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Shape the future of adult, child, mental health or learning disability nursing with this new masters which includes registration. Read more
Shape the future of adult, child, mental health or learning disability nursing with this new masters which includes registration.

The Masters in Nursing (MN) enables you to achieve a post-graduate qualification and professional registration. The MN underpins all aspects of nursing practice and leads to eligibility for registration on the Nursing and Midwifery Council professional register in one of the four fields: Adult Health /Child Health /Mental Health /Learning Disability.

It is a full-time, three year, post-graduate degree course which aims to provide you with a range of learning, teaching and assessment experiences that will enable you to become a critically reflective, post-graduate nurse with an in-depth knowledge and understanding of your respective field of nursing.

Throughout this programme you will be in University studying theory (50%) and then have the opportunity to engage in clinical-based learning (50%) in a variety of hospital and community settings within the Lothian and Borders area. Integrated into this programme is the opportunity to engage in voluntary and elective practice placements locally or internationally.

What you'll learn

This new Masters in Nursing with registration is a full-time 3 year programme. It would suite highly motivated graduates who enjoy a challenge and want to shape the future of one of the four fields of nursing: Adult Health, Child Health, Mental Health or Learning Disability.

The Masters in Nursing (MN) enables you to achieve a post-graduate qualification and professional registration. The MN underpins all aspects of nursing practice and leads to eligibility for registration on the Nursing and Midwifery Council professional register in one of the four fields: Adult Health /Child Health /Mental Health /Learning Disability.

It is a full-time, three year, post-graduate degree course which aims to provide you with a range of learning, teaching and assessment experiences that will enable you to become a critically reflective, post-graduate nurse with an in-depth knowledge and understanding of your respective field of nursing.

Throughout this programme you will be in University studying theory (50%) and then have the opportunity to engage in clinical-based learning (50%) in a variety of hospital and community settings within the Lothian and Borders area. Integrated into this programme is the opportunity to engage in voluntary and elective practice placements locally or internationally.


Nurses today need to be able to demonstrate competence in nursing care across the patient’s lifespan. To deliver this, they need to be able to work flexibly, inter-professionally and collaboratively in a dynamic and ever changing health care arena.

Our nursing programme has been written to take account of the key drivers in health care at local, national and international levels and was developed in partnership with our clinical partners, students, service users and carers.

During each year of the programme you will learn alongside colleagues in all fields of nursing, and will work with peers from the MN and the undergraduate nursing programme. The course is designed so that you will acquire in-depth knowledge and understanding which gives you specific skills, knowledge and competences to work within a variety of health-care settings. There is increasing nursing field specialisation as the programme progresses which keeps you abreast of the current developments within your chosen field of nursing. On completion, this course will support you to become a creative, innovated and dynamic nurse with an excellent grounding in nursing theory and practice.

Year 1 lays the foundations about what the role of the nurse is and introduces you to the Nursing and Midwifery code as well as theories and models of nursing and nursing skills. It also focuses on anatomy and physiology, determinants of health across the life span, communication, compassionate care, and ethics and inter-professional working. You will also begin to develop academic and research skills.
Year 2 to builds on the work undertaken previously, but also introduces factors which influence health and well-being such as global and national public health priorities. You will explore the impact of altered health status on the individual and their family/carers over the life span. In addition, you will acquire deeper understanding of inter-professional healthcare delivery which includes looking at aspects of co-production, individuals’ rights and inclusion.

Year 3 builds and consolidates your knowledge within your specific field of nursing. Here you will looks more specifically at complex health care needs, health care delivery, interventions, governance, leadership and decision-making. You will undertake a literature review which provides opportunities to build upon your prior learning and experience in an area of interest to you.

Modules

Theory year 1
• Foundations of health and well-being {Masters} 1A
• Foundations of health and well-being (Bridging) 1B
• Developing Professionalism {Bridging} 2A
• Developing Professionalism {Masters} 2B

Practice learning disability year 1
• Nursing Practice 1
• Nursing Practice 2 (learning disability)

Theory Year 2
• Essential Theory and Skills for learning disability Practice {Masters} 3A
• Essential Theory and Skills for learning disability Practice {Masters} 3B
• Effective Interagency working in healthcare {Masters} 4A
• Effective Interagency working in healthcare {Masters} 4B

Practice year 2
• Nursing Practice 3 (learning disability)
• Nursing Practice 4 (learning disability)

Theory Year 3
• Critical Perspectives of learning disability {Masters} 5A
• Critical Perspectives of learning disability {Masters} 5B
• Effective Leadership in Healthcare {Masters} 6 Dissertation

Practice year 3
• Nursing Practice 5 (learning disability)
• Nursing Practice 6 (learning disability)

Study modules mentioned above are indicative only. Some changes may occur between now and the time that you study.

Careers

Edinburgh Napier University is the largest provider of nursing professionals in Scotland. This new programme has the potential to deliver post-graduate nurses who have excellent career prospects across hospitals and local communities, voluntary organisations and the private sector.

As new registrants you will be taking up leading roles within education, practice and research within the NHS and in the private sector, and will be able to work anywhere within the UK and EU and in some cases even further afield.

How to apply

http://www.napier.ac.uk/study-with-us/postgraduate/how-to-apply

SAAS Funding

Nothing should get in the way of furthering your education. Student Awards Agency Scotland (SAAS) awards funding for postgraduate courses, and could provide the help you need to continue your studies. Find out more: http://www.napier.ac.uk/study-with-us/postgraduate/fees-and-funding/saas-funded-courses

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The Master of Health Science (Developmental Disability) is designed for practitioners from diverse backgrounds in disability services, including medical, nursing, dental, allied health therapies, social work, behavioural science and educational professions to develop specialist knowledge in the field of developmental disability. Read more
The Master of Health Science (Developmental Disability) is designed for practitioners from diverse backgrounds in disability services, including medical, nursing, dental, allied health therapies, social work, behavioural science and educational professions to develop specialist knowledge in the field of developmental disability.

Developmental disability is a diverse group of chronic conditions including intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorders and cerebral palsy. People living with developmental disability, across their lifespan, confront many issues, especially in communication, physical and mental health, learning, family life, social inclusion, sexuality, self-help, and independent living.

Underpinned by theory, scholarship and research, this program looks to expand the knowledge and understanding of the issues faced by people with developmental disability, and enhance the skills of professionals to respond to the challenges faced by the sector.

The Master of Health Science (Developmental Disability) is taught by world-class leaders in the field who are committed to advancing health and social policy and practice solutions to enable affected individuals and their families to participate fully in society.

This program tackles some of the difficult questions in developmental disability, including sexuality, end-of-life issues, and parenting to ensure that people receive the support they need in these crucial aspects of their life that are all too often overlooked.

To ask a question about this course, visit http://sydney.edu.au/internationaloffice/

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The term 'learning disabilities' is used interchangeably with 'intellectual disability' to describe those who have significant problems with learning and who need support with many aspects of life. Read more

Why take this course?

The term 'learning disabilities' is used interchangeably with 'intellectual disability' to describe those who have significant problems with learning and who need support with many aspects of life.

This distance learning course enhances knowledge and skills of graduates and experienced practitioners wishing to develop their understanding of people with learning disabilities.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Be taught by academics who are active researchers in learning disability
Participate in live web-based chat forums, e-conferencing, and individual tutorials, to discuss your work with lecturers and with other students
Tap into the Library’s vast selection of electronic resources or access library facilities and borrow books locally via the SCOLNUL scheme

What opportunities might it lead to?

This course provides an opportunity for those supporting children and adults with intellectual disabilities and their families to enhance their knowledge and skills, and gain an academic qualification.

Module Details

Full-time students will study all 180 Level M credits (i.e. six units) in one full year. Part-time students will normally study three units each year, and will begin to explore potential research ideas and research methodologies in the first year. All units are Level 7, 30 credits, and are core units.

Here are the units you will study (part-time students will study these in the first year):

Critical Disability Studies and Intellectual Disability: The perspective of Critical Disability Studies (CDS) is about how society and its agents respond to the labelled person's circumstances rather than how intellectual disability inhabits the person. This unit will address the relationship between workers and disabled people that CDS might call for. Here disability and intellectual disability in particular will be a standpoint or position from which to view society, in contrast to disability as a categorisation of people.

Autistic Spectrum Conditions: A Critical Approach: this unit aims to provide knowledge about autistic spectrum conditions and promote understanding of the key issues in providing support to people with autistic spectrum conditions and their families.

Quantitative and Qualitative Research Methods: This unit provides an introduction to experimental and survey-based research methods, and quantitative data analysis techniques. It covers qualitative methods for data collection and analysis, as well as to how to write research reports in both traditions.

The following units will be studied in the first year by full-time students and in the second year by part-time students:

Families and Systemic Therapy: This unit aims to provide you with an understanding of families including an appreciation of experiences of families with an intellectually disabled member. It aims to enhance your abilities to support families via theoretically informed, partnership-based empowering practices.

Research Project: The research project requires you to initiate, conduct and report upon an original piece of research. The work is conducted to deadlines agreed with a project supervisor and project must include empirical quantitative or qualitative research – data collection and relevant analysis must be included. Any statistical analysis must be both descriptive (e.g. means, standard deviations and graphs etc.) and inferential (i.e. statistical tests).

Communication and Investigative Interviewing of People with Intellectual Disabilities: This unit aims to promote communication skills and opportunities for people with intellectual disabilities and outline the status of the law concerning vulnerable adults as witnesses/victims. It aims to provide you with the opportunity to examine issues that arise when people with intellectual disabilities are interviewed as witnesses/victims of crime.

Programme Assessment

Despite its distance learning mode, this course is still extremely student focused. You will be given resources, materials, help and guidance to complete your studies to your full ability. Using our virtual learning environment you can participate in group discussions with other students in a friendly yet challenging online class environment. Plus real-time text based 'chat sessions' with lecturers will ensure you receive all the support you need for the topics you study.

You are assessed in a variety of ways to reflect the individual topics, however there are no examinations and all assessment is coursework based. Here’s how we assess your work:

Practice files
Essays
Wikis
Statistical analysis and reports
Literature reviews
A research project

Student Destinations

When embarking on this course, you may benefit from having completed paid or voluntary work with children or adults with intellectual disabilities.

Previous graduates of the course frequently make significant progress in their careers. Some are just in the beginning stages while others move on to senior manager positions and upwards. Past students have also progressed to advanced academic qualifications such as PhDs or professional doctorates.

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Disability Studies is a relatively new but rapidly growing academic discipline, as illustrated by the international proliferation of courses, events, networks, journals, book series, monographs, edited collections, and so on. Read more
Disability Studies is a relatively new but rapidly growing academic discipline, as illustrated by the international proliferation of courses, events, networks, journals, book series, monographs, edited collections, and so on. Though drawing on this progress substantially, the Disability Studies MA differs from similar programmes insofar as it places particular emphasis on cultural issues. We are not only interested in the policies, prejudices, and professions around disability but also its representation in literature, media, film, art and so on. Liverpool Hope University is particularly well suited as a host for this programme on many counts. Most obviously, and indeed most importantly, we have a wealth of specialist staff and resources. We have a number of experts in Disability Studies, award winning tutors, and internationally recognised scholars and researchers. What is more, the regional, national, and international profile of the programme is enhanced greatly by the Centre for Culture & Disability Studies–and, by extension, the Journal of Literary & Cultural Disability Studies, the Literary Disability Studies book series, the on-going seminar series, and the International Network of Literary & Cultural Disability Scholars–that is housed at the Graduate School in the Faculty of Education, Liverpool Hope University.

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MA Education Special Educational Needs and Disability (SEND) is a professional and academic degree that provides an in-depth understanding of inclusive practice in education across the age range (in keeping with the 0-25 framework in the Children and Families Act 2014). Read more
MA Education Special Educational Needs and Disability (SEND) is a professional and academic degree that provides an in-depth understanding of inclusive practice in education across the age range (in keeping with the 0-25 framework in the Children and Families Act 2014). The degree is relevant from early years to post-compulsory education in a wide variety of settings. The diverse requirements of learners identified with SEND and best practice to support inclusive learning and achievement will be explored. You'll be encouraged to critically engage with relevant theory and legislation contextualised and applied in practice. The course is informed by the experiences of disabled people and based on the principles on 'nothing about us without us'.

The theoretical aspects of the programme will deepen your understanding of the application of theory to practice, the legislative context and inclusive learning.

You'll develop a particular strand of interest into the dissertation and have opportunities to disseminate your findings to the work place and throughout the course. The Centre for Educational Research has a number of ongoing disability focused research projects and hosts the Disability Equality Research Network (DERN). This provides a vibrant supportive environment for your research and ensures that course content is always research-informed.

The programme will take place at LSBU (K2 Building) or in Special Educational Needs partners' schools and be delivered by academics and experts from the Special Educational Needs sector.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/ma-education-special-educational-needs-and-disability

National Award for SEN Co-ordinator

You can also choose to take the recognised award of 'National Award for SEN Co-ordination' or options that will further deepen your understanding of SEND.

Modules

- Leadership and management for SENCOs and Disability Services Managers(NCTL National SENCO qualification)
- Teaching and learning (SEND /Autism)
- Researching special education
- Dissertation

Plus two options from the following optional modules:
- Equality and achievement
- Equality, inclusion and citizenship
- Special Educational Needs and Disability (SEND)
- Leadership and Management for SENCOs

All modules are assessed by a mix of assignments, presentations, research projects and portfolio development.

Employability

This programme will contribute to your employability and the National SENco award may be a requirement of your workplace.

Students wishing to achieve promotion or develop a career in education benefit from having a higher degree. Progression from the MA to the EdD further enhances employability and promotion prospects, particularly in academia and research. CVs are improved by having publications in refereed journals and this is encouraged and supported on the MA as well as the Doctorate in Education.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Professional links

The department has wide professional links within and beyond the university and the UK. Examples include:
- The Equality Challenge Unit
- The Alliance for Inclusive Education
- Equality and Diversity Forum Research Network
- The Leadership Foundation
- Research Autism
- Theorising Autism Project
- Teacher Education for Equality and Sustainability Network (TEESNet)
- National Association of Disability Practitioners
- Commonworks (for a just and sustainable world)

Recent guest lectures have been given by disabled academics and parents of pupils who have experienced special education.

Placements

Access to the workplace (including voluntary work) is essential for most of the modules within the MA.

Teaching and learning

You'll be taught by Dr Nicola Martin who has substantial experience in the field of autism including working with Professor Baron-Cohen on the Cambridge University Autism Project. She was also formerly director of the Autism Centre at Sheffield Hallam University. Dr Martin is currently a lecturer at LSBU and is a Principal Investigator for Research Autism.

You'll also be taught by Gianna Knowles who has considerable experience of working with school staff to develop their Special Educational Needs Departments. Gianna has published a range of academic textbooks that support staff development in this area.

You'll benefit from an up to date Virtual Learning Environment via Moodle and be actively encouraged to make use of the extensive range of support services across the university. You'll have access to a supervisor during the dissertation phase.

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The MSc Professional Practice (Learning Disability) is open to all professionals working with people who have a learning disability. Read more
The MSc Professional Practice (Learning Disability) is open to all professionals working with people who have a learning disability. Professionals working with this client group need to keep up-to-date with the latest developments in order to meet the clients’ changing needs.

The aim of this degree is to transform your practice and thus improve the quality of care for service users. Module content and delivery is underpinned by the latest research evidence, which ensures that this award meets the challenges of the demanding and dynamic environments that health and social care practitioners work in today.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/609-msc-professional-practice-learning-disability

What you will study

Modules
Core modules:
- Research methods
- Dissertation

Specialist modules:
There modules relate directly to this degree.

- Autistic Spectrum Disorder
This 20 credit module covers areas such as Introduction to Autistic Spectrum Disorders; autism; Asperger’s syndrome; incidence and prevalence, diagnosis; assessment strategies; related syndromes and conditions; bio-psycho-social factors; diet; pharmacotherapy; environmental considerations; communication methods; TEACCH; therapeutic approaches;

- Contemporary Issues in Learning Disability
This 20 credit module covers areas such as local, national and international policy developments; inter-professional practice; quality of life; frameworks and philosophies of care; anti-discriminatory practice; vulnerability and abuse issues; stake holder involvement; developments in research and service delivery; person centred approaches; developments in technology.

- Advocacy
This 20 credit module covers areas such as – What is Advocacy and the different types of advocacy- independent; self; group; citizen and professional; Legislation and duties; Mental Capacity Act 2005 and consent; the role of the IMCA; DOLS; Human Rights Act 1998 and Equalities Act 2010; Power, Empowerment and Participation; Practical skills – supporting people to self advocate; Communicating concepts; listening, negotiation skills; Developing, marshalling and presenting coherent arguments on behalf of others; Policy and Guidance e.g. POVA; advocacy within the policy process; ethical principles, frameworks and decision making; interagency working, confidentiality and sharing information; thresholds for intervention/referral; creating an advocacy culture.

Learning and teaching methods

To gain the MSc Professional Practice (Learning Disability) degree you will need to study at least 80 credits (including your dissertation of 60 credits) relating to the support and care of people with learning disabilities. This means that you must choose to study at least one of the specialist modules. To graduate from a masters’ degree course you must study a total of 180 credits which must include a 40 credit research module.

These modules run yearly depending on demand and are usually delivered via weekly four-hour sessions throughout the academic year.

Teaching methods include facilitated discussions, seminars, workshops and presentations. You will be required to undertake background reading to develop a broad knowledge base and encouraged to become a critical thinker, enabling you to question theories and develop your own ideas informed by evidence and research.

We offer a range of support services for students with a disability. We encourage you to discuss your individual requirements with an adviser as early as possible when you apply.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

To date, students undertaking this course have normally been qualified nurses. However, other professionals such as psychologists, speech and language therapists, occupational therapists and social workers have undertaken modules. Currently, there are attempts being made to include this pathway or elements of it in the post qualified social work framework and childrens nursing post registration programme. Feedback received from students undertaking modules has so far been very positive especially the use of service users and carers as well as specialist practitioners and leading academics.

Assessment methods

Assessments will take the form of written assignments (one linked to publication).

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This exciting programme explores disability as an equal opportunities issue by focusing on contemporary organisations and institutionalised practice. Read more
This exciting programme explores disability as an equal opportunities issue by focusing on contemporary organisations and institutionalised practice.

If you’re a service provider, practitioner or policy maker who wants to bring theory and practice together, or you’re planning a career in the field of disability, you’ll explore a range of disability-related issues from theoretical and practical perspectives.

Core modules focus on social policy for disabled people in education, benefits, housing, transport, employment, health and social support services, as well as recent developments in social research on disability. You’ll also choose from optional modules to focus on the topics that best suit your own interests or career plans, from care to disability and development via research training or race and ethnicity studies.

Supported by our Centre for Disability Studies, you’ll learn in a stimulating environment where tutors’ teaching is informed by their own cutting-edge research.

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Taught at our Riverside Campus in Chester, our MA in Special Educational Needs and Disability will provide you with the knowledge, skills and understanding needed to become an advanced practitioner and leader in your setting. Read more
Taught at our Riverside Campus in Chester, our MA in Special Educational Needs and Disability will provide you with the knowledge, skills and understanding needed to become an advanced practitioner and leader in your setting.

The MA in Special Educational Needs and Disability is a postgraduate course designed in response to a changing agenda for special education. It aims to provide you with the knowledge, skills and understanding needed to become an advanced practitioner and leader in your setting.

You can receive credit on the Special Educational Needs and Disability course at three different levels.

You may wish to undertake a Postgraduate Certificate in Special Educational Needs and Disability. The Postgraduate Certificate comprises three specialist special educational needs (SEN) modules from the course (60 credits). If you wish to undertake a Postgraduate Diploma, you can then add three more specialist modules from the SEN options, including Autism, Dyslexia or Dyscalculia (another 60 credits). Your final 60 credits would then be your Dissertation based around a topic within SEN. Successful completion of all of these would then give you a full MA in SEN.

The MA takes as its ideology the notion that person-centred, inclusive thinking that foregrounds individual interests and needs of children, young people and adults with SEN and/or disabilities is at the heart of all practice. It is based on the premise that parents and carers are equal partners in securing achievement, progress and well-being, and that value-free understanding of social and familial contexts is crucial in responding to a child, young person or vulnerable adult.

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The MSc in Intellectual & Developmental Disabilities offers a contemporary programme of study for a range of professionals/practitioners/ carers working in the field of intellectual and developmental disabilities. Read more
The MSc in Intellectual & Developmental Disabilities offers a contemporary programme of study for a range of professionals/practitioners/ carers working in the field of intellectual and developmental disabilities. The MSc in Intellectual & Developmental Disabilities programme is a direct response to recent public interest and government agenda of reducing premature death, improving care & treatment and enhancing the health and wellbeing of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

The course is typically expected to take between 2 and 6 years to complete.

This MSc programme is part of an overarching Wellbeing Framework at the University of Hertfordshire. It includes 4 discipline specific programmes to suit those working in:
-Social Practice and Wellbeing
-Mental Health and Wellbeing
-Children and Young People’s Wellbeing
-Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

The inclusion of MSc in Intellectual & Developmental Disabilities within the overarching MSc Wellbeing Framework addresses the need to offer postgraduate development that reflects contemporary workforce requirements in terms of integrated/transdisciplinary working arrangements. This is in line with changing workforce needs to provide a clear pathway for postgraduate development and It recognises our unique position in responding to emergent collaborative working practices across health, social care, private, voluntary and independent boundaries. This innovative framework has been co-produced with key stakeholders and service users with lived experience and reflects the emerging impetus for collaboration in both design and delivery of the programme.

Why choose this course?

-The MSc framework structure will provide opportunities for all course participants to undergo a collaborative/multi-professional/Integrated learning experience
-Listening to the voice of service users and their families will be a key feature of the programme. This will include the co-production and delivery of teaching and learning experiences with service users, families, professionals and carers
-The programme fully intends to promote wider participation of applicants irrespective of their age, gender, race, disability and professional background
-Co-production and service user voice are foundation principles of this programme. Education has an intrinsic part to play in wellbeing generally but education for those involved in services as recipients or providers has never been more important as the academic and practice discourse about achieving better outcomes recognises the need for truly integrated working and service user centred care at all levels of engagement

Careers

This programme is intended to enhance the knowledge, skills and attributes of course participants to embark on careers in the following areas of practice:
-Advanced nurse practitioner in integrated community learning disability teams
-Senior social work practitioner in integrated community learning disability teams
-Senior practitioner in transition teams for people with IDD and Children &Adolescent Mental health Services
-Managers in the NHS, social services and PVI organisations that provides a service to people with IDD
-Lead practitioners in public and private services
-Special needs education teachers
-Approved Mental Health PractitionersTrainer/Academic in education and training organisations
-Commissioning bodies

Teaching methods

In response to stakeholder feedback there is an emphasis on blended learning in the programme. Scheduled online learning will be incorporated into all the core framework modules. There will be extensive use of cross discipline action learning sets in class and outside of class. The flipped classroom approach will be key to preparation for many of the sessions in order to facilitate full and active classroom participation that deepens and expands learning.

Structure

Modules
-Applied Health and Social Care Law
-Autistic Spectrum Conditions
-Best Interests Assessor
-Concepts and Theories of Wellbeing
-Dissertation
-End of Life Care for Service Users with Learning Disabilities
-Integrated Working for Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
-Integrating Research with Professional Practice
-Psychopharmacology and Medicines Management
-Safeguarding : Working with Risk and Opportunity

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The MA Disability Studies programme is designed for practising teachers, educators and others with a personal or professional interest in the field of education. Read more
The MA Disability Studies programme is designed for practising teachers, educators and others with a personal or professional interest in the field of education. The programme aims to provide opportunities for engagement with the key theories, concepts and ideas in education.

This programme is part of the ‘Interdisciplinary Studies in Education’ suite of research-informed Masters provision. It offers each student a choice of awards that means they can tailor the available provision to their own research interests.

By studying at Liverpool Hope University, you will be joining an academic community with a strong record in educational research. You will study in a supportive learning environment and be encouraged to develop your own research profile.

Our Disability Studies block must be combined with one of the following blocks:

Developmental Psychology
Early Childhood
Education Leadership and Management
Education Policy, Pratice and the Professional
International Education *subject to availability
Pedagogy (part-time only)
Religious Education

* Please note, Special Educational Needs is not available as an option to study with Disability Studies

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This programme will equip you with the skills, knowledge and ability to plan and carry out academic research relevant to disability studies. Read more
This programme will equip you with the skills, knowledge and ability to plan and carry out academic research relevant to disability studies. You will gain a particular awareness and skill set associated with emancipatory and participatory models of research, where disabled people themselves take active roles in the research process. Parts of the programme are delivered by, or co-taught with, people with disabilities, including those with learning difficulties.

You will take core units about research design, quantitative methods and qualitative methods along with students on the MSc in Policy Research and the MSc in Social Work Research, plus an additional core unit about inclusive research with disabled people. The core units are part of the ESRC South West Doctoral Training Centre at Bristol, and as such are a good grounding for those who wish to carry on to a PhD or take up research posts. The optional units will give you a chance to consider research about inclusion for disabled people in relation to international rights, as well as UK structures in society.

Programme structure

Core units
-Philosophy and Research Design in the Social Sciences
-Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods in the Social Sciences
-Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods in the Social Sciences
-Inclusive Research with Disabled People

Optional units
-Global Contexts of Rights and Disability
-Disabled Childhoods
-Health and Social Care Research
-Researching Poverty, Inequality and Social Exclusion

Dissertation
In order to gain an MSc, you will undertake a research dissertation, which is the equivalent of a further three units. Part-time students will normally take two core units and one optional unit in year one, and two core units and one optional unit in year two.

Careers

This programme is primarily about research, which means successful graduates often move on to PhD research. Some graduates are already employed in the disability sector, and use their qualification to progress their career or makes changes in their own organisation. For example, social care managers or self-advocacy group coordinators have gone on to carry out research with the disabled people their organisation works with.

Other graduates gain employment in social and health care, self-advocacy and user-led organisations, education, universities or academic research.

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The MA in Inclusive Special Education has been designed to encourage greater understanding and a critical appreciation of the trends and developments in special educational needs and disability (SEND) provision in our schools. Read more
The MA in Inclusive Special Education has been designed to encourage greater understanding and a critical appreciation of the trends and developments in special educational needs and disability (SEND) provision in our schools.

You will have the opportunity to engage in the conceptual, philosophical and ethical debates relating to the education of children and young people who have a special educational need and/or disability both nationally and globally.

There will be a strong emphasis on promoting equality of opportunity, valuing diversity and social justice.

The Programme will therefore be relevant for educators working in any educational phase and in mainstream, special and specialist setting and has been designed to achieve a close connection between your studies at Masters level and your workplace practice.

Indicative modules
There will be two modules in each academic year and you will be able to begin the dissertation in either Semester 1 which starts in September or in Semester 2 which starts in February. While the course content in each module will cover a range of topics you will be encouraged and supported to develop your research in your specific area of interest in SEND and inclusive practice.

Critical Disability Studies (30 credits)

In this module you will be critically evaluating the discourses and models of disability and inclusive practice through relevant literature and develop insights into the interrelationship between social policy, political frameworks and ideological perspectives on SEND. You will investigate disability rights; equality of opportunity and advocacy in a global and political context, cultural representations of disability; SEN and ethnicity; the impact on families; social exclusion; ethics and disability. You will be encouraged to engage professionally and academically with a review of relevant literature into educational practices for pupils with SEND with the aim of evincing change within your workplace practice.

Communication and Interaction (30 credits)

This module aims to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the range of speech, language and communication needs (SLCN) experienced by children and young people, including; dyslexia, autism; specific learning difficulties, selective mutism; sensory impairments; bilingualism, and pupils with English as an additional language (EAL) and a SEND. You will critically examine the latest research and legislation on the education of children and young people who have a speech, language, communication difficulties and evaluate the range of educational and therapeutic interventions that are currently being used in schools and settings. You will gain knowledge and understanding of the links between research and educational practice by undertaking a case study in your workplace.

Exploring Inclusive Pedagogy (30 credits)

The aim of this module is to critically examine the concepts of inclusion in education and how special educational needs and disability is positioned within different establishments and phases of education. You will debate the social and educational implications for different types of inclusive provision and critically examine policies and practices that promote partnership with families and multiagency collaboration. Other topics will include teachers and TA/LSAs working together; partnership with parents; evaluating educational and therapeutic interventions; personalising learning; equality and diversity; the role of the SENCO; transitions from Early Years through to FE; SEND legislation and the political agenda and inclusive leadership. You will undertake an action research project to inform and change inclusive practices and promote school improvement.

Engaging Learners with Complex Needs (30 credits)

In this module you will develop your knowledge of a range of complex medical, developmental and psychological difficulties and how they affect learning and development. You will critically examine motivational and psychological theories; neuroscience and learning; complex medical needs; multisensory teaching for pupils with complex needs; mental health in children and young people; foetal alcohol spectrum disorder; attachment needs in children and young people; the legal and ethical frameworks for safeguarding children; the role of specialist and alternative provision, and multi-agency collaboration. For the assessment in this module you will critically evaluate teaching and learning strategies and alternative provision that supports pupils’ access to the curriculum through an observational study.

Dissertation (60 credits):

The dissertation represents the culmination of your study for the MA in Inclusive Special Education degree. It is divided into two 30 credit modules (Part 1 and Part 2) that focus on research methods for practitioner inquiry and developing an article for publication.

Part 1 (30 credits): You will design a medium scale enquiry with the intention of understanding and / or intervening to improve inclusive practice for children and young people with a SEND in the workplace on a topic of your choice. You will need to demonstrate a critical awareness of the ethical issues underpinning educational research and clearly justify choices in the research design, methodology and methods to address these issues. You will design, apply and critically evaluate data gathering and analysis methods to investigate a chosen aspect of SEND and/or inclusive practice and interpret your findings to inform the development of practice and the achievement of children and young people with a SEND.

Part 2 (30 credits): You will need to successful complete Part 1 before continuing with Part 2. Part 2 will give you the opportunity to problematise practitioner research within the wider context of educational concerns in the education of children and young people with a SEND, and the application of ideas from literature to school-based inquiry. You will achieve this through a critical review of the research including international research and professional literature around a chosen area of practitioner inquiry to inform your understanding of how to select relevant data and provide justification for the methods used and the implications future action. This will culminate in a greater understanding of the approaches and techniques for writing and disseminating work of publishable quality.

Teaching assessment
The MA in Inclusive Special Education can normally be completed in 3 years on a part-time basis, as follows:Two years (four semesters) with one module per semester, plus a further year (two semesters) for the dissertation.

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This course will be of interest to those working in FE, HE and Adult contexts, including those supporting young people and adults in transition to independent living or employment. Read more
This course will be of interest to those working in FE, HE and Adult contexts, including those supporting young people and adults in transition to independent living or employment.

The Postgraduate Certificate in Special Educational Needs and Disability in Further and Higher Education will be of interest to those working in FE, HE and Adult contexts, including those supporting young people and adults in transition to independent living or employment.

Our course will enable you to promote person-centred, inclusive practice that is in the interests of, and fulfils the needs of, young people and adults with special educational needs (SEN) and/or disabilities.

The course aims to build on your significant experience and expertise by encouraging you to use the essential skills of critical analysis and reflection.

Delivery will take place on our Riverside Campus in Chester, which has its own learning resources. The course can also be taught in schools and settings.

Learning alongside experts from the field through a range of learning and teaching experiences, you will enjoy lively debate and discussions around policy and practice.

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The Centre offers excellent opportunities for full or part-time research in intellectual disability and community care leading to higher degrees. Read more
The Centre offers excellent opportunities for full or part-time research in intellectual disability and community care leading to higher degrees.

The Tizard Centre has a strong track record of attracting University and ESRC research studentship funding.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/106/applied-psychology

About the Tizard Centre

The Tizard Centre is part of the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research (SSPSSR) and has excellent links with health and social care organisations, and other relevant establishments.

The Centre is at the forefront of learning and research in autism, intellectual disability and community care, and in 2013 received a Queen’s Anniversary Prize in recognition of its outstanding work in these areas.

The Centre has excellent links with health and social care organisations, and other relevant establishments. Our primary aims, through research, teaching and consultancy, are:

- to find out more about how to effectively support and work with people with learning disabilities

- to help carers, managers and professionals develop the values, knowledge and skills that enable better services

- to aid policymakers, planners, managers and practitioners to organise and provide enhanced services.

The Tizard Centre is recognised as leading the field in deinstitutionalisation and community living, challenging behaviour, quality of staff support, sexuality and autism, and has had a significant impact on national policies in these areas. We are committed to addressing issues arising from social inequality.

Study support

All teaching takes place at the Tizard Centre. Postgraduate research students have a shared office space with a computer and telephone.

- Acclaimed active department

The Tizard Centre runs an annual seminar series where staff or guest lecturers present the results of research or highlight recent developments in the field of social care. The Jim Mansell Memorial Lecture invites public figures or distinguished academics to discuss topics that could interest a wider audience. The Centre also publishes the Tizard Learning Disability Review (in conjunction with Emerald Publishing) to provide a source of up-to-date information for professionals and carers.

The Tizard Centre provides consultancy to organisations in the statutory and independent sectors, both nationally and internationally, in diversified areas such as service assessment, person-centred approaches, active support and adult protection. The Centre also teaches a range of short courses, often in conjunction with other organisations.

- Dynamic publishing culture

Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. Among others, they have recently contributed to: Journal of Mental Health; Journal of Applied Research and Intellectual Disabilities; American Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities; and Journal of Intellectual Disability Research.

- Researcher Development Programme

Kent's Graduate School co-ordinates the Researcher Development Programme for research students, which includes workshops focused on research, specialist and transferable skills. The programme is mapped to the national Researcher Development Framework and covers a diverse range of topics, including subjectspecific research skills, research management, personal effectiveness, communication skills, networking and teamworking, and career management skills.

Research areas

Current research areas include: social inequalities and community care; intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Careers

Our postgraduate courses improve employability prospects for both those with established careers and new entrants to the field. Many of our students already work with people with intellectual and developmental disabilities in professional, management or supporting capacities.

Our programmes support their continuing professional development and enhance their opportunities for career advancement. Other students, who are at the beginning of their careers, move on to a range of professional roles in health and social care including working as psychologists in learning disability or behavioural specialists in community learning disability teams; service management of development roles; clinical psychology training or a PhD.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Read less
The Centre offers excellent opportunities for full or part-time research in intellectual disability and community care leading to higher degrees. Read more
The Centre offers excellent opportunities for full or part-time research in intellectual disability and community care leading to higher degrees.

The Tizard Centre has a strong track record of attracting University and ESRC research studentship funding.

2016 Postgraduate Tizard programmes will close to applicants at 23:59 hrs on Thursday 21 April 2016. Applications received after this time will be held for consideration for 2017 entry. The final tranche of interviews for 2016 will be held during the week of 23 May 2016. Applicants unable to make themselves available this week (in person or via skype or telephone) will be considered for 2017 entry.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/110/intellectual-and-developmental-disabilities

About the Tizard Centre

The Tizard Centre is part of the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research (SSPSSR) and has excellent links with health and social care organisations, and other relevant establishments.

The Centre is at the forefront of learning and research in autism, intellectual disability and community care, and in 2013 received a Queen’s Anniversary Prize in recognition of its outstanding work in these areas.

The Centre has excellent links with health and social care organisations, and other relevant establishments. Our primary aims, through research, teaching and consultancy, are:

- to find out more about how to effectively support and work with people with learning disabilities

- to help carers, managers and professionals develop the values, knowledge and skills that enable better services

- to aid policymakers, planners, managers and practitioners to organise and provide enhanced services.

The Tizard Centre is recognised as leading the field in deinstitutionalisation and community living, challenging behaviour, quality of staff support, sexuality and autism, and has had a significant impact on national policies in these areas. We are committed to addressing issues arising from social inequality.

Study support

All teaching takes place at the Tizard Centre. Postgraduate research students have a shared office space with a computer and telephone.

Acclaimed active department
The Tizard Centre runs an annual seminar series where staff or guest lecturers present the results of research or highlight recent developments in the field of social care. The Jim Mansell Memorial Lecture invites public figures or distinguished academics to discuss topics that could interest a wider audience. The Centre also publishes the Tizard Learning Disability Review (in conjunction with Emerald Publishing) to provide a source of up-to-date information for professionals and carers.

The Tizard Centre provides consultancy to organisations in the statutory and independent sectors, both nationally and internationally, in diversified areas such as service assessment, person-centred approaches, active support and adult protection. The Centre also teaches a range of short courses, often in conjunction with other organisations.

Dynamic publishing culture
Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. Among others, they have recently contributed to: Journal of Mental Health; Journal of Applied Research and Intellectual Disabilities; American Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities; and Journal of Intellectual Disability Research.

Researcher Development Programme
Kent's Graduate School co-ordinates the Researcher Development Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/tstindex.html) for research students, which includes workshops focused on research, specialist and transferable skills. The programme is mapped to the national Researcher Development Framework and covers a diverse range of topics, including subjectspecific research skills, research management, personal effectiveness, communication skills, networking and teamworking, and career management skills.

Research areas

Current research areas include: social inequalities and community care; intellectual and developmental disabilities.

View details of current research on the Tizard website (http://www.kent.ac.uk/tizard/research/Current_recent_research.html).

Careers

Our postgraduate courses provide detailed knowledge of intellectual and developmental disabilities. Graduates will have gained a very good understanding of the matters arising within this population and will be able to analyse and conduct relevant research.

Our postgraduate courses improve employability prospects for both those with established careers and new entrants to the field. Many of our students already work with people with intellectual and developmental disabilities in professional, management or supporting capacities. Our programmes support their continuing professional development and enhance their opportunities for career advancement. Other students, who are at the beginning of their careers, move on to a range of professional roles in health and social care including working as psychologists in learning disability or behavioural specialists in community learning disability teams; service management of development roles; clinical psychology training or a PhD.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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