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Masters Degrees (Digital Society)

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Programme description. This programme will provide you with a rigorous introduction to the sociological study of digital society and digital culture. Read more

Programme description

This programme will provide you with a rigorous introduction to the sociological study of digital society and digital culture. The programme will introduce you to the core theoretical and methodological issues that arise when sociologists investigate the increasing prevalence of digital technology, digital infrastructure, and data production, capture, and analysis in everyday life. It will also allow you to study the very social conditions (economic, political, and cultural) that give rise to such technologies and their circuits of power. Students in this programme may take up the following specialised topics, including (but not limited to) the sociological analysis of digital technology and new forms of data on the fields of contemporary culture, work and labour, leisure, health, education, government and law, and finance.

While this programme will be primarily suitable for those with some background in the social sciences, the MSc in Digital Society is intended for anyone who wants to understand, as well as learn to study, analyse, and critique digital technologies and the complex ways in which they shape society, social institutions, and culture. The degree combines seminar teaching on specific topics with individual research supervision by leading researchers in the emerging field of “Digital Sociology”, in the UK’s top-ranked department for sociological research.

Programme structure

You will take compulsory courses that give you a sociological perspective and prepare you for independent dissertation research. Your four further option courses can address digital media, social and cultural theory and research training, as you prefer. The dissertation, a piece of self-designed research with supervisory support, allows you to put your personal stamp on your studies.

Learning outcomes

As well as providing students with , studying for this degree will allow you:

  • A foreground the sociological analysis of digital technology, digital media, and the social relations they engender.
  • To foster critical analysis of the social, economic, and political conditions that give rise to digital technology/media and data infrastructures.
  • To engage with, as well as critically assess, digital research tools and platforms via the necessary methodological training.
  • A focused academic background in social and cultural theory, as relevant to the study of digital society.
  • To become conversant in the digital research methods relevant to their topic of study, with an emphasis on cultivating the ability to assess the social impact of such research.
  • To engage with ethical issues that are raised by digital sociological work.

Career opportunities

This degree is well-positioned for a wide range of careers in the public, private, and third sectors. It is particularly relevant for those who have aspirations for a career in digital research or digital media design and development. The programme is also key for those who wish to engage with digital technology and data in their own personal lives or on a wider scale as an activist, artist, manager, practitioner, or policy maker. You may go on to undertake roles in social media analysis, Internet research, journalism, education, and law and government. The programme also offers a route to a PhD programme in social research. You will gain highly transferable skills in research, communication, and project management applicable to roles in many fields.



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This course offers you a unique opportunity to develop a broad understanding of the interweaving of digital media and society from a sociological perspective. Read more

About the course

This course offers you a unique opportunity to develop a broad understanding of the interweaving of digital media and society from a sociological perspective.

Where your masters can take you

Our graduates are academics, researchers and health and social care professionals. Others become managers or administrators in the public and private sectors.

How we teach

Our teaching is rigorous and research-led. We encourage you to think critically, to learn research techniques and develop transferable skills. We also help you to develop the personal attributes that will make you highly employable. The department is a friendly place, where staff and postgraduates work together as colleagues.

Our interdisciplinary approach brings together sociologists, social policy analysts, social workers and social anthropologists. Our empirical research is internationally recognised. We make significant contributions to policy debates.

Course content

Drawing upon staff expertise in digital media and digital society, this programme will give you a grounding in four aspects of digital media, allowing you to specialise in a specific area, or develop your understanding of all of the following: Theorising digital society; Digital practices; Digital methods; Digital research.

As a student within the Faculty of Social Sciences, you will also benefit from the research and training activities of both the University’s Sheffield Methods Institute and the faculty-wide Digital Society Network, the latter of which brings together interdisciplinary researchers engaged in research at the cutting-edge of society-technology interactions.

Core modules

These include: Researching Digital Society, Digital Practices, Digital Methods, Qualitative OR Statistical Methods.

Examples of optional modules

These can include: Social Media, Data and Society, Researching Social Media, Information, Governance and Ethics, Online Journalism Studies, Media , State and Society in China, The Sociology of Surveillance, What It Means to Be Human.

Teaching and assessment

Assessment varies across modules and will include a combination of coursework (essays, portfolio and practical work). Formal examination may be required for some optional modules. Students are also expected to complete a dissertation-length project equivalent to 15,000 words in length.

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The MA in Digital Media is unique in its combination of practical and theoretical approaches to contemporary media and technology- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-digital-media-technology-cultural-form/. Read more
The MA in Digital Media is unique in its combination of practical and theoretical approaches to contemporary media and technology- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-digital-media-technology-cultural-form/

The established and exciting degree is designed to help you understand digital transformations in media, culture and society and apply this understanding in practice, in the media and creative industries and in further research. You will be equipped with skills that can be applied to current and future developments in digital media, social media, computing and other aspects of technology.

The MA in Digital Media educates aspiring media practitioners and academics as well as early and mid-career professionals who seek to reflect on their roles in a structured and stimulating learning environment designed to give all students up-to-the-minute knowledge of digital media and the skills to apply that knowledge to future developments.

The MA offers two pathways:

-Pathway 1 is a theory programme where you learn about developments in digital media and technology from a wide range of perspectives

-Pathway 2 is a theory and practice programme where you improve your skills, understanding and experience in one of the following areas:

Documentary
Image making
Journalism
Writing

Acclaimed academics and practitioners

Benefit from the experience and expertise of one of the world’s leading media and communications departments. You'll be taught by theorists and practitioners of international standing: Sarah Kember, Joanna Zylinska, Graham Young, Tony Dowmunt, Angela Phillips, Julian Henriques and David Morley.

Work placements and internships

The MA in Digital Media regularly attracts offers of work placements and internships. Recently these have come from Google, The Science Museum and N1creative.com.

Facilities

Our students have access to state-of-the-art facilities including well-equipped lecture and seminar rooms, exhibition spaces, computer facilities and digital media suites.

The department is also currently host to the renowned philosopher of media and technology, Bernard Stiegler and students will have access to his modulein Media Philosophy as well as priority access to the innovative and popular option After New Media. Designed to complement the MA in Digital Media, this course provides a framework for thinking about the current media environment as well as future forms of human and computer interaction.

An established record

The MA in Digital Media has been redefining media theory and practice since 2004. Our students become proficient in:

the history, sociology and philosophy of digital media
the application of critical conceptual skills to specialist areas and future forms of media
multimedia skills in image making (photography, video, animation, graphic art) script writing, journalism and documentary
MA Digital Media students have access the pioneering option ‘After New Media’, a non-assessed online module which explores the themes of self mediation, ethical mediation and intelligent mediation, and develops a framework for thinking about 'life' after new media. As befits a course of this kind we will be combining media, and exploring their pedagogic potential – uniting digital-online technologies with more traditional teaching formats, such as reading groups, seminars and an end of year symposium.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Sarah Kember.

Modules & Structure

The programme consists of:

Two compulsory core modules
Pathway 1 - between two and four option modules (worth 60 credits) OR
Pathway 2 - a two-term practice block (worth 30 credits) and either one or two option modules (worth 30 credits)
The dissertation or the practice/theory project

Assessment

Seen take-home paper; essays; dissertation or practice/theory project and other production work in the area of documentary, image-making, journalism or fiction.

Programme overview

This is an exciting programme which offers a critical, contextual and practical approach to digital media and technology. It problematises approaches to the 'new' media in academic and professional debate, especially those which overemphasise the potential for radical social change led by a homogenised technology itself.

The programme is defined by its resistance to technological determinism and its insistence on the importance of addressing the social and historical contexts within which a range of media technologies are employed. In order to provide a contextual framework and facilitate the conceptualisation of digital media and technologies as fully cultural forms and processes, the programme will draw on a range of disciplines including: media and cultural studies, sociology, anthropology and philosophy. However, the programme will remain focused on key contemporary concerns about the potential role of digital media in society and on refiguring the contours of the 'new' media debate.

The programme offers two pathways. Pathway 1 addresses central theoretical and conceptual concerns relating to digital media. Pathway 2 combines theoretical analysis and practical work, offering students the opportunity to explore new media theories and concepts in practice. Pathway 2 is primarily aimed at students who already have some experience in one of the areas on offer: documentary; digital photography and image making; journalism; writing. It is meant to appeal to media industry professionals who are keen to reflect critically on their practice within a structured learning environment, graduates of practice-based courses but also those who have gained their practical experience in documentary; digital photography and image making; journalism or writing in informal settings.

Programme structure

The first compulsory core course is Digital Media - critical perspectives and this is taught in a small workshop format in the Autumn term. This course functions as a foundation for the second core course and offers students a map of the key debates in digital media. The course is taught in ten two hour workshop sessions and is supported by the provision of one-to-one tutorials.

The second compulsory core course is Technology and Cultural Form - debates, models, dialogues and this develops questions of technology, power, politics and subjectivity which were introduced in the first core course. The first part of this course highlights the key conceptual concerns of a contextualised approach to digital media plus the relevant debates and models formulated by key figures in the field. The second part of this course aims to generate a dialogue between theoreticians and practitioners around some of the most intellectually stimulating, contentious and contemporary ideas in the field without necessarily seeking a resolution. This course is taught in ten two hour workshop sessions during the Spring term and is supported by the weekly provision of one-to-one tutorials.

Students are required to take options from the lists provided by the Media and Communications, Anthropology, Comparative Literature and Sociology Departments as well as the Centre for Cultural Studies. Examples might include: After New Media, Nature and Culture, Cultural Theory, Globalisation, Risk and Control, Embodiment and Experience, Political Communications. Options are taught primarily through lectures and seminars and take place in the Autumn or Spring terms.

Each student's option profile is discussed with the programme convenor in order to ensure that the balance of subject-specific topics is appropriate for the individual concerned. Option courses are taught primarily through lectures, seminars and tutorials and take place in the Autumn or Spring terms.

All students are required to produce either a 12,000 word dissertation on a topic agreed by the student and supervisor or a practice/theory project in the area of documentary, photography and image making, journalism or fiction. The length of the practical element is dependent on the media and the form used and will be agreed in advance with the supervisor. It will, however, be comparable with practical projects undertaken in practice MA programmes in the relevant field. Students undertaking the practice/theory project will also be expected to submit a 3-4000 word analysis of their practice which locates it within the theoretical debates explored in the MA as a whole. This essay may be presented as a separate document or as an integral part of the project depending on the nature of the project and by a agreement with both theory and practice supervisors.

Programme outcomes

The programme's subject specific learning outcomes require students to analyse and contextualise developments in digital media and technology with reference to key debates in the history, sociology, anthropology and philosophy of the media. Students who opt for the practice/theory pathway will also be required to produce material of publishable or broadcast standard and to evaluate the ways in which theoretical and practical insights intersect. All students will develop a wide range of transferable qualities and skills necessary for employment in related or unrelated areas. These are described by the Quality Assurance Agency as: 'the exercise of initiative and personal responsibility, decision-making in complex and unpredictable situations, and the independent learning ability required for continuing professional development'.

By the end of the programme students will be able to:

-Map and critically evaluate key debates in the field of new media
-Analyse and contextualise current and future developments in digital media and technology
-Evaluate and articulate key historical, sociological, anthropological and philosophical approaches to the study of digital media and technology
-Demonstrate in-depth knowledge of at least four differing areas of inquiry
-Demonstrate an advanced level of conceptual knowledge and (where relevant) practical skill appropriate for a sustained piece of work in the field
-Prepare and deliver clearly argued and informed work
-Locate, retrieve and present relevant information for a specific project
-Manage a complex array of competing demands and work effectively to a deadline
-Work resourcefully and independently
-Think critically and/or work practically within a given context

Skills

We provide graduates with skills that are cutting edge: in the critical analysis and/or creative production of digital media; in the disciplinary knowledge and conceptual frameworks necessary for current and future forms of media and technology; in the awareness of how digital media and technologies are re-shaping society from the ways we communicate (through social media and web 2.0) to the increasingly ‘smart’ environments in which we live.

Careers

Our programme provides a theory and practice pathway and prepares students for work in the following areas:

-media and creative industries; advertising, marketing and PR (graduates of the MA Digital Media have found work with Virgin Media, Google, the BBC and other leading organisations worldwide)
-research and academia (graduates from this programme have gone on to study for PhD degrees in higher education institutions around the world and also here with us)
-media production and new media art (graduates have exhibited, published and produced work in photography, journalism, TV, documentary, film and multimedia)

Graduate Ekaterina discusses her career:

"I work for a company, called Visual DNA, which already sounds like life happening After New Media. The company is the largest data provider in Europe and is totally multinational. We actually try to analyse human visual DNA, you memories, feelings, thoughts about the future, anticipations, etc by creating personality quizzes where instead of verbal answers we tend to use images.

My role is as Creative Developer. It involves working with images from concept to finding/shooting and post-production. My qualifications perfectly matched what they’ve been looking for, Digital Media rocks!

My tip for the new-to-be-graduates is this: physically go to places and companies and talk to people. It really opens up loads of possibilities, and when I tell someone where I’ve graduated from they look impressed, and there is some sort of respect coming from them."

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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What is the Master of Digital Humanities all about?. The Master of Science in Digital Humanities helps graduates from . Read more

What is the Master of Digital Humanities all about?

The Master of Science in Digital Humanities helps graduates from Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences programmes to develop digital competencies that will allow them to add digital dimensions to their own domain expertise. It aims to explicitly link these competencies to research questions, case studies and applications related to the domain expertise of the students.

Graduates of this programme will be able to bring their own domain expertise to a significantly higher level of functionality, using digital tools and techniques. Building both on the expertise they obtained from the programme and their prior expertise in Humanities, Social or Behavioral Sciences, graduates will be well placed to open many new digital applications to a much wider community. Moreover, those who wish to move to a professional profile involving more advanced digital competencies, are well prepared to do so.

Structure

The programme is organized around a number of clusters of course units. The central clusters are the Application Domains cluster and the Tools for the Digital World cluster. Supporting clusters are the Introductory Digitization Components cluster, the Advanced Digitization Components cluster and the Management Component. The heart of the research activities is situated in the Master’s thesis.

International and multidisciplinary

The Master’s Programme is conceived as a one year, international and multidisciplinary advanced master programme (master-after-master). The programme is unique in Flanders and one of only a few in Europe. The programme is firmly framed in an explicit collaboration between the Faculty of Arts, the Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, the Faculty of Social Sciences and the Faculty of Sciences - Department of Computer Science. As such, it is supported by experts in Digital Humanities applications, who supply research expertise for the programme, as well as by experts in digital techniques and tools, who provide a sound technical basis for the students.

Objectives

Digitization affects in many ways how future scientists in Humanities and Behavioural Sciences will conduct their research. Also, graduates from Humanities and Behavioural Sciences programs enter a professional world in which digitization becomes the standard, be it in publishing, arts, libraries, teaching and many others.

The Master of Science in Digital Humanities program aims to prepare graduates from Humanities and Behavioural Sciences programs for these challenges. It aims to help such graduates to develop digital competencies that will allow them to add digital dimensions to their own domain expertise. It aims to explicitly link this knowledge and these competencies to case studies and applications related to the domain expertise of the students. It will train them to master information structures and functionalities of data, programming structures and technique to produce scripts for digital applications, tools for improving access and interactive use of data and the development of new digital applications. It will train them how to manage projects related to digitization and introduce them to emerging new digital technologies and their applications.

As an advanced master program (master-after master), it is assumed that the students entering this program have already achieved the general academic competencies defined for any master's program. Nevertheless, it is also within the aims of the program to further strengthen these competencies, within the specific context that Digital Humanities offers.

More specifically, graduates understand the basics of Digital Humanities, databases and query languages, scripting languages, the role of IT in management and of some of the emerging technologies in Digital Humanities. They are able to formulate research goals, determine trajectories that achieve these goals, collect and select information relevant to achieve the research goals and interpret collected information on the basis of a critical research attitude. They are able to communicate scientifically. They are able to model a database and use SQL, to use a scripting language, to apply tools for Digital Humanities and to study applications in Digital Humanities. They have the attitudes of valuing and fostering creative, critical and independent thinking, of applying an interdisciplinary and participative approach in innovative development and of striving towards opening the digital world to a broader society.

Career perspectives

Academically, researchers in the Humanities, Social or Behavioral Science are confronted with the need to apply digital tools to facilitate and enhance their research. The program enables graduates to enhance their research in the Humanities, Social or Behavioral Sciences through non-trivial uses of digital tools and techniques. This may include modeling and querying databases, accessing data, interconnecting andquerying web resources, extending tools with scripts to provide extra functionality, text-encoding and e-publishing, mining repositories, data visualization, analyzing social networks, adopting, adapting and enhancing e-learning environments, improvingusability of human-computer interaction. As such, graduates are very well placed to take on the challenges that novel research positions require.

Professionally, graduates of the Humanities, Social of Behavioral Sciences enter professional environments where connecting the company’s business with digital tools and techniques has become standard. Here as well, the program enables its graduates to put to use non-trivial digital techniques in their professional occupations, including e-media, publishing, arts, history, culture, music, libraries, e-education or interactions for end-user applications. Thus, graduates who want to pursue a career in the usual sectors for graduates of the Humanities, Social or Behavioral Sciences will be much better prepared to cope with the digital techniques that are currently applied there.

More generally, graduates of this program provide society with professionals and researchers who are able to bring their own domain expertise to a higher level of functionality, using digital tools and techniques. Building both on the expertise they obtained from the program and their prior expertise in Humanities, Social or Behavioral Sciences, are well placed to take part in opening the digital world to a larger community.

Graduates of this program who wish to move to a job profile involving more advanced digital competencies, are prepared to do so and will help to close to gap in an IT-focused labor market. This will require extra training at the company and aims at positions such as project analysts, project managers, service managers.



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The emergence of new digital communication platforms has had significant impacts. Read more
The emergence of new digital communication platforms has had significant impacts. Audiences are transforming into media producers; new business models are emerging; social media campaigns create new forms of politics; digital culture highlights practices of sharing and participation; and data collection and analytics affect an increasing part of our lives.

This offers new possibilities for digital citizens, but it also raises new questions regarding classic notions of privacy and freedom of expression, and it renders information and digital infrastructure a key resource.

The MA Digital Media and Society addresses current challenges of online communication and internet studies. It enables you to develop specialist knowledge in areas such as social media, big data, citizen journalism, digital culture, the creative industries, internet governance, and digital rights. It also provides a theoretical and methodological grounding in media and communication studies.

This course provides you with a thorough understanding of the current transformations and with the analytical skills to investigate digital media in the context of social, political and economic change. We ask how online communication is shaped by users, states and businesses, and how our society is, in turn, affected by digital media.

This course draws on the strength and diversity of Cardiff University’s staff, giving you a unique opportunity to work with academics whose research explores issues such as citizen journalism, online activism, big data, internet surveillance, internet governance and digital rights.

You can get involved in our Research Group Digital Media and Society and thus become part of a dynamic research environment.

Please note this course focuses on academic research and does not provide extensive practical training.

Distinctive features

• Enables you to develop an in-depth understanding of digital media and their implications for the social, political, economic and cultural environment.

• Conveys specialist knowledge that addresses current areas of concern, such as social media use, big data, the sharing economy, privacy and surveillance, internet governance, digital rights, and citizen journalism.

• Empowers you to assess how technological change is linked to forces of globalisation, political institutions, and historical developments, and how it affects democracy and social change.

• Equips you with a thorough theoretical and methodological grounding in media and communication studies.

• Allows you to apply up-to-date research skills to carry out your own original research for the dissertation and beyond.

• Produces reflective and well-trained graduates who understand the multiplicity of social, cultural, political and technological complexities of digital media and who will be able to solve complex problems and make informed decisions in their future careers.

Structure

This is a one-year full-time course, combining core and optional modules. Over the course duration you will study modules totalling 180 credits.

Core modules:

Politics of Global Communication
Putting Research into Practice I
Putting Research into Practice II
Understanding Digital Media
Citizen Journalism and Digital Publics
Project Based Dissertation

Optional modules:

Media Law
Reporting Business, Finance & Economics
Reporting the Middle East
Insurgency into the 21st Century
Citizen Media
Global Crisis Reporting
In The Editor's Chair
Reporting Health and Science
Electoral Behaviour, Public Opinion and the Media
Social Media and Politics
Governing the Internet: Digital Freedoms and Restrictions
Big Data, Society and Everyday Life

Teaching

You will be taught through a mixture of lectures and seminars, which complement the academic nature of the course.

Assessment

You will be assessed through a range of formative and summative assessments throughout the course. The main method of assessment on this programme is course work.

Career prospects

Graduates of MA Digital Media and Society are employed in a range of occupations, including the non-profit sector, digital business, online journalism, and regulatory institutions. They take on leading roles in social media campaigns, internet policy, human rights organisations, journalism, and creative industries.

As an academic course focusing on critical analysis, this programme also provides a perfect starting-point for PhD research and prepares you for careers in research institutions, both at university and other public or private institutions.

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This course looks at the creation, management, curation and repurposing of digital media and digital assets. Read more

This course looks at the creation, management, curation and repurposing of digital media and digital assets.

As the digital aspects of content industries, the cultural heritage sector and the private sector are reaching maturity, career opportunities have mushroomed worldwide for professionals, who are familiar with digital media and have the skills to manage digital content throughout its lifecycle.

Key benefits

  • We draw on a wide range of expertise, offering insights into curatorial and archival practices of dealing with digital assets as well as into technologies and wider socioeconomic questions such as rights and project management.
  • The course tutors offer unrivalled expertise in technologies and processes that allow the quick and efficient storage, retrieval and reuse of digital assets. They come from a diverse and highly interdisciplinary background, having run digital archives or worked in the digital industries in the past.
  • Through the optional internship module students can have direct access to some of the world’s most important culture and media institutions.
  • Close links and regular speakers from the content sector give students insights and up-to-the-minute knowledge of the subject area.

Description

Our Digital Asset & Media Management MA takes a comparative and interdisciplinary approach, allowing you to explore and critically assess competing theories and practices from across new media digital management, archival, and information science. This will provide you with a well-rounded understanding of the requirements across many domains. In recent years there has been an explosion in the volume, complexity and range of digital content in a variety of media. This has been called the big data revolution and is closely connected to the increasing interest in the digital economy as an engine of growth.

There are very few institutions of any size that do not create and depend on the management, reuse and curation of digital media and information. Government, the public sector, Higher Education, cultural and creative industries and business all make and use these assets every day. This makes the skills we will give you increasingly attractive to employers. As well as developing the practical skills you need to manage digital media assets, you will also develop your critical and reflective capacities and increase your understanding of the interdependence between digital processes, technology, society and curatorial practice. This will enable you to enter into a technologically complex and fast-moving digital world of work.

Reasons you should consider the Digital Asset and Media Management:

  • Broadcast and publishing industries are increasingly using digital media in new ways, on new technological platforms such as tablets and mobile.
  • Archives and libraries are increasingly depending on digital materials and cultural heritage organisations are digitizing and making digital materials relating to our history and culture more available.
  • Businesses rely on digital media and content to develop, run and manage their future prosperity.
  • Research managers and data scientists work with large volumes of digital data, running experiments, simulations and visualisations.
  • Employers are looking for skilled professionals with knowledge and expertise in managing their valuable digital media assets.

Course purpose

The course will prepare students for work or research in an economy and society which increasingly recognises the value of digital media and digital assets in general. Managing these and understanding how to exploit them within a complex digital information environment presents significant challenges for organisations. As a consequence there is an increasing demand for professionals with digital asset and media management expertise. The MA responds to this demand for digitally literate professionals to work in the educational and heritage institutions as well as the publishing, broadcast, and creative content industries. The course aims to equip students with a range of strategic, technical and practical skills to provide direction and leadership in these areas.

Course format and assessment

Teaching Style

If you are a full-time student, we will provide you with 120 to 180 hours of teaching through lectures and seminars, and we will expect you to undertake 1,674 hours of independent study.

If you are a part-time student, we will give you 90 hours of teaching through lectures and seminars in your first year and 50 in your second year. We will expect you to undertake 720 hours of independent study in your first year, and 954 hours in your second.

Assessment

We will assess our modules entirely through coursework, which will consist of a mixture of essays, project work, and workshop reports, depending on the modules you choose.

The study time and assessment methods detailed above are typical and give you a good indication of what to expect. However, they may change if the course modules change.



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This course give you a unique opportunity to explore the many forms of digital culture and their profound effects on society from a number of different angles. Read more

This course give you a unique opportunity to explore the many forms of digital culture and their profound effects on society from a number of different angles. It aims to develop participants' skills in forming their own assessments of digital technologies and their impact on society and culture. 

Graduates of this coursewill have gained the analytical tools required to understand how digitisation and internet technologies have shaped and are shaping modern culture.

 Key Benefits

  • Develop an understanding of the role and impact of digital technologies in contemporary culture, broadly interpreted to include such areas of activity as performing arts, telecommunications, information technology, philosophy, law and education.
  • Study digital technologies within an interdisciplinary and cross-cultural framework, combining modules from participating departments.
  • Obtain on-the-job training in a month long internship within a relevant organisation.
  • Take field trips to major London cultural institutions, such as Tate Modern, National Gallery, Institute of Archaeology and the BBC Archives.

Description

On this Digital Culture & Society MA programme you will focus on how technology and culture are connected in today’s society. We broadly interpret this to include such areas of activity as performing arts, telecommunications, information technology, philosophy, law and education. We aim to develop and enhance your awareness and understanding of a range of subjects relevant to digital culture and technology, including:

  • The key information and communication technologies that shape contemporary society.
  • The key developments in contemporary cultural expression, specifically how these are driven, mediated or influenced by digital technologies.
  • The role of digital technologies in the study of culture and cultural artefacts from the past.
  • How digital technologies are shaping today’s society, including social intercourse, social structures, government, international politics, education and law.
  • The current critical and theoretical debates around digital culture and the role of technology in cultural life.
  • The ethical, moral and philosophical issues that arise from the role and impact of technology in cultural and social life.

Course purpose

The aim of the MA Digital Culture & Society programme is to develop participants’ understanding of the role and consequences of digital technologies in contemporary culture, broadly interpreted to include such areas of activity as performing arts, telecommunications, information technology, philosophy, law and education. The programme is conceived as fundamentally interdisciplinary, drawing for its teaching on four academic Schools: Arts and Humanities; Law; Physical Sciences and Engineering; and Social Science & Public Policy. It is aimed at a diverse range of participants, offering technological insights to those with non-technical backgrounds, and cultural perspectives to those who have not thought about digital culture in a systematic way.

Course format and assessment

Teaching Style

If you are a full-time student, we will provide 120 to 180 hours of teaching through lectures and seminars, and we will expect you to undertake 1674 hours of independent study.

If you are a part-time student, we will provide 90 hours of teaching through lectures and seminars in your first year, and 50 hours in your second. We will expect you to undertake 720 hours of independent study in your first year and 954 hours in your second.

Assessment

We will assess our modules entirely through coursework, which will mostly take the form of essays, with some project work.

Regulating body

King’s College is regulated by the Higher Education Funding Council for England.



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This programme offers a comprehensive understanding of current developments in digital media and their wider social significance. Read more
This programme offers a comprehensive understanding of current developments in digital media and their wider social significance. Smartphones; social networking, blogging and tweeting; online shopping; communication by email; and the delivery of news, film, music and e-books over the Internet: these are just some of the most striking ways in which the digital is penetrating and transforming contemporary society.

The programme is delivered by a diverse interdisciplinary team with a strong profile in, for example, digital culture, media, sociology, anthropology and communication studies.

Core study areas include media and cultural industries, digital futures, media and cultural work, textual analysis research techniques, production and reception analysis and a dissertation.

Optional study areas include politics of representation, media and modernity, communication and citizenship, sex industries, global communications, media, nations, and nationalisms, digital cultures, digital economies, cultural memory and the heritage industries, and marketing politics.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/social-sciences/digital-media-society/

Programme modules

Compulsory Modules:
- Digital Cultures
- Digital Futures: explorations in new media
- Production and Reception Analysis
- Digital Economies
- Digital Methodologies
- Dissertation

Optional Modules:
A selection of the following options will be available:
- Media and Modernity
- Media and Cultural Industries
- The Politics of Representation
- Popular Music and Modern Times
- Citizenship and Communications
- Media, Nations and Nationalisms
- Global Communications
- Media and Cultural Work
- Tourism, Culture and Society
- Sex Industries
- Cultural Memory and the Heritage Industries
- Marketing Politics

Assessment

Coursework plus a dissertation of 10,000 words on an agreed topic.

Careers and further study

The degree is designed to develop specialist understanding of contemporary developments in digital media and culture. This will be relevant to anyone pursuing a professional career in this rapidly growing sector and to those with an interest in these significant social changes. Students will also acquire research skills which will be of value in both media-related and academic careers.

Why choose social sciences at Loughborough?

The Department of Social Sciences has long been recognised as an international centre of academic excellence and for its cutting-edge interdisciplinary work.

This recognition of excellence has been a major factor in enabling the Department to recruit a lively community of postgraduate students that currently numbers around 100.

In the Department of Social Sciences we offer a rich variety of taught postgraduate masters. The courses are delivered by an internationally renowned interdisciplinary team, through the use of contemporary case studies and research-informed applied teaching and learning.

The courses provide training in digital culture, media, communications, sociological and anthropological, theory, as well as quantitative and qualitative methods

- Research
All of our academic staff are active researchers, working within and across the following disciplinary boundaries – Communication and Media Studies, Criminology, Social Policy, Social Psychology, and Sociology.

Loughborough is home to the most world-leading, original and internationally excellent research in communication, media studies, sociology, and social psychology. Our research has excellent impact, with staff working with a wide range of public and third sector bodies (e.g., BBC Trust, the Metropolitan Police, the Electoral Commission, the College of Mediators, UK Drug Policy Commission, Department of Health). Our social policy and criminology research also has world-leading impact, particularly in services for children and minimum income standards.

- Career prospects
Our programmes prepare our graduates for the real world of the television industry, marketing, academia, publishing, plus many more industries. They go on to work for companies and organisations such as China Development Research Foundation, Elsevier Ltd, Image Line Communication, Institute of Psychiatry, Metropolitan Police Service, Oxfam and X-Pert Med GmbH.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/social-sciences/digital-media-society/

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IN BRIEF. Study at our state-of-the-art MediaCityUK campus, adjacent to the BBC and ITV, in the heart of the region’s growing media hub. Read more

IN BRIEF:

  • Study at our state-of-the-art MediaCityUK campus, adjacent to the BBC and ITV, in the heart of the region’s growing media hub
  • Learn from lecturers with strong, relevant professional backgrounds and undertake placements in the industry
  • Develop the latest digital skills and knowledge that are highly sought-after in today’s global digital workplace
  • Based at MediaCityUK
  • Overseas study available
  • Work/industrial placement opportunity
  • International students can apply

COURSE SUMMARY

This course offers a hands-on practical approach to this exciting discipline, underpinned by a strong academic foundation.You will gain a solid grounding in the theory and practice of Public Relations and Digital Communications, preparing you for a career in this constantly changing and evolving industry.

A key element of the course will focus on content creation – an emerging area within Public Relations and Digital Communication. You will benefit from a multimedia approach, learning how to use different techniques – including social media, video and content management – to optimise the effectiveness of communicating in a digital age.

As well as exploring the history of PR and how its relationship with journalism has developed and evolved over the years, you will examine the ethical issues surrounding PR and the ways PR can contribute to the management and protection of an organisation or individual’s reputation.

You will learn from lecturers with strong, relevant professional backgrounds and have the chance to undertake placements in the industry.

This programme offers you the opportunity to focus on digital communications strategies as well as more traditional public relations practice.

COURSE STRUCTURE

This 12 month postgraduate course aims to produce highly-skilled graduates who are able to operate professionally in today’s PR and digital communication-related industries.

You will develop cutting-edge knowledge and understanding of the role and influence of PR and digital communication within contemporary society, and the demands on and opportunities for PR and digital communication professionals.

This course will involve developing a professional level of practical skills and understanding in the devising and implementation of PR campaign strategies To develop systematic and advanced research techniques for the evaluation and analysis of critical texts and aspects of current research and scholarship at the forefront of the field of Public Relations and digital communications.

In the first trimester, you will study Public Relations & Journalism and Content Creation modules, which will provide a solid basis on which to develop your skills.

The modules you will study in the second trimester are Understanding PR Campaigns, which looks at case studies and strategies, and Professional PR Practice, which incorporates an industry work placement.

In the third trimester, you will work on a Major Project or a Dissertation.

TEACHING

  • Delivery will include lectures and presentations, seminars and workshops, aimed at development of students’ understanding of the theory and practice of PR and digital communications.
  • Workshops and seminars will explore and develop students’ understanding of PR as an evolving industry. 
  • Visiting speakers from within the industry and related sectors.
  • Student-led independent research, independent study and project work, such as analysing and devising PR campaigns, will support programme aims and learning outcomes.
  • Group work will feature strongly during this programme, with students having the opportunity to work together on real projects as well as evaluating and analysing existing case studies.

CAREER PROSPECTS

Public Relations is one of the fastest growing professions in the UK, employing 62,000 people in 2015.

The importance of the digital economy, and the opportunities and challenges it presents, has been noted by a Lords Select Committee. Its report, entitled Make or Break: The UK’s Digital Future, emphasises the urgent need, at HE level, for industry input, so that graduates are learning job-relevant digital skills. This illustrates the employability value of a postgraduate programme in Public Relations and Digital Communications.

The programme would prepare graduates for work within PR and Digital Communication related industries and feeds into this skills gap in the PR and communications industries. However, it will also provide key transferable skills that are increasingly sought after in today’s job market.

Graduates may go on to secure jobs in the PR and digital communication sectors and also undertake roles in content creation – for example, copywriting, SEO and analytics

LINKS WITH INDUSTRY

Students will be encouraged to take advantage of work placement opportunities which will also be available as part of the programme and there will also be a focus on working with industry partners. We have links with the Chartered Institute of Public Relations (CIPR) as well as a number of organisations (NHS, BBC, ITV, Salford Red Devils, Sale Sharks Rugby Union Club, Manchester United and Manchester City Football Clubs, plus independent PR and Comms agencies), which could be developed further to incorporate more PR, social media and digital communications roles.

FURTHER STUDY

Graduates can undertake a postgraduate degree by research at MPhil (two years full-time) or PhD level (three years full-time). This could occur in any field of communications, journalism and media. At Salford the Communication, Cultural & Media Studies Research Centre and the International Media Research Centre contain a range of internationally leading academics able to supervise research degrees in their broad field.

For more details, visit:

http://www.smmp.salford.ac.uk/international-media-centre

http://www.smmp.salford.ac.uk/page/communication-cultural-and-media-studies



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The emergence of the internet and digital culture has affected all societies, albeit unevenly. This programme explores the global dimensions of digital culture, focusing on digital creativity and practices in the global South. Read more
The emergence of the internet and digital culture has affected all societies, albeit unevenly. This programme explores the global dimensions of digital culture, focusing on digital creativity and practices in the global South. Students are taught to understand the historical development of digital technologies and the internet, exploring their impact and meaning in diverse economic, political and cultural realms. They study contemporary theories of the digital and consider their adequacy for understanding the non-Western world, while developing knowledge of a range of research tools for understanding the internet, social media and big data.

Students are encouraged to develop arguments about the global dimensions of digital culture in written and oral forms. In addition, they explore the shifting lines between theory and practice by becoming digital adepts, developing collective and individual blogs and acquiring other digital multi-media skills.

The programme is designed for those wishing to be active in the growing digital culture markets in the global South; personnel working for NGOs and other organizations involved in new media and development; policymakers for digital innovation; and diplomats faced with new digital diplomacy. It is an excellent platform for those wishing to undertake MPhil/PhD research on global digital cultures.

Email:

Phone: +44 (0)20 7898 4422

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/media-studies/ma-global-digital-cultures/

Structure

Two Compulsory Units:
- Theoretical Issues in Global Digital Cultures - 15PMSC006 (1 Unit) - Full Year
- Dissertation in Global Digital Cultures - 15PMSC994 (1 Unit) - Full Year

Courses in Media Studies:
- Studies in Global Digital Cultures - 15PMSH029 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1
- International Political Communication - 15PMSH009 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2
- Mediated Culture in the Middle East: Politics and Communications - 15PMSH003 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1
- The Transnational News Environment: Production, Representation and Use - 15PMSH006 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1
- Transnational Communities and Diasporic Media:Networking, Connectivity, Identity - 15PMSH004 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2
- Theoretical Issues in Media and Cultural Studies - 15PMSH005 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1
- Studies in Global Media and Post-National Communication - 15PMSH007 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1
- Qualitative Research Methods - 15PMSC033 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1

The Department

Key Facts:

- The Centre is unique in the UK in its focus on media in the Global South. It offers an eclectic mix of postgraduate degrees whose non-Eurocentric approach offers fresh directions to examining the contemporary world.

- A dedicated team of full time staff members who are research active, focusing on different aspects of communications, culture, society and critical media theory in the Middle East, Asia and Africa.

- Staff members regularly appear in the media as guests and commentators on various contemporary issues and themes depending on their regional expertise.

- Alumni go onto high profile careers in the media, in NGO and Think Tanks and academic research.

- The centre has broad links with the media industry in the UK and the Global South

- External examiners have consistently remarked positively on the outstanding quality of the students' work

Our Strengths

The Centre for Media Studies is unique in the world in its focus on the media and communication landscapes of Asia, the Middle East, and Africa. We study the contemporary world and its historical roots, and are committed to upend, theoretically and empirically, the Western-centric orientation that still pervades media studies scholarship. The research of our award-winning faculty spans media in the Arab world, critical theory and cultural studies, transnational news and India and digital technologies in the Global South.

Research underpins our teaching: students receive a rigorous grounding in their chosen MA and are encouraged to take optional courses across the School of Art and the university to build a degree that truly reflects their interests and goals.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Our Big Data in Culture & Society MA recognises the growing importance of Big Data in contemporary society and addresses the theory and practice of Big Data from an arts and humanities perspective. . Read more

Our Big Data in Culture & Society MA recognises the growing importance of Big Data in contemporary society and addresses the theory and practice of Big Data from an arts and humanities perspective. 

What is Big Data? Beyond the unprecedentedly large data sets that can be analysed to reveal patterns, trends, and associations, it is increasingly about our everyday lives. In short, it is about how the data we generate is transforming social, cultural, political and economic processes as well as the generation of knowledge.

This course is likely to appeal to a broad range of students across the Arts and Humanities from Sociology to Political Science to English to Business and beyond. It will attract forward-thinking students interested in emerging trends who recognise that data scientists and analysts require collaborators with domain specialisation and critical insights.

  • Taught by scholars working at the leading edge of digital studies and Big Data.
  • Offers a lively mix of theory and practical work.
  • Equips students with skills that are highly attractive to employers in our digital age.
  • Provides a series of workshops with data scientists and analysts to learn collaborative practices and applications in social media and cultural analytics, mobile platforms, and data visualisation.
  • Is at the forefront of digital developments - Big Data is transforming society, politics, the economy and culture and impacting work
  • Offers innovative interdisciplinary methods of study crossing technological and cultural perspectives
  • Links Big Data to Culture, Law & Ethics, Geography, Public Health, and Social Life
  • Located in a highly ranked department - the Digital Humanities department was ranked first in the UK for research power (2014 Research Excellence Framework)

Description

This Big Data in Culture & Society MA offers you the opportunity to develop your knowledge and understanding of the role of Big Data in culture and society. It will enable you to analyse Big Data across social, political and economic areas. In addition to the required content we cover, you will have the opportunity to pursue your own academic interests through our optional modules and to undertake an internship and a group project module.

By bringing together domain knowledge and technical skills and approaching these from an Arts and Humanities perspective, the course will help you develop highly valued employment skills and expertise for careers in Big Data.

The course will provide you with:

  • Knowledge and understanding of the effects of Big Data on contemporary society.
  • Critical and theoretical approaches to the analysis of Big Data.
  • Knowledge of the historical antecedents of Big Data.
  • Understanding of the innovative methods for generating new knowledge through the use and analysis of Big Data.
  • Understanding of Big Data in relation to the broader study of digital culture, the digital humanities and traditional humanities disciplines.
  • Understanding of appropriate personal and professional conduct in the context of digital culture as an emerging discipline. 

Course purpose

The MA Big Data in Culture and Society offers students the opportunity to develop their knowledge and understanding of the role of Big Data in culture and society. It enables them to analyse Big Data across social, political and economic areas and provides them with a background for pursuing careers in Big Data by bringing together domain knowledge and technical skills. 

Course format and assessment

Teaching

If you are a full-time student, we will provide you with 120 to 180 hours of teaching through lectures and seminars across the year. We expect you to undertake around 1,674 hours of independent study.

If you are a part-time student, we’ll provide you with 90 hours of teaching through lectures and seminars in your first year, and 50 hours in your second. We’ll expect you to undertake 720 hours of independent study in your first year and 954 hours in your second.

Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

Assessment

We assess our modules entirely through coursework. This will comprise a mixture of essays, project work, and workshop reports, depending on the modules you choose.

Regulating body

King’s College London is regulated by the Higher Education Funding Council for England.

Career prospects

Our graduates will follow a broad range of career paths. The skills you develop are likely to be particularly transferable to work in social media management, analytics & website management, CRM management, digital advertising, metrics management, market research, marketing and across cultural industries.



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The Masters in Digital Curation is designed to train you in the enhanced skills required for collecting and curating digital information and preparing it for use by individuals and organisations. Read more

About the course

The Masters in Digital Curation is designed to train you in the enhanced skills required for collecting and curating digital information and preparing it for use by individuals and organisations. This Masters in Digital Curation will train you in the complexities of digital asset management. You will master the policies, procedures and governance required to ensure the integrity of digital material over time, and you will graduate with the skills and experience to handle information for any size of organisation, be it national, governmental or international.

In addition to subject-specific instruction, you will also be trained in mediation so that you can manage the dialogue between stakeholders in the new digital information ecology. You will also be equipped with conventional skills in archive administration and in the scientific processes of information curation. This unique combination of disciplines and skills will prepare you for managerial and strategic roles in both academic and professional contexts. In addition to subject-specific skills and knowledge, you will have the opportunity to undertake personal development and develop a set of widely-applicable professional skills to help you in any workplace – information-related or otherwise. On completion of this course your general employability will be greatly enhanced to give you the best possible chance of successful entry into your chosen career path.

This degree will suit you:

• If you wish to receive first-rate training in digital curation
• If you want to become an authority on the digital information ecology in which business and government now operates
• If you are, or intend to be, a gatekeeper for information resources
• If you desire skills highly sought-after by any postgraduate employer

Course structure and content

Our distance learning students participate in residential study schools and are supported by web-based conferencing facilities which enable them to communicate with each other – whether consulting about a particular assignment in one of the module conferencing areas, or just enjoying a light hearted exchange at the electronic students café - and with staff, easing the feeling of isolation that can sometimes be felt by distance learners.

The Diploma/MA in Digital Curation is divided into two parts: The first part (120 credits) is the taught course, successful completion of which reaches Diploma-level. The second part (60 credits) involves writing a dissertation, to be submitted for the Master’s-level qualification.

Tuition is provided through printed or digital study packs containing the core learning material, supplemented by a resource pack and a conference area on Blackboard (the Virtual Learning Environment), which provides information updates relevant to the course, and a directory of websites referred to in the study packs. Assessment is by means of a variety of written assignments including essays and reports. You can progress at your own pace, taking between two and five years to complete the course. On average, you should expect to spend 10 to 15 hours a week studying.

Core modules:

Archive Collection development and Description
Digital Information : Discovery to Delivery
Digital Preservation
Dissertation
Knowledge and Information Architecture
Management Information Systems
Records and Information Governance
Research in the Profession

Optional modules:

Archive Managment : Management of Archive Services
Compliance Law and Ethics
Information Organisation and Retrieval
Information and Society
Publishing and the Web:Exploring New Technologies
Studies in Management
Work Case Study: Digital Preservation

Contact time

Students on all courses are required to attend Study Schools in Aberystwyth. For most students this means attending three schools of approximately 4-5 days duration during the course. For the rest of the time you will work through specially designed self-study module packs supported by online learning materials.

Employability

Every course at Aberystwyth University is designed to enhance your vocational and general employability. This Masters will equip you with latest developments in digital curation, both in terms of technological and theoretical approaches. By balancing the theory with the practice, you will be strongly placed to succeed in the jobs marketplace, particularly in organisations that prize well-trained managers of its most valuable resource: information. The course of study will also equip you with a wide range of more general work skills – in research, analysis, writing, presentation and management – ensuring your employability is improved across the board.

Study Skills

You will develop skills in quickly and accurately assimilating and interpreting data – which you will find invaluable in curating information for storage and future use. You will develop productive strategies for planning and problem-solving that can be applied beyond your chosen area of study, making you a versatile academic as well as a productive professional. You will also enhance your research skills which you will draw on in both your dissertation and future career.

Self-Motivation and discipline

Studying at Masters level requires discipline and self-motivation from every candidate. You will have access to the expertise and helpful guidance of departmental staff, but you are ultimately responsible for devising and completing a sustained programme of scholarly research in pursuit of your Master’s degree. This process of independent study at an extremely high level will strengthen your skills as an independent and self-sufficient worker, a trait prized by most employers.

Transferable Skills

The Masters programme is designed to give you a range of transferable skills that you can apply in a variety of employment contexts. Upon graduation, you will have proven your abilities in structuring and communicating ideas efficiently, writing for and speaking to a range of audiences, evaluating and organizing information, working effectively with others and working within time frames and to specific deadlines. Whether you pursue a career in an information pathway or not, the prestige of your Masters will open doors for you into workplaces in every industry.

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Waikato's Master of Digital Business is unique in New Zealand, as it provides a strong focus on digital technology from a management perspective. Read more

Waikato's Master of Digital Business is unique in New Zealand, as it provides a strong focus on digital technology from a management perspective. If you're keen to pursue a career as a tech-savvy manager, this pioneering programme will bring you bang up-to-date with the theory and practice of e-commerce and digital business.

You'll gain advanced skills in how the latest digital technologies are revolutionising business operations and changing the way we interact with customers and suppliers across most industries. For example, even agriculture is now a hotbed of digital innovation, as geospatial data can link what we buy from the supermarket to specific paddocks, trees or vines.

Our students get hands-on exposure to contemporary business technologies, and gain key management skills in leading digital transformation strategies for organisations. You'll also have the opportunity to do an industry internship over summer.

In this degree, you'll explore topics such as cloud computing, big data, mobile computing, beacon technology, gamification, social media, business intelligence, real-time analytics, global marketing, IT consumerisation, location-based services, supply chain integration, automated logistics, e-government business services, and virtual team communication.

In a society that has an obsession with all things smart and mobile, industries and businesses that fail to keep pace with these new technologies will become increasingly irrelevant.

Students can attend face-to-face classes on campus in Hamilton, or choose to study online from anywhere in New Zealand.

Professional stream

If you’d like to gain practical knowledge of digital business and prepare for a professional career, this stream is for you.

It includes an industry internship (8-13 weeks over summer) working on real projects at an organisation of your choice, either in New Zealand or overseas. This is designed to kick-start your career by gaining hands-on experience, and help solidify your knowledge base.

You'll also complete an applied research project investigating a problem or opportunity related to digital business.

It's possible to study the Professional stream completely online if you wish – ideal for people who are working full-time. All interactions with staff and students will take place online.

Research stream

Conduct in-depth research into a specialist area of digital business that you're truly passionate about.

This stream may be the best option for you if you're interested in further academic study, such as a PhD, or a possible future research career. You'll get to grips with the latest research and gain expertise in how digital technologies can be applied in a business context.

Waikato has an international reputation

You'll be studying at Waikato Management School, a Triple Crown international business school accredited by EQUIS, AMBA and AACSB since 2005. This is a global benchmark of excellence in teaching and research, achieved by less than 1% of the world's business schools.

Waikato is ranked in the world's top 250 universities for the teaching of Business & Management Studies by the prestigious QS World University Subject Rankings 2017.

And in the Eduniversal Best Masters Rankings 2017, our Master of Digital Business is ranked 41st globally and 1st in New Zealand for Best Master's in E-Business and Digital Marketing.

Career opportunities

  • Digital business manager
  • Business analyst
  • Project manager
  • Systems developer
  • Web systems manager
  • User experience manager
  • Digital marketing specialist
  • Product architect


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Art, Media and Society is a renewed, fully English-taught Master's specialization within the Master's program Culture Studies. The Master’s specialization in Art, Media and Society focuses on the transformations that cultural products undergo as a result of digitalization and globalization. Read more
Art, Media and Society is a renewed, fully English-taught Master's specialization within the Master's program Culture Studies.

The Master’s specialization in Art, Media and Society focuses on the transformations that cultural products undergo as a result of digitalization and globalization. In this program you will analyze how digital cultural products and artefacts critically reflect societal issues, such as the financial crisis, the rise of populism or the ‘tyranny of intimacy’ of social media. Furthermore, you will investigate the public impact of activities carried out by a range of different authors and artists. You will use theories and analytical tools to understand what is at stake here. Central questions are: How can art reshape the public sphere? What are new dimensions of information in the current public sphere?

As a student of Art, Media and Society, you take an interdisciplinary approach to media and art in the modern digital and culturally diverse society, and find yourself at the interface between culture, media, aesthetics and politics.

In this Master’s program, you study digital cultural products and artefacts in contemporary society: phenomena of high and mass culture as well as fashion and advertising, narrative forms of expression such as journalism and personal blogging, as well as literature and visual art focusing on varied purposes: to articulate human rights, to challenge neoliberal development, and to forge alternative local and transnational solidarities. You investigate how information circulates in various contexts, what the social, political and ethical implications are of cultural products, and how roles of producing and consuming these products are negotiated.

In addition, you study theories about the way cultural products and artefacts are experienced and responded to. You practice and further develop your ability to communicate your knowledge and to define, formulate, develop and implement projects. The purpose of the Master’s specialization in Art, Media and Society is to educate professionals with clear profiles.

Career Perspective Art, Media and Society

Art, media and society prepares you for a career in today’s global, digital and cultural diverse society. An average of 80 % of our students finds a job within a year after graduating. Our alumni work in the (online) media sector, in education, as programmer of film, theater, festival or debate. The third unit of the Master’s program is especially focused on developing the specific role of the cultural scholar in society.

The program prepares you for a job in the cultural sector, or the media sector, in which you have to organize, analyze, interpret, write and present.

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This Masters programme provides state-of-the-art training in the latest advances in Digital Health Systems development and management. Read more
This Masters programme provides state-of-the-art training in the latest advances in Digital Health Systems development and management. It's aimed at those who aim to become leaders in the field of Health IT, either for Health systems service delivery or for the Health & Wellness IT industry.

Graduates will gain essential skills and expertise in designing applications that are accessible and usable, and that comply with complex data governance within healthcare. You'll gain experience in managing, analysing and making use of data collected from personal devices (such as apps and wearables) and large scale health systems (such as electronic records). You'll also gain key software development and management skills that are critical for deploying health systems.

This course looking at the whole systems implementation of digital health systems is one of its kind in the UK.

This new and unique course is the first of its kind to offer technical graduates the opportunity to develop the core skills required to develop advanced health and wellness systems and technologies for improving the way we personally manage our lifestyles and how our care systems deliver better health to citizens.

You'll study

The course includes 120 credits of taught material - taken over the first two semesters - and a 60-credit digital health project that runs, typically, from May to September.

In addition to learning about the design, development and evaluation process for personal health and wellness devices and systems and larger scale hospital and community based IT systems, students will also be trained to understand and use techniques for using the data that these systems produce to support decision making and planning and delivery of better care.

Work placement

Student projects will be conducted in close collaboration with the Digital Health Research group partners.

Furthermore, the Digital Health Research group has close links with Scotland’s innovation centres (Digital Health & Care Institute, Data Lab), the Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy & Biomedical Sciences, The City Observatory, and the Centre for Health Policy. These links provide a range of opportunities for practical partnerships with the leading organisations and industries in the field.

Major projects

Working closely with the Digital Health research group means students will be alongside a group that has conducted major collaborative research and development projects and evaluations within the UK and internationally. The group were lead investigators in the evaluation of a £37 million Innovate UK programme to deploy assistive digital health and wellness technologies at scale across the UK.

The group is also involved in organising key national and international conferences such as the British Computer Society (BCS) Health Informatics conference and the ACM conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems.

Example projects include: Design of mobile apps for Managing Diabetes; Cost Benefit Analysis of Technology Enabled Care; Evaluating the Barriers to Implementing Electronic Personal Health Records at Scale.

Student competitions

Each year one student will be awarded the 'Innovative Digital Health and Care' award for the best overall student project (judged by representatives from academia, health and social care and industry).

Guest lectures

The taught modules will include guest-lectures from experts and practitioners in the field of Health IT, both from industry, this sector and the National Health Service.

Course content

Classes
-Design of Usable Health Systems
-Digital Health Implementation
-Decision Support & Health Analytics
-Research Methods & Legal, Ethical and Professional Issues for the Information Society
-Information Systems Architecture
-Database & Web Systems Development
-Individual Project

Learning & teaching

Teaching combines face-to-face lectures, labs and tutorials as well as personal/group study time.

Assessment

Taught modules are assessed using a combination of individual projects, group projects and final exams. The project is assessed on the quality of the project report (ie Master thesis). An overall minimum of 50% across all assessed classes and report is required in order to be awarded the Master in Digital Health Systems.

Careers

Graduates from the programme will enjoy a broad range of career opportunities. The NHS remains one of the largest employers in the world and IT professionals is one of the fastest growing profession within the organisation.

Equally, private and public health and care services world-wide are also expanding their digital health capacities and workforce and hardware and software companies (sensors, wearables, mobile computing) are all seeking expertise in the health and wellness sector. Future career options will include:
-Application & system developer
-Health Systems & Service Designers
-Data Analyst
-IT manager
-Knowledge management specialist
-Knowledge & information manager
-Information governance manager
-Clinical information manager
-Computer support analyst/engineer
-Clinical coder/Clinical coding trainer
-Planning & performance manager
-Systems & process Auditor

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