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Masters Degrees (Disabilities)

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A Master of Science in Developmental Disabilities is designed to prepare researchers, advocates, administrators and policy makers to be leaders in community-based or governmental agencies that address the confluence of issues associated with developmental disabilities throughout the life span. Read more

A Master of Science in Developmental Disabilities is designed to prepare researchers, advocates, administrators and policy makers to be leaders in community-based or governmental agencies that address the confluence of issues associated with developmental disabilities throughout the life span. This degree program's body of knowledge will allow graduates of the M.S. program to pursue doctoral-level training in human services, counseling, and public policy, among others. In addition, this degree will provide professionals from disciplines such as nursing and education with the necessary skills to be effective leaders and advance in the field.

The successful graduate of the M.S. in Developmental Disabilities program is expected to:

  • Apply knowledge of effective administrative and other leadership skills in the field of developmental disabilities through the use of case study analyses, research papers, and in-class assignments.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the different developmental disabilities and the challenges faced by these individuals across the lifespan.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the impact of the family, the educational system, and community services on the successful integration of individuals with developmental disabilities into the community.
  • Apply ethical and legal principles related to working with individuals who have developmental disabilities to real-world cases and settings.
  • Apply knowledge of developmental disabilities, organizational behavior, and strategic planning to the design and/or administration of human services organizations which provide services to individuals and families with developmental disabilities. 
  • Demonstrate research, analytic thinking, and writing skills when creating a program design or evaluation project on a relevant topic in the field.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the impact of health disparities experienced by individuals with developmental disabilities and the implications for healthcare and human services organizations.

This program is designed for individuals seeking a career in or as:

  • Program Director (non-profit)
  • Program Coordination
  • Early Childhood Interventionist
  • Transition Specialist
  • Job Coach
  • Child Life Specialist (with Child Life Specialist concentration)
  • Developmental Specialist
  • Case Manager
  • Vocational Counselor
  • Advocate
  • Behavior Analyst or Assistant Behavior Analyst (with ABA concentration)

Program Format

The master's program is offered entirely online. The online format allows for students to participate in courses from anywhere in the world where Internet access is available. In addition, it allows for the flexibility of completing your master's degree without interrupting your career.

Master's students are provided NSU computer accounts including email and Blackboard, but must obtain their own Internet service providers, use their own computer systems and have a usable web camera. Online students use the web to access course materials, announcements, email, distance library services, subscription library databases, and other information, and for interaction with faculty and fellow students. Online, interactive learning methods are based on the use of Blackboard as a course management system. Online activities facilitate frequent student-to-faculty and student-to-student interaction. They are supported by threaded discussion boards, white boards, chat rooms, email, and multimedia presentations. In addition, Blackboard enables students to submit assignments online in multimedia formats and to receive their professors' reviews of assignments online in the same formats.

Curriculum

Students enrolled in the Masters of Science in Developmental Disabilities are required to complete 18 credit hours of foundational coursework, 9 credit hours in one of the Concentrations, and 3 credit hours of a Developmental Disabilities Master's Research Project.

Foundational coursework:

  • HSDD 5000: Survey of Developmental Disabilities (3 credits)
  • HSDD 5100: Program Design and Evaluation (3 credits)
  • HSDD 5200: Disability and the Family Life Cycle (3 credits)
  • HSDD 5300: Legal and Ethical Issues in Disability (3 credits)
  • HSDD 5400: Healthcare Issues in Developmental Disabilities (3 credits)
  • HSDD 5500: Disability Services Administration (3 credits)
  • HSDD 6000: Developmental Disabilities Masters Project (3 credits)

Concentrations



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This is an advanced professional development programme involving the following. coursework, modules, study workshops, dissertation and a placement in forensic ID services. Read more

This is an advanced professional development programme involving the following: coursework, modules, study workshops, dissertation and a placement in forensic ID services.

The programme aims to provide graduates with detailed knowledge of intellectual and developmental disabilities and forensic issues. You will develop an evidence-based critical understanding of intellectual and developmental disabilities and forensic issues. The programme encourages values-based, ethically stringent practice and/or research in the subject area.

Graduates will be able to take leading roles in public services for children and adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities and issues.

About the Tizard Centre

The Tizard Centre is part of the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research (SSPSSR) and has excellent links with health and social care organisations, and other relevant establishments.

The Centre is at the forefront of learning and research in autism, intellectual disability and community care, and in 2013 received a Queen’s Anniversary Prize in recognition of its outstanding work in these areas.

The Centre has excellent links with health and social care organisations, and other relevant establishments. Our primary aims, through research, teaching and consultancy, are:

  • to find out more about how to effectively support and work with people with learning disabilities
  • to help carers, managers and professionals develop the values, knowledge and skills that enable better services
  • to aid policymakers, planners, managers and practitioners to organise and provide enhanced services.

The Tizard Centre is recognised as leading the field in deinstitutionalisation and community living, challenging behaviour, quality of staff support, sexuality and autism, and has had a significant impact on national policies in these areas. We are committed to addressing issues arising from social inequality.

Course structure

Teaching includes lectures, guided study using Moodle, with seminars and group exercises to enhance understanding of the underlying concepts. The MSc is awarded for the achievement of 180 credits from taught modules and the successful completion of the dissertation and practical placement.

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation:

  • research methods
  • social psychology of intellectual and developmental disabilities and forensic issues
  • assessment and intervention
  • research project in intellectual and developmental disabilities
  • intellectual and development disabilities and forensic services issues

Careers

Over 98% of Kent's postgraduate students who graduated in 2016 were in work or further study within six months. Our postgraduate courses provide detailed knowledge of intellectual and developmental disabilities. Graduates will have gained a very good understanding of the matters arising within this population and will be able to analyse and conduct relevant research. 

Our postgraduate courses improve employability prospects for both those with established careers and new entrants to the field. Many of our students already work with people with intellectual and developmental disabilities in professional, management or supporting capacities. Our programmes support their continuing professional development and enhance their opportunities for career advancement.

How to apply: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Why study at the University of Kent

We offer inspirational teaching and supervision alongside first-class library and IT facilities. You also benefit from our high-impact research in all subjects. Whatever you are looking to study, Kent provides a dynamic and challenging environment for your postgraduate studies.

  • Kent was awarded gold, the highest rating, in the UK Government’s Teaching Excellence Framework
  • Kent is ranked 21st in the Times Higher Education (THE) ‘Table of Tables’ 2017
  • Kent is ranked 25th in the Complete University Guide 2018
  • Kent is ranked 22nd in the Guardian University Guide 2018
  • 42% of our academics are from overseas and we have students representing 158 nationalities
  • In the most recent research rankings, 97% of research at Kent was found to be of international quality (REF 2014)
  • Kent is ranked 17th in the UK* for research intensity and research output (REF 2014)
  • Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why-kent/

* of 122 universities, not including specialist institutions



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This Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) fulltime, campus- based programme is designed for educational and health practitioners that work with, or have an interest in working with, children identified as having special educational needs and disabilities. Read more
This Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) fulltime, campus- based programme is designed for educational and health practitioners that work with, or have an interest in working with, children identified as having special educational needs and disabilities. It provides opportunities for participants to reflect on their practice, to critique the conceptualisation of disability within culture and society, and to be analytical as to SEND practices and policies.

This course is internationally focused, and examines SEND practices around the world. Students will, however, be given opportunities to experience UK schools and to engage in research at both the UK and international level.

Awards available on the SEND programme
PG Cert – 3 modules (60 credits at M Level)
PGDip – 6 modules (120 credits at M Level)
MA – 6 modules plus a 15,000 word dissertation (180 credits at M Level)

The Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) programme will enable you to deepen and extend your knowledge and understanding of educational and social theories which are related to working with children and young people with a range of special educational and individual learning needs.

The programme utilises lectures, seminars, tutorials, school visits, practical tasks, and discussions. Lectures and seminars are facilitatedby academics who are leaders in research in the field of SEND.

The programme has been designed to allow opportunities for individualisation of content to ensure that it is relevant to your professional and personal needs. As a student on the programme, you will be expected to be self-directed in your learning, and propose projects that can be practical, theoretical, or both. If you choose to pursue the MA award, you will have the opportunity to design and implement research that will allow you to gain skills in research design and methodology.

This programme is designed to supplement professionals already working in the field, or those seeking a general introduction to topics within special educational needs and disabilities. In general, this includes educators already working with students with special educational needs and disabilities, support workers in places such as a university or workplace disability service unit, a social worker or nurse providing care for persons with disabilities, someone working for a non-governmental organization dealing with disabilities issues, or a staff member of a Ministry of Education or Ministry of Health, amongst other things. This programme is not intended to be a training programme for Special Educational Needs Coordinators (SENCOs), nor will it provide specific teacher training to directly work with students with disabilities in education or health settings.

About the School of Education

The School of Education has a long-standing reputation as a centre of excellence for teaching and research in a wide range of areas of educational practice and policy. It is an international leader in education with a history of top rated research. In the 2016 QS World Rankings, it was ranked 28th in the World and joint 7th in Europe/UK.
The School employs over 100 academic staff who teach more than 2,500 students. It is home to a number of departments and research centres with a history of top rated research and is an international leader in education.
School of Education ranking:
- Ranked 6th in the Guardian University League Tables 2017
- Ranked 10th in the 2017 Complete University Guide
- In Top 3 for HEI provision in the Good Teacher Training Guide
- Ranked 28th in the World in the 2016 QS World Rankings
- Ranked 9th overall for Research in the 2014 REF (with more than 82% of research rated as ‘internationally excellent’ (3*) or ‘world leading’ (4*).
- Rated 'outstanding' in latest Ofsted inspection (2013) for its Teacher Training programmes
- Ranked third for Education in The Times Good University Guide 2017

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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This is an advanced professional development programme for psychology and social science graduates and professionals. Through this programme you will undertake analysis of issues appertaining to the care and progression of individuals with developmental disabilities. Read more

This is an advanced professional development programme for psychology and social science graduates and professionals. Through this programme you will undertake analysis of issues appertaining to the care and progression of individuals with developmental disabilities. You will assess different types of interventions and will have the opportunity to engage with disability service providers and users. You will gain detailed knowledge and understanding of:

  • definitions and epidemiology of intellectual disability
  • cognitive, communicative and social characteristics of people with intellectual disabilities
  • biological, social and environmental causes of intellectual disability
  • behaviour analysis
  • challenging behaviour and other special needs
  • ideology, policy and service development
  • definition and measurement of service quality
  • the relationships between service organisation and quality
  • research methodology and basic statistical analysis

Course structure

Coursework is taught through a mixture of web-based resources, directed reading, videos, lectures, seminars and practical sessions, supported by a number of workshops, where you work with skilled professionals and have the opportunity to share ideas and experiences with fellow students. You will also undertake practical work placements which are assessed by written reports as well as having the opportunity to complete a piece of original research with your Research Project.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme:

  • Social psychology of intellectual and developmental disabilities
  • Behaviour analysis and intervention
  • Service issues in intellectual and developmental disabilities
  • Research methods

Knowledge and understanding

You will gain knowledge and understanding of:

  • definitions and epidemiology of intellectual disability
  • cognitive, communicative and social characteristics of people with intellectual disabilities
  • biological, social and environmental causes of intellectual disability
  • behaviour analysis
  • challenging behaviour and other special needs
  • ideology, policy and service development
  • definition and measurement of service quality
  • the relationships between service organisation and quality
  • research methodology and basic statistical analysis 

Transferable skills

You will gain the following transferable skills:

  • communication: the ability to organise information clearly and respond to written sources
  • numeracy: if you are doing the statistical element of the research methods module, you will make sense of statistical materials and integrate quantitative and qualitative information. You will also become familiar with ways of summarising and presenting data
  • information technology: the ability to produce written documents, undertake online research
  • working with others: the ability to work co-operatively on group tasks both within the virtual learning environment and during the residential workshops
  • improve your own learning: the ability to explore your strengths and weaknesses, time management skills and review your working environment
  • problem-solving: the ability to identify and define complex problems, explore alternative solutions and discriminate between them.

Dynamic centre of expertise

This programme is taught by the University's renowned Tizard Centre. An annual seminar series runs at which staff or guest lecturers present the results of research or highlight recent developments in the field of social care. The Jim Mansell Memorial Lecture invites public figures or distinguished academics to discuss topics that could interest a wider audience. The Centre also publishes the Tizard Learning Disability Review (in conjunction with Emerald Publishing) to provide a source of up-to-date information for professionals and carers.

The Tizard Centre provides consultancy to organisations in the statutory and independent sectors, both nationally and internationally, in diversified areas such as service assessment, person-centred approaches, active support and adult protection..

Careers

Our postgraduate courses improve employability prospects for both those with established careers and new entrants to the field. Many of our students already work with people with intellectual and developmental disabilities in professional, management or supporting capacities.

Our programmes support their continuing professional development and enhance their opportunities for career advancement. Other students, who are at the beginning of their careers, move on to a range of professional roles in health and social care including working as psychologists in learning disability or behavioural specialists in community learning disability teams; service management of development roles; clinical psychology training or a PhD.

Career destinations include working as a consultant behaviour analyst, carer co-ordinator, service care manager, special needs teacher, quality officer, ABA tutor and research assistant in various health care organisations such as Dimensions UK Ltd, Care Management Group, Consensus Support Services, Mencap and Ambitious About Autism.

Why study at the University of Kent

We offer inspirational teaching and supervision alongside first-class library and IT facilities. You also benefit from our high-impact research in all subjects. Whatever you are looking to study, Kent provides a dynamic and challenging environment for your postgraduate studies.

  • Kent was awarded gold, the highest rating, in the UK Government’s Teaching Excellence Framework
  • Kent is ranked 21st in the Times Higher Education (THE) ‘Table of Tables’ 2017
  • Kent is ranked 25th in the Complete University Guide 2018
  • Kent is ranked 22nd in the Guardian University Guide 2018
  • 42% of our academics are from overseas and we have students representing 158 nationalities
  • In the most recent research rankings, 97% of research at Kent was found to be of international quality (REF 2014)
  • Kent is ranked 17th in the UK* for research intensity and research output (REF 2014)

Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why-kent/

* of 122 universities, not including specialist institutions



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Nursing is one of the most rewarding careers to enter, and more importantly it is a privilege. Learning Disability Nurses work with children and adults. Read more

Nursing is one of the most rewarding careers to enter, and more importantly it is a privilege. Learning Disability Nurses work with children and adults. As a specialist nurse you will be able to assess, plan and develop individual packages of care designed to provide the appropriate levels of physical, emotional and psychological care to meet the needs of children, young people and their families, while meeting the challenges of a changing healthcare environment.

This Masters degree provides the exciting opportunity for graduates to enter the nursing profession. You will gain a comprehensive education in nursing and develop into a confident, autonomous, compassionate and research-aware practitioner, specialising in learning disabilities nursing. The programme includes an innovative exploration of leadership and management in healthcare and will enable you to critically evaluate evidence to inform decision making and apply analytical and creative problem solving approaches to complex situations. You will be fully equipped with the skills, knowledge and practical experience required to deliver excellent care as a modern-day nursing professional.

What will I study?

Year 1 provides the opportunity to achieve national generic and field specific competency outcomes. These include professional values, communication and interpersonal skills, nursing practice, decision making, leadership, management and team working. The programme will immerse you in health promotion, prevention strategies and best practice for service users and their families. A comprehensive introduction will also be provided to the research process.

Year 2 continues the development of field-specific competencies, with a particular focus on person-centred holistic care for individuals with learning disabilities and complex needs. In addition to this, you will develop the leadership and management skills required for the transition to professional practice.

This programme adheres closely to the NHS’ six core values. These values, enshrined within the NHS Constitution, have been developed by patients, the public and staff to inspire passion in the NHS, guide it in the 21st century, and provide common ground for cooperation in achieving shared aspirations. Further information about the core values can be found at http://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-nhs-constitution-for-england.

How will I study?

You will be taught using a combination of seminars, lectures, tutorials, work-based learning and technology enhanced learning. The theory part of the programme is delivered during the normal working week (Monday to Friday).

You will spend 50% of your time in practice which will be undertaken in hospitals and community settings within the NHS, local authority, independent and voluntary organisations. You will be supported by a practice placement mentor/supervisor and a practice education facilitator.

Placements include weekend, early morning, evening and night work to ensure access to a full range of practice experiences across 24 hour care. There may also be the opportunity to undertake a practice learning experience outside the region, either within the United Kingdom or internationally.

How will I be assessed?

Assessment in both theory and practice is continuous, assessed against national outcomes and generic and field competencies, with students required to demonstrate evidence of their achievement. A range of assessment of theory procedures is in place including assignments, seminar presentations, advanced notice examinations, online learning activities, case studies and portfolio work.

Who will be teaching me?

All lectures are delivered by professionals within the field of nursing as well as specialists in other areas. The pathway team represent a range of qualified, research-active professionals with extensive experience of working within the health and/or social care sector. Most importantly service users, carers and their families will be involved in facilitating learning so that an understanding is gained about the impact care has on individual groups.

What are my career prospects?

The complex and dynamic landscape of modern nursing requires nurses who can work creatively and innovatively, who can lead and inspire, who can make decisions in challenging situations and who can contribute to the advancement of nursing.

Career opportunities are excellent. NMC registration is recognised the world over and following registration as a Learning Disabilities Nurse, you can pursue a career in a variety of settings including residential homes, supported living and employment and assessment and treatment units, as well as specialist child and adult learning disabilities teams in the community. Increasingly, qualified learning disabilities nurses are acquiring posts within mainstream services, such as acute trusts, prisons and criminal liaison teams as health facilitators and specialist advisors to support people with learning disabilities.



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Learning disability nurses enable individuals to live their lives to their full potential within the social context they choose, through collaborative interventions across a variety of health and social care settings and by using specialist input, through person centred practice, underpinned by the concept of partnership working. Read more
Learning disability nurses enable individuals to live their lives to their full potential within the social context they choose, through collaborative interventions across a variety of health and social care settings and by using specialist input, through person centred practice, underpinned by the concept of partnership working.

This course teaches you to promote social inclusion, good mental and physical health and self-determination through developing your skills, knowledge and attributes. All learning is grounded in a strong evidence base of integrative health and social care modelling. Our placements are varied, offering you the chance to create a future career that will be rewarding both for your personal and professional advancement.

Modules

You will be taught separately from the three-year undergraduate students and will study the following:

Year 1

Improving quality, change management and leadership
Building practice skills for learning disability nursing
Applied physiology, growth and development
Contemporary issues in learning disability nursing

Year 2

Research in health and social care
Enhancing practice skills in learning disability nursing
Complexity in learning disabilities
Advanced communication

MSc pathway

You'll follow the same modules as outlined above for the PgDip, with the addition of a dissertation:

Dissertation
Assessment methods vary within each module, mapped against the professional standards as outlined by the NMC (2010) and assessed either through course work, and/or clinical placement assessments. Written assessments include essays, case study's, and critical reviews of evidence for example. Clinical practice assessments include achievements of identified competencies, a learning assessment portfolio, and problem based scenarios.

Teaching and learning

You'll be expected to work as an independent adult learner, working alongside academic staff to expand and extend your knowledge, skills and attitudes as a critical scholar in the field of Intellectual Disabilities.

You'll be allocated a personal tutor, a cohort leader, and a course director, plus clinical mentors, and link lecturers whilst on placement.

The course makes use of the virtual learning environment MOODLE, an interactive based system for accurate and rapid information sharing, so course materials are available whenever you need them. A range of learning styles are employed, including visits from service users and their carers, to ensure the course remains contemporary and applied to real life situations.

Placements

Every student will spend 50% of the course on placement. You'll have the opportunity to work in partnership with individuals with learning disabilities and their families using a health mentoring model. Alternatively you can work in partnership with community based organisations on projects where all parties increase their awareness, understanding and valuing of their roles, using strength based approaches.

The placement aim is to provide a broad range of experiences working with children and adults with learning disabilities in a variety of settings. This will enhance your knowledge and experience of the range of challenges people with a learning disability may face on a daily basis and what can be done to assist not only the individual but also their families.

You'll also gain insight into what is available to support workers and organisations providing services in the areas of physical and mental health, complex care needs, communication, behaviours of concern, sexuality, personal care and a range of other areas.

Professional links

The learning disability nursing programmes at LSBU have a long history of partnership working with agencies in the NHS and independent and voluntary sector. The Professional Lead for Mental Health and Learning Disabilities at the Department of Health England is a frequent guest speaker who inspires Learning Disability nurses to influence and innovate.

Learning disability nursing as a career

The course will enable you to develop a wide range of employability skills through the emphasis on a vocational approach to teaching which leads to a professional qualification leading to registration with the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC).

There is an increasing body of research that shows the need for learning disability nurses as a specialist resource to address health inequalities experienced by people with learning disabilities. The course will give you the specialist knowledge and skills to work in a wide range of services, and the confidence to work collaboratively with people with learning disabilities, their families and carers, and other professionals and agencies.

Role and responsibilities

As a learning disabilities nurse you would work with people of all ages to give them the skills and confidence they need to live as independently as possible. You'd be working as part of a multi-disciplinary team and be responsible for co-ordinating care plans with other healthcare professionals, as well as monitoring progress. A learning disabilities nurse would be responsible for making an initial assessment of a patient's health and social care needs.

Day-to-day duties would be likely to include help and encouragement with tasks such as personal hygiene, dressing, using public transport, shopping, leisure interests, making and attending appointments, and finding a job. Learning disabilities nursing also involves campaigning on behalf of those with learning disabilities, supporting the agenda for equality and trying to improve healthcare services for those with learning difficulties.

Career progression

Successful graduates of the PgDip can top-up to MSc in one year and will be qualified to study a range of further specialist postgraduate pathways. With additional experience, advanced practice is available at Masters level with the potential to progress to doctorate studies. Once you are a registered nurse browse our online CPPD prospectus to find out what courses are on offer to help with your professional development.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

• Direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
• Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
• Mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

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The PGDip/MSc in Adults with Learning Disabilities is a part-time distance learning course run by the School of Psychology and Neuroscience. Read more

The PGDip/MSc in Adults with Learning Disabilities is a part-time distance learning course run by the School of Psychology and Neuroscience. The Postgraduate Diploma must be completed within one calendar year from October to September. The focus is on research, and students will learn the skills of a research practitioner.

For those progressing on to the MSc, you will spend an additional year researching and writing a 15,000-word dissertation. Students apply the knowledge and research skills gained in the PG Diploma to carry out research that will benefit the quality of service, care and life of adults with learning disabilities.

Highlights

  • The online open learning materials are written in an interactive style and are designed to encourage students to use their own workplace experiences as a basis for new learning and development of research skills.
  • Students have full electronic access to the University of St Andrews library resources, including full text journals and other online resources.

Teaching format

The course is delivered via online modules through the University of St Andrews Dynamic Learning Environment. Students will have access to research publications, electronic databases and the University's library resources.

Over the course of the year, students will take six compulsory modules. It is not possible to enrol for individual modules at the Postgraduate Diploma level. Typically, each module is completed within two months and requires 100 hours of total study time, including completion of assessments. Module teaching materials are delivered online where students will have access to additional reference materials.

Students complete assessments online. The taught modules are continuously assessed through coursework, which students submit online. Coursework assessment includes multiple choice questions, short answer assignments, reference searches, and analysis of published research as well as developing a full research proposal. There is no final exam for the course.

University tutors are available for support via email and telephone.

Further particulars regarding curriculum development.

Modules

Each module typically comprises:

  • guided online teaching and learning materials
  • 100% coursework assessment.

For more details of each module, including weekly contact hours, teaching methods and assessment, please see the latest module catalogue which is for the 2017–2018 academic year; some elements may be subject to change for 2018 entry.



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If you would like to teach post-14 learners in the Further Education (FE) and Skills Sector with a specialism, then this course is for you. Read more

Why choose this course?

• If you would like to teach post-14 learners in the Further Education (FE) and Skills Sector with a specialism, then this course is for you
• The specialist pathways allow you to focus on a key subject area in English: Literacy, Maths, Engineering* or teaching learners with disabilities
• We were rated 'Outstanding' in our most recent Ofsted inspection for the training and assessment of our trainees
• You may be entitled to a bursary, depending on your degree classification.
*‌ Our Engineering pathway is currently subject to validation for September 2016 entry.

About this course:

This course will enable you to apply for Qualified Teacher of Learning and Skills (QTLS) via the Education and Training Foundation (formerly the Institute for Learning). Depending on your preference and prior experience, you can either specialise in English: Literacy, Maths, Engineering* or teaching learners with disabilities.

We will thoroughly prepare you for the practical demands of teaching in the FE & Skills sector within one academic year. The course will also provide you with 60 credits at masters level.

You’ll be based at the University for two days a week, where you’ll be taught in our specialist teacher training facilities. For two days a week, you’ll be on a teaching placement, and you’ll undergo a six-week block placement in February. You will also complete an alternative placement in a different setting which you are expected to have fulfilled before the course starts. This information will be relayed to you on pre-induction.

If you are interested in teaching post-14 learners in areas outside of English: Literacy, Maths, Engineering* and teaching learners with disabilities, then we also offer a generic PGCE Post-14 (Education and Training) course.
Bursaries

There is a government initiative that currently provides bursaries for teaching English, Maths, and SEN disabled learners. The amount is dependent on your degree classification. Please see the Fees and finance section for further details.

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This is an advanced professional development programme delivered by distance learning for flexibility and convenience. The programme aims to provide you with detailed knowledge of intellectual and developmental disabilities. Read more

This is an advanced professional development programme delivered by distance learning for flexibility and convenience. The programme aims to provide you with detailed knowledge of intellectual and developmental disabilities. Through the programme you will gain knowledge and understanding of:

  • definitions and epidemiology of intellectual disability
  • cognitive, communicative and social characteristics of people with intellectual disabilities
  • biological, social and environmental causes of intellectual disability
  • behaviour analysis
  • challenging behaviour and other special needs
  • ideology, policy and service development
  • definition and measurement of service quality
  • relationships between service organisation and quality
  • research methodology.

Course structure

Coursework is taught through a mixture of web-based resources, directed reading, videos, lectures, seminars and practical sessions, supported by a number of workshops, where you work with skilled professionals and have the opportunity to share ideas and experiences with fellow students.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme:

  • Social psychology of autism
  • Behaviour analysis and intervention
  • Service issues in intellectual and developmental disabilities
  • Research methods
  • Case study assessment

Transferable skills

You will gain the following transferable skills:

  • communication: organising information clearly; responding to written sources; presenting information orally
  • numeracy: (if statistical element of research methods module taken) making sense of statistical materials; integrating quantitative and qualitative information
  • information technology: producing written documents; undertaking online research
  • working with others: working co-operatively on group tasks; understanding how groups function
  • improving own learning: exploring personal strengths and weaknesses; time management; reviewing working environment
  • problem solving: identifying and defining problems: exploring alternative solutions and discriminating between them.

Dynamic centre of expertise

This programme is taught by the University's renowned Tizard Centre. An annual seminar series runs at which staff or guest lecturers present the results of research or highlight recent developments in the field of social care. The Jim Mansell Memorial Lecture invites public figures or distinguished academics to discuss topics that could interest a wider audience. The Centre also publishes the Tizard Learning Disability Review (in conjunction with Emerald Publishing) to provide a source of up-to-date information for professionals and carers.

The Tizard Centre provides consultancy to organisations in the statutory and independent sectors, both nationally and internationally, in diversified areas such as service assessment, person-centred approaches, active support and adult protection.

Careers

This programme supports continuing professional development and enhances your opportunity for career advancement. Previous successful students have moved on to a range of professional roles in health and social care including working as psychologists in learning disability or behavioural specialists in community learning disability teams; service management of development roles; clinical psychology training or a PhD.

Why study at the University of Kent

We offer inspirational teaching and supervision alongside first-class library and IT facilities. You also benefit from our high-impact research in all subjects. Whatever you are looking to study, Kent provides a dynamic and challenging environment for your postgraduate studies.

  • Kent was awarded gold, the highest rating, in the UK Government’s Teaching Excellence Framework
  • Kent is ranked 21st in the Times Higher Education (THE) ‘Table of Tables’ 2017
  • Kent is ranked 25th in the Complete University Guide 2018
  • Kent is ranked 22nd in the Guardian University Guide 2018
  • 42% of our academics are from overseas and we have students representing 158 nationalities
  • In the most recent research rankings, 97% of research at Kent was found to be of international quality (REF 2014)
  • Kent is ranked 17th in the UK* for research intensity and research output (REF 2014)

Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why-kent/

* of 122 universities, not including specialist institutions



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This is an advanced professional development programme which aims to provide you with detailed knowledge of intellectual and developmental disabilities. Read more

This is an advanced professional development programme which aims to provide you with detailed knowledge of intellectual and developmental disabilities. Through the programme you will gain knowledge and understanding of:

  • definitions and epidemiology of intellectual disability
  • cognitive, communicative and social characteristics of people with intellectual disabilities
  • biological, social and environmental causes of intellectual disability
  • behaviour analysis
  • challenging behaviour and other special needs
  • ideology, policy and service development
  • definition and measurement of service quality
  • relationships between service organisation and quality
  • research methodology.

Course structure

Coursework is taught through a mixture of web-based resources, directed reading, videos, lectures, seminars and practical sessions, supported by a number of workshops, where you work with skilled professionals and have the opportunity to share ideas and experiences with fellow students.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme:

  • Social psychology of autism
  • Behaviour analysis and intervention
  • Service issues in intellectual and developmental disabilities
  • Research methods
  • Case study assessment

Transferable skills

You will gain the following transferable skills:

  • communication: organising information clearly; responding to written sources; presenting information orally
  • numeracy: (if statistical element of research methods module taken) making sense of statistical materials; integrating quantitative and qualitative information
  • information technology: producing written documents; undertaking online research
  • working with others: working co-operatively on group tasks; understanding how groups function
  • improving own learning: exploring personal strengths and weaknesses; time management; reviewing working environment
  • problem solving: identifying and defining problems: exploring alternative solutions and discriminating between them.

Dynamic centre of expertise

This programme is taught by the University's renowned Tizard Centre. An annual seminar series runs at which staff or guest lecturers present the results of research or highlight recent developments in the field of social care. The Jim Mansell Memorial Lecture invites public figures or distinguished academics to discuss topics that could interest a wider audience. The Centre also publishes the Tizard Learning Disability Review (in conjunction with Emerald Publishing) to provide a source of up-to-date information for professionals and carers.

The Tizard Centre provides consultancy to organisations in the statutory and independent sectors, both nationally and internationally, in diversified areas such as service assessment, person-centred approaches, active support and adult protection.

Careers

This programme supports continuing professional development and enhances your opportunity for career advancement. Previous successful students have moved on to a range of professional roles in health and social care including working as psychologists in learning disability or behavioural specialists in community learning disability teams; service management of development roles; clinical psychology training or a PhD.

Why study at the University of Kent

We offer inspirational teaching and supervision alongside first-class library and IT facilities. You also benefit from our high-impact research in all subjects. Whatever you are looking to study, Kent provides a dynamic and challenging environment for your postgraduate studies.

  • Kent was awarded gold, the highest rating, in the UK Government’s Teaching Excellence Framework
  • Kent is ranked 21st in the Times Higher Education (THE) ‘Table of Tables’ 2017
  • Kent is ranked 25th in the Complete University Guide 2018
  • Kent is ranked 22nd in the Guardian University Guide 2018
  • 42% of our academics are from overseas and we have students representing 158 nationalities
  • In the most recent research rankings, 97% of research at Kent was found to be of international quality (REF 2014)
  • Kent is ranked 17th in the UK* for research intensity and research output (REF 2014)

Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why-kent/

* of 122 universities, not including specialist institutions



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The PG Dip in Habilitation and Disabilities of Sight (Children and Young People) trains students to support, plan, carry out, supervise and evaluate children’s and young people’s (from birth to 25 years) habilitation skills at home, in public settings, and in educational transitions. Read more
The PG Dip in Habilitation and Disabilities of Sight (Children and Young People) trains students to support, plan, carry out, supervise and evaluate children’s and young people’s (from birth to 25 years) habilitation skills at home, in public settings, and in educational transitions.

Degree information

The programme provides students with the opportunity to benefit from our links with Habilitation VIUK (formerly MISE UK), obtaining a qualification that matches the initial quality standards-based registration requirements for habilitation practitioners in the UK. Students work with eminent practitioners in the field of visual impairment, gaining experience of working in a variety of habilitation settings and environments.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of four core modules (45 credits).

Students are able to exit with a Graduate Certificate on successful completion of modules one and two (taken in this order and worth 90 credits) and all other first-year assessment elements. No optional modules are available.

Core modules - passes in all four core modules, taken in order, and successful completion of all the various assessment elements of the programme are required for an overall pass for the programme.
-Policy and Practice in Habilitation Studies
-Habilitation in Educational Contexts and the Extended Curriculum
-Habilitation at Home, In Public Contexts and During Transitions
-Habilitation, Professional Practices and the Service Setting: The Extended Assessed Placement

Teaching and learning
Both face-to-face and virtual learning environment elements will inform the pattern of teaching on the programme. It is assessed by written assessments, coursework assignments, practical skill assessments, skill observations, self-videoed practical assessment activities, presentations, placements, and a portfolio which is matched against the Quality Standards for Habilitation Work with Children and Young People (2011).

Placement
Modules three and four involve an extended training/teaching placement.

Careers

Graduates of this programme are currently working as habilitation specialists and assistants in local authorities for sensory services, consortia or sensory impairment services for national and local visual and sensory impairment-related charities.

Employability
Graduates of this programme work across agencies such as local authorities, schools, and charities to support and develop the habilitation (mobility and independence) of children and young people who are blind or partially sighted.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This programme has been matched against the National Occupational Standards for Sensory Services of the CWDC (2009) and has been developed with the support of the DfE, RNIB and Habilitation VIUK. It takes trainees from the basics of habilitation up to the standard needed for registration as an Habilitation Specilaisit with HabilitationVIUK.

Successful completion of the Graduate Diploma, followed by a probationary year, is a registration requirement of the UK Habilitation Professional Body, Habilitation VI UK.

Introductory Braille sessions are available for those not already qualified.

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The term 'learning disabilities' is used interchangeably with 'intellectual disability' to describe those who have significant problems with learning and who need support with many aspects of life. Read more

Why take this course?

The term 'learning disabilities' is used interchangeably with 'intellectual disability' to describe those who have significant problems with learning and who need support with many aspects of life.

This distance learning course enhances knowledge and skills of graduates and experienced practitioners wishing to develop their understanding of people with learning disabilities.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Be taught by academics who are active researchers in learning disability
Participate in live web-based chat forums, e-conferencing, and individual tutorials, to discuss your work with lecturers and with other students
Tap into the Library’s vast selection of electronic resources or access library facilities and borrow books locally via the SCOLNUL scheme

What opportunities might it lead to?

This course provides an opportunity for those supporting children and adults with intellectual disabilities and their families to enhance their knowledge and skills, and gain an academic qualification.

Module Details

Full-time students will study all 180 Level M credits (i.e. six units) in one full year. Part-time students will normally study three units each year, and will begin to explore potential research ideas and research methodologies in the first year. All units are Level 7, 30 credits, and are core units.

Here are the units you will study (part-time students will study these in the first year):

Critical Disability Studies and Intellectual Disability: The perspective of Critical Disability Studies (CDS) is about how society and its agents respond to the labelled person's circumstances rather than how intellectual disability inhabits the person. This unit will address the relationship between workers and disabled people that CDS might call for. Here disability and intellectual disability in particular will be a standpoint or position from which to view society, in contrast to disability as a categorisation of people.

Autistic Spectrum Conditions: A Critical Approach: this unit aims to provide knowledge about autistic spectrum conditions and promote understanding of the key issues in providing support to people with autistic spectrum conditions and their families.

Quantitative and Qualitative Research Methods: This unit provides an introduction to experimental and survey-based research methods, and quantitative data analysis techniques. It covers qualitative methods for data collection and analysis, as well as to how to write research reports in both traditions.

The following units will be studied in the first year by full-time students and in the second year by part-time students:

Families and Systemic Therapy: This unit aims to provide you with an understanding of families including an appreciation of experiences of families with an intellectually disabled member. It aims to enhance your abilities to support families via theoretically informed, partnership-based empowering practices.

Research Project: The research project requires you to initiate, conduct and report upon an original piece of research. The work is conducted to deadlines agreed with a project supervisor and project must include empirical quantitative or qualitative research – data collection and relevant analysis must be included. Any statistical analysis must be both descriptive (e.g. means, standard deviations and graphs etc.) and inferential (i.e. statistical tests).

Communication and Investigative Interviewing of People with Intellectual Disabilities: This unit aims to promote communication skills and opportunities for people with intellectual disabilities and outline the status of the law concerning vulnerable adults as witnesses/victims. It aims to provide you with the opportunity to examine issues that arise when people with intellectual disabilities are interviewed as witnesses/victims of crime.

Programme Assessment

Despite its distance learning mode, this course is still extremely student focused. You will be given resources, materials, help and guidance to complete your studies to your full ability. Using our virtual learning environment you can participate in group discussions with other students in a friendly yet challenging online class environment. Plus real-time text based 'chat sessions' with lecturers will ensure you receive all the support you need for the topics you study.

You are assessed in a variety of ways to reflect the individual topics, however there are no examinations and all assessment is coursework based. Here’s how we assess your work:

Practice files
Essays
Wikis
Statistical analysis and reports
Literature reviews
A research project

Student Destinations

When embarking on this course, you may benefit from having completed paid or voluntary work with children or adults with intellectual disabilities.

Previous graduates of the course frequently make significant progress in their careers. Some are just in the beginning stages while others move on to senior manager positions and upwards. Past students have also progressed to advanced academic qualifications such as PhDs or professional doctorates.

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The master’s degree in Rehabilitation Counseling is designed to prepare rehabilitation counselors to serve persons with disabilities in a variety of work settings. Read more
The master’s degree in Rehabilitation Counseling is designed to prepare rehabilitation counselors to serve persons with disabilities in a variety of work settings. The rehabilitation counseling program is 48 credit hours and is fully accredited by the Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE).

Mission

Professional rehabilitation counselors encourage and support persons with disabilities and their families to fully participate in their community by providing individual and group counseling, vocational assessment, case management, advocacy, assistive technology, and consultation services to help meet their personal, social, vocational, psychological, independent living, and quality of life goals. The mission of the Rehabilitation Counselor Education (RCE) distance-based program at the University of Alabama is to prepare professional rehabilitation counselors who will provide quality rehabilitation counseling services for persons with disabilities from diverse backgrounds and their families.

Visit the website http://education.ua.edu/academics/esprmc/counseling/marehab/

In addition to objective of the Program in Counselor Education, the RCE Program has the following objectives:

Objectives

1. To introduce the philosophy and historical tenets of rehabilitation counseling through new literacies of technology and interpersonal communication.

2. To deliver a 21st century, distance-based curriculum of didactic and clinical experiences that encourages active learning and adheres to the Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE) standards.

3. To prepare qualified rehabilitation counselors to work in both public and private settings located in rural and urban communities to facilitate the needs of all persons with disabilities and their families.

4. To recruit, select, and matriculate rehabilitation counseling graduate students who represent minorities, women, and individuals with disabilities.

5. To provide our rehabilitation counseling graduate students with the knowledge and skills necessary to develop a philosophical orientation and approach reflective of their commitment to meeting the needs of persons with disabilities and their families, as well as employer and community needs.

6. To foster our university’s mission in advancing the intellectual and social condition of the people by communicating to our rehabilitation graduate counseling students the need for advocacy, community integration, and social responsibility.

7. To prepare our rehabilitation counseling graduate students to become ethical rehabilitation counselors by understanding and following the Code of Professional Ethics for rehabilitation counselors.

8. To promote the involvement of our rehabilitation counseling graduate students in rehabilitation counseling professional associations (e.g., National Rehabilitation Association, National Rehabilitation Counseling Association, American Rehabilitation Counseling Association, National Rehabilitation Counselors and Educators Association) to enhance awareness of professional issues and service that are important to the growth of our field.

The RCE master’s program is 48 semester hours in length. However, a 60-semester hour option is available for students who wish to pursue 60 hours of graduate coursework. The curriculum provides both didactic and experiential learning and culminates in a 600 hour internship under the supervision of a Certified Rehabilitation Counselor. The RCE program is fully accredited by the Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE). Students completing the RCE program are eligible to become Certified Rehabilitation Counselors (CRC). For more information about becoming a CRC, visit the Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification website: http://www.crccertification.com/

The RCE program is an on-line program. Distance students must meet criteria for full or conditional admission. Distance students who can enroll for 9 hours (fall and spring) and 6 hours (summer) may complete the degree program in two calendar years. Distance students may take more or fewer hours each semseter with advisor approval. Some rehabilitation courses are offered as synchronous courses and will require weekly participation via live virtual classroom.

In most states, program graduates are eligible to begin the process of becoming a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC). The following link provides a listing of counselor licensure boards in all of the states: http://www.counseling.org/Counselors/LicensureAndCert/TP/StateRequirements/CT2.aspx

Employment Outlook

According to the U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook (2009), jobs for rehabilitation counselors are expected to grow by 19%, which is faster than the average for all occupations. Rehabilitation counselors serve persons with disabilities in a variety of work settings including, but not limited to, state-federal vocational rehabilitation agencies, non-profit community rehabilitation programs, private-for-profit rehabilitation companies, rehabilitation hospital settings, community mental health and substance abuse programs, correctional facilities, and private practice.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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A letter of intent written by the applicant, discussing why you wish to develop your knowledge and skills in the field of special education, in addition to the personal attributes you possess that will help you meet the challenges of the graduate program. Read more
• A letter of intent written by the applicant, discussing why you wish to develop your knowledge and skills in the field of special education, in addition to the personal attributes you possess that will help you meet the challenges of the graduate program.
• Submission of three letters of recommendation, using the required recommendation form.
• Résumé or curriculum vitae.
• Submission of a teaching certificate, indicating preparation in general education curriculum at the level of the program for which application is being made.
• Certain coursework may be required as a component to individual admission, as determined at the time of application.

E-mail: • Phone: 315-267-2165

Visit http://www.potsdam.edu/graduate to view the full application checklist and online application.

The Master of Science in Education in Special Education is recognized by the Council for Exceptional Children and accredited by NCATE. All programs are registered with the New York State Education Department and lead to initial certification in one of the following three areas: Early Childhood (Birth-Grade 2), Childhood (Grade 1-6), or Adolescent (Grade 7-12). Please note that students may also receive certification at both the Early Childhood and Childhood levels. Program start date: Fall.

Required Program Courses
Minimum of 36 credit hours

SPED 601, Characteristics of Learners with Mild/Moderate Disabilities
SPED 607, Educational Research: Critical Issues in Special Education
SPED 609, Field Experience I
SPED 612, Technology in Special Education
SPED 637, Diagnosis and Assessment of Educational Disabilities
SPED 638, Teaching Reading for Students with Special Needs
SPED 640, Behavior Management for the Special Educator
SPED 649, Field Experience II
SPED 650, Collaborative Consultation with Professionals and Parents
SPED 669, Practicum
SPED 670, Culminating Experience

Program Specific Course Requirements: 6 credit hours

Early Childhood (Birth – Grade 2):
SPED 648, Strategies for Early Childhood Special Education
Elective Course selected with advisor approval

Childhood (Grades 1–6):
SPED 646, Strategies for Teaching Elementary Students with Disabilities
Elective Course selected with advisor approval

Adolescent (Grades 7–12):
SPED 646, Strategies for Teaching Elementary Students with Learning / Behavioral Disabilities
SPED 647, Strategies for Teaching Secondary Students with Disabilities

The GRE Exam (or equivalent) is required for all teacher preparation program candidates who are seeking certification (for applicants seeking admission for Fall 2015 forward). All other graduate programs, including non-certification options, do not require this exam. More information on the GRE exam can be found by visiting http://www.gre.org. SUNY Potsdam’s code for sending score reports is 2545.

Uniqueness of Program

Students enrolled in this selective program complete their course- work with the same peer cohort, affording them a unique opportunity to build relationships and collaborate with fellow students throughout the program. Small class sizes and a dedicated faculty fosters positive relationships. Students also have the opportunity to gain direct hands-on field experiences with students with disabilities under the mentorship of the classroom teacher and college supervisor. Part-time study is available.

Testimonials

“The thing I valued the most about the program was how the faculty treated us all like individuals. They knew us on a per- sonal level and worked to assist us all in gaining the knowledge and skills we need to work with the population of students we intended to teach. I felt that my opinions were respected. My personal experiences were valued and welcomed by the faculty to help our diverse group truly understand that we all had very different backgrounds and could learn so much from each other.”

“My favorite thing about the program was the small classes and the personal attention that I got in regards to my academics. Whenever I needed help, there was always someone there willing to help. I also really enjoyed how much technology is stressed in the program.”

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The Master's degree in Communication and Deafblindness is a unique programme during which you acquire theoretical and methodological skills. Read more
The Master's degree in Communication and Deafblindness is a unique programme during which you acquire theoretical and methodological skills. These skills will enable you to analyse communication in situations that are specific to the field of deafblindness. You will learn to apply this knowledge in the contexts of research and intervention. The programme is especially interesting for those who are already working as professionals and who would like to expand their basic knowledge and research skills.

The programme starts with the course Introduction to Communication with people with Deafblindness. In this course, you will learn about fundamental communicative processes, including topics like early symbolic communication and narratives and the role of gestures in communication and thinking.

After the introductory course, students receive coaching in methodology. You will also perform a practical training and write a learner's report. In addition, you will carry out research and write a Master's thesis.

Degree: MSc in Pedagogical Sciences

Why in Groningen?

- Only programme in the world focussing on communication with people who are deafblind, for 2013-2014 also acquired deafblindness
- Aims at providing deafblind and hearing sighted persons with tools that help them communicate
- Tools acquired in this programme are also applicable to other people with disabilities

Job perspectives

After graduation, you have the knowledge and skills needed to work in the field of education related to deafblindness. This programme gives you a good basis for consultancy work in education and for further research.

Research Centre on Profound and Multiple Disabilities

The Master programme Educational Sciences: Communication and Deafblindness is linked to the Research Centre on Profound and Multiple Disabilities.

Field of research

- domains for research are concentrated on the topic of communication with people with deafblindness
- research is also conducted in the field of people who are deafblind and have additional disabilities, or in the field of people with sensory and multiple disabilities
- research lines are: meaning-creation, tactile communication, assessment, communication and transition to a cultural language

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