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Masters Degrees (Digital Preservation)

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All CAIS programmes are accredited by the UK Archives and Records Association and The Records and Information Management (RIM) Professionals Australasia. Read more
All CAIS programmes are accredited by the UK Archives and Records Association and The Records and Information Management (RIM) Professionals Australasia.

Overview

These Masters programmes provide a thorough education in the principles, theory and practice of records management and digital preservation. They are delivered via flexible distance learning and entirely online using the University's Virtual Learning Environment. A range of core and optional modules, all written and tutored by acknowledged subject experts, ensure that students complete the programme with:

An in-depth knowledge of record keeping theory and practice and the ability to apply this knowledge in the public sector or in commercial or specialist environments,

A comprehensive training in the creation and management of current and semi-current records an understanding of the legal and ethical issues relating to records management and digital preservation,

An understanding of how digital records should be managed and retrieved,

A knowledge of the issues surrounding the preservation of records and in particular the proper use of metadata and other techniques to help ensure long-term survival of information and records.

Programme Content

The programme consists of a range of core archive and records management modules and optional modules including preservation and disaster management, metadata standards and information taxonomies, business archives, ethics and international perspectives, international concepts in information access, management for information professionals. The module list can be viewed on the course website.

Methods of Assessment

Essays/reports; contribution to module (through online tasks and discussion board debate); dissertation of 15,000 words.

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All CAIS programmes are accredited by the UK Archives and Records Association and The Records and Information Management (RIM) Professionals Australasia. Read more
All CAIS programmes are accredited by the UK Archives and Records Association and The Records and Information Management (RIM) Professionals Australasia.

Overview

These Masters programmes provide a thorough education in the principles, theory and practice of records management and digital preservation. They are delivered via flexible distance learning and entirely online using the University's Virtual Learning Environment. A range of core and optional modules, all written and tutored by acknowledged subject experts, ensure that students complete the programme with:

An in-depth knowledge of record keeping theory and practice and the ability to apply this knowledge in the public sector or in commercial or specialist environments,

A comprehensive training in the creation and management of current and semi-current records an understanding of the legal and ethical issues relating to records management and digital preservation,

An understanding of how digital records should be managed and retrieved,

A knowledge of the issues surrounding the preservation of records and in particular the proper use of metadata and other techniques to help ensure long-term survival of information and records.

Programme Content

The programme consists of a range of core archive and records management modules and optional modules including preservation and disaster management, metadata standards and information taxonomies, business archives, ethics and international perspectives, international concepts in information access, management for information professionals. The module list can be viewed on the course website.

Methods of Assessment

Essays/reports; contribution to module (through online tasks and discussion board debate); dissertation of 15,000 words.

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A two-year international programme providing a combination of theoretical knowledge and practical training that will equip students to manage and curate the digital information & digital assets of organisations across the public and private sectors. Read more
A two-year international programme providing a combination of theoretical knowledge and practical training that will equip students to manage and curate the digital information & digital assets of organisations across the public and private sectors. Students study for one year at each of King’s and Humboldt University Berlin, and choose from an exceptional range of options covering different aspects of digital curation.

Reasons you should consider the MA in Digital Curation are:

- You will receive an outstanding education that will equip you to become a leader in the field of digital curation and information management.
- Employers are looking for skilled professionals with knowledge and expertise in managing and curating their valuable digital information and assets.
- You will study in two of Europe’s most exciting cities and will have the opportunity to engage with cultural and creative sectors in both cities.

Key benefits

- Students will study in two of Europe’s most vibrant cities spending a year in Berlin followed by a year in London. These unrivalled locations allow students to experience a variety of different cultures, and access to some of the greatest cultural heritage and arts institutions in the world. Both King’s and Humboldt have close links with a range of cultural heritage and memory institutions in London and Berlin respectively and are able to offer internship opportunities and up-to-the-minute knowledge of the subject area.

- The tutors offer cutting edge expertise in library, archive and information science, with specialist knowledge in digital technologies and processes. They come from diverse and highly interdisciplinary backgrounds, including running digital archives or working in the digital industries.

- The MA can lead to further research or to careers in a range of organisations, including libraries, museums, galleries, and archives; media organisations; publishing houses; government and industry; research institutions; healthcare and law firms.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/digital-curation-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

Throughout the programme, students will be provided with opportunities to engage with the rich cultural heritage of the cities, with guest speakers and visits to memory and cultural institutions such as the British Library, the Southbank Centre, and the Berlin State Library experiencing all that studying in Berlin and London can offer.

Digital content and digital technologies are a defining feature of our age. Digital data, information and knowledge are an asset for cultural heritage, memory institutions, industry, commerce and government. They are fundamental for research and practice in fields such as the law and medicine. As individuals we increasingly communicate and record our lives and our memories in digital form. But digital information is fragile and complex and requires ongoing and active curation as we seek to ensure its longevity, innovate in its use, and exploit its social, cultural and commercial value. It is a shared once-in-a-generation challenge.

This programme will provide students with the core skills, knowledge and competencies to become leaders in the rapidly expanding field of digital curation. Students will study a wide range of subjects including metadata, preservation, knowledge representation, digital libraries, ethics and rights management, and new digital technologies and methods, including cloud and crowd-sourcing technologies. Students will also have an opportunity to undertake an internship to gain workplace experience. We want students to acquire a great deal of practical knowledge, but even more we want them to develop their critical and reflective capacities, and to acquire an understanding of the inter-dependence between the developments in digital processes, technology and curatorial practice. The MA will also provide an excellent grounding for students interested in going on to a PhD in Digital Curation or related area.

- Course purpose -

The MA in Digital Curation is designed to prepare students for leadership roles in organisations and enterprises with significant volumes of digital information and knowledge. The programme responds to the increasing demand for digitally literate professionals to work in education and heritage institutions, as well as wider industry by equipping students with a range of strategic, technical and practical skills to provide direction and leadership in the curation of digital information and assets.

- Course format and assessment -

Lectures on theoretical topics; demonstrations; practical classes and exercises. Modules are assessed by coursework and/or examination.

Career Prospects:

All institutions concerned with the effective curation of digital information and digital assets, for example, libraries, museums, galleries, and archives; media organisations; publishing houses; government and industry; research institutions; healthcare and law firms.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 21 universities worldwide (2016/17 QS World University Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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While the rate of deterioration and disappearance of heritage sites has accelerated due to acceleration of human progress, major technological breakthroughs have occurred to enable digital preservation, i.e. Read more
While the rate of deterioration and disappearance of heritage sites has accelerated due to acceleration of human progress, major technological breakthroughs have occurred to enable digital preservation, i.e. 3D digital capture has been developed allowing high definition, high accuracy, and high productivity associated with digital documentation. This technology has been adopted worldwide and over 3,000 international service providers are available to deploy this technology to facilitate the preservation of heritage sites. In addition, major innovations in digital image processing, 3D modelling software, broadband access, and computer hardware capabilities have allowed worldwide public access to voluminous data and information systems including 3D visualisation.

The

MSc in Visualisation (International Heritage)

is a specialist pathway in the realm of 3D visualisation at DDS. This course aims to develop the knowledge and skill sets required to deliver and conduct digital preservation of world heritage sites and to create a unique opportunity to combine architecture and heritage with state of the art digital technologies, including 3D laser scanning, digital reconstruction of historic sites and artefacts, interaction and visualisation using virtual reality facilities. It allows an ideal opportunity for documentation, maintenance, and preservation of significant cultural sites and physical heritage assets, and to reconstruct them in a real-time 3D environment for use in tourism, art, education, entertainment and science.

This pathway will enable students to understand the process of creating original 3D datasets of cultural objects and sites, to reconstruct and present immersive visualisation with interactive narratives and provide a novel approach to foster multi-disciplinary study in computer science, history, geography, culture study, archaeology, architecture, the build environment, art and design and tourist management.

The programme aims to develop the knowledge and skill sets required to deliver and conduct digital preservation of world heritage sites and to create a unique opportunity to combine architecture and heritage with state of the art digital technologies, including 3D laser scanning, digital reconstruction of historic sties and artefacts, interaction and visualisation using virtual reality facilities. It allows an ideal opportunity for documentation, maintenance and preservation of significant cultural sites and physical heritage assets, and the ability to reconstruct them in a real-time 3D environment for use in tourism, art, education, entertainment and science.

The International Heritage pathway emerged as a result of successful strategic research collaborations between the DDS and a number of partners in cultural heritage. DDS has several long-term partnerships with industry and governmental organisations and a world-leading portfolio of work. DDS and Historic Scotland have formed the Centre for Digital Documentation and Visualisation (CDDV) which specialises in the precise documentation and 3D representation of heritage objects, architecture and environments using state of the art, high resolution laser scanning technology and 3D visualisation software. The CDDV promotes and celebrates Scotland’s cultural heritage at home and abroad and enhance Scotland’s reputation for developing world class and innovative research and development. It is delivering the digital documentation of the five Scottish UNESCO World Heritage Sites and five International Heritage Sites in a five-year project known as the Scottish Ten.

The MSc in Visualisation (International Heritage) provides a high level taught programme to those emerging from a wide range of disciplines. This places graduates in a leading global competitive position to advance in research, academia, governmental and commercial organisations, gaining a greater understanding of techniques that may assist in digital heritage practices.

Although just one intake per year in September, students can attend this programme on a part-time basis.
A number of Scottish Funding Council Fee Waivers are available for this programme.

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The programme provides you with an understanding of contemporary information and records management issues. It pays special attention to the management of digital records and electronic resources, and how to manage these alongside analogue resources. Read more
The programme provides you with an understanding of contemporary information and records management issues. It pays special attention to the management of digital records and electronic resources, and how to manage these alongside analogue resources.

Why this programme

-The programme is designed for those with a vocational interest in records management, archives and digital curation. It will prepare you to work in these fields, and give you a thorough grounding for continuing with research.
-You will complete a two-week work placement in an archive, records management or digital repository.
-As a graduate you will be eligible to be accredited by both the Archives & Records Association and CILIP (Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals), providing valuable professional recognition in both the archive and library fields.

Programme structure

You will develop skills in the core competencies of archives, records, and information management, creating and managing digital records, digital curation and preservation issues, archival theory, user needs, and description,
cataloguing, and navigation.

The programme consists of six courses spread over two semesters. You will take courses in:
-Archives and records information management
-Records and evidence
-Description, cataloguing and navigation
-Management, curation and preservation of digital materials.

Optional courses include:
-2D digitisation
-Law for cultural heritage institutions
-Archives and records theory
-Records and the transition to the digital
-Palaeography
-Phenomenology.

To graduate with the MSc you will also need to complete a course in research methods and professional studies, and produce a dissertation.

Career prospects

As a graduate, you will be well placed for a career as an archivist, records manager or digital curator within a variety of public and private organisations.

Positions held by recent graduates include Assistant Archivist and Records Manager.

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The Masters in Digital Information Services is designed to train you in the enhanced skills required for managing the transfer of electronic information within and between organisations and individuals. Read more
The Masters in Digital Information Services is designed to train you in the enhanced skills required for managing the transfer of electronic information within and between organisations and individuals. The Masters in Digital Information Services will address the theoretical and the practical – you will study managerial and strategic issues as well as the technical and practical aspects of digital library services and management. You will graduate with the skills and experience to handle information for any size of organisation, be it national, governmental or international.

As well as instructing you in subjects essential to a digital information professional – such as information architecture, literacy and management – your tutors will encourage you to work creatively and independently on your chosen areas of study. You will be pushed to innovate and approach your research topics with positivity, so that you can enhance the culture of your workplace through every possible means. In addition to subject-specific skills and knowledge, you will have the opportunity to undertake personal development and develop a set of widely-applicable professional skills to help you in any workplace – information-related or otherwise. On completion of this course your general employability will be greatly enhanced to give you the best possible chance of successful entry into your chosen career path.

See the website http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/digital-information-services-masters/

Suitable for

This degree will suit you:

- If you wish to receive first-rate training in the management of digital information
- if you want to master good management practices of human and financial resources
- if you are, or intend to be, a manager in an information context
- if you desire skills highly sought-after by any postgraduate employer

Course detail

This Masters in Digital Information Services is designed to give you a profound understanding of how information is stored, retrieved, managed, reviewed and interpreted. You will go beyond this to interrogate the structures and systems that enable and limit these practices and to find more efficient and productive ways of operating. In addition, you will be encouraged to reflect on the subject to understand its impact on and responsibility for the health of wider society.

By the end of your course of study, you will be able to demonstrate a mastery of the technological processes of information management, such as the limits of software and hardware, such as the digitisation processes itself, metadata and issues of access and interfacing. Depending on your module choices, your study topics may include Publishing and The Web: Exploring New Technologies, Records and Information Governance, Digital Preservation, Knowledge Management and many more.

Your study will culminate in a significant piece of independent research and your academic dissertation on an aspect of digital information management that holds particular interest to you. You may choose to use this study as a showcase of your expertise or as a springboard into future study or research.

In addition to this first-rate training in digital information services, you will also nurture a skill set perfect for almost any role in any business or postgraduate workplace. You will be confident in research, analysis and planning, as well as writing, reporting and argument formation to justify your decisons in managing an organisation's most precious commodity: information. These are just some of the skills you will gain which will make you a desirable employee for a wide range of public and private sector organisations and businesses.

The university has a proud tradition of research excellence, as demonstrated in the most recent Research Excellence Framework (2014) assessment. It placed the university in the top 50 institutions for research power and intensity. It submitted 77% of eligible staff and 95% of the university's research was of an internationally recognised standard.

Assessment

The taught part of the course (Part 1) is delivered and assessed through lectures, student seminars, practical exercises, case studies, course work and formal examinations. Successful completion allows the award of a Diploma. The subsequent successful submission of your dissertation (Part 2) leads to the award of a Masters.

Employability

More of our Postgraduate Students (74.1%) entered employment at a graduate level than the national average (72.1%), earnign more on average than Postgraduates in other fields. * 2010/11

Every course at Aberystwyth University is designed to enhance your vocational and general employability. This Masters will equip you with latest developments in information management, both in terms of technological and theoretical approaches. By balancing the theory with the practice, you will be strongly placed to succeed in the jobs marketplace, particularly in organisations that prize well-trained managers of its most valuable resource: information. The course of study will also equip you with a wide range of more general work skills – in research, analysis, writing, presentation and management – ensuring your employability is improved across the board.

Key Skills and Competencies:

- Study Skills:
You will develop skills in quickly and accurately assimilating and interpreting data – which you will find invaluable in managing future information transactions and storage. You will develop productive strategies for planning and problem-solving that can be applied beyond your chosen area of study, making you an versatile academic as well as a productive manager in a work context. You will also enhance your research skills which you will draw on in both your dissertation and future career.

- Self-Motivation and discipline:
Studying at Masters level requires discipline and self-motivation from every candidate. You will have access to the expertise and helpful guidance of departmental staff, but you are ultimately responsible for devising and completing a sustained programme of scholarly research in pursuit of your Master’s degree. This process of independent study at an extremely high level will strengthen your skills as an independent and self-sufficient worker, a trait prized by most employers.

- Transferable Skills:
The Masters programme is designed to give you a range of transferable skills that you can apply in a variety of employment contexts. Upon graduation, you will have proven your abilities in structuring and communicating ideas efficiently, writing for and speaking to a range of audiences, evaluating and organizing information, working effectively with others and working within time frames and to specific deadlines. Whether you pursue a career in an information pathway or not, the prestige of your Masters will open doors for you into workplaces in every industry.

Find out how to apply here https://www.aber.ac.uk/en/postgrad/howtoapply/

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A ground-breaking new MA delivered in partnership with the BFI to prepare students to build successful careers in film exhibition, programming, criticism or archival work. Read more
A ground-breaking new MA delivered in partnership with the BFI to prepare students to build successful careers in film exhibition, programming, criticism or archival work.

Quick Facts:

2 Year Course
Full-time
Course runs Jan-Dec each year
Next intake: January 2017
NFTS Scholarships available for UK Students

Visit the website https://nfts.co.uk/our-courses/masters/film-studies-programming-and-curation

APPLICATION DEADLINE: 08 SEP 2016

COURSE OVERVIEW

- The course is delivered in partnership with the BFI (the leading body for film in the UK) who will also provide hands-on placement opportunities across a range of curatorial and critical activities.
- The course is delivered by film professionals in film exhibition and distribution, festivals, archives and film criticism, alongside academics and film makers
- Students on the course will attend film festivals.
- Students learn how to conceptualise film work in terms of idea, form and style, as well as understanding the relationship between film and audience.
- Students will learn about the practicalities of film exhibition, distribution and preservation in the changing digital landscape.
- Students will study the practice of film criticism and comment, including reviewing and critical writing about films, filmmakers and the broader culture.
- Students have the opportunity to mount festivals, pop up screenings and other events.

This course commences at the end of January each year.

The National Film and Television School’s Film Studies Programming and Curation Masters delivered in partnership with the BFI is designed for students who wish to make a career in the wider film and media culture, whether in the fields of curation, exhibition, criticism, archives, preservation or restoration. The course provides a detailed understanding of the concepts, contexts and critical thought that have shaped the production and reception of film as a basis for engagement with rapidly changing contemporary film and moving image culture. A rigorous academic framework is combined with real world applications enabling each student to develop their own skills, knowledge and understanding to provide a strong basis for a career in film and media.

The philosophy of this course is to give students a theoretical, historical and critical understanding of film, which they will apply practically in the fields of film curating and programming, distribution and archiving.

With all the resources of the National Film and Television School available to them, students on this Master’s programme benefit from working alongside a new generation of filmmakers, encouraging creative dialogue between makers and curators/critics.

CURRICULUM

Students on this course gain a thorough understanding of the process by which a film moves from a creative idea to an audience experience. They will explore the history, theory and critical contexts of film. In addition they will look at a variety of critical writing on film, to give them access to the major ideas that inform film.

Optional units and a professional placement allow a more specialised focus on industry practices in programming, curation, archives and film criticism through project work and research portfolios.

1: Conceptualising Film: Idea, Form and Style

The unit provides an introduction to key ways of conceptualising film that underpin approaches to critical, theoretical and creative practice. The main topics include:

- The Evolution of the moving image – from scientific experiment to mass entertainment and beyond
- Ways of seeing: approaches to studying film
- The development of an industry and its audience. Film and Commerce
- Film and Realism: Cinema as a Mirror of Society?
- The Subconscious Art: Dream Cinema and the language of film
- Historical movements in Cinema: Influential developments, including the early avant-garde, Italian neo-realism, the Nouvelle Vague, Third Cinema
- Contemporary and British World Cinema: approaches development and trends
- Film Forum: the evolution of film criticism and comment
- Film and Digital Media (technology, and the impact on form and style)
- Expanded cinema: Film as a gallery experience, film as a live event

The unit draws on a wide range of illustrative film examples, and explores each concept with in-depth analysis of one or more key films. Each topic will be introduced by a film and media practitioner and/or an academic.

Students will write an essay in order to explore one of the key concepts.

2: Identifying the Audience: The Practice of Cinema from Idea to Exhibition

This unit looks at the changing sites and forms of film viewing, providing a detailed exploration of the cultural, economic and technological contexts that structure the processes and pathways by which films reach an audience. Whilst primary examples will largely be drawn from Europe and the USA, these will be considered in a global context.

- Audiences: bringing people together to watch films: who, why and how, from fairground attraction to movie palace to pop-up and online.
- The relationship between production and audiences: creativity, development journeys, film finance and funding.
- Contemporary patterns of distribution: buying and selling films in a multi-platform world; from conglomeration and globalisation to independence and self-distribution
- The business of contemporary exhibition: the ‘majors’ and the alternatives; the digital revolution
- Cultural cinema in the UK and Europe; the status of ‘specialised cinema’, including repertory and archive film
- Film Festivals and markets: cultural and economic impact; models of programming;
- Programming for diverse audiences
- Programming beyond the single screen: event cinema, alternative content, installation and on-line platforms
- Marketing and promotion: identifying, reaching and developing audiences
- Critics and criticism in the age of the internet and social media: continuity and change
- Reception: case studies

In addition to regular lectures and seminars by NFTS tutors, the teaching programme includes a wide range of talks by cinema and festival directors and programmers; industry executives working in exhibition, distribution, sales and marketing; venue and event managers; filmmakers and critics.

Students will prepare and present a case study one of the subject areas.

3: Programming Film & Cultural Events and Film Preservation and Restoration

This unit is broken into two strands with students participating in both.

Informed by the study in Parts A and B, there will be in-depth sessions on programming, including researching programme and event ideas, developing themes, selecting work to meet cultural and commercial imperatives, copywriting and devising marketing strategies. Practical issues regarding rights and availability, projection and technical presentation, producing publicity materials and on-stage introductions and Q&A hosting will all be covered.

The film preservation and restoration strand will cover understanding film materials, the impact of digitization on film preservation, and its limits; sessions will also explore issues of curatorial practice with regard both to collecting and exhibiting work and will consider the presentation and reception of archive material across a range of exhibition platforms. Students will also have the opportunity to visit archives, a specialised film collection, film laboratory or digital media centre.

During this part of the course students will attend the London Film Festival

4: Dissertation

As part of the dissertation module a number of specialised workshops will be arranged to enable students to explore a strand related to their dissertation in greater detail.

The dissertation may take the form of an extended piece of film criticism or an original exploration of aspects of film culture, genre or cinema history.

5: Graduation Project

The Graduation Project will be both a theoretical and practical exploration of their chosen subject and specialist areas. For example if a student wishes to explore sites and forms of cinema they will organise a pop-up cinema experience and deliver a written or video essay that explores the themes and concepts.

6: Professional Placement

During the process of developing the graduation portfolio each student will also undertake a 1-2 month professional placement.

7: Meet The Industry

A series of familiarisation visits to venues and projects with a variety of curatorial and critical approaches, to help provide students with a further sense of possible career options.

METHODS

In addition to a wide range of screenings and seminars, the course provides hands-on approach to teaching and learning through workshops, group projects, field trips, personal research, portfolio as well as professional placements (at Festivals, Cinemas etc). For example, students work in small groups to develop portfolios (e.g. promotional strategy for a film) and workshops (e.g. peer review in film criticism).

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

This course invites applications from students with a BA (Hons) degree (or equivalent) in arts, humanities or science. Film and media related degrees, while welcome, are not essential for admission.

Applicants without a first degree but with professional experience may also be considered for admission. In these cases an appropriate piece of written work will be required, along with details of professional qualifications. The application will then be referred to the NFTS concessions committee for consideration.

APPLY WITH

- Please submit a brief essay on either a) The preservation of film culture, through archiving, exhibition and restoration
Or b) Discuss the changing forms of cinema distribution and exhibition.

- Write a review of either: a) A contemporary film that has impressed you, or, b) an earlier film that you believe to be of artistic or historical importance. The review should not exceed 1,000 words.

- Choose a movement in cinema or one particular national cinema that is important to you. Briefly discuss your personal response to it. This should not exceed 1,000 words

- Discuss one author or film critic, or one book of critical writing on film that has influenced you. Discuss why you have found this author/book of value to you.

HOW TO APPLY

You can apply directly to us at the NFTS by clicking on the link below:

APPLY FOR FILM STUDIES PROGRAMMING & CURATION COURSE - https://nfts.co.uk/sign-me-up/apply-now/?nid=1857

You can apply online, or download a word document of the application form to submit via email
When selecting your course, please ensure that you have read the entry requirements and details of the supporting materials that should accompany your application.

TIMING YOUR APPLICATION

We are happy to receive applications 24/7 and 365 days a year up until the deadline. That said, there is no particular advantage to submitting your application very early. The important thing is that your application shows us your latest work and tell us about your most recent filmmaking experiences.

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The Masters in Digital Curation is designed to train you in the enhanced skills required for collecting and curating electronic information and preparing it for use by individuals and organisations. Read more
The Masters in Digital Curation is designed to train you in the enhanced skills required for collecting and curating electronic information and preparing it for use by individuals and organisations. This Masters in Digital Curation will train you in the complexities of digital asset management. You will master the policies, procedures and governance required to ensure the integrity of digital material over time, and you will graduate with the skills and experience to handle information for any size of organisation, be it national, governmental or international.

In addition to subject-specific instruction, you will also be trained in mediation so that you can manage the dialogue between stakeholders in the new digital information ecology. You will also be equipped with conventional skills in archive administration and in the scientific processes of information curation. This unique combination of disciplines and skills will prepare you for managerial and strategic roles in both academic and professional contexts. In addition to subject-specific skills and knowledge, you will have the opportunity to undertake personal development and develop a set of widely-applicable professional skills to help you in any workplace – information-related or otherwise. On completion of this course your general employability will be greatly enhanced to give you the best possible chance of successful entry into your chosen career path.

This Masters in Digital Curation is designed to give you a thorough understanding of the professional ethics, laws, principles, policies and design principles which underpin the discipline. You will go beyond this to interrogate the structures and systems that define the information continuum in order to find more efficient and productive ways of operating. The world-class instruction from our departmental staff will be augmented by visiting professionals from cutting-edge organisations.

By the end of your course of study, you will be able to demonstrate a mastery of the technological processes for information governance and digital preservation. You will achieve this by applying your specialist skills to real real-life situations throughout the course and, by making the most of this experiential learning, you will graduate with valuable hands-on experience of this increasingly important subject. Your study will culminate in a significant piece of independent research and your academic dissertation on an aspect of digital curation that holds particular interest for you. You may choose to use this study as a showcase of your expertise or as a springboard into future study or research.

In addition to this first-rate training in digital curation, you will also nurture a skill set perfect for almost any role in any business or postgraduate workplace. You will be confident in research, analysis and planning, as well as writing, reporting and argument formation to justify your decisons in managing an organisation's most precious commodity: information. These are just some of the skills you will gain which will make you a desirable employee for a wide range of public and private sector organisations and businesses.

The university has a proud tradition of research excellence, as demonstrated in the most recent Research Excellence Framework (2014) assessment. It placed the university in the top 50 institutions for research power and intensity. It submitted 77% of eligible staff and 95% of the university's research was of an internationally recognised standard.

Our Staff: Department of Information Studies lecturers are either qualified to PhD level or work in areas of the subject where professional practices are the focus. Many of the staff engage in research relevant to the theoretical and practical development of the discipline and the associated professions.

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Public history refers to the pursuit of historical understanding and interpretation in the public realm. MTSU was in the first wave of American universities to embrace the study of public history and now offers a master’s degree, doctorate, and advanced certificates. Read more
Public history refers to the pursuit of historical understanding and interpretation in the public realm. MTSU was in the first wave of American universities to embrace the study of public history and now offers a master’s degree, doctorate, and advanced certificates. Students pursuing the Master of Arts in History with a concentration in Public History may choose from five tracks: historic preservation and cultural resource management, museum management, archival management, oral history, and public archaeology. Master’s candidates are exposed to the myriad career possibilities associated with each specialty, helping them select the curriculum best suited to their interests and aspirations. The program carefully balances academic historical methods and scholarship; the intellectual foundations and nature of public history; and professional development in several areas. To prepare students for professional practice, the program partners with a number of on-campus centers and initiatives, including the Center for Historic Preservation, Albert Gore Research Center, Center for Popular Music, and Walker Library digital collections.

Career

Public historians work in a wide range of professional settings with public audiences of all ages. Potential employers include archives, museums, historic organizations, historical societies, historic sites, private consulting firms, and historical agencies at all levels of government. Examples of career possibilities with an advanced degree in public history include:

Architectural historian
Archivist
Author
College professor/instructor
Consultant
Cultural heritage manager
Cultural resources manager
Digital librarian/cataloger
Historic preservation planner
Historian
Museum/collections curator or administrator
Oral historian
Public archaeologist

Employers of MTSU alumni include:

Alabama Department of Archives and History
Advisory Council on Historic Preservation
American Association for State and Local History
Belle Meade Plantation
Belmont Mansion
East Tennessee Historical Society
Historic Home of T.R.R. Cobb
Historical Association of Catawba County, N.C.
History Center, Diboll, Texas
Huntsville (Ala.) Historic Preservation Commission
Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve
Land Trust for Tennessee
Manzanar National Historic Site
Maymont Foundation, Richmond, Va.
Metro Nashville Arts Commission
Mike Curb Archives
New South Associates
Ohio History Connection
President James K. Polk Ancestral Home
Rutherford County Archives
Tennessee Agricultural Museum
Tennessee Department of Transportation
Tennessee State Library and Archives
Thomason & Associates
Vicksburg (Miss.) Foundation for Historic Preservation
Williamson County Archives and Museum
War in the Pacific National Hist

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The Archives and Records Management MA provides the skills and knowledge that are needed by new entrants to the profession in the United Kingdom and abroad. Read more
The Archives and Records Management MA provides the skills and knowledge that are needed by new entrants to the profession in the United Kingdom and abroad. Students learn to manage and preserve records created in the present and those inherited from the past for use in the present and future.

Degree information

The programme focuses on the management of records and archives in a variety of digital and hard copy formats. Students learn to manage, organise, interpret and provide access to a wide range of records and archives, focussing on both the management of records for ongoing purposes, and their selection, preservation and accessibility for future uses including historical research.

MA students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of five core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma, five core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits), full-time nine months or flexible study up to five years, is offered. A Postgraduate Certificate, four optional modules (60 credits), full-time 15 weeks or flexible study over a period of up to two years, is offered.

Core modules:
-Concepts and Contexts (30 credits, taught across two terms)
-Creation and Capture
-Curation and Stewardship
-The Record-keeping Professional
-Access and Use of Archives and Records

Optional modules include:
-Advanced Preservation
-Digital Resources in the Humanities
-Introduction to Digital Curation
-Information Governance
-Manuscript Studies
-Oral History: from Creation to Curation
-Reading and Interpretation of Archives from 1500
-Standards for Digital Recordkeeping
-Extended Practicum

Dissertation/report
All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, computer laboratory sessions and class-based practical exercises, with a strong emphasis on group and peer learning and the acquisition of practical skills underpinned by archival theory and knowledge. Assessment is through a mixture of essays, reports, presentations and practical assignments.

Placement
The work placement gives students taking the MA/Dip iexperience of how the techniques they have learned may be applied in practice. Placements last for two weeks, and are undertaken as part of the INSTG060 Curation and Capture core module just after the beginning of the third term (May). We arrange placements individually for each student and do our best to match the placement with their interests and experience.

Careers

Past graduates have taken up professional roles at prestigious organisations and institutions including national societies, university libraries and the House of Commons.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Assistant Record Manager, House of Lords
-Archives Manager, Historic Royal Palaces
-Project Archivist, Cambridgeshire County Council
-Archivist, National Motor Museum.
-Archivist, United Kingdom Hydrographic Office (UKHO)

Employability
This programme prepares students to work in a wide variety of traditional and non-traditional archives and information management roles in both the private and public sectors, in the UK and internationally.

Students benefit from the department's excellent links with employers in the information professions which provide them with 'real life' experience through guest lectures, visits and a placement. Students also receive specific careers advice, including how to construct CVs. In the longer term the programme equips students with the skills and knowledge to have long and successful careers in their chosen field and become leaders in their profession.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL boasts one of the longest-established archive education programmes in the UK. It is taught by leading experts in the field, drawing on their innovative research as well as extensive practical experience of archives and records work.

Students benefit from UCL's location close to many records management services, and the broadest grouping of historical archives in any city in the English-speaking world.

The programme hosts an impressive range of visiting speakers, organises frequent field visits to a wide variety of working environments and a two-week placement, all of which provide unique occasions to network and create professional links with key players in the sector.

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Mission Statement. The MAS program prepares professionals to exercise creativity, integrity and leadership in designing, implementing and promoting programs and systems for the creation, organization, management, preservation and effective use of records and archives. Read more
Mission Statement: The MAS program prepares professionals to exercise creativity, integrity and leadership in designing, implementing and promoting programs and systems for the creation, organization, management, preservation and effective use of records and archives.

Program content focuses on:
- Nature of records and archives
- The life-cycle of records from creation to preservation
- Records systems and archival systems
- Selection of records and their acquisition in archives
- Intellectual control of records and archives and provision of access
- Records, archives and the law
- Ethical and professional responsibilities
- History of record-keeping and archives

Graduates may find work in such positions as:
Archivist; digital archivist; archives curator; archives advisor; manuscripts processing archivist; electronic records archivist; audiovisual archivist; data/digital curator; e-discovery advisor; privacy and information officer; records and information manager; records administrator/specialist; records analyst; records policy and program officer; records/preservation system designer; research officer; security specialist; and others.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Archival Studies
- Specialization: Archival Studies
- Subject: Specialty
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Options
- Faculty: Faculty of Arts
- School: School of Library, Archival and Information Studies

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See the department website - http://www.rit.edu/gis/architecture/. At a time of significant transition in the profession, RIT's architecture program allows for full incorporation of the skills and knowledge critical to the 21st century architect. Read more
See the department website - http://www.rit.edu/gis/architecture/

At a time of significant transition in the profession, RIT's architecture program allows for full incorporation of the skills and knowledge critical to the 21st century architect. The program produces broad-thinking architects well grounded in the principles and practices of sustainability who can apply their knowledge and talents to the architectural problems posed by the modern city.

Plan of study

Students are required to complete 105 credit hours. Designed as a full-time program, courses are offered on campus, primarily during the day. Much of the course work is studio-based and includes technical courses, sustainability courses, and electives. In addition to three required sustainability courses, students will take one sustainability elective. All students prepare a thesis during their final year of study. Students take four graduate electives, drawn from courses offered by the colleges of Applied Science and Technology, Business, Engineering, Imaging Arts and Sciences, and Liberal Arts. In addition to course work, students must fulfill one co-op experience and one global experience.

The program is designed for students with a broad range of interests and backgrounds who are interested in studying architecture at the graduate level, whose undergraduate degrees were obtained in fields either inside or outside of architecture. The curriculum has been shaped by the global emphasis of sustainability, factors that impact urbanism, and the application of the principles of design and craft; along with a focus around building technology, materials, construction, and systems.

Sustainability

With a global need for a more sustainable world, including buildings and their impact on energy consumption and carbon footprints, the focus of many courses reflect the conditions of sustainable design and practice.

Technology

Design exploration is enhanced through the understanding of the implication of technology on both design process and product. The program enables students to focus and collaborate in many specialized areas of technology, including engineering, computer science, imaging science, materials and construction, and products and remanufacturing.

Urbanism

Because a degraded urban environment has grave implications for social, economic, cultural, and environmental health, the program pays particular attention to urban settings and urban principles. The complexity of the urban environment requires an interdisciplinary approach to architecture education – one that references economics, public policy, sociology, and regional culture. The program focuses on the practices and principles of preservation and adaptive reuse. The city of Rochester, New York, serves as an active learning environment for students.

Integrated learning/integrated practice

Like all strong design programs, the program’s core education will take place in the studio. However, our studio curriculum integrates construction technologies, material science, and mechanics into design. From the outset, students will approach design problems within teams, learning to value and leverage collective intelligence. The integrated learning model prepares students for the increasingly integrated practice of architecture, where integrated project delivery is fast becoming the dominant model, and architects are orchestrating teams of professionals from a variety of fields, including engineering, management, science, and computer science.

Admission requirements

To be considered for admission to the M.Arch. program in architecture, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

- Hold a baccalaureate degree (B.Arch., BS, BA, or BFA) from an accredited institution,

- Have an undergraduate cumulative GPA of B (3.0) or higher,

- Successfully complete at least one semester each of college-level math (e.g. algebra, pre-calc, calculus) and science (e.g. physics, earth science, chemistry, etc.).

- Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work,

- Submit a one page personal statement and a 90 second video (maximum length) explaining your interest in studying architecture at the graduate level.

- Submit scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).

- Submit three letters of recommendation (one from a current or former teacher or academic adviser; one from a current or former supervisor; and one from someone familiar with your creative abilities).

- Submit a PDF digital portfolio (see portfolio guidelines) of creative work, which may include sketches, constructions, graphics, and/or photographs. (While student portfolios do not require examples of architectural drawing/design, evidence of creative talent will be important in determining admission).

- Complete a graduate application.

- International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Minimum scores of 600 (paper-based) and 100 (Internet-based) are required.

Applicants who exceed the general admission requirements may be considered for conditional acceptance before GRE scores are available.

- Portfolio Guidelines

All applications must be accompanied by a PDF digital portfolio. Print or bound portfolios or digital portfolios in formats other than PDF will not be accepted or reviewed. Please note, all PDF portfolios should be less than 6.0mb. Files larger than this will not be accepted or reviewed. In the event the review committee requires additional information or higher resolution images, the applicant will be notified.

Guidelines for portfolio preparation:

- Image quality: A medium quality image setting on a digital camera is sufficient. No images should be pixelated.
- File size: The total size must be 8.5"x11" format and cannot exceed 6.0mb. Alternatively students may use the PDF portfolio feature (found under FILE, in more recent versions of Adobe Acrobat) to create a portfolio.
- Orientation: Landscape orientation is preferred.
- Cropping: Crop out unnecessary objects from the images so that there are no distractions from work presented.
- Image enhancement: If the image files of your work are not accurate after photographing, image-editing software is allowed to correct the appearance of the files submitted. Please use caution. It is important to maintain the integrity of the original artwork.
- File name: Only one PDF portfolio file is allowed. It should be labeled using the following format: UARC_XX_LASTNAME.PDF, (XX is equal to the code for the academic year to which you are applying, ex: 2013 would be 13, 2014 would be 14, etc.) Enter last name in all capital letters in place of LASTNAME. Do not enter given names or middle names in this field.
- Submission: All PDF portfolio files must be submitted via email to . Students should include their name in the subject line of the email. Files delivered on CD/ROM or USB drives will not be reviewed or accepted.

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The Library and Information Studies MA provides the ideal foundation for career progression in library or information work. Read more
The Library and Information Studies MA provides the ideal foundation for career progression in library or information work. The one-year programme is accredited by the professional association Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP), and offers students a wide range of up-to-date learning opportunities while helping to develop strong networks designed to enhance their employability.

Degree information

The programme prepares students for professional practice in the field of library and information studies. It equips them with the practical skills required for the identification, location, management and organisation of information and information stores, and fosters an understanding of the processes by which information is produced, disseminated, controlled and recorded.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of six core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma, six core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits), full-time nine months or flexible study 2-5 years, is offered.

Core modules
-Cataloguing and Classification 1
-Collection Management and Preservation
-Information Sources and Retrieval
-Introduction to Management
-Principles of Computing and Information Technology
-Professional Awareness

Optional modules - students choose two of the following:
-Advanced Preservation
-Cataloguing and Classification 2
-Digital Resources in the Humanities
-Electronic Publishing
-Historical Bibliography
-Individual Approved Study
-Information Governance
-Knowledge Representation and Semantic Technologies
-Manuscript Studies
-Publishing Today
-Records Management
-Web Publishing
-Information Literacy
-Academic and Journals Publishing

Dissertation/report
All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, computer laboratory and classroom practicals, with a strong emphasis on active learning and the acquisition of practical skills. Assessment is through a mixture of essays, reports, examination and practical assignments such as website design and the creation of indexing tools.

Placement
The work placement is only open to full-time students and forms part of the G030 Professional Awareness module. The work placement gives students experience of how the techniques they have learned may be applied in practice. Placements last for two weeks, and are undertaken at the beginning of the third term. We arrange placements individually for each student and do our best to match the placement with their interests and experience.

Careers

The programme aims to be broad-based: we are not trying to produce graduates who can work in only one kind of library or information service. The skills we try to impart are, therefore intended to apply in a wide range of different jobs.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Information Officer, Trowers and Hamlins
-News Reference Specialist, British Library
-Cataloguer, Eton College
-Librarian, BSix
-Knowledge and Information Specialist, CRU Group

Employability
As a vocational Master's, this programme prepares students for employment in the sector, and, in most cases, for promotion from their pre-library school role as a library assistant to a qualified librarian role, such as senior library assistant, assistant librarian, librarian and library manager. Students occasionally choose careers in information provision, such as taxonomists and web designers. There are specialist employment agencies that place students in both short-term and permanent positions, so if students do not find their ideal post straight away, they usually find suitable employment while continuing to seek their ideal post.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This well-established programme is accredited by CILIP (to 2019). It attracts an outstanding team of researchers, teachers, students, practitioners and information industry leaders. It combines an appreciation of the traditional library with the latest developments in internet and digital technologies to develop an understanding of the ever-evolving information environment.

Networking opportunities include a two-week work placement, regular journal club and speaker events, guest lectures by professionals and career seminars sponsored by industry professionals.

Students benefit from UCL's proximity to major libraries and repositories, including the British Library and the Senate House LIbrary of the University of London.

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With our Library Science MA/MSc you can develop the skills and understanding to initiate, work with and develop modern collection based information services. Read more
With our Library Science MA/MSc you can develop the skills and understanding to initiate, work with and develop modern collection based information services.

Who is it for?

This programme is for students with a first degree or equivalent in any discipline, who have an interest in information communication, and who would like to start or develop a career in information management in libraries, galleries, archives or museums. It is also suitable for professionals wishing to update their knowledge and skills within the discipline.

Library Science is a broad discipline, and it appeals to students prepared to challenge inequalities in information access and use, who enjoy communicating and sharing information, and who like working with information technologies.

Objectives

Humanity has now entered the age of the zettabyte (1000 exabytes), with enough information being generated daily to fill US libraries several times over [Floridi L, 2014. The 4th Revolution. Oxford. p 38]. The demand for knowledge organisation, access, and understanding has never been greater.

City’s MA/MSc Library Science examines contemporary questions of information communication from a framework of information history and philosophy. Our focus is divided equally between theory and its application to practice. The course spans the fundamental concepts of documentation, collection management, information organisation, access, information literacy, use of new and emergent technologies, methods of investigation and analysis, socio-political implications and policy formulation.

The course equips you with a deep understanding of collection-orientated institutions and services, and their relevance and impact within society. There is a strong focus on ethics, professional communication and networking. You will benefit from a high level of engagement with practitioners, and we are pleased to welcome many leaders in the profession as speakers on our modules.

Academic facilities

City has recently undergone a significant level of refurbishment, so that course participants can enjoy state of the art classrooms and facilities.

We work in close connection with our colleagues at City Library, who offer excellent support and advice to our students, in addition to contributing to our courses. Follow @cityunilibrary and @cityunilibresearchers on Twitter. You will have access to our state-of-the-art mentoring service.

Placements

Internships are not a part of this course, but students who wish to are usually able to obtain work experience (paid or voluntary), or to work with external organisations in completing assignments or carrying out a dissertation project. Details of opportunities are posted on our Moodle forum.

Teaching and learning

The teaching and learning methods we use mean that your specialist knowledge and autonomy develop as you progress through the course.

Taught modules are normally delivered through a series of 30 hours of lectures.

Lectures are normally used to:
-Present and exemplify the concepts underpinning a particular subject.
-Highlight the most significant aspects of the syllabus.
-Indicate additional topics and resources for private study.

In addition to lectures and tutorial support, you also have access to a personal tutor. This is an academic member of staff from whom you can gain learning support throughout your degree. In addition, City’s online learning environment Moodle contains resources for each of the modules including lecture notes, further reading, web-based media resources and an interactive discussion forum.

We expect you to study independently and complete coursework for each module. This should amount to approximately 120 hours per module if you are studying full time. Each module is assessed through coursework, where you will need to answer a variety of assignments to show that you are able to apply your theoretical learning to practical situations.

Communication and networking via social media is an integral part of our Library Science masters course, and in preparation for professional practice, you are expected to engage with blogs, Twitter and other relevant communication media as part of your studies. Face-to-face participation in student and new professional forums including research seminars, workshops and conferences is actively promoted. You are encouraged to present your work (assignments, dissertation) to the wider LIS community for discussion and development.

The course culminates with an individual project. This is an original piece of research conducted with academic supervision, but largely independently. The individual project (dissertation) allows you to demonstrate your ability to think and work independently, to be aware of and to comprehend current issues within the discipline and practice, to initiate ways of investigating and solving current problems or questions, and to deliver results and solutions on time.

The individual project is a substantial task. It is your opportunity to develop a research-related topic under the supervision of an academic member of staff. This is the moment when you can apply what you have learnt to solve a real-world problem or to develop further, contemporary conceptual theory in library science.

Modules

The MA/MSc in Library Science is offered as a one year full-time course, or two year part-time course. On successful completion of the course, you can choose between the award of MA or of MSc. This is usually based on the arts or science content of the work undertaken for the degree, and/or your career aspirations. The course structure and modules are the same for either award. The difference occurs in the focus of the assignments and the dissertation.

You can expect to study for approximately 40 hours per week full-time, and 20 hours per week part-time. The actual time required will vary according to the individual, and with existing experience and prior study.

The course comprises seven core modules and one elective module. These taught modules run during the first and second terms, whilst the third, summer term is reserved for the dissertation. Each of the modules counts for 15 credits, and requires approximately 150 hours work, of which 30 hours are face-to-face instruction (this may be lectures, seminars, group work, discussion or practical work), and 120 hours are self-directed study.

On successful completion of eight taught modules, students can progress to the dissertation. The dissertation is worth 60 credits, and takes around 400 hours. This is an original piece of research conducted with academic supervision, but largely independently.

The goal of library and information science is to enable access to, use of, and consequent understanding of information. To do this, the discipline is concerned with the processes of the information communication chain: the creation, dissemination, management, organisation, preservation, analysis and use of information, instantiated as documents.

Core modules
-Library and Information Science Foundation (15 credits)
-Digital Information Technologies and Architecture (15 credits)
-Information Organisation (15 credits)
-Digital Libraries (15 credits)
-Information Management and Policy (15 credits)
-Research Methods and Communication (15 credits)
-Libraries and Publishing in the Information Society (15 credits)

Elective modules - you can choose one module from the following.
-Information Resources and Documentation (15 credits)
-Information law and policy (15 credits)
-Independent study (15 credits)
-Web applications development (15 credits)

Career prospects

Library Science MSc/MA graduates have an excellent record of finding suitable jobs and going on to successful careers, most commonly in public, academic and school libraries, consultancies, special libraries and information services and publishing. The Library Science postgraduate course is also an excellent preparation for further study and research.

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This interdisciplinary programme is taught by staff from a wide range of departments at UCL, all international experts in the field of film studies. Read more
This interdisciplinary programme is taught by staff from a wide range of departments at UCL, all international experts in the field of film studies. Linguistic and cultural expertise informs our teaching on the film-making traditions of Europe, the Americas, the Middle East, Asia and Southeast Asia.

Degree information

The programme covers the history of cinema and a wide variety of world cinemas. It is designed to provide students with advanced knowledge of both the history of cinema and its contemporary developments, and with the skills, concepts, methods and theories required for the study of cinema and media at graduate level.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (30 credits), three options (90 credits), a dissertation (60 credits) and a research methodology module (not credit bearing).

Core modules
-Moving Images: Technology, Forms, Receptions
-Reading and Research Films

Optional modules
-Ancient Rome on Film
-Film Exhibition
-Genre in Italian Cinema
-Hollywood Genres
-How to Make an 8-Minute Documentary
-New Argentine Cinema
-Nordic Cinema: Contextualising Dreyer, Bergman and Dogme
-Political Cinema
-Russian Cinema: Epochs and Genres
-Spanish Film
-The French New Wave
-The Idea of Documentary
-Theories and Practices of Film
-Global Cinemas
-Digital Media
-East and South Asian Cinemas

Dissertation/report
All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials, and film and video screenings. The core courses are assessed by essays and examinations, which together count for 20% of the final mark. Optional courses are assessed by essays (40%), and the dissertation makes up the final 40%.

Careers

Graduates from the MA in Film Studies have pursued various careers, including: academic research and teaching; careers within media arts (writing, directing, editing); print and media journalism; arts and museum management; multimedia authoring and digital design; film preservation and curating.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Lecturer, SOAS, University of London
-Communication Officer, Camera Lucida Productions
-Head of Development, Clcada Bellweather (CB Productions)
-Media and Film Studies Lecturer, City and Islington College
-Programme Assistant, ICA (Institute of Contemporary Arts)

Employability
Former students of this programme have gone on to careers in education and publishing and a wide variety of careers in the media arts, including film production, festival programming, and film curation with organisations that include the BBC, the Barbican Centre, the Athens International Film Festival, and the London Film School.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Each year, we welcome students from all over the world to our Film Studies MA. Under the aegis of UCL's Centre for Multidisciplinary and Intercultural Inquiry (CMII), students spend a year amongst a thriving, cross-disciplinary community of cinema scholars and research students.

We have particular research strengths in film history, film theory, and in an exceptionally broad range of national and regional cinemas.

UCL has made a major commitment to refurbishing its multimedia infrastructure for the study of film and related media. This includes building a significant collection of print and visual materials and new facilities for teaching and for film and media screenings.

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