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Masters Degrees (Digitisation)

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Who is it for?. This MA is designed for aspiring professionals who recognise that the global publishing industry is changing dramatically - and who wish to equip themselves with the knowledge and skills needed by the next generation of publishers. Read more

Who is it for?

This MA is designed for aspiring professionals who recognise that the global publishing industry is changing dramatically - and who wish to equip themselves with the knowledge and skills needed by the next generation of publishers. Your first degree might be from the Humanities, the Social Sciences or the Sciences; and you might be a recent graduate or someone with work experience either in publishing or in another field.

Objectives

Located in the heart of London, the commercial centre of this global industry, this MA explores how publishing is evolving in the face of digitisation.

The programme provides you with an applied understanding of how books, journals, magazines and interactive resources are conceived, developed and marketed, including the key role of authorship.

You will be encouraged to explore whether your interests lie in publishing for entertainment, education, research or information. Alongside research-led analytical assignments, you will develop a portfolio of achievements relating to the global industry which reflect the range of professional roles in contemporary publishing, including editorial, marketing, production, and both print and digital content development.

Placements

All MA Publishing students at City, University of London are strongly encouraged to apply for and complete placements, whether in London or other locations, subject to the approval of the Programme Director.

To join the optional MA Publishing Professional Placement module in Term 2, you need to be offered a placement by the beginning of that term (or by the end of Term 2 for part-time students). Whether or not you join that module, you will be encouraged to apply for the many placement opportunities that are shared with the programme, and supported to develop a practice-related Major Project that furthers your career goals.

Teaching and learning

The course content covers all types of publishing, from trade and specialist publications to novels and non-fiction, and provides a thorough grounding in the drivers of commercial success for both print and digital products.

You will be taught both by research experts and publishing practitioners who share specialist expertise and up-to-date industry knowledge.

Your core modules aim to establish and develop your understanding of contemporary industry conditions, including the impact of digitisation. Your options in Term 2 allow you to develop more scholarly or applied interests, and include an optional Professional Placement module.

Our publishing programmes foster a nurturing community with great guest speakers and student opportunities. Search #citypublishing and find out more.

Modules

You will learn through lectures, project work, student-led projects and presentations, workshops, online learning and research, preparation of submitted work, site visits and discussions. Your final module is a substantial Major Project, which can include an approved industry project.

Visiting lecturers from the industry contribute to the programme throughout the teaching year, and in many cases directly support your project work.

A standard module consists of 20 timetabled hours in a combination of lectures, groupwork sessions and supervised project work. Each module also requires substantial study hours towards both individual and group assessments.

Core modules

  • PBM001 Business and Marketing in Publishing (15 credits)
  • PBM002 Creating and Managing Intellectual Property (15 credits)
  • PBM003 Digitisation and Publishing (15 credits)
  • PBM004 Publishing History and Culture (15 credits)
  • PBM008 Major Project (60 credits).

Elective modules

  • PBM005 Professional Placement (15 credits)
  • PBM006 Developing Creative Content (15 credits)
  • PBM007 Innovations in Content: Curating Cultural and Commercial Value (15 credits)
  • PBM011 Designing Interactive Media (15 credits)
  • AMM421 Digital Cultures (15 credits).

Part time students

Part-time students take the course over two years and normally chose an equal number of elective modules between the two years. All modules are 15 credits unless otherwise stated.

Core Modules

  • PBM001 Business and Marketing in Publishing (Year one, term 1)
  • PBM002 Creating and Managing Intellectual Property (Year one, term 1)
  • PBM003 Digitisation and Publishing (Year two, term 1)
  • PBM004 Publishing History and Culture (Year two, term 1)
  • PBM008 Major Project (60 credits, Year two)

Career prospects

City’s Publishing graduates develop careers in a variety of organisations, with the majority of each class achieving a publishing role within months of graduating. The roles of a recent class show the range of possible careers in global publishing, include:

  • Trainee, Foreign Language Publishing Co, Shanghai;
  • Rights Assistant, Literary Agency
  • Editorial, Production Assistant and Rights Assistants, Children’s Publishing
  • Contracts Assistant and International Sales Representative, Academic Publishing
  • Business Reporter in a Chicago newspaper
  • Marketing Assistant and Digital Marketing Executive, Bloomsbury
  • Rights Assistant, Fiction, Paris
  • Picture Researcher, Hodder
  • Marketing, Random House
  • Editorial Business Analyst, Condé Nast Japan
  • Editorial Assistant and Marketing Assistant, Specialist and Academic Publishing
  • PR and Literary Agent, Freelance
  • Editor, Economics website
  • Publicist, Hachette NZ
  • Magazine Publishing, Beijing
  • Production Assistant, ELT, Greece.


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This programme draws together teaching from a wide range of disciplines, investigating the application of computational technologies to the arts, humanities and cultural heritage. Read more

This programme draws together teaching from a wide range of disciplines, investigating the application of computational technologies to the arts, humanities and cultural heritage. We study the impact of these techniques on cultural heritage, museums, libraries, archives and digital culture while developing skills that employers and students tell us are needed.

About this degree

Our students develop an advanced understanding of digital resources, techniques and computational methods relevant to research and practice in the humanities and cultural heritage sectors; these include programming, XML, databases, internet technologies, image capture and digitisation. They receive both practical and theoretical training to develop a unique and critical skill set suitable for many types of employment or advanced study.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of five core modules (75 credits), three optional modules (45 credits), a research dissertation (60 credits) and a work placement.

A Postgraduate Diploma, five core modules (75 credits), three optional modules (45 credits), full-time nine months or flexible study up to 5 years, is offered.

A Postgraduate Certificate, four from any of the available modules (60 credits), full-time fifteen weeks or flexible study up to two years, is offered.

Core modules

  • Digital Resources in the Humanities
  • Internet Technologies
  • Introduction to Programming and Scripting
  • Server Programming and Structured Data
  • XML

Optional modules

Students choose three optional modules from a list which may include the following: 

  • Affective Interaction
  • Computer Music
  • Cultural Heritage and Development
  • Early Modern Handwriting and Manuscript Culture for Researchers
  • Electronic Publishing
  • Fundamentals of Information Science
  • Geographical Information Systems
  • Historical Bibliography
  • Interaction Design
  • Systems Management
  • Introduction to Digital Curation
  • Introduction to Digitisation
  • Knowledge Representation and Semantic Technologies
  • Legal and Social Aspects of Electronic Publishing
  • Manuscript Studies
  • Research Software Engineering with Python
  • Research Skills for Spatial Analysis
  • Systems Management
  • The Anthropology of Social Media
  • User-centred Evaluation Methods

Optional modules are offered subject to availability, and students may be required to fulfil specific prerequisites.

Dissertation/report

All MA/MSc students undertake an independent research project in the form of a 12,000-word dissertation.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, demonstrations, seminars and practical sessions, and will include a work placement in a relevant organisation. Assessment is through a mixture of essays, practical projects, programming exercises, written technical examinations, and group work projects, depending on the options chosen.

Placement

Students undertake a 4-6 week work placement as part of their programme of study. Past placement hosts have included the British Museum; British Library; Marx Memorial Library; Islington Museum; the Postal Museum; Ken Saro-Wiwa Foundation; Ubiquity Press; SOAS, University of London; UCL Grant Museum; and The Warburg Institute.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Digital Humanities MA/MSc

Careers

The cultural heritage sector is increasingly aware of the need to provide and manage digital material and projects with institutions and museums investing heavily in online content. Our graduates develop a unique skill set and are well placed for project management, further research, or a career in e-commerce and the fast growing digital field. Our alumni have found employment in the British Museum, Oxford University, UNESCO, International Red Cross, Knowledge 4 All Foundation, and the British Medical Journal, in roles as diverse as web editor, chief operating officer, and senior digital marketing executive. Several have also progressed to fully-funded research degrees; others have further developed their technical skills and have been recruited as programmers and developers for both academic and commercial projects.

Employability

The MA/MSc in Digital Humanities is a unique and groundbreaking programme that gives students the skills that they and employers tell us are needed. In this truly interdisciplinary programme, with optional modules offered across UCL, our students receive an exceptional blend of practical and theoretical skills that are in great demand. The work placement gives our students the opportunity to put theory into practice and gain invaluable experience of the workplace in this fast-moving environment. As well as the practical and technical skills of programming and other digital tools, they are equipped with a critical and analytical mindset and are well positioned to go on to pursue careers that focus on collaborative, innovative and creative thinking.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This MA/MSc is a truly interdisciplinary programme, and students can capitalise on UCL's world-leading strengths in information studies, computer science, the arts and humanities, and social and historical studies.

Students benefit from research teaching delivered by leading scholars and the excellent range of facilities available, including the UCL Library Special Collections, UCL Museums & Collections, and the UCLDH Digitisation Suite. Teaching by academic staff is supplemented by guest lectures given by experienced practitioners and expert industry professionals.

Students take advantage of our collaboration with many internationally important cultural heritage institutions including the British Museum and the British Library. Students undertake a work placement, where they have the opportunity to make professional contacts and gain invaluable experience, putting what they have learnt into practice. Past placement hosts have included the British Museum; British Library; Marx Memorial Library; Islington Museum; the Postal Museum; Ken Saro-Wiwa Foundation; Ubiquity Press; SOAS, University of London; UCL Grant Museum; and The Warburg Institute.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Information Studies

68% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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Who is it for?. This MA is designed for aspiring professionals who recognise that the global publishing industry is changing dramatically - and who wish to equip themselves with the knowledge and skills needed by the next generation of publishers. Read more

Who is it for?

This MA is designed for aspiring professionals who recognise that the global publishing industry is changing dramatically - and who wish to equip themselves with the knowledge and skills needed by the next generation of publishers. Your first degree might be from the Humanities, the Social Sciences or the Sciences; and you might be a recent graduate or someone with work experience either in publishing or in another field.

Objectives

Located in the heart of London, the global centre of this creative, dynamic industry, this MA explores how publishing is evolving in the face of digitisation.

The programme provides you with an applied understanding of how books, journals, magazines and interactive resources are conceived, developed and marketed, including the key role of authorship.

You will be encouraged to explore whether your interests lie in publishing for entertainment, education, research or information. Alongside research-led analytical assignments, you will develop a portfolio of achievements relating to the global industry which reflect the range of professional roles in contemporary publishing, including editorial, marketing, production, and both print and digital content development.

Placements

All Publishing MA students at City, University of London are strongly encouraged to apply for and complete placements, whether in London or other locations, subject to the approval of the Programme Director. Your Term 2 International Publishing Case Study project will reflect current industry practice, often developed in conjunction with an industry sponsor.

You will also be eligible to apply for the many placement opportunities that are shared with the programme, and supported to develop a practice-related Major Project that furthers your career goals.

Teaching and learning

The course content covers all types of publishing, from trade and specialist publications to novels and non-fiction, and provides a thorough grounding in the drivers of the commercial success for both print and digital products in local and global markets.

You will be taught both by research experts and publishing practitioners who share specialist expertise and up-to-date industry knowledge.

Your core modules aim to establish and develop your understanding of the contemporary industry in local and global markets, including the impact of digitisation. Your options in Term two allow you to develop more scholarly or applied interests, alongside the applied insights you gain in the compulsory International Publishing Case Studies module.

Modules

You will learn through lectures, project work, student-led projects and presentations, workshops, online learning and research, preparation of submitted work, site visits and discussions. Your final module is a substantial Major Project, which can include an approved industry project.

Visiting lecturers from the industry contribute to the programme throughout the teaching year, and in many cases directly support your project work.

A standard module consists of 20 timetabled hours in a combination of lectures, groupwork sessions and supervised project work. Each module also requires substantial study hours towards both individual and group assessments.

Core modules

All modules 15 credits unless stated otherwise

  • PBM001 Business and Marketing in Publishing
  • PBM002 Creating and Managing Intellectual Property
  • PBM003 Digitisation and Publishing
  • PBM004 Publishing History and Culture
  • PBM009 International Publishing Case Studies
  • PBM008 Major Project (60 credits)

Elective modules

  • PBM006 Developing Creative Content
  • PBM007 Innovations in Content: Curating Cultural and Commercial Value
  • PBM011 Designing Interactive Media
  • AMM421 Digital Cultures
  • INM380 Libraries and Publishing in the Information Society

Career prospects

City’s International Publishing graduates develop careers in a variety of organisations, with the majority of each class achieving a publishing role within months of graduating. The roles of a recent class show the range of possible careers in global publishing, including:

  • Trainee, Foreign Language Publishing Co, Shanghai
  • Rights Assistant, Literary Agency
  • Contracts Assistant and International Sales Representative, Academic Publishing
  • Rights Assistant, Fiction, Paris
  • Editorial Business Analyst, Condé Nast Japan
  • Marketing Assistant, Academic Publishing
  • Editor, Economics website
  • Publicist, Hachette NZ
  • Magazine Publishing, Beijing


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The aims of the programme are. 1. To support students in the development of their intellectual and practical skills through the study and interpretation of cultural heritage artefacts, their historic societal significance and relationship with the landscape and the wider environment in the past and the present. Read more

AIM

The aims of the programme are:

1. To support students in the development of their intellectual and practical skills through the study and interpretation of cultural heritage artefacts, their historic societal significance and relationship with the landscape and the wider environment in the past and the present.

2. To demonstrate how geo-spatial technologies and techniques (including GIS, scanning and digitisation) play a central role in the recording, analysis, interpretation and management of cultural heritage across a range of scales from excavated items, archaeological sites, and paper records to historic buildings, monuments and their landscapes.

WHY QUEEN'S?

In the new programme the internationally recognised expertise within GAP with regard to the development and application of digitisation and scanning technologies will be more fully used and integrated into the student learning experience.

The integration of these skills with wider academic expertise in Archaeology and the Centre for Archaeological Fieldwork (CAF), and Geography and the Centre for Data Digitisation and Analysis (CDDA) will create a unique 'heritage' focused programme in which students will experience heritage in its widest context and will have the opportunity to acquire and practice a wide range of geo-spatial skills and explore the conceptual issues associated with their application.

PROGRAMME CONTENT

MSc: successfully complete the five taught modules (120 CATS) and undertake independent research for the dissertation (60 CATS).

PgDip: successfully complete the same five taught modules but do not take the dissertation module.

PgCert: successfully complete the two Semester 1 modules.

Semester 1
GIS Technologies: Application and Practice (30 credits)
Introduction to Cultural Heritage and GIS (30 credits)

Semester 2
Heritage Structures (20 credits)
Heritage Landscapes (20 credits)
Professional Practice Placement (20 credits)

Semester 3
Dissertation (60 credits)

LEARNING AND TEACHING

One of the modules included in the Cultural Heritage and GIS programme includes a residential field course (between 5-10 days).

CAREER PROSPECTS

The market for those with a qualification in Cultural Heritage and GIS can be defined as:

professionals who are involved in providing scientific understanding in the support of heritage protection
professionals engaged in dealing with the digital documentation and portrayal of heritage structures and landscapes
professionals seeking a targeted training in the use of digital data handling, especially through the application of GIS
those wishing to develop a career in cultural heritage conservation and/or management;
those already employed in cultural heritage management who require the updating of qualifications, or the improvement of existing ones, in order to reflect new developments in technology and thinking.

Queen's postgraduates reap exceptional benefits. Unique initiatives, such as Degree Plus and Researcher Plus bolster our commitment to employability, while innovative leadership and executive programmes alongside sterling integration with business experts helps our students gain key leadership positions both nationally and internationally.

ASSESSMENT & FEEDBACK

Teaching is achieved through various combinations of lectures, seminars, practical classes and fieldwork and is supported by intensive self-guided independent learning. All assessment is coursework based and will be individually undertaken. The dissertation submission is an independent piece of research undertaken by each student under the supervision of an academic member of staff. Both formative and summative feedback will be given through, as appropriate, oral and written means. The pass mark for all assessments is 50 per cent. Students must obtain an overall 50 per cent pass mark for this taught programme (five modules) before progression from the PG Diploma to Masters.

VISIT US

Visit Queen's to sense the atmosphere of our historic campus, tour our world-class facilities, and experience for yourself the exceptional learning environment we provide. Find out when our next Open Days are, or arrange a guided tour to suit you.

HOW TO APPLY

Applications for admission to the vast majority of postgraduate programmes are submitted online via the Postgraduate Direct Applications Portal. The online system also allows application for funding where appropriate.

If you have queries on course content please contact the school representative below.

Dr Paul Ell
School of Geography, Archaeology and Palaeoecology
Tel: 9097 3186
Email:
WWW: http://www.qub.ac.uk/gap

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This Masters is concerned with outlining and critically evaluating the concept of the ‘avant-garde’ both theoretically and in terms of its applicability to representative areas of 20th-century art. Read more

This Masters is concerned with outlining and critically evaluating the concept of the ‘avant-garde’ both theoretically and in terms of its applicability to representative areas of 20th-century art. Dealing with art from the early twentieth century to the present, you will investigate concepts such as historical avant-garde, neo-avant-garde, and post-avant-garde, paying close attention to the theorists who have elaborated these ideas.

Why this programme

  • Glasgow’s civic and university collections are some of the richest and most diverse in Europe and are of international standing. You are granted privileged access to the extensive collections in our own Hunterian Museum and Art Gallery.
  • You have the opportunity to take part in a project-based work placement, where you can explore a possible future career while meeting professional practitioners and developing your skills and experience.
  • If you want to learn from world-leading researchers and develop expert knowledge of 20th-century Avant-Gardes, this programme is for you.
  • Our research forum provides you with a lively and stimulating introduction to methodological debates within art history. It provides a sense of art history’s own history as well as contemporary concerns and practice, examining the beliefs and values that have informed various forms of historical and visual analysis and enquiry. It is focused around a series of seminars or workshops run by members of staff and visiting academics.

Programme structure

Closely focused on the visual and historical specificities of the subject, the core teaching will have you examining the politically oppositional and ‘transgressive’ impulses of the avant-garde.

You will interpret ‘transgression’ in the widest sense and in relation to a range of diverse historical contexts, including: the anti-art concerns of Dada; the political tensions arising from conflicts between nationalist and internationalist currents in European art of the early 20th century and the Nietzschian/Bataillean testing of the boundaries of conventional moral positions, particularly regarding sexual identity and the body.

The optional courses available are closely geared to the research interests of our staff. Their content will draw upon current exhibitions and debates. 

You will take five core courses and one optional course. This is followed by a period of self-study towards a dissertation 15,000 words in length (including footnotes but excluding bibliography) and will be on a topic chosen in consultation with the tutors and the programme convenor.

Core courses

  • Research methods in practice
  • Theories of the Avant Garde
  • Readings in Duchamp: anti-art, blasphemy, sexuality
  • Art, embodiment, transgression
  • Dada in Switzerland and Germany.

Optional courses

You may choose from the following options in the College of Arts

  • a Humanities Advanced Technology and Information Institute (HATII) course: 2D Digitisation (Theory and Practice)
  • a course from the MLitt Modernities: Modernism, Modernity & Post-Modernity run by English Literature 
  • a course from elsewhere in the College of Arts, subject to the approval of the programme convenor.

Or from courses run by History of Art

  • Art in the making: modern and Avant-Garde techniques
  • Independent study 
  • Work placement.

Study trip

Students on this programme are invited to take part in an optional study trip of approximately one week, which is funded by the student. Previous destinations include Berlin and Dublin.

Career prospects

Career opportunities include positions in curation, digitisation and research within museums and other cultural and heritage institutions. The programme also provides an excellent platform for you to move onto PhD studies and an academic career.



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Book History is a dynamic and rapidly growing area of interdisciplinary study that examines the book as an artefact in material culture. Read more

Book History is a dynamic and rapidly growing area of interdisciplinary study that examines the book as an artefact in material culture. This programme brings together theory and practice in new and innovative ways. We study the production, circulation and reception of books from manuscript to e-books, paying attention to the histories of reading and authorship.

The programme integrates traditional bibliography, advanced theoretical approaches, training in special collections, and hands-on experience. You will be taught by leading experts at the University’s renowned Centre for the History of the Book. Field trips and work placements will allow you to take advantage of the exceptional collections in Edinburgh.

The programme attracts outstanding students from a variety of academic and professional backgrounds. The degree is accredited by the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals.

Programme structure

You will complete two core and two option courses, along with training in research methods. You will then complete a supervised, independently-researched dissertation on a topic of your choice.

Compulsory courses:

  • Cultures of the Book
  • Working with Collections

Option courses may include:

  • Critical Theory: Issues and Debates
  • Shakespeare's Sister: Archival Research and the Politics of the Canon
  • Sex and God in Victorian Poetry
  • Exploring the Novel
  • Censorship

Work placement/internship opportunities

Work placements allow students to take advantage of the exceptional resources in Edinburgh for the study of books in order to gain hands-on experience that will be beneficial in their future careers.

Placements may take place internally, for example in the Centre for Research Collections at the University Library, or externally with several partner organisations.

You will receive training from the placement supervisor, and will undertake well-defined projects in the course of your placement, such as cataloguing, conservation, collation, digitisation and other kinds of work.

You will reflect on your placement in a poster presentation, and it will provide material for an academic essay. Regular academic oversight of the work placement will be provided by the Course Organiser.

Learning outcomes

By the end of the programme, you will have a firm grasp of:

  • the extensive range of media forms and technologies, from manuscript to electronic text
  • the issues surrounding conservation, cataloguing, digitisation, and the display and management of collections
  • advanced archival research methodologies in manuscript and print

Career opportunities

This programme will equip you with the detailed knowledge and research skills you need to progress to a research degree and continue a career in academia; or you may pursue a career in publishing, libraries, and the cultural heritage sector. You will graduate with a number of highly transferable skills in communication, project management and analysis that will give you an advantage, whatever your chosen career.



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Through combining arts management with heritage studies, students will develop a sophisticated understanding of the changing political, policy and practice contexts within which the arts and heritage sectors operate today. Read more

Through combining arts management with heritage studies, students will develop a sophisticated understanding of the changing political, policy and practice contexts within which the arts and heritage sectors operate today.

Core modules explore the nature of heritage and how meanings of objects, artworks and buildings change in different contexts. You will examine the challenges faced by arts managers and cultural leaders, and the changes that have led some museums to move towards the role of the ‘manager’ rather than the ‘curator’.

You will choose from optional modules to tailor your degree to your interests or career plans – including the opportunity to undertake a work placement or consultancy project role in either arts management or heritage. Previous students have undertaken placements focused on collections, digitisation work, digital interpretation and community engagement.

Supported by our Centre for Critical Studies in Museums, Galleries and Heritage, you will benefit from our partnerships with major arts and cultural organisations to find out what it means to work in this challenging sector.

You will study in the heart of a cultural hub for this diverse and vibrant region. Leeds is home to a wide variety of world-leading and innovative arts and heritage organisations, from the Royal Armouries, Opera North, West Yorkshire Playhouse and Northern Ballet through to nine council-run museums, galleries and heritage sites and many contemporary art spaces.

We are also close to everything the rest of Yorkshire has to offer, from The Hepworth Wakefield to the National Science and Media Museum, Yorkshire Sculpture Park and the Brontë Parsonage Museum. We have close links with many of these cultural institutions to support your practical learning.

Interdisciplinary learning

This exciting programme has been developed in close collaboration with the School of Performance and Cultural Industries and allows students to undertake core and optional courses in both Schools. Students become members of the Centre for Critical Studies in Museums, Galleries and Heritage and enjoy the opportunities that membership offers.

Course content

All MA students in the School take two core modules.

In Arts Management and Cultural Leadership, students will examine theoretical concepts in the emerging field of arts management and the challenges faced by arts managers and cultural leaders. Dialogue with our arts and cultural partners will give an insight into the exciting possibilities opened up by bringing theory and practice together. Students can deepen their learning in this area through optional modules that explore a variety of key issues, such as audience engagement and impact, cultural entrepreneurship, and contemporary cultural strategies, technologies and media.

In Heritage Studies: Key Words, students will develop a critical exploration of heritage through the ways in which people have sought to preserve, understand and pass on their cultures. This is underpinned through combining a sustained theoretical engagement with key ideas which animate heritage – place, community, memory, archive, future – with embedded skills development in heritage and museum interpretative and curatorial practice (which are a core set of sector skills). Students can build on these skills through optional modules such as exploring anthropology and representation, cultural memory and material culture.

Through our Advanced Research Skills modules, students are equipped to undertake assessments and ultimately develop their own research project. The modules build to a symposium in Semester 2 where students present initial research findings towards a dissertation on a research topic of interest.

In addition, students choose from a range of optional modules offered by the School of Fine Art, History of Art and Cultural Studies and the School of Performance and Cultural Industries. These include the opportunity to complete a placement or consultancy project role in either arts management or heritage. Previous students have undertaken placements focused on collections, digitisation work, digital interpretation and community engagement.

We use a range of teaching and learning methods to allow students to benefit from the expertise of our staff. These include weekly seminars, group learning sessions, tutorials and lectures.

Students will also benefit from the expertise of visiting speakers, visits off campus and practical experience. Independent study is also vital to this course, allowing students to develop individual skills and prepare for taught sessions

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Arts Management and Heritage Studies Dissertation 50 credits
  • Advanced Research Skills 15 credits
  • Advanced Research Skills 25 credits
  • Heritage Studies: Key Words 30 credits
  • Arts Management and Cultural Leadership 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Derrida and Deconstruction 30 credits
  • Capitalism-Criticism-Contemporary Art 30 credits
  • Unfinished Business: Trauma, Cultural Memory & the Holocaust 30 credits
  • From Chagall to Kitaj and Beyond 30 credits
  • Encountering Things: Art & Entanglement in Anglo-Saxon England 30 credits
  • Anthropology, Art & Representation 30 credits
  • Individual Directed Study 30 credits
  • Placements in Context: Policy, Organizations and Practice 30 credits
  • Performance & Collaborative Enterprise 30 credits
  • Audience Engagement & Impact 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Arts Management and Heritage Studies MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Arts Management and Heritage Studies MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use a range of teaching and learning methods to help you benefit from the expertise of our staff. These include weekly seminars, group learning sessions, tutorials and lectures. You’ll also benefit from the expertise of visiting speakers, visits off campus and practical experience. Independent study is also vital to this programme, allowing you to develop your individual skills and prepare for taught sessions.

Assessment

Depending on the modules you choose, you may experience a range of different assessment methods. These usually include essays of around 7,000 words, individual and group presentations, in-course assessment and project work. You may also be asked to complete a reflective log for your projects, allowing you to look back and critically assess your own practice.

Placement opportunities

All students have a choice of two optional modules. A number of these modules have a work or enterprise component to gain first-hand experience of contemporary museum and gallery practice. If you have a particular ambition in mind for a work placement, we try to find a role that suits you.




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Advance your leadership skills and develop your business acumen in the creative industries. Building on our 35-year experience of running one of the world's leading, triple-accredited MBA programmes, this Executive MBA can be studied online with attendance at four residential weeks over two years. Read more
Advance your leadership skills and develop your business acumen in the creative industries.

Building on our 35-year experience of running one of the world's leading, triple-accredited MBA programmes, this Executive MBA can be studied online with attendance at four residential weeks over two years.

It is for busy professionals either already working in the creative sector or looking to make the transition into the sector, who wish to gain the strategic skills and knowledge required to respond to increased digitisation and globalisation.

To download brochure click here

https://www.ashridge.org.uk/lp/embac

The programme is designed and taught by Ashridge Executive Education with the expertise and contribution from two experienced industry partners: Creative Skillset and Atticus Education. An Advisory Board of senior executives from the creative industries including advertising, publishing, film and television provides extensive industry knowledge, experience and support for this qualification.

Credibility and expertise

This brand new Executive MBA is brought to you by triple-accredited Ashridge Business School. One of only 1% of business schools globally to be accredited by AMBA, EQUIS and AACSB, Ashridge provides the assurance of quality, credibility and relevance.

Creative Skillset http://creativeskillset.org/ is the UK-wide strategic skills body that works to ensure that the UK's creative industries have continued access now and in the future to the skills and talent they require. Their unrivalled knowledge of the creative industries has ensured that this Executive MBA is directly relevant and fills the skills gap in the need for strategic management expertise.
This qualification is also supported by an Advisory Board of industry experts. Find out more about our Advisory Board https://www.ashridge.org.uk/qualifications/executive-mba-for-the-creative-industries/faculty/advisory-board/

Who is it for?

Whether you are a freelancer, mid-career professional, business owner or entrepreneur, the Ashridge Executive MBA for the Creative Industries is a strategic programme for professionals wishing to lead, establish or grow their role and their business in the fast-paced, changing environment of the creative industries. To apply, you must have a minimum of 3 years’ work experience plus a Bachelor degree, or a minimum of 5 years’ work experience without a degree. English must be at IELTS 7.0 level or equivalent for those for whom English is not their first language. The Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT) is not mandatory but may be required in certain circumstances. Work experience in the creative industries is not essential, but you will need to be able to base your assignments on a relevant organization during the programme.

What will you learn?

This is a general MBA including all the main subjects of strategic management: marketing, finance, operations, leadership, strategy, global management, sustainability, economics and innovation. However, resources for each subject are tailored to ensure they are relevant to the creative industries. In addition, you can use your own organization as the basis for your learning and your assignments, to ensure direct relevance and practical application while you study. There are no exams, just assignments and a final business-based masters project, so your organization may even benefit from free consultancy! This is of particular value if you are looking for company sponsorship for your studies. The four residential weeks will include development of personal and leadership skills which are more effective when practiced face-to-face. While studying online, you will have the opportunity to interact with your tutor and your peers through discussion forums, privately and in the virtual classroom.

Flexibility and innovation

This is an online MBA that can be studied in your own time to fit around busy work schedules, especially important in the creative industries. The online study planner will outline the study schedule, key deadlines and dates for online interactive sessions. You will then be able to draw on the extensive online resources, including state-of-the-art video material from Atticus Education and access to the MBA Learning Zone and Virtual Ashridge. Here you will find numerous databases of thousands of articles, industry journals, company reports, and e-books which are all freely available to support your studies. Although focused around distance learning, you will be expected to attend four residential weeks, two per year, to gain the key soft skills required to support the academic elements of the MBA. Three of these weeks will be at Ashridge Business School, near London, UK and one will be outside of the UK.

Why gain an Executive MBA?

Here are some reasons why you might be looking to gain an Executive MBA qualification:

‌•Personal
‌•Career progression in your organisation
‌•Change career
‌•Start your own business
‌•Consolidate your experience.
‌•Professional
‌•To improve in a strategic role
‌•To move into a strategic role
‌•To move into general management from a specialist function
‌•To lead the business in a new direction.

Watch the videos from our current students and alumni to see why they chose to study for the Ashridge MB: https://www.ashridge.org.uk/qualifications/mba-executive-mba/participant-insights/

How to Apply

https://www.ashridge.org.uk/qualifications/executive-mba-for-the-creative-industries/apply/

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This course give you a unique opportunity to explore the many forms of digital culture and their profound effects on society from a number of different angles. Read more

This course give you a unique opportunity to explore the many forms of digital culture and their profound effects on society from a number of different angles. It aims to develop participants' skills in forming their own assessments of digital technologies and their impact on society and culture. 

Graduates of this coursewill have gained the analytical tools required to understand how digitisation and internet technologies have shaped and are shaping modern culture.

 Key Benefits

  • Develop an understanding of the role and impact of digital technologies in contemporary culture, broadly interpreted to include such areas of activity as performing arts, telecommunications, information technology, philosophy, law and education.
  • Study digital technologies within an interdisciplinary and cross-cultural framework, combining modules from participating departments.
  • Obtain on-the-job training in a month long internship within a relevant organisation.
  • Take field trips to major London cultural institutions, such as Tate Modern, National Gallery, Institute of Archaeology and the BBC Archives.

Description

On this Digital Culture & Society MA programme you will focus on how technology and culture are connected in today’s society. We broadly interpret this to include such areas of activity as performing arts, telecommunications, information technology, philosophy, law and education. We aim to develop and enhance your awareness and understanding of a range of subjects relevant to digital culture and technology, including:

  • The key information and communication technologies that shape contemporary society.
  • The key developments in contemporary cultural expression, specifically how these are driven, mediated or influenced by digital technologies.
  • The role of digital technologies in the study of culture and cultural artefacts from the past.
  • How digital technologies are shaping today’s society, including social intercourse, social structures, government, international politics, education and law.
  • The current critical and theoretical debates around digital culture and the role of technology in cultural life.
  • The ethical, moral and philosophical issues that arise from the role and impact of technology in cultural and social life.

Course purpose

The aim of the MA Digital Culture & Society programme is to develop participants’ understanding of the role and consequences of digital technologies in contemporary culture, broadly interpreted to include such areas of activity as performing arts, telecommunications, information technology, philosophy, law and education. The programme is conceived as fundamentally interdisciplinary, drawing for its teaching on four academic Schools: Arts and Humanities; Law; Physical Sciences and Engineering; and Social Science & Public Policy. It is aimed at a diverse range of participants, offering technological insights to those with non-technical backgrounds, and cultural perspectives to those who have not thought about digital culture in a systematic way.

Course format and assessment

Teaching Style

If you are a full-time student, we will provide 120 to 180 hours of teaching through lectures and seminars, and we will expect you to undertake 1674 hours of independent study.

If you are a part-time student, we will provide 90 hours of teaching through lectures and seminars in your first year, and 50 hours in your second. We will expect you to undertake 720 hours of independent study in your first year and 954 hours in your second.

Assessment

We will assess our modules entirely through coursework, which will mostly take the form of essays, with some project work.

Regulating body

King’s College is regulated by the Higher Education Funding Council for England.



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The Masters in Information Technology is an intensive, practically oriented taught postgraduate programme which will equip you with advanced IT skills. Read more

The Masters in Information Technology is an intensive, practically oriented taught postgraduate programme which will equip you with advanced IT skills. This is a conversion degree programme intended for students without a computing science background. You will apply your knowledge and skills by conducting a development project.

Why this programme

  • The School of Computing Science is consistently highly ranked achieving 2nd in Scotland and 10th in the UK (Complete University Guide 2017)
  • The School is a member of the Scottish Informatics and Computer Science Alliance: SICSA. This collaboration of Scottish universities aims to develop Scotland's place as a world leader in Informatics and Computer Science research and education.
  • You will have opportunities to meet employers who come to make recruitment presentations, and often seek to recruit our graduates during the programme.
  • You will benefit from having 24-hour access to a computer laboratory equipped with state-of-the-art hardware and software.

Programme structure

Modes of delivery of the MSc in Information Technology include lectures, seminars and tutorials and allow students the opportunity to take part in lab, project and team work.

Core courses

  • Database theory and applications
  • Enterprise cyber security
  • Programming
  • Software engineering
  • Software project management
  • Systems and networks
  • Group project

Optional courses

  • Advanced programming
  • Algorithms and data structures
  • Cryptography and secure development
  • Cyber security fundamentals
  • Cyber security forensics
  • Digitisation
  • Human computer interaction: design and evaluation
  • Internet technology
  • Safety critical systems

Depending on staff availability, the optional courses listed here may change.

If you wish to engage in part-time study, please be aware that dependent upon your optional taught courses, you may still be expected to be on campus on most week days.

Career Prospects

Former students are now employed in the chemical, electronics, travel, food, and oil industries, in banking and insurance, in software houses, in retailing, in education, in the health service, in management consultancy, in civil engineering, and in other sectors. Some graduates apply their newly-acquired IT skills within their existing careers, or move into research or teaching.

Graduates of this programme have gone on to positions such as:

  • Programmer at Ciber
  • IT Software Developer at Lockheed Martin (Amor Group Ltd)
  • Web Developer at Emerald Design
  • Web and Mobile Developer at SwarmOnline Ltd
  • Technical Consultant at Kana Verint
  • Project Manager at Equator
  • IT Consultant at Agile Solutions
  • Business Analyst at Reply Ltd
  • Analyst at Agile Solutions (GB) Ltd
  • Developer at SwarmOnline
  • Associate Software Engineer at Moody’s
  • Technical Analyst at QueryClick
  • Graduate Applications Developer at Baillie Gifford
  • Junior Software Developer at TBR Global
  • Junior Developer at OLM Group
  • Graduate Digital Developer at Tesco Bank
  • Process Development Trainee at Elaine’s Vehicles
  • Associate Software Engineering at KANA Software
  • Graduate Developer at V.Ships Crewing
  • Software Developer at SEEMiS Group LLP
  • Application Developer at JP Morgan
  • Technical Graduate Trainee at Fujitsu.


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This CILIP-accredited course is about the creation, management and use of digital libraries and resources. It will introduce you to the strategic thinking and project management skills you need for a successful career. Read more

About the course

This CILIP-accredited course is about the creation, management and use of digital libraries and resources. It will introduce you to the strategic thinking and project management skills you need for a successful career. You’ll learn about digitisation, repositories, web creation and how to design digital libraries people want to use.

The course combines lectures from academics and professionals, seminars, small-group work and computer labs. We can also help you to develop leadership and management capabilities.

Your career

Effective use of information improves the world and makes a positive difference to our lives. It is also central to economic development. The rapid pace of technological change and the globalisation of markets means that organisations in all sectors must realise the value of information systems.
The world needs graduates who are information literate.

Our graduates work for all kinds of organisations, in the public and private sectors. Employers include:

Adidas; BBC; British Red Cross; Cambridge University; The Department of Health; Ernst and Young; GCHQ; Goldman Sachs; Hewlett-Packard CDS; House of Commons Library; Imperial College London; IBM; Kings College London; NHS; Pepsico; Pricewaterhouse Coopers; Stanford University

If you’re already an experienced professional, you can develop new skills and advance your career with one of our Professional Enhancement Programmes (page xxx).

Your subject

Our courses are research-led, which means you’ll learn about the latest concepts from academics who work with organisations to drive developments in this field. Alongside the theory and technical skills, you’ll develop some valuable attributes including effective communication, application of research methods and creative problem solving.

How we teach

All our courses (except our distance learning courses) include lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical laboratory classes, group work, online discussion, case studies and lectures by visiting speakers. Our MA Librarianship course also includes visits to library and information service organisations. You’ll be assessed using a wide variety of methods including essays, reports, small projects, in-class tests, presentations, posters, group work and a research-based dissertation.

Learning Environment

Our dedicated departmental teaching suite contains two networked laboratories with 60 computers and a 30-seat lecture room. Our state of the art iLab includes a Usability Lab and Digital Media Lab designed to collect research data into human–computer interaction.

The iSpace is an open plan, social learning area for students. It has display facilities, open-access PCs and bookable partitioned group work areas. There is Wi-Fi coverage throughout the department, and you can connect your own laptop to our network. Mobile devices and tables are available for you to borrow for project work.

We’re right in the middle of the campus and close to the Information Commons and the new Diamond building so you’ll be able to access the University’s many resources.

Core modules

Dissertation; Designing Usable Websites; Digital Multimedia Libraries; Management and Strategy for Digital Libraries; Information Retrieval: Search Engines and Digital Libraries; Research Methods and Dissertation Preparation.

Examples of optional modules

Including: Researching Social Media; Information Systems in Organisations; E-Business and E-Commerce; Database Design; Libraries, Information and Society; Introduction to Digital Humanities; Content Management Systems; Information Governance and Ethics; Data and Society: Business Intelligence; Academic and Workplace Library, Information and Knowledge Services; Human Computer Information Interaction; Archives and Record Management; Advanced Digital Humanities.

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The MSc in Information Science is an ideal career development programme for librarians, archivists and other information professionals who wish to update their management skills and experience in the use of information technology, the internet and digital media, or for those from a computer-oriented background who wish to specialise in information fields. Read more

The MSc in Information Science is an ideal career development programme for librarians, archivists and other information professionals who wish to update their management skills and experience in the use of information technology, the internet and digital media, or for those from a computer-oriented background who wish to specialise in information fields.

About this degree

The programme includes both practical and theoretical work through which students develop a deeper understanding of not just the technologies themselves but also the implications of applying and managing these technologies in varied information environments. The wide range of optional modules allows students to tailor the programme to fit their individual career specialisms and needs.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of five core modules (75 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma, consisting of five core modules (75 credits), three optional modules (45 credits), full-time nine months or flexible study over 2-5 years, is offered.

A Postgraduate Certificate - any four of the modules available (60 credits), full-time 15 weeks or flexible study over a period of up to two years - is offered but does not carry CILIP accreditation.

Core modules

  • Systems Management
  • Internet Technologies
  • Database Systems Analysis and Design
  • Introduction to Programming and Scripting
  • Fundamentals of Information Science

Optional modules (indicative list)

  • Digital Resources in the Humanities
  • Electronic Publishing
  • Individual Approved Study
  • Introduction to Digital Curation
  • Introduction to Digitisation
  • Knowledge Representation and Semantic Technologies
  • Legal and Social Aspects
  • Management
  • Server Programming and Structured Data
  • XML

The list above only indicates commonly chosen options. In principle, students may apply to take any module offered within the department, or in other departments, with the tutors' permission.

Dissertation/report

All MSc students undertake an independent research project on a specific aspect of information technology and its application, which culminates in a dissertation of c. 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, computer laboratory practicals and classroom practicals, with a strong emphasis on informal teaching, discussion, and the acquisition of practical skills. Assessment is through a mixture of essays, reports, examination, and practical projects such as website design and data modelling.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Information Science MSc

Careers

The MSc in Information Science prepares students for management roles in the information industries with an emphasis on technology, for example: information systems manager, systems librarian, web manager, information architect, knowledge manager, data manager, or indeed any information management role. Our graduates find work all over the world with electronic systems for managing, retrieving, distributing and archiving information.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Digital Delivery Co-ordinator, Macmillan
  • Engineer, Formosa Soft
  • Research Services Librarian, Slaughter and May
  • Technology Auditor, The Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS)
  • Executive Director, Open Planets Foundation

Employability

This programme challenges students to think more deeply about the implications of using information technology of all kinds in the workplace, and to consider better ways of designing, specifying, implementing and managing systems in order to promote organisational success. Understanding these issues and having the skills to develop and manage practical solutions equips our students to succeed individually and to help their organisations succeed. Our students achieve a high employability rate on graduating, and rise in organisations as their skills are recognised. Many past students now occupy senior positions in the information world in government, commerce, industry and academia.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Information Studies combines the best of traditional library and archive studies with the latest developments in internet technologies and electronic communication and publishing.

It brings together an outstanding team of researchers, teachers, students, practitioners and information industry leaders to help you understand, develop and shape the emerging information environment while elucidating and building on the historical developments that have created it.

Students benefit from UCL's central London location, close to many major libraries and repositories and information centres, including the British Library and many specialist collections, giving ready access to an unsurpassed range of materials.

Accreditation

Both the MSc and PG Diploma programmes are recognised and accredited by the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP), for professional qualifications purposes.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Information Studies

68% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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The Masters in Celtic & Viking Archaeology provides an introduction to both theory and practice in approaches to early medieval archaeology, based on our particular research strengths in the settlements and material culture of Celtic, Pictish and Viking peoples, and in the archaeology of kingship and political development. Read more

The Masters in Celtic & Viking Archaeology provides an introduction to both theory and practice in approaches to early medieval archaeology, based on our particular research strengths in the settlements and material culture of Celtic, Pictish and Viking peoples, and in the archaeology of kingship and political development.

Why this programme

  • If you want to further your career in archaeology, our new approaches to early medieval studies bring fresh insights into the life and ideas of the period and provide you with a stimulating environment, learning from internationally-renowned scholars
  • You will have the opportunity to take fieldtrips to a number of sites relevant to your studies.
  • Our programme has strong links with the University's Hunterian Museum, and Glasgow Life giving you access to primary source material, including objects and archives.

Programme structure

You will take two core courses and three optional courses. For the MLitt you will produce a dissertation on a specialist topic agreed with the course convenor.

The core courses provides you with a theoretical background to the study of early medieval archaeology, examining themes such as burial, settlement, material culture, religion through a series of case studies. You will also get training and support in a wide variety of research methods including library skills, humanities computing, writing and presenting papers.

Core courses

  • Approaches to Celtic and Viking Archaeology
  • Research Skills

Optional courses

Three optional courses must be selected, two of which from the following

  • Themes in Early Medieval Scottish archaeology
  • Early Christian monuments of Scotland
  • Early Medieval artefacts
  • Viking and late Norse artefacts
  • Norse in the North Atlantic, AD 800–1500
  • Viking and late Norse British Isles.

You may also choose one of the following options

  • Thematic studies: any one of the thematic courses offered via other MLitt programmes, by agreement with the course convener. These may include courses available via other Masters programmes within the University (most relevant are those offered as part of Celtic Studies and Scottish Medieval Studies)
  • Independent study on a topic agreed with the course convenor.
  • Artefact studies: any one of the specialist courses offered in the MLitt Material Culture & Artefact Studies
  • Multimedia analysis and design or 2D digitisation.

Career prospects

Graduates have gone on to work for various heritage bodies such as the National Museum of Scotland, and for UK-based commercial archaeology firms.

The programme provides an excellent platform for you to move onto PhD studies and an academic career. The wide variety of specialist optional courses allow you to tailor your particular programme experience towards a direction that best suits your future plans upon completion.

Positions held by recent graduates include Field Archaeologist, Open Learning Tutor, University lectureships and research managers.



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The programme provides you with an understanding of contemporary information and records management issues. It pays special attention to the management of digital records and electronic resources, and how to manage these alongside analogue resources. Read more

The programme provides you with an understanding of contemporary information and records management issues. It pays special attention to the management of digital records and electronic resources, and how to manage these alongside analogue resources.

Why this programme

  • The programme is designed for those with a vocational interest in records management, archives and digital curation. It will prepare you to work in these fields, and give you a thorough grounding for continuing with research.
  • You will complete a two-week work placement in an archive, records management or digital repository.
  • As a graduate you will be eligible to be accredited by both the Archives & Records Association and CILIP (Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals), providing valuable professional recognition in both the archive and library fields.

Programme structure

You will develop skills in the core competencies of archives, records, and information management, creating and managing digital records, digital curation and preservation issues, archival theory, user needs, and description,

cataloguing, and navigation.

The programme consists of six courses spread over two semesters. You will take courses in:

  • Archives and records information management
  • Records and evidence
  • Description, cataloguing and navigation
  • Management, curation and preservation of digital materials.

Optional courses include: 

  • 2D digitisation
  • Law for cultural heritage institutions
  • Archives and records theory
  • Records and the transition to the digital
  • Palaeography
  • Phenomenology.

To graduate with the MSc you will also need to complete a course in research methods and professional studies, and produce a dissertation.

Career prospects

As a graduate, you will be well placed for a career as an archivist, records manager or digital curator within a variety of public and private organisations.

Positions held by recent graduates include Assistant Archivist and Records Manager.



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The Masters in Dress & Textile Histories provides you with the skills to research and interpret the history of dress and textiles. Read more

The Masters in Dress & Textile Histories provides you with the skills to research and interpret the history of dress and textiles. Drawing on the knowledge of interdisciplinary academic and curatorial experts, the programme combines taught and research components based on a combination of theoretical and object based approaches. Working with museum collections, archives and historic interiors you will also be given a unique insight into the curation, interpretation and preservation of historic dress and textile collections.

Why this programme

  • The programme provides you with a unique opportunity within the UK to study historic dress and textiles, enabling you to develop knowledge and understanding of theory and practice in dress and textile histories in a critical and/or historical context
  • Scotland has a rich textile heritage and Glasgow is the ideal city in which to study dress and textile history, as there are internationally significant object and archival collections in the city and close by, including the National Museums Scotland, Paisley Museum and Art Gallery, and the Scottish Business Archives at the University of Glasgow.
  • You will have privileged access to primary source material, objects and archives, including at the University of Glasgow’s Hunterian Museum and Art Gallery and Glasgow Museums.   
  • The work placement option will enable you to develop your professional expertise within the heritage sector.

Programme structure

The taught component consists of three core courses and three optional courses running over two semesters. This is followed by a period of supervised research and writing of a dissertation.

A number of study visits are built into the programme, introducing important local collections.

Teaching is delivered by a combination of in-house specialist and visiting scholars and experts. The lectures are enhanced by seminar discussions, some based in museums and galleries, giving you the opportunity to present your ideas and discuss them with classmates in a supportive yet challenging environment. 

Core courses

  • Framing Dress and Textile Histories
  • Research Methods in Practice
  • Museums and the Making of Dress and Textile Histories

Optional courses

  • The Birth of Modern Fashion? Textiles and Dress, 1680 - 1815
  • Understanding Textiles
  • Victorian Visions: Dress and Textiles c.1837-1901
  • Material Cultures

You may also choose from the following options run by History of Art:

  • Work placement
  • Independent study

Or from the following options in the College of Arts:

  • A Humanities Advanced Technology and Information Institution (HATII) course : 2D Digitisation (Theory and Practice)
  • A course from elsewhere in the College of Arts, subject to the approval of the programme convenor.

Study trip

These courses are supported by a self-funded four day study trip in semester 2. Previous trips have included Manchester (2012), Leeds (2013) and London (2014-16).

Dissertation

Submitted at the end of August, the dissertation (or other substantial piece of work) encourages independent work and the application of acquired research skills. It is expected that MLitt dissertations should make a contribution to some aspect of the subject. The dissertation is 15,000 words in length (including footnotes but excluding bibliography) and will be an in-depth critical exploration on a topic chosen in consultation with the tutors and the programme convenor.

Career prospects

The attributes you gain will be attractive to employers from museums, the heritage sector, art dealers and auction houses. You could also get into theatre, film and television production as a costume researcher/designer. The programme also offers an excellent foundation upon which to progress to PhD studies and an academic career.



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