exploitation, community interventions and self-advocacy. With strong involvement of service users, carers and practice partners throughout the programme, the MSW provides strong foundations for practice in any field of social work.

Local and global perspectives 

Our approach to social work education reflects the connections between individuals, their families and communities. We offer you a broad foundation for social work practice underpinned by the global definition of social work and emphasise the connections between local and global issues in social work. Shared learning alongside postgraduate students studying International Social Work and Community Development, and Community and Youth Work, provides valuable opportunities for the exchange of ideas and experiences.

Excellent employment prospects  

There is very strong demand for Durham MSW graduates by employers in local authorities and non-government organisations regionally, nationally and internationally. Durham MSW graduates have been able to transfer their registration to other countries including Australia, Canada, Scotland and the USA. 

Course Structure

The MSW is structured around seven modules designed to meet the academic and practice learning requirements for a degree in social work.

Year 1 

  • Social Work in Practice (40 credits): Understanding perspectives of service users and carers; social exclusion; social policy and law for social work 
  • Social Work in Context (40 credits): Human growth and development through the life course, disability and mental health; social work theories and methods; working in organisations
  • Professional and Personal Development (30 credits): Principles, values and ethics; critical thinking and evidence-based practice; skills development; Interprofessional working 
  • Social Work Practice 1 (50 credits): 70-day practice placement in a partner agency.

Year 2

  • Research in Social Work (45 credits): Research and evaluation design and methods; ethical issues in social welfare research; dissertation
  • Advanced Social Work (30 credits): Advanced application of theories and methods; critical analysis of social work policy; protection and empowerment of vulnerable children, young people and adults
  • Social Work Practice 2 (70 credits): 100-day practice placement. 

Course Learning and Teaching

The MSW is full-time, starting in early October and continuing over 21 months. The programme does NOT run to university terms. There are approximately 12 weeks of vacation, including public holidays, during the course of the whole programme. In Year 1 the first four months are spent developing the necessary knowledge and skills to prepare you for your first practice placement of 70 days. In Year 2 you undertake a 100 day placement with a different service user group and in a contrasting setting where you will gain experience of statutory interventions in social work. Practice placements provide the opportunity to develop a range of skills set out in the Professional Capabilities Framework. You also extend your skills in linking theory, policy and practice, and undertake a research dissertation.

Assessment

A range of assessment methods is used including essays, observation studies, project reports, case studies, group and individual presentations. Knowledge and understanding of social work law and policy is assessed in a take away exercise. Before embarking on the first placement, you will undergo a practical assessment of your communication skills in readiness for direct practice. Practice placements are assessed by critically reflective accounts of work with individuals, groups or communities and by your practice educator who provides regular supervision and observes your practice. You are also expected to seek, and reflect on, feedback from service users and professional colleagues. Research in Social Work is assessed through a 10,000 word dissertation.

Practice Placements

Placements normally take place in the north east region and students are required to travel independently to these.



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Summary. The LLM Gender, Conflict and Human Rights draws on the established research excellence of the Transitional Justice Institute to deliver a world-leading masters programme in the field. Read more

Summary

The LLM Gender, Conflict and Human Rights draws on the established research excellence of the Transitional Justice Institute to deliver a world-leading masters programme in the field.

This programme has been developed to enable students to:

  • Gain a systematic understanding, in-depth knowledge and critical awareness of the differential experiences of women and men of human rights norms and institutions, especially in conflict and post-conflict situations;
  • Understand foundational concepts in gender theory and their application to human rights, international law and transitional justice;
  • Gain knowledge and skills in carrying out research projects from design to write-up;
  • Enhance skills in critically appraising published and commissioned research;
  • Develop skills highly relevant to legal practice, and to gender policy, research and advocacy roles in the voluntary, public and private sectors in the UK, Ireland and beyond;
  • Successful completion may also open up a range of further study and research options.

About

The Transitional Justice Institute in Northern Ireland is uniquely placed to deliver an effective and stimulating programme of study in this area. Key highlights of the programme include:

  • Opportunity to undertake an LLM programme with a specific focus on gender and transitional justice – the only LLM programme of its type in the UK or Ireland;
  • Teaching is delivered by active researchers in the TJI, many of whom have received international recognition for their work;
  • Gain unique insights into the differential legal protection of human rights of women and men in transitional contexts, while studying in a society currently in a process of transition;
  • Take advantage of the opportunities to specialise in identified areas e.g. human rights, transitional justice, peace and conflict research in divided societies;
  • Enhance the skills you need for working with gender and human rights in a range of sectors;
  • Internship opportunities with a range of organizations. In previous years students have secured internships with the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission, Disability Action (Centre on Human Rights), Human Rights Consortium, Law Centre (NI) and Northern Ireland Council for Ethnic Minorities (NICEM), all based in Belfast;
  • Extensive events programme (TJI Seminar Series, International Conferences) and distinguished Visiting Scholars programme.
  • Excellent library facilities on campus. Students also have sole access to a dedicated LLM computer suite;
  • Fully equipped LLM teaching rooms with integrated audio visual and video conferencing facilities.

Attendance

Attendance is compulsory for successful completion of the LLM. Modules are delivered through weekly half-day classes or fortnightly full-day classes.

Work placement / study abroad

The Transitional Justice Institute works closely with a range of human rights organisations that regularly offer internship opportunities to our LLM students – including the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission, Human Rights Consortium, Law Centre (NI) and Northern Ireland Council for Ethnic Minorities (NICEM).

Career options

Successful completion of the LLM

Previous graduates have gone onto positions in the local human rights sector and public sector in Northern Ireland, to legal practice in areas related to the LLM and to PhD research. Further, previous graduates have secured work in the United Nations and in international non-governmental organisations.



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This MSc takes a unique cross-disciplinary approach to global health and attracts students from a range of academic and professional backgrounds. Read more

This MSc takes a unique cross-disciplinary approach to global health and attracts students from a range of academic and professional backgrounds. Students can craft a programme of study that suits their interests and which will help them become better global health practitioners wherever they work in the world.

About this degree

The programme challenges students to understand the complex forces that shape health worldwide, by developing their understanding of the principles underlying research, policy and practice in global health, fostering critical thinking, and building transferable skills.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (60 credits), four optional modules (60 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits, nine months full-time, two to five years flexible study) is offered. Students take four core modules (60 credits) and four optional modules (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits, three months full-time, two years' flexible study) is offered. Students take four core modules (60 credits)

Core modules

  • Concepts and Controversies in Global Health
  • Research Methods and Evidence for Global Health
  • Power and Politics in Global Health
  • Health Systems in a Global Context

Optional modules

The Institute for Global Health reserves the right not to run modules with less than 10 students registered. It may not be possible to take your chosen optional module because of timetabling and capacity constraints. If in doubt, consult the programme administrator.

Options may include the following:

  • Anthropological Perspectives on Global Health
  • Conflict, Humanitarianism and Health
  • Climate Change and Health
  • Disability and Development
  • Economic Evaluation in Health Care
  • Essentials of International Child Health
  • Evaluating Interventions
  • Global Health Promotion
  • Health Management: Planning and Programme Design
  • Infectious Diseases Epidemiology and Global Health Policy
  • Key Principles of Health Economics
  • Law and Governance of Global Health
  • Nutrition and Public Health
  • Perinatal Epidemiology and Maternal Health
  • Research in Action: the Qualitative Approach
  • Collecting and Using Data: Essentials of Quantitative Survey Research
  • Social Determinants of Health
  • Urban Health

Dissertation/report

All MSc students undertake an individual research project on a topic relevant to future work in global health and development which includes a presentation and culminates in a dissertation of 7,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is taught with an emphasis on collaborative and co-operative learning to ensure that students enter the workforce capable of joining projects and programmes where working in teams is important. Assessment is through written assignments, unseen written examinations, projects, oral presentations, group work, and the written dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Global Health and Development MSc

Careers

The programme equips students with the knowledge and transferable skills they will need in their future careers in global health. Career routes include research, programme management, policy advice and advocacy, at national and international levels, and in public, private and not-for-profit sectors.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Consultant, United Nations (UN)
  • Health Care Change Manager, Bupa
  • Project Manager, Medecins Sans Frontieres
  • Quality Improvement Officer, Private Sector Health Alliance of Nigeria (PHN)
  • Research Co-ordinator, IHI (Ifakara Health Institute)

Employability

This wide-ranging programme strives to create students who will be able to look at health problems from different angles and think analytically and critically – all key transferable skills in the job market. The diversity of approaches to global health taken by the programme helps expand students' employment horizons and options.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL offers a multidisciplinary approach to studying global health. Students work alongside teachers, researchers and other students from a diverse range of disciplines and are taught by experts from several of UCL's faculties. These may include health policy specialists, economists, philosophers, lawyers, political scientists, geographers, clinicians, nutritionists, anthropologists, and epidemiologists.

We place particular emphasis on research-based teaching, and our academics use their current research as case studies.

The programme is taught with an emphasis on collaborative and co-operative learning to ensure that students enter the workforce capable of joining projects and programmes where working in teams is important. Assessment is through written assignments, unseen written examinations, projects, oral presentations, group work, and the written dissertation. 

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Institute for Global Health

81% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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Global Health and Development. tropEd is a route through the Global Health and Development MSc, which combines UCL modules with modules taken at tropEd network institutions in the UK, Europe and around the world. Read more

Global Health and Development: tropEd is a route through the Global Health and Development MSc, which combines UCL modules with modules taken at tropEd network institutions in the UK, Europe and around the world. This route maximises professional and educational networking opportunities and international experiences that enhance employability.

About this degree

The programme challenges students to understand the complex forces that shape health worldwide, by developing their understanding of the principles underlying research, policy and practice in global health, and their ability to critically evaluate the issues that are important for today's developing countries and common to the whole world.

MSc students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core UCL modules (60 credits), optional modules taken at UCL and partner trop-Ed institutions (60 credits), and the research dissertation completed at UCL (60 credits). All UCL taught modules are 15 credits. To gain the tropEd MSc you should take at least 15 credits of optional modules outside UCL in a partner tropEd institution.

UCL core modules

  • Concepts and Controversies in Global Health
  • Research Methods and Evidence for Global Health
  • Power and Politics in Global Health
  • Health Systems in a Global Context

Optional modules

The Institute for Global Health (IGH) reserves the right not to run modules with less than 10 students registered. It may not be possible to take your chosen optional modules because of timetabling and capacity constraints. If in doubt, consult the programme administrator.

  • There are more than 150 modules available that have been approved and accredited by tropEd.
  • For further details visit: http://www.troped.org
  • UCL optional modules may include the following:
  • Anthropological Perspectives on Global Health
  • Climate Change and Health
  • Conflict, Humanitarianism and Health
  • Collecting and Using Data: Essentials of Quantitative Survey Research
  • Disability and Development
  • Economic Evaluation in Health Care
  • Essentials of International Child Health
  • Evaluating Interventions
  • Global Health Promotion
  • Health Management: Planning and Programme Design
  • Infectious Diseases Epidemiology and Global Health Policy
  • Key Principles of Health Economics
  • Law and Governance of Global Health
  • Nutrition and Public Health
  • Perinatal Epidemiology and Maternal Health
  • Research in Action: The Qualitative Approach
  • Urban Health

Dissertation/report

All MSc students undertake an individual research project on a topic relevant to future work in global health and development which includes a presentation and culminates in a dissertation of 7,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is taught with an emphasis on collaborative and co-operative learning. This is to ensure that students enter the workforce capable of joining projects and programmes with a supportive network of peers. Assessment is through written assignments, unseen written examinations, projects, oral presentations, group work and the written dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Global Health and Development: tropEd programme MSc

Careers

The programme equips students with knowledge and transferable skills they will need in their future careers in global health. Career routes include research, programme management, policy advice and advocacy, at national and international levels, and in public, private and not-for-profit sectors.

Employability

This wide-ranging programme strives to create students who will be able to look at health problems from different angles and think analytically and critically – all key transferable skills in the job market. The diversity of approaches to global health taken by this programme helps expand students' employment horizons and options.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Education at the UCL Institute for Global Health is cross-disciplinary, with teaching led by experts drawn from health policy, economics, philosophy, political science, anthropology, epidemiology and medicine.

The tropEd MSc consists of core and optional modules and a dissertation. The tropEd degree allows for optional modules to be selected from tropEd network affiliated institutions around the world that the Global Health and Development MSc does not.

The tropEd degree provides networking opportunities and international experiences which enhance tropEd graduate employability. Mobility across leading international institutions prepares students for effective work in multicultural and multidisciplinary environments. Students also experience diverse learning styles and perspectives on global health problems.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Institute for Global Health

81% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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The programme is delivered by two internationally recognised centres of excellence and provides an integrated, strongly interdisciplinary, education in mental health, ethics and law. Read more
The programme is delivered by two internationally recognised centres of excellence and provides an integrated, strongly interdisciplinary, education in mental health, ethics and law. It will equip students to become leaders in healthcare, mental health law or policy.

Key benefits

- In-depth and integrated clinical, philosophical and legal analysis of key issues presented in the field of mental health.

- Supported by the UK's first centre of medical law and ethics (CMLE) and Europe’s largest centre for research and teaching in psychiatry, psychology and neuroscience (IoPPN).

- Located in central London and maintains close links with national and international policy formers and leading legal and clinical practitioner communities.

- Generous scholarships are available to support the brightest and best students.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/mental-health-ethics-and-law-msc.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

The interface between the law and the mental health disciplines raises fundamental questions concerning our very human nature. Concepts such as autonomy, responsibility, decision making capacity and risk are central and have come under increasing scrutiny in the literature. While each discipline approaches the debate from its own perspective and understanding of the world, increasingly connections have been made and relationships recognised. At a theoretical level this has led to a growing and vibrant literature. At the level of practice the close interaction between law and psychiatry, which had been evident across the centuries, has become increasingly significant and sensitive. In the context of evolving societal attitudes to mental ill health and disability and the expanding influence of international human rights norms the role of the law is becoming both more complex and more contentious.

Building on the experience gained from working across our disciplinary boundaries we have developed a strongly interdisciplinary programme, designed to investigate the interface between mental health, law and ethics at a theoretical level and to engage directly with the dilemmas and experience of illness encountered in practice. The course will expand students’ understanding, both within and beyond their own disciplines, and will provide them with the skills necessary to analyse and critique current law, practice and policy in relation to mental health.

- Course purpose -

A joint programme between The Dickson Poon School of Law and Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience. This integrated MSc is for anyone concerned with mental health who wishes to study the clinical, ethical and legal thinking behind current law, policy and clinical practice. It has been designed for health professionals, lawyers, policy makers, and all those with a relevant first degree who are keen to consider the difficult questions raised by mental ill health and society’s response. Students will be able to study alongside others from a wide range of academic and professional disciplines at the heart of London’s legal and psychiatric world.

- Course format and assessment -

Teaching is predominantly by seminar to encourage active student participation in critical enquiry. Case studies will be held as part of each taught core module.

Full-time students are required to complete the programme over one academic year. Some modules will be assessed by examinations held in January or May of that year, while others will be assessed by coursework. Dissertations are due by late August the same year.

Part-time students are required to complete the programme over two academic years, with dissertations due by late August of the second/final year of study.

Career prospects

Employers value interdisciplinary skills and graduates of MHEL will be able to use the degree for many different career opportunities. These include:

- Leadership roles in relevant policy-related areas including positions in mental health advocacy groups nationally and internationally, professional regulatory organisations and governmental departments in UK and overseas;

- For clinical practitioners, evidence of professional development in order to obtain promotion, or to take their career in a more specialist direction in clinical management, education or research;

- For legal practitioners, opportunities for specialisation in mental health and mental capacity law;

- A stepping stone to a career in clinical psychology or other clinical roles within the NHS or other healthcare settings;

- Possibilities to move into the private sector, into areas such as scientific publishing, human resources, occupational health, management consultancy or roles;

- A stepping stone to purse doctoral-level research (PhD or MD(Res)), including at King's;

- Research students may find academic positions in law schools, health schools and other research centres within a range of humanities departments.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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Taught at our Riverside Campus in Chester, this course fulfills the training requirements of The Special Educational Needs Code of Practice (2015) which envisages that a SENCO will provide leadership and professional guidance to colleagues and will work closely with staff, parents and carers, etc. Read more
Taught at our Riverside Campus in Chester, this course fulfills the training requirements of The Special Educational Needs Code of Practice (2015) which envisages that a SENCO will provide leadership and professional guidance to colleagues and will work closely with staff, parents and carers, etc. It challenges SENCOs to promote person-centred, inclusive, practice in which the interests and needs of pupils with SEN and/or disabilities are at the heart of everything that they do.

Why Study NASENCo with us?

At Chester the NASENCo also forms part of the MA in Special Educational Needs and Disability.

It takes as its ideology the notion that person-centred, inclusive thinking that foregrounds individual interests and needs of children, young people and adults with SEN and/or disabilities is at the heart of all practice. It is based on the premise that parents and carers are equal partners in securing achievement, progress and well-being, and that value-free understanding of social and familial contexts is crucial in responding to a child, young person or vulnerable adult with SEN.

What will I learn?

Learning alongside experts from the field, you will enjoy lively debate and discussions around policy and practice.

The modules of this course cover the impact of statutory regulatory contexts for SEND in relation to the candidates work setting; leadership and management and personal and professional qualities, learner voice and statutory arrangements including advocacy/dispute resolution. These are then evidenced in a portfolio.

How will I be taught?

Teaching approaches are designed to engage you as a self-directed learner, and include lectures, group work, discussion, independent research, personal contextualised reflection, tutorials, and use of the University’s Moodle virtual learning environment.
You will attend two weekends per module on a Friday evening and Saturday. Contact hours are 5-7pm on Fridays and 9.30am-4.30pm on Saturdays. You will also be expected to undertake 184 hours’ non-contact-guided study per module.

How will I be assessed?

Assessment tasks include essays, small-scale practitioner enquiry, analytical case study and a professional portfolio with a critical commentary.

Postgraduate Visit Opportunities

If you are interested in this courses we have a number of opportunities to visit us and our campuses. To find out more about these options and to book a visit, please go to: https://www1.chester.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/postgraduate-visit-opportunities

Request a Prospectus

If you would like to know more about the University please request a prospectus at: http://prospectus.chester.ac.uk/form.php

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