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Masters Degrees (Digital Sociology)

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The MA in Digital Media is unique in its combination of practical and theoretical approaches to contemporary media and technology- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-digital-media-technology-cultural-form/. Read more
The MA in Digital Media is unique in its combination of practical and theoretical approaches to contemporary media and technology- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-digital-media-technology-cultural-form/

The established and exciting degree is designed to help you understand digital transformations in media, culture and society and apply this understanding in practice, in the media and creative industries and in further research. You will be equipped with skills that can be applied to current and future developments in digital media, social media, computing and other aspects of technology.

The MA in Digital Media educates aspiring media practitioners and academics as well as early and mid-career professionals who seek to reflect on their roles in a structured and stimulating learning environment designed to give all students up-to-the-minute knowledge of digital media and the skills to apply that knowledge to future developments.

The MA offers two pathways:

-Pathway 1 is a theory programme where you learn about developments in digital media and technology from a wide range of perspectives

-Pathway 2 is a theory and practice programme where you improve your skills, understanding and experience in one of the following areas:

Documentary
Image making
Journalism
Writing

Acclaimed academics and practitioners

Benefit from the experience and expertise of one of the world’s leading media and communications departments. You'll be taught by theorists and practitioners of international standing: Sarah Kember, Joanna Zylinska, Graham Young, Tony Dowmunt, Angela Phillips, Julian Henriques and David Morley.

Work placements and internships

The MA in Digital Media regularly attracts offers of work placements and internships. Recently these have come from Google, The Science Museum and N1creative.com.

Facilities

Our students have access to state-of-the-art facilities including well-equipped lecture and seminar rooms, exhibition spaces, computer facilities and digital media suites.

The department is also currently host to the renowned philosopher of media and technology, Bernard Stiegler and students will have access to his modulein Media Philosophy as well as priority access to the innovative and popular option After New Media. Designed to complement the MA in Digital Media, this course provides a framework for thinking about the current media environment as well as future forms of human and computer interaction.

An established record

The MA in Digital Media has been redefining media theory and practice since 2004. Our students become proficient in:

the history, sociology and philosophy of digital media
the application of critical conceptual skills to specialist areas and future forms of media
multimedia skills in image making (photography, video, animation, graphic art) script writing, journalism and documentary
MA Digital Media students have access the pioneering option ‘After New Media’, a non-assessed online module which explores the themes of self mediation, ethical mediation and intelligent mediation, and develops a framework for thinking about 'life' after new media. As befits a course of this kind we will be combining media, and exploring their pedagogic potential – uniting digital-online technologies with more traditional teaching formats, such as reading groups, seminars and an end of year symposium.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Sarah Kember.

Modules & Structure

The programme consists of:

Two compulsory core modules
Pathway 1 - between two and four option modules (worth 60 credits) OR
Pathway 2 - a two-term practice block (worth 30 credits) and either one or two option modules (worth 30 credits)
The dissertation or the practice/theory project

Assessment

Seen take-home paper; essays; dissertation or practice/theory project and other production work in the area of documentary, image-making, journalism or fiction.

Programme overview

This is an exciting programme which offers a critical, contextual and practical approach to digital media and technology. It problematises approaches to the 'new' media in academic and professional debate, especially those which overemphasise the potential for radical social change led by a homogenised technology itself.

The programme is defined by its resistance to technological determinism and its insistence on the importance of addressing the social and historical contexts within which a range of media technologies are employed. In order to provide a contextual framework and facilitate the conceptualisation of digital media and technologies as fully cultural forms and processes, the programme will draw on a range of disciplines including: media and cultural studies, sociology, anthropology and philosophy. However, the programme will remain focused on key contemporary concerns about the potential role of digital media in society and on refiguring the contours of the 'new' media debate.

The programme offers two pathways. Pathway 1 addresses central theoretical and conceptual concerns relating to digital media. Pathway 2 combines theoretical analysis and practical work, offering students the opportunity to explore new media theories and concepts in practice. Pathway 2 is primarily aimed at students who already have some experience in one of the areas on offer: documentary; digital photography and image making; journalism; writing. It is meant to appeal to media industry professionals who are keen to reflect critically on their practice within a structured learning environment, graduates of practice-based courses but also those who have gained their practical experience in documentary; digital photography and image making; journalism or writing in informal settings.

Programme structure

The first compulsory core course is Digital Media - critical perspectives and this is taught in a small workshop format in the Autumn term. This course functions as a foundation for the second core course and offers students a map of the key debates in digital media. The course is taught in ten two hour workshop sessions and is supported by the provision of one-to-one tutorials.

The second compulsory core course is Technology and Cultural Form - debates, models, dialogues and this develops questions of technology, power, politics and subjectivity which were introduced in the first core course. The first part of this course highlights the key conceptual concerns of a contextualised approach to digital media plus the relevant debates and models formulated by key figures in the field. The second part of this course aims to generate a dialogue between theoreticians and practitioners around some of the most intellectually stimulating, contentious and contemporary ideas in the field without necessarily seeking a resolution. This course is taught in ten two hour workshop sessions during the Spring term and is supported by the weekly provision of one-to-one tutorials.

Students are required to take options from the lists provided by the Media and Communications, Anthropology, Comparative Literature and Sociology Departments as well as the Centre for Cultural Studies. Examples might include: After New Media, Nature and Culture, Cultural Theory, Globalisation, Risk and Control, Embodiment and Experience, Political Communications. Options are taught primarily through lectures and seminars and take place in the Autumn or Spring terms.

Each student's option profile is discussed with the programme convenor in order to ensure that the balance of subject-specific topics is appropriate for the individual concerned. Option courses are taught primarily through lectures, seminars and tutorials and take place in the Autumn or Spring terms.

All students are required to produce either a 12,000 word dissertation on a topic agreed by the student and supervisor or a practice/theory project in the area of documentary, photography and image making, journalism or fiction. The length of the practical element is dependent on the media and the form used and will be agreed in advance with the supervisor. It will, however, be comparable with practical projects undertaken in practice MA programmes in the relevant field. Students undertaking the practice/theory project will also be expected to submit a 3-4000 word analysis of their practice which locates it within the theoretical debates explored in the MA as a whole. This essay may be presented as a separate document or as an integral part of the project depending on the nature of the project and by a agreement with both theory and practice supervisors.

Programme outcomes

The programme's subject specific learning outcomes require students to analyse and contextualise developments in digital media and technology with reference to key debates in the history, sociology, anthropology and philosophy of the media. Students who opt for the practice/theory pathway will also be required to produce material of publishable or broadcast standard and to evaluate the ways in which theoretical and practical insights intersect. All students will develop a wide range of transferable qualities and skills necessary for employment in related or unrelated areas. These are described by the Quality Assurance Agency as: 'the exercise of initiative and personal responsibility, decision-making in complex and unpredictable situations, and the independent learning ability required for continuing professional development'.

By the end of the programme students will be able to:

-Map and critically evaluate key debates in the field of new media
-Analyse and contextualise current and future developments in digital media and technology
-Evaluate and articulate key historical, sociological, anthropological and philosophical approaches to the study of digital media and technology
-Demonstrate in-depth knowledge of at least four differing areas of inquiry
-Demonstrate an advanced level of conceptual knowledge and (where relevant) practical skill appropriate for a sustained piece of work in the field
-Prepare and deliver clearly argued and informed work
-Locate, retrieve and present relevant information for a specific project
-Manage a complex array of competing demands and work effectively to a deadline
-Work resourcefully and independently
-Think critically and/or work practically within a given context

Skills

We provide graduates with skills that are cutting edge: in the critical analysis and/or creative production of digital media; in the disciplinary knowledge and conceptual frameworks necessary for current and future forms of media and technology; in the awareness of how digital media and technologies are re-shaping society from the ways we communicate (through social media and web 2.0) to the increasingly ‘smart’ environments in which we live.

Careers

Our programme provides a theory and practice pathway and prepares students for work in the following areas:

-media and creative industries; advertising, marketing and PR (graduates of the MA Digital Media have found work with Virgin Media, Google, the BBC and other leading organisations worldwide)
-research and academia (graduates from this programme have gone on to study for PhD degrees in higher education institutions around the world and also here with us)
-media production and new media art (graduates have exhibited, published and produced work in photography, journalism, TV, documentary, film and multimedia)

Graduate Ekaterina discusses her career:

"I work for a company, called Visual DNA, which already sounds like life happening After New Media. The company is the largest data provider in Europe and is totally multinational. We actually try to analyse human visual DNA, you memories, feelings, thoughts about the future, anticipations, etc by creating personality quizzes where instead of verbal answers we tend to use images.

My role is as Creative Developer. It involves working with images from concept to finding/shooting and post-production. My qualifications perfectly matched what they’ve been looking for, Digital Media rocks!

My tip for the new-to-be-graduates is this: physically go to places and companies and talk to people. It really opens up loads of possibilities, and when I tell someone where I’ve graduated from they look impressed, and there is some sort of respect coming from them."

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Designed for students interested in new ways of exploring and understanding the social world through the use of visual, sensory and other experimental approaches, this programme allows you to study sociological issues alongside innovative methods- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-visual-sociology/. Read more
Designed for students interested in new ways of exploring and understanding the social world through the use of visual, sensory and other experimental approaches, this programme allows you to study sociological issues alongside innovative methods- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-visual-sociology/

The MA will enable you to intervene in and represent the social world by developing the ability to undertake empirical research and present it publicly in a variety of media and materials.

You will engage with sociology as an inventive research practice, orientated towards the creative deployment of research methods.

An introduction to debates in visual and sensory sociology

The MA in Visual Sociology provides an introduction to the range of debates in visual and sensory sociology, encouraging you to build on these by using visual and sensory methodological practices to carry out critical social research in your areas of interest, whether this is science and technology, contemporary capitalism, gender and sexual cultures, human rights, globalisation or other aspects of social life.

A hands-on approach to sociological research

The programme combines lectures and seminars with practical sessions and workshop-based projects in which you develop a hands-on approach to sociological research, providing a skill base in methods which could be used in public sector contexts, art/media research, design or commercial application.

As well as presenting your ideas through writing, during the course you will have the opportunity to produce a range of different outputs including exhibitions, visual models and film/video. Critical feedback sessions function as a testing ground for individual projects.

Themed projects allow groups of students to further develop a portfolio of research outputs geared to a variety of audiences. The dissertation allows you to undertake a substantive research project geared to your individual interests.

You will have access to the Visual Media Lab, which offers post-production and editing stations, as well as equipment for photography and video. Students can also borrow equipment from the Media Equipment Centre.

At the forefront of the discipline

The MA is based in the Department of Sociology, home of the The Methods Lab and at the forefront of research using live methods. It is taught by staff with a wide range of experience in both sociology and interdisciplinary research, including visual and experimental approaches.

The course is suitable for applicants from a wide variety of backgrounds, including art, design, anthropology, media and communications, cultural studies, geography, and sociology.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Rebecca Coleman.

Modules & Structure

Core modules:
In the first part of the course you will take 'Introduction to Sensory Sociology', a module that investigates the transformation of sociology in the age of visual, digital and other empirical methods. The module 'Key Debates for Inventive and Visual Sociology' enables you to address debates within visual sociology, and also encompasses more recent issues surrounding the notions of media, translation and studio practice which are associated with inventive approaches. Assessment of these modules is by essay.

Alongside these modules you will take a core practical component that offers the opportunity to gain skills in photography, sound and video and to develop materials that engage a sociological imagination. A central focus is on how to translate a research question into a variety of materials or media and to be able to critically discuss the selection and use of these.

In the second term you continue with a practical module in inventive sociology in which students working individually or in groups respond to a theme to create a visual, sensory or experimental object or media. Assessment of the practical work includes a diary of research process alongside documentation of work.

These core modules are taught in Sociology. In the second term you will also take an option that may be chosen from Sociology or may be taken from departments across Goldsmiths including the Departments of Anthropology, English and Comparative Literature, Politics, Media and Communications, Educational Studies, Music, and the Centre for Cultural Studies. 



In the summer term you will complete a dissertation involving a major practical project consisting of any media and addressing a specific sociological problem. You will meet for individual supervision with a member of the Sociology staff.
 The dissertation is a substantive piece of research in which you develop a visual, inventive or experimental approach to a topic of your choice.

Option modules:
You will chose an option module to the value of 30 credits from Sociology or from departments across the College including the Departments of Anthropology, English and Comparative Literature, Politics, Media and Communications, Music, Educational Studies, and the Centre for Cultural Studies.

Modules in Sociology address themes such as:

contemporary capitalism and inequality
human rights
globalisation and urban life
gender and sexuality
science, technology and medicine
digitisation of social life

Skills & Careers

This programme attracts students from a wide range of backgrounds, including art and design, business, and the third sector, as well as those with social science degrees. This means the careers that they are interested in pursuing are wide and varied.

The programme helps students develop their critical and analytical abilities as well as a number of other practical skills and competencies, which are valued in different sectors. For example, as well as reflecting moves within sociology to study the visual and sensory, the MA also responds to how sociological methods – such as interviews, focus groups and ethnography – are increasingly used in commercial settings, including in social and market research, and in research and development for international companies.

The programme can lead to many types of career including in the arts and creative industries, the charity and public sectors, social research. A number of graduates from the programme are also interested in pursuing further academic research.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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This programme offers a comprehensive understanding of current developments in digital media and their wider social significance. Read more
This programme offers a comprehensive understanding of current developments in digital media and their wider social significance. Smartphones; social networking, blogging and tweeting; online shopping; communication by email; and the delivery of news, film, music and e-books over the Internet: these are just some of the most striking ways in which the digital is penetrating and transforming contemporary society.

The programme is delivered by a diverse interdisciplinary team with a strong profile in, for example, digital culture, media, sociology, anthropology and communication studies.

Core study areas include media and cultural industries, digital futures, media and cultural work, textual analysis research techniques, production and reception analysis and a dissertation.

Optional study areas include politics of representation, media and modernity, communication and citizenship, sex industries, global communications, media, nations, and nationalisms, digital cultures, digital economies, cultural memory and the heritage industries, and marketing politics.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/social-sciences/digital-media-society/

Programme modules

Compulsory Modules:
- Digital Cultures
- Digital Futures: explorations in new media
- Production and Reception Analysis
- Digital Economies
- Digital Methodologies
- Dissertation

Optional Modules:
A selection of the following options will be available:
- Media and Modernity
- Media and Cultural Industries
- The Politics of Representation
- Popular Music and Modern Times
- Citizenship and Communications
- Media, Nations and Nationalisms
- Global Communications
- Media and Cultural Work
- Tourism, Culture and Society
- Sex Industries
- Cultural Memory and the Heritage Industries
- Marketing Politics

Assessment

Coursework plus a dissertation of 10,000 words on an agreed topic.

Careers and further study

The degree is designed to develop specialist understanding of contemporary developments in digital media and culture. This will be relevant to anyone pursuing a professional career in this rapidly growing sector and to those with an interest in these significant social changes. Students will also acquire research skills which will be of value in both media-related and academic careers.

Why choose social sciences at Loughborough?

The Department of Social Sciences has long been recognised as an international centre of academic excellence and for its cutting-edge interdisciplinary work.

This recognition of excellence has been a major factor in enabling the Department to recruit a lively community of postgraduate students that currently numbers around 100.

In the Department of Social Sciences we offer a rich variety of taught postgraduate masters. The courses are delivered by an internationally renowned interdisciplinary team, through the use of contemporary case studies and research-informed applied teaching and learning.

The courses provide training in digital culture, media, communications, sociological and anthropological, theory, as well as quantitative and qualitative methods

- Research
All of our academic staff are active researchers, working within and across the following disciplinary boundaries – Communication and Media Studies, Criminology, Social Policy, Social Psychology, and Sociology.

Loughborough is home to the most world-leading, original and internationally excellent research in communication, media studies, sociology, and social psychology. Our research has excellent impact, with staff working with a wide range of public and third sector bodies (e.g., BBC Trust, the Metropolitan Police, the Electoral Commission, the College of Mediators, UK Drug Policy Commission, Department of Health). Our social policy and criminology research also has world-leading impact, particularly in services for children and minimum income standards.

- Career prospects
Our programmes prepare our graduates for the real world of the television industry, marketing, academia, publishing, plus many more industries. They go on to work for companies and organisations such as China Development Research Foundation, Elsevier Ltd, Image Line Communication, Institute of Psychiatry, Metropolitan Police Service, Oxfam and X-Pert Med GmbH.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/social-sciences/digital-media-society/

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The MPhil in Sociology of Media and Culture pathway provides students with the opportunity to study the nature and transformation of media and cultural forms at an advanced level. Read more
The MPhil in Sociology of Media and Culture pathway provides students with the opportunity to study the nature and transformation of media and cultural forms at an advanced level. The programme gives students a firm grounding in the theoretical and empirical analysis of media and culture and enables them to study particular media and cultural forms in depth, examining their transformations over time and their impact on other aspects of social and political life. The programme consists of 4 components:

1. Theories of Culture and Media: all students taking this programme will be expected to follow this course of lectures that will cover some of the major theoretical contributions to the study of media and culture, ranging from Adorno and Habermas to Bourdieu and Becker and from medium theory to Castells and more recent theoretical work on new media and the internet. Students are also strongly encouraged to follow the course of lectures on social theory.

2. Substantive modules: there will be at least three core substantive modules taught by Prof John Thompson, Prof Patrick Baert and Dr Ella McPherson. The modules will be research-led and will reflect the research being undertaken by members of the Department. The content of specific modules may vary from year to year but topics covered will typically include the nature of the digital revolution and its impact on the media and creative industries; the changing nature of news and journalism in the digital age; the role of new media in the development of social movements and new forms of political mobilization and protest; the uses of social media and the internet and their impact on everyday life and culture; the role of ideas, intellectuals and media forms in processes of social and political change. Students in this programme will be expected to take at least three of these modules; they may also take the fourth module in this programme, or they may substitute one of these modules with a module taken from another MPhil programme offered by the Department (Modern Society and Global Transformations, Political and Economic Sociology, Sociology of Reproduction).

3. Research Methods: all students will take a course on research methods which includes sessions on philosophical issues in the social sciences; research design; data collection and analysis in relation to quantitative and qualitative methods; reflection on research ethics and practice; library and computer skills.

4. Dissertation: all students will write a dissertation on a topic of their choice that allows for theoretically informed empirical analysis of some aspect of media or culture in contemporary societies. The choice of dissertation topic is made in consultation with your supervisor, who can advise you on the suitability and feasibility of your proposed research and on research design. A dissertation workshop provides the opportunity to present aspects of your dissertation work and to receive constructive feedback from course teachers and fellow students.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hssompsmc

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the programme students should have:

- an advanced understanding of current sociological research in selected topics;
- skills necessary to conduct independent social research and experience in their use;
- an ability to apply and develop modern social theory with respect to empirical topics;
- a deeper understanding of their chosen specialist area, including command of the literature and current research;
- the ability to situate their own research within current developments in the field.

Format

The course offers teaching on Social Theory, Substantive modules and Research Methods. Students work towards a written dissertation supported by supervisions and a dissertation workshop.

Students receive written feedback on each essay and the dissertation. Feedback is also given during the dissertation workshop on the direction and progress of the dissertation research.

Assessment

Students write a dissertation of not less than 15,000 and not more than 20,000 words on a subject approved by the Degree Committee.

Students write one methods essay of not less than 2,500 and not more than 3,000 words [or prescribed course work] and two substantive essays of not less than 4,000 and not more than 5,000 words.

Continuing

Students are encouraged to proceed to the Faculty's PhD programme, provided they reach a high level of achievement in all parts of the course. MPhil students who would like to continue to the PhD would normally need to have a final mark of at least 70% overall and 70% on the dissertation.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

The Department of Sociology holds ESRC funding awards. Sociology is a recognised Doctoral Training Centre pathway toward a PhD. Therefore candidates for the MPhil in Sociology (Media and Culture) can apply for 1+3 ESRC funding.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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This course offers you a unique opportunity to develop a broad understanding of the interweaving of digital media and society from a sociological perspective. Read more

About the course

This course offers you a unique opportunity to develop a broad understanding of the interweaving of digital media and society from a sociological perspective.

Where your masters can take you

Our graduates are academics, researchers and health and social care professionals. Others become managers or administrators in the public and private sectors.

How we teach

Our teaching is rigorous and research-led. We encourage you to think critically, to learn research techniques and develop transferable skills. We also help you to develop the personal attributes that will make you highly employable. The department is a friendly place, where staff and postgraduates work together as colleagues.

Our interdisciplinary approach brings together sociologists, social policy analysts, social workers and social anthropologists. Our empirical research is internationally recognised. We make significant contributions to policy debates.

Course content

Drawing upon staff expertise in digital media and digital society, this programme will give you a grounding in four aspects of digital media, allowing you to specialise in a specific area, or develop your understanding of all of the following: Theorising digital society; Digital practices; Digital methods; Digital research.

As a student within the Faculty of Social Sciences, you will also benefit from the research and training activities of both the University’s Sheffield Methods Institute and the faculty-wide Digital Society Network, the latter of which brings together interdisciplinary researchers engaged in research at the cutting-edge of society-technology interactions.

Core modules

These include: Researching Digital Society, Digital Practices, Digital Methods, Qualitative OR Statistical Methods.

Examples of optional modules

These can include: Social Media, Data and Society, Researching Social Media, Information, Governance and Ethics, Online Journalism Studies, Media , State and Society in China, The Sociology of Surveillance, What It Means to Be Human.

Teaching and assessment

Assessment varies across modules and will include a combination of coursework (essays, portfolio and practical work). Formal examination may be required for some optional modules. Students are also expected to complete a dissertation-length project equivalent to 15,000 words in length.

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The Digital Media, Culture and Education MA explores the theory and practice of media education and emergent new literacies in the digital age. Read more
The Digital Media, Culture and Education MA explores the theory and practice of media education and emergent new literacies in the digital age. The programme combines theory with practical opportunities for media production. Students will critically examine new developments within digital media and work with partners including the British Film Institute (BFI).

Degree information

This programme provides the opportunity to explore media education, media literacy and related fields. It combines theory with practical opportunities in moving image production, Internet cultures and game design. Students will critically examine developments in the fields of new media, including the impact of new technologies on education, and debates about the place and purpose of media in society.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of two core modules (60 credits), two optional modules (60 credits), a dissertation (60 credits) or a report (30 credits) and an additional optional module (30 credits).

Core modules
-Digital Media, Cultural Theory and Education
-Internet Cultures: Theory & Practice

Recommended optional modules include:
-Moving Image Production
-Digital Games, Play and Creativity

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project, which culminates in a dissertation of 20,000 words or a report of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
Teaching is delivered by face-to-face lectures and seminars, practical workshops combined with online-learning. Students are assessed by coursework assignments of up to 5,000 words, plus practical work for some modules, and a 20,000-word dissertation or 10,000-word report.

Careers

Graduates of this programme are currently working across a broad range of areas. Some are working as teachers in primary, secondary schools and further and higher education, while others have jobs as within areas related to digital media. Graduates can also be found working as museum and gallery education officers and in other informal learning spaces.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This programme is run by UCL's London Knowledge Lab (LKL) where collaborating computer and social scientists research the future of learning with digital technologies in a wide range of settings. LKL conducts research, design and development across a broad range of media, systems and environments and brings together computer and social scientists from the areas of education, sociology, culture and media, semiotics, computational intelligence, information management, personalisation, semantic web and ubiquitous technologies.

Students are able to work with the BFI, our partner for one of our modules, as well as leading researchers from the DARE Collaborative, a research partnership focussed on the digital arts in education led by UCL Institute of Education (IOE) and the BFI.

LKL conducts research, design and development across a broad range of media, systems and environments and brings together computer and social scientists from the areas of education, sociology, culture and media, semiotics, computational intelligence, information management, personalisation, semantic web and ubiquitous technologies.

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We're committed to developing our postgraduates into skilled researchers who can conduct rigorous research using a variety of methodologies and methods- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-sociology/. Read more
We're committed to developing our postgraduates into skilled researchers who can conduct rigorous research using a variety of methodologies and methods- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-sociology/

Goldsmiths’ research in sociology covers a range of areas, including:

art and literature
deviance
education
the sociology of governance and regulation
theories of industrial society
health, illness and psychiatry
interpersonal relations
knowledge
politics
‘race’ and ethnicity
class
religion
values in society
childhood and youth culture
the body and society
social aspects of the life sciences and bio-medicine, science and technology
the expansion of capitalism on a world scale
urban studies
gender and the sexual division of labour
culture and communications

We emphasise the importance of the relationship between you and your supervisor: we ‘match’ you with a supervisor whose current active research interests and expertise are compatible with your chosen topic of research.

You will be assessed by a thesis and viva voce.

The MPhil programme offers the opportunity for you to continue your research to a PhD.

The Sociology MPhil programme is recognised by the ESRC for excellence in research training.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact the Postgraduate Research Officer, Sociology.

Department

Sociology at Goldsmiths is ranked:
9th in the UK and 45th in the world for this subject area**
9th in the UK for the quality of our research***

**QS World University Rankings by subject 2015
***Research Excellence Framework 2014, Times Higher Education research intensity subject rankings

The Department of Sociology at Goldsmiths is active, contemporary and inventive. We are interested in everything from the ‘global’ issues of poverty and injustice to the ‘micro’ issues of cultural identity and the presentation of self in a digital world.

Our staff are some of the top academics in the world for this discipline – they’re the pioneers who are pushing boundaries and challenging the status quo. They’ve played a key role in developing social research methods, setting agendas in social and cultural policy, and linking theory to practice.

Through their world-leading research you’ll be at the forefront of current debates and will be encouraged to see the world differently.

Skills

You'll develop advanced research training covering a wide range of qualitative and quantitative sociological methods, and an ability to develop advanced and extended forms of written argument and scholarly practice.

Careers

Possible careers cover:

Academia
Social research in applied areas like health or urban regeneration
Research consultancy
Practice-orientated work
Work in the arts and cultural industries
Publishing

How to apply

Before you apply for a research programme, we advise you to get in touch with the programme contact, listed above. It may also be possible to arrange an advisory meeting.

Before you start at Goldsmiths, the actual topic of your research has to be agreed with your proposed supervisor, who will be a member of staff active in your general field of research. The choice of topic may be influenced by the current research in the department or the requirements of an external funding body. You should look at the staff research interests to see if we are the right department for you and whether there is a member if staff who may match your research interests.

If you wish to study on a part-time basis, you should also indicate how many hours a week you intend to devote to research, whether this will be at evenings or weekends, and for how many hours each day.

Research proposals

Along with your application and academic reference, you should also upload a research proposal at the point of application.

This should be in the form of a 1,500-3,000-word statement of the proposed area of research and should include:

delineation of the research topic
why it has been chosen
an initial hypothesis (if applicable)
a brief list of major secondary sources
the name of a staff member who you believe would be interested in acting as your supervisor

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Join one of the top sociology departments in the UK and further your understanding of the tensions, interactions and networks that dictate how societies are organised. Read more
Join one of the top sociology departments in the UK and further your understanding of the tensions, interactions and networks that dictate how societies are organised. You contribute to the thinking that guides organisations such as the Home Office, Amnesty International and the United Nations.

You explore some of the most important and significant debates in contemporary social theory, learning to think analytically about theoretical questions. You discover the importance of social theory in developing a politically engaged understanding of concepts such as post-structuralism, feminism and actor-network theory, focusing on topics such as:
-The history of digital piracy
-Sociology of human rights
-Media and criminology
-Gender and sexuality
-Citizenship

You also develop the skills needed to make your own contribution to the field, gaining a critical and coherent perspective on empirical research and examining the key assumptions and ideological underpinnings of qualitative and quantitative research.

Our Department of Sociology was rated top 10 in the UK for research quality (REF 2014), and we consistently receive strong student satisfaction scores, including 96% overall student satisfaction in 2015.

Our expert staff

We are a large and friendly department, offering a diverse range of research interests and with staff members who are committed to teaching, research and publication that covers a broad geographical spectrum.

Many have worked at the local level with local authorities, justice councils, community partnerships and charities. Others have worked at a national and international level with bodies like the United Nations, the European Commission’s Expert Group on Public Understanding of Science, Amnesty International, The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health, the Home Office and national non-governmental organisations.

Specialist facilities

-Dedicated postgraduate support facilities
-Our renowned off-campus Graduate Conference takes place every February
-A unique Student Resource Centre where you can get help with your studies, access examples of previous students’ work, and attend workshops on research skills
-The Sociology common room is open all day Monday-Friday, is stocked with daily newspapers, magazines and journals, and has free drinks available
-Links with the Institute of Social and Economic Research, which conducts large-scale survey projects and has its own library, and the UK Data Archive, which stores national research data like the British Crime Survey
-Our students’ Sociology Society, a forum for the exchange of ideas, arranging talks by visiting speakers, introducing you to various career pathways, and organising debates

Your future

A good sociology course, especially one from a recognised centre of excellence like Essex, opens many doors.

This course provides excellent preparation for further academic study, and many of our postgraduates go on to successful academic careers, both in the UK and overseas.

Others have established careers in non-governmental organisations, local authorities, specialist think tanks, government departments, charities, media production, and market intelligence.

We work with the university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

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Businesses require an understanding of people - both of individuals, and of a potentially large customer-base. As the occupation of management grows and changes, it demands a more specialised understanding of the modern organisation and the world it operates in. Read more
Businesses require an understanding of people - both of individuals, and of a potentially large customer-base. As the occupation of management grows and changes, it demands a more specialised understanding of the modern organisation and the world it operates in. Potential managers need an up-to-date and in-depth understanding of their occupation and its context.

Our innovative MA Sociology and Management brings together expertise from our top-rated Department of Sociology and Essex Business School, providing you with a unique opportunity to gain a critical appreciation of the social dynamics of work in the twenty-first century.

Combining theoretical perspectives from the disciplines of sociology and management, you explore the importance of debates surrounding power, culture, class, gender, sexuality and new forms of labour as a means of understanding the complexities of today's contemporary workplace.

You explore topics including:
-Management and organisational processes
-Theory and practice of social research
-Management across cultures
-Creativity management
-The work-life balance

Essex Business School takes you beyond the basics of a business education. Our strong emphasis on ethics and sustainable business practice in the global economy, and our expertise in international management, accounting and finance, will provide you with the knowledge and skills necessary for your future career in an increasingly complex business world.

Our Department of Sociology was rated top 10 in the UK for research quality (REF 2014), and we consistently receive strong student satisfaction scores, including 96% overall student satisfaction in 2015.

Our expert staff

We are a large and friendly department, offering a diverse range of research interests and with staff members who are committed to teaching, research and publication that covers a broad geographical spectrum.

Many have worked at the local level with local authorities, justice councils, community partnerships and charities. Others have worked at a national and international level with bodies like the United Nations, the European Commission’s Expert Group on Public Understanding of Science, Amnesty International, The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health, The Home Office and national non-governmental organisations.

Within Essex Business School, our staff specialise in areas including SMEs, business-to-business relationship marketing, branding, marketing management, new product development and social entrepreneurship.

While maintaining core engagement with contemporary marketing practice, our staff enrich our courses with novel marketing ideas drawn from both the contemporary business world and cutting-edge academic research.

Specialist facilities

-Dedicated postgraduate support facilities
-Our renowned off-campus Graduate Conference takes place every February
-A unique Student Resource Centre where you can get help with your studies, access examples of previous students’ work, and attend workshops on research skills
-The Sociology common room is open all day Monday-Friday, is stocked with daily newspapers, magazines and journals, and has free drinks available
-Links with the Institute of Social and Economic Research, which conducts large-scale survey projects and has its own library, and the UK Data Archive, which stores national research data like the British Crime Survey
-Our students’ Sociology Society, a forum for the exchange of ideas, arranging talks by visiting speakers, introducing you to various career pathways, and organising debates
-Our landmark new Essex Business School building on our Colchester Campus is the first zero carbon business school in the UK. Set around a lush winter garden, the Eden-style dome gives the building its own micro-climate.

Our new building provides you with a stunning new work environment, offering:
-A virtual trading floor with Bloomberg Terminals offering direct use of Bloomberg data, information and analytics
-A light and spacious lecture theatre, with seating for 250 students
-Study pods and innovation booths for group working
-Dedicated office space for student entrepreneurs
-Networking opportunities with visiting businesses
-A café with an adjacent sun terrace

Your future

This course provides excellent preparation for further academic study, and many of our postgraduates go on to successful academic careers, both in the UK and overseas.

Others have established careers in non-governmental organisations, local authorities, specialist think tanks, government departments, charities, media production, and market intelligence.

We work with the university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-Dynamics of Home and Work (optional)
-Sociological Research Design
-Dissertation
-Management and Organisational Behaviour
-Interviewing and Qualitative Data Analysis (optional)
-Managing for Ethics and Sustainability (optional)
-Digital Economy (optional)

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The MPhil in Visual Sociology offers you the opportunity to combine written sociological argument with film, sound, or photographic representation- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-visual-sociology/. Read more
The MPhil in Visual Sociology offers you the opportunity to combine written sociological argument with film, sound, or photographic representation- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-visual-sociology/

It will allow new researchers to re-think both the conduct of social research and the forms that social research writing takes in the 21st century.

Students registered on this degree will complete all of the research training modules outlined for the MPhil programme. The MPhil will allow you to re-think the gathering, analysis and presentation of research data and consider the future of sociological representation.

Assessment will be via a thesis, visual/aural component (a video or sound feature, or a photographic project), and viva voce.

The MPhil programme offers the opportunity for you to continue your research to a PhD.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact the Postgraduate Research Officer of Sociology.

Department

Sociology at Goldsmiths is ranked:
9th in the UK and 45th in the world for this subject area**
9th in the UK for the quality of our research***

**QS World University Rankings by subject 2015
***Research Excellence Framework 2014, Times Higher Education research intensity subject rankings

The Department of Sociology at Goldsmiths is active, contemporary and inventive. We are interested in everything from the ‘global’ issues of poverty and injustice to the ‘micro’ issues of cultural identity and the presentation of self in a digital world.

Our staff are some of the top academics in the world for this discipline – they’re the pioneers who are pushing boundaries and challenging the status quo. They’ve played a key role in developing social research methods, setting agendas in social and cultural policy, and linking theory to practice.

Through their world-leading research you’ll be at the forefront of current debates and will be encouraged to see the world differently.

How to apply

Before you apply for a research programme, we advise you to get in touch with the programme contact, listed above. It may also be possible to arrange an advisory meeting.

Before you start at Goldsmiths, the actual topic of your research has to be agreed with your proposed supervisor, who will be a member of staff active in your general field of research. The choice of topic may be influenced by the current research in the department or the requirements of an external funding body. The choice of topic may be influenced by the current research in the department or the requirements of an external funding body. You should look at our staff research interests to see if we are the right department for you and whether there is a member if staff who may match your research interests.

If you wish to study on a part-time basis, you should also indicate how many hours a week you intend to devote to research, whether this will be at evenings or weekends, and for how many hours each day.

Research proposals

Along with your application and academic reference, you should also upload a research proposal at the point of application.

This should be in the form of a 1,500-3,000-word statement of the proposed area of research and should include:

delineation of the research topic
why it has been chosen
an initial hypothesis (if applicable)
a brief list of major secondary sources
the name of a staff member who you believe would be interested in acting as your supervisor

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Societies such as Ireland are adjusting very rapidly to change in the external and internal environments. The aim of this MA is to interrogate the social, political, economic and cultural dimensions of the internet in contemporary societies. Read more

Overview

Societies such as Ireland are adjusting very rapidly to change in the external and internal environments.

The aim of this MA is to interrogate the social, political, economic and cultural dimensions of the internet in contemporary societies. From work to leisure, from education to politics, the internet provides a platform for new forms of interaction, engagement and socialisation. This exciting new MA will build upon the theoretical and methodological strengths of the Department of Sociology, with additional options offered by the Departments of Law and Media in Maynooth.

Course Structure

The taught programme is built around three components: a core theoretical module, substantive courses, and methods courses. Modules include the political economy and cultures of the internet, information technology and privacy law and advanced digital research methods. Beyond this, the researching and writing of a thesis constitutes 30 credits. Each module comprises on average 12 two hour seminars.

Career Options

The aim of the MA in Sociology (Internet and Society) programme is to prepare students for both academic and non-academic positions which support social behaviour online, including on social media and in large transnational online communities. Graduates of this course will be able to interface with programmers and designers and with those working on the deep statistical analysis of user data. There is a demand for digitally literate graduates who understand the social, cultural, political, legal and business aspects of transnational online users and communities. Graduates will be able to develop, execute and report on internet based research projects for a range of public and private sector employers. They may also wish to use their new skills to progress to PhD studies.

How to Apply

Online application only http://www.pac.ie/maynoothuniversity

PAC Code
MHY56 MA Sociology (Internet and Society)

The following information should be forwarded to PAC, 1 Courthouse Square, Galway or uploaded to your online application form:
Certified copies of all official transcripts of results for all non-Maynooth University qualifications listed MUST accompany the application. Failure to do so will delay your application being processed. Non-Maynooth University students are asked to provide a copy of their birth certificate or valid passport, two academic references and official transcripts. A personal statement is required. This should include any information that you consider relevant to your interest and ability in the MA in Sociology.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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This course helps you think systematically about the social world, the changes taking place and what those changes mean for societies of the future. Read more

About the course

This course helps you think systematically about the social world, the changes taking place and what those changes mean for societies of the future. You’ll analyse social problems at a local, national and global level.

Where your masters can take you

Our graduates are academics, researchers and health and social care professionals. Others become managers or administrators in the public and private sectors.

How we teach

Our teaching is rigorous and research-led. We encourage you to think critically, to learn research techniques and develop transferable skills. We also help you to develop the personal attributes that will make you highly employable. The department is a friendly place, where staff and postgraduates work together as colleagues.

Our interdisciplinary approach brings together sociologists, social policy analysts, social workers and social anthropologists. Our empirical research is internationally recognised. We make significant contributions to policy debates.

Course content

Core modules cover theoretical concepts and methods in sociology. We focus on major contemporary social problems. Optional modules are based on research we’re doing into various important topics. You’ll write a dissertation on a topic of your choice.

Core modules

These include: Explorations in Contemporary Social Change; Foundations of Sociological Inquiry; Qualitative Methods; Quantitative Methods.

Examples of optional modules

These can include: Digital Research; Men, Masculinities and Gender Relations; Sociology of Evil; Sociology of the New Genetics; Intimacy and Personal Relationships; Sociology of Whiteness.

Teaching and assessment

We use a combination of lectures, seminars, group work and problem-solving exercises. You’re assessed on coursework. You’ll also write a 15,000-word dissertation.

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Created for international students who wish to familiarise themselves with academic learning in the UK before undertaking rigorous study in their chosen subject. Read more

Created for international students who wish to familiarise themselves with academic learning in the UK before undertaking rigorous study in their chosen subject. Students undertake a preparatory year of English language and undergraduate modules in the subject area before embarking on Master's level modules in their second year.

Course detail

You gain a clear, confident and advanced understanding of the subject while receiving coaching in academic study and writing skills. The skills you develop on this programme include critical thinking, data analysis and presentation of key findings as well as transferable skills such as time management, IT and problem solving.

Purpose

You acquire practical and analytic skills in advanced research methodologies, learning the techniques and approaches that social researchers use to organise, structure and interpret data. You will learn about the process of research and how the analysis and presentation of evidence is influenced and can be influential in understanding social structure. You will become adept at using a range of frameworks and methodologies and will be able to assess the most appropriate to use in a given scenario.

Format

As well as taking core modules, you will choose from a range of optional modules; typical optional modules may include::

  • The sociology of risk
  • Digital culture
  • Sociology of health, illness and medicine
  • Race, difference and belonging
  • Social and political movements
  • Sociology of violence
  • The family, parenting culture and parenting policy

Careers

Over 98% of Kent's postgraduate students who graduated in 2016 were in work or further study within six months. Recent graduates from our School have pursued careers in academia, journalism, local and central government, charities and NGOs.

Why study at the University of Kent

We offer inspirational teaching and supervision alongside first-class library and IT facilities. You also benefit from our high-impact research in all subjects. Whatever you are looking to study, Kent provides a dynamic and challenging environment for your postgraduate studies.

  • Kent was awarded gold, the highest rating, in the UK Government’s Teaching Excellence Framework
  • Kent is ranked 21st in the Times Higher Education (THE) ‘Table of Tables’ 2017
  • Kent is ranked 25th in the Complete University Guide 2018
  • Kent is ranked 22nd in the Guardian University Guide 2018
  • 37% of our academics are from overseas and we have students representing 148 nationalities
  • In the most recent research rankings, 97% of research at Kent was found to be of international quality (REF 2014)
  • Kent is ranked 17th in the UK* for research intensity and research output (REF 2014)
  • Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why-kent/

* of 122 universities, not including specialist institutions

Postgraduate scholarships and funding

We have a scholarship fund of over £9 million to support our taught and research students with tuition fees and living costs. Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/fees-and-funding/index.html

English language learning

Kent offers a range of modules and programmes in English for Academic Purposes (EAP) which you can access throughout your degree https://www.kent.ac.uk/ems/eng-lang-reqs/index.html



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This programme provides core teaching in the ideas and approaches of sociology as applied to understanding social order and social change globally and internationally. Read more

This programme provides core teaching in the ideas and approaches of sociology as applied to understanding social order and social change globally and internationally. It explores the local impacts of global processes, and global impacts of local processes.

This programme will give you a better understanding of global processes of social change, and allow you to explore topics of personal interest in depth, both in coursework and in a supervised dissertation project.

It will appeal to those concerned about some of the key social problems and dynamics of our day, providing a thorough grounding in approaches to social research on global issues.

It presents sociology as the study of a dynamic and globalising world, around such issues as:

  • sustainable development
  • migration, refugees and displacement
  • global financial markets
  • social network analysis
  • China
  • human rights and citizenship
  • digital and global popular cultures
  • inequality

You will become part of a community led by international experts working on globally involved topics, in one of the UK’s best departments for research and teaching.

Programme structure

You will take compulsory courses that give you a sociological perspective and prepare you for independent dissertation research.

Your four further option courses can address global topics, social theory and research training, as you prefer.

The dissertation, a piece of self-designed research with supervisory support, allows you to put your personal stamp on your studies.

Learning outcomes

When you complete the degree you will:

  • have a comprehensive overview of Sociology and its key theoretical and research concerns and approaches
  • be able to design, conduct and present a substantial piece of empirical research
  • be able to contribute to the key debates in the specific areas you have chosen to study through the optional courses

Career opportunities

This programme is extremely relevant if you are seeking employment in consultancy, the public sector, UN agencies, non-governmental organisations, the private sector or think-tanks, or as an academic, practitioner or policy maker.

Past students have gone on to undertake roles in development and international aid, the public sector, academia/think-tanks, migration NGOs, environment and conservation, law and journalism.



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The award will provide the knowledge of the latest cyber security principles, practices, tools and techniques, taught by a team of specialist staff in purpose-built cyber security laboratories. Read more
The award will provide the knowledge of the latest cyber security principles, practices, tools and techniques, taught by a team of specialist staff in purpose-built cyber security laboratories. Graduates will be Cyber-operators, able to use ‘information’ as a defensive or offensive weapon.

Today, Cyber-Operators are required to have an ‘enriched’ background drawing elements of practical experience from fields as diverse as sociology, psychology, networks and network security, computer science and computer security, information management and information security, software engineering and reverse engineering, and of course, the law.

We have a diverse number of placements with companies from the security industry, high tech crime units and government organisations.

In January 2014 Staffordshire University announced exciting plans to create one main city campus in Stoke-on-Trent. This is to confirm this course will move from our Stafford Campus to Stoke-on-Trent Campus from Summer 2016.

Course content

Throughout the course you will be invited to attend guest lectures delivering workshops and conducting seminars with the students. Our visiting tutors are national and international security experts.

You will also have an opportunity in achieving industry recognised certification in Certified Ethical hacking.

Our purpose-built state of the art security laboratory offers each student a unique experience in enhancing your skills and knowledge in Cyber Security. As a result of winning a recent £5 million STEM bid, you will benefit from state of the art hardware resources, which will enhance your learning.

You will gain:
-Sound understanding of the computer science.
-Sound understanding of TCP-IP networks, the TCP-IP suite and its supporting protocols.
-Sound understanding and practical knowledge of digital forensics incidence response.
-Understanding and practical knowledge of managing information at all levels.
-Practical knowledge of the different types of computer crime.
-Ability to use with competency cyber-security toolkits.
-Ability to follow strict policies and procedures with meticulous record keeping.
-Good understanding of people and their motivational catalysts.
-Knowledge of evidence law and legal procedures.
-Ability to write reports on technical issues in a non-technical manner.
-Ability to address large audiences in a formal manner and affect their decision making process.

Core Modules
-Computer Security – Low Level
-Cyber Operations
-Malware analysis and Reverse Engineering
-Research Methods
-Operating Systems Security
-Digital Forensics & Incidence Response

Option Modules*
-Network Security with CISCO
-Network Security
-Penetration Testing
-Computer Security – High Level

*If you have CCNA certification (or an equivalent CISCO background), there will be the option of doing Network Security with the CISCO curriculum. Those of you who are not CCNA certified (or without an equivalent CISCO background), will do a less practical module of similar learning outcomes. After Teaching Block 2 you will have an option, again based on your prior knowledge on ethical hacking (and/or background, qualifications), for doing either Computer Security – High Level, which focuses on ethical hacking, or a more technical module on Penetration Testing.

Graduate destinations

The award will provide you with the knowledge of the latest cyber security principles, practices, tools and techniques, taught by a team of specialist staff in purpose-built cyber security laboratories. Graduates will be Cyber-operators, equipped with the skills to work in the security industry.

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