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See the department website - http://www.cis.rit.edu/graduate-programs/master-science. The master of science program in imaging science prepares students for positions in research in the imaging industry or in the application of various imaging modalities to problems in engineering and science. Read more
See the department website - http://www.cis.rit.edu/graduate-programs/master-science

The master of science program in imaging science prepares students for positions in research in the imaging industry or in the application of various imaging modalities to problems in engineering and science. Formal course work includes consideration of the physical properties of radiation-sensitive materials and processes, the applications of physical and geometrical optics to electro-optical systems, the mathematical evaluation of image forming systems, digital image processing, and the statistical characterization of noise and system performance. Technical electives may be selected from courses offered in imaging science, color science, engineering, computer science, science, and mathematics. Both thesis and project options are available. In general, full-time students are required to pursue the thesis option, with the project option targeted to part-time and online students who can demonstrate that they have sufficient practical experience through their professional activities.

Faculty within the Center for Imaging Science supervise thesis research in areas of the physical properties of radiation-sensitive materials and processes, digital image processing, remote sensing, nanoimaging, electro-optical instrumentation, vision, medical imaging, color imaging systems, and astronomical imaging. Interdisciplinary efforts are possible with other colleges across the university.

The program can be completed on a full- or a part-time basis. Some courses are available online, specifically in the areas of color science, remote sensing, medical imaging, and digital image processing.

Plan of study

All students must earn 30 credit hours as a graduate student. The curriculum is a combination of required core courses in imaging science, elective courses appropriate for the candidate’s background and interests, and either a research thesis or graduate paper/project. Students must enroll in either the research thesis or graduate paper/project option at the beginning of their studies.

Core courses

Students are required to complete the following core courses: Fourier Methods for Imaging (IMGS-616), Image Processing and Computer Vision (IMGS-682), Optics for Imaging (IMGS-633), and either Radiometry (IMGS-619) or The Human Visual System (IMGS-620).

Speciality track courses

Students choose two courses from a variety of tracks such as: digital image processing, medical imaging, electro-optical imaging systems, remote sensing, color imaging, optics, hard copy materials and processes, and nanoimaging. Tracks may be created for students interested in pursuing additional fields of study.

Research thesis option

The research thesis is based on experimental evidence obtained by the student in an appropriate field, as arranged between the student and their adviser. The minimum number of thesis credits required is four and may be fulfilled by experiments in the university’s laboratories. In some cases, the requirement may be fulfilled by work done in other laboratories or the student's place of employment, under the following conditions:

1. The results must be fully publishable.

2. The student’s adviser must be approved by the graduate program coordinator.

3. The thesis must be based on independent, original work, as it would be if the work were done in the university’s laboratories.

A student’s thesis committee is composed of a minimum of three people: the student’s adviser and two additional members who hold at least a master's dgeree in a field relevant to the student’s research. Two committee members must be from the graduate faculty of the center.

Graduate paper/project option

Students with demonstrated practical or research experience, approved by the graduate program coordinator, may choose the graduate project option (3 credit hours). This option takes the form of a systems project course. The graduate paper is normally performed during the final semester of study. Both part- and full-time students may choose this option, with the approval of the graduate program coordinator.

Admission requirements

To be considered for admission to the MS in imaging science, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

- Hold a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution (undergraduate studies should include the following: mathematics, through calculus and including differential equations; and a full year of calculus-based physics, including modern physics. It is assumed that students can write a common computer program),

- Submit a one- to two-page statement of educational objectives,

- Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate or graduate course work,

- Submit letters of recommendation from individuals familiar with the applicant’s academic or research capabilities,

- Submit scores from the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) (requirement may be waived for those not seeking funding from the Center for Imaging Science), and

- Complete a graduate application.

- International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Minimum scores of 600 (paper-based) or 100 (Internet-based) are required. Students may also submit scores from the International English Language Testing System. The minimum IELTS score is 7.0. International students who are interested in applying for a teaching or research assistantship are advised to obtain as high a TOEFL or IELTS score as possible. These applicants also are encouraged to take the Test of Spoken English in order to be considered for financial assistance.

Applicants seeking financial assistance from the center must have all application documents submitted to the Office of Graduate Enrollment Services by January 15 for the next academic year.

Additional information

- Bridge courses

Applicants who lack adequate preparation may be required to complete bridge courses in mathematics or physics before matriculating with graduate status.

- Maximum time limit

University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program. Bridge courses are excluded.

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The School conducts high-quality significant national and international research and offers excellent opportunities for graduate studies, successfully combining modern engineering and technology with the exciting field of digital media. Read more
The School conducts high-quality significant national and international research and offers excellent opportunities for graduate studies, successfully combining modern engineering and technology with the exciting field of digital media. The digital media group has interests in many areas of interactive multimedia and digital film and animation.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/264/digital-arts

About the School of Engineering and Digital Arts

Established over 40 years ago, the School has developed a top-quality teaching and research base, receiving excellent ratings in both research and teaching assessments.

The School undertakes high-quality research (http://www.eda.kent.ac.uk/research/default.aspx) that has had significant national and international impact, and our spread of expertise allows us to respond rapidly to new developments. Our 30 academic staff and over 130 postgraduate students and research staff provide an ideal focus to effectively support a high level of research activity. There is a thriving student population studying for postgraduate degrees in a friendly and supportive teaching and research environment.

We have research funding from the Research Councils UK, European research programmes, a number of industrial and commercial companies and government agencies including the Ministry of Defence. Our Electronic Systems Design Centre and Digital Media Hub provide training and consultancy for a wide range of companies. Many of our research projects are collaborative, and we have well-developed links with institutions worldwide.

Course structure

The digital media group has interests in many areas of interactive multimedia and digital film and animation.

There is particular strength in web design and development, including e-commerce, e-learning, e-health; and the group has substantial experience in interaction design (eg, Usability and accessibility), social computing (eg, Social networking, computer mediated communication), mobile technology (eg, iPhone), virtual worlds (eg, Second Life) and video games. In the area of time-based media, the group has substantial interest in digital film capture and editing, and manipulation on to fully animated 3D modelling techniques as used in games and feature films.

Research Themes:
- E-Learning Technology (http://www.eda.kent.ac.uk/research/theme_detail.aspx?gid=1&tid=1)

- Medical Multimedia Applications and Telemedicine (http://www.eda.kent.ac.uk/research/theme_detail.aspx?gid=1&tid=2)

- Human Computer Interaction and Social Computing (http://www.eda.kent.ac.uk/research/theme_detail.aspx?gid=1&tid=3)

- Computer Animation and Digital Visual Effects (http://www.eda.kent.ac.uk/research/theme_detail.aspx?gid=1&tid=4)

- Mobile Application Design and Development (http://www.eda.kent.ac.uk/research/theme_detail.aspx?gid=1&tid=25)

- Digital Arts (http://www.eda.kent.ac.uk/research/theme_detail.aspx?gid=1&tid=26)

Research areas

- Intelligent Interactions

The Intelligent Interactions group has interests in all aspects of information engineering and human-machine interactions. It was formed in 2014 by the merger of the Image and Information Research Group and the Digital Media Research Group.

The group has an international reputation for its work in a number of key application areas. These include: image processing and vision, pattern recognition, interaction design, social, ubiquitous and mobile computing with a range of applications in security and biometrics, healthcare, e-learning, computer games, digital film and animation.

- Social and Affective Computing
- Assistive Robotics and Human-Robot Interaction
- Brain-Computer Interfaces
- Mobile, Ubiquitous and Pervasive Computing
- Sensor Networks and Data Analytics
- Biometric and Forensic Technologies
- Behaviour Models for Security
- Distributed Systems Security (Cloud Computing, Internet of Things)
- Advanced Pattern Recognition (medical imaging, document and handwriting recognition, animal biometrics)
- Computer Animation, Game Design and Game Technologies
- Virtual and Augmented Reality
- Digital Arts, Virtual Narratives.

Careers

We have developed our programmes with a number of industrial organisations, which means that successful students are in a strong position to build a long-term career in this important discipline. You develop the skills and capabilities that employers are looking for, including problem solving, independent thought, report-writing, time management, leadership skills, team-working and good communication.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Building on Kent’s success as the region’s leading institution for student employability, we offer many opportunities for you to gain worthwhile experience and develop the specific skills and aptitudes that employers value.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The programme disseminates imaging knowledge, skills and understanding, in order to enable effective and efficient use of imaging, clinically, in research and in industry. Read more

Programme description

The programme disseminates imaging knowledge, skills and understanding, in order to enable effective and efficient use of imaging, clinically, in research and in industry.

Our flexible, intermittent, part-time, online distance learning (OLDL) programme aims to:
•provide an understanding of imaging theory, techniques, analysis and applications
•develop research planning and designing skills, incorporating imaging
•enable interpretation and analysis of relevant imaging data
•relate imaging research to clinical applications

Online learning

Our online learning technology is fully interactive, award-winning and enables you to communicate with our highly qualified teaching staff from the comfort of your own home or workplace.

Our online students not only have access to Edinburgh’s excellent resources, but also become part of a supportive online community, bringing together students and tutors from around the world.

Programme structure

You may choose to study to Certificate, Diploma or Masters level.

Year 1: Certificate
You will complete the compulsory courses:

Techniques & physics (core – 20 credits)
Practicalities & safety (core – 10 credits)

You will complete 30 credits from the following options:

Applications in disease research (optional – 10 credits)
Clinical applications (optional – 10 credits)
Digital image processing & analysis (optional – 20 credits)
Image interpretation & evaluation (optional – 20 credits)

Year 2: Diploma
You will complete the compulsory courses:

Statistics (core - 10 credits)
Study design (core - 10 credits)

You will complete 40 credits from the following options:

Biomechanics (optional - 10 credits)
Light microscopy (optional – 10 credits)
Preclinical imaging (optional - 10 credits)
Neuro-anatomy (optional – 10 credits)
Body anatomy (optional – 10 credits)
Translational imaging (optional – 10 credits)
Cardiovascular imaging (optional – 10 credits)
Oncologic imaging (optional – 10 credits), and


Year 3: Masters
You will complete practical work (a project) and assessed activities.

Postgraduate Professional Development

If you are looking for a shorter course option, we offer online credit-bearing courses which run for 11 weeks at a time. These lead to a University of Edinburgh postgraduate award of academic credit.

You may take a maximum of 50 credits worth of courses through our Postgraduate Professional Development scheme. These credits will be recognised in their own right at postgraduate level, or may be put towards gaining a higher award, such as a Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma or MSc.

Career opportunities

Clinical graduates will exit the programme with improved clinical image management skills, and will also be better able to advise companies and businesses which develop tools and techniques for their specialties, where imaging is required. For pre-clinically focused students, an imaging skill set expands academic possibilities and is more likely to assist with translational techniques necessary to bridge the preclinical and clinical sciences.

The degree will also be attractive as a preliminary qualification before undertaking career training in hospital Medical Physics (for physicists and engineers), as well as a preliminary qualification before taking a PhD or research scientist post involving medical physics, medical imaging, biomechanics in academia or industry.

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The MSc in Internet Systems and e-Business is a taught programme aimed at all graduates who want to train in modern computing. It provides an opportunity to acquire the skills required to pursue a career in Internet-based information systems. Read more
The MSc in Internet Systems and e-Business is a taught programme aimed at all graduates who want to train in modern computing. It provides an opportunity to acquire the skills required to pursue a career in Internet-based information systems. The programme is also suitable for those who have been in industry or other employment, possibly involving increasing recent work with IT, and now want to improve their career by means of formal training and a recognised qualification. The programme starts with an introduction to programming and then covers key details of software engineering and Internet technology.

Course Structure

Seven taught modules and then a dissertation module of approximately two months over the summer.

Core Modules

-Object-Oriented Programming in Java and UML
-Software Engineering for the Internet
-Distributed Computing
-Enterprise and Distributed Systems
-Research Methods and Professional Issues
-Web Technology
-Digital Imaging
-Dissertation

Learning and Teaching

The MSc in Internet Systems and e-Business is a full-time taught programme aimed at all graduates who want to train in modern computing. It provides an opportunity to acquire the skills required to pursue a career in Internet-based information systems. The programme is also suitable for those who have been in industry or other employment, possibly involving increasing recent work with IT, and now want to improve their career by means of formal training and a recognised qualification. Students are registered for 12 months from the course start date at the beginning of October each academic year. The programme starts with an introduction to programming and then covers key details of software engineering and Internet technology.

The programme consists of seven lecture/tutorial based core modules plus a research project. The two modules in Object Oriented Programming, and Web Technology, each feature 18 hours of lectures plus 8 hours of tutorial contact time.

The three modules in Digital Imaging, Distributed Computing and Research Methods and Professional Issues each feature 12 hours of lectures plus 8 hours of tutorial contact time. The lecture module on Software Engineering for the Internet has 20 hours of tutorials. The lecture module on Enterprise and Distributed Systems use a variety of teaching methods. It might typically feature 24 hours of lectures, 8 hours of tutorials and a total of 91 hours of laboratory/practical classes. The total contact hours for all 7 of these modules is therefore 96 hours of lectures, 68 hours of tutorials and 91 hours of laboratory/practical classes.

A major individual research project is also undertaken during the course under the guidance of an appropriate staff supervisor. This provides an open-ended challenge to each individual student. Regular meetings are held with the supervisor to discuss project progress and planning issues. At the end of the project students are required to submit a dissertation documenting their project work. Students should expect to have around 5 hours of contact time with their supervisors over the course of their research projects.

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Vision is the most useful sense we possess and as such accounts for about 30% of the sensing processing of the brain. Read more
Vision is the most useful sense we possess and as such accounts for about 30% of the sensing processing of the brain. The automation of visual processing (ie computer vision) has many applications in the modern world including medical imaging for better diagnosis, surveillance systems to improve security and safety, industrial and domestic robotics plus advanced interfaces for computer games, mobile phones and human-computer interfaces. The possibilities are only limited by our imagination.

Key features
-The unique combination of computer vision and embedded systems skills is highly desirable in state-of-the-art industrial applications.
-This course is accredited by BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT.
-You will have the opportunity to work on your project dissertation in the internationally recognised Digital Imaging Research Centre with groups on visual surveillance, human body motion, medical imaging and robotics and being involved in national and international projects or in collaboration with our industrial contacts.

What will you study?

The Embedded Systems (Computer Vision) pathway will equip you with the knowledge and skills required to specify and build computer vision embedded systems, choosing from different imaging devices and applying software that can process and understand images. You will study a range of option modules encompassing computing, engineering and digital media processing. It may also be possible for you to undertake a real-world project in an industrial placement or as part of high-quality research working alongside DIRC (Digital Imaging Research Centre) groups (eg visual surveillance, human body motion analysis, robotics, medical imaging).
The Embedded Systems (Computer Vision) MSc course can be combined with Management Studies enabling you to develop business and management skills so you can work effectively with business managers to develop innovative and imaginative ways to exploit computer vision and embedded systems for business advantage. This is a key skill for employability, particularly as organisations in the public, private and voluntary sectors grapple with austerity.

Assessment

Coursework and/or exams, research project/dissertation.

Work placement scheme

Kingston University has set up a scheme that allows postgraduate students in the Faculty of Science, Engineering and Computing to include a work placement element in their course starting from September 2017. The placement scheme is available for both international and home/EU students.

-The work placement, up to 12 months; is optional.
-The work placement takes place after postgraduate students have successfully completed the taught portion of their degree.
-The responsibility for finding the placement is with the student. We cannot guarantee the placement, just the opportunity to undertake it.
-As the work placement is an assessed part of the course for international students, this is covered by a student's tier 4 visa.

Details on how to apply will be confirmed shortly.

Course structure

The full MSc course consists of an induction programme, four taught modules, and project dissertation. Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Embedded Systems (Computer Vision) MSc modules
-Digital Signal Processing
-Real-time Programming
-Artificial Vision Systems
-Project Dissertation
-One option module

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Vision is the most useful sense we possess and as such accounts for about 30% of the sensing processing of the brain. Read more
Vision is the most useful sense we possess and as such accounts for about 30% of the sensing processing of the brain. The automation of visual processing (ie computer vision) has many applications in the modern world including medical imaging for better diagnosis, surveillance systems to improve security and safety, industrial and domestic robotics plus advanced interfaces for computer games, mobile phones and human-computer interfaces. The possibilities are only limited by our imagination.

Key features
-The unique combination of computer vision and embedded systems skills is highly desirable in state-of-the-art industrial applications.
-This course is accredited by BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT.
-You will have the opportunity to work on your project dissertation in the internationally recognised Digital Imaging Research Centre with groups on visual surveillance, human body motion, medical imaging and robotics and being involved in national and international projects or in collaboration with our industrial contacts.

What will you study?

The Embedded Systems (Computer Vision) pathway will equip you with the knowledge and skills required to specify and build computer vision embedded systems, choosing from different imaging devices and applying software that can process and understand images. You will study a range of option modules encompassing computing, engineering and digital media processing. It may also be possible for you to undertake a real-world project in an industrial placement or as part of high-quality research working alongside DIRC (Digital Imaging Research Centre) groups (eg visual surveillance, human body motion analysis, robotics, medical imaging).

The Embedded Systems (Computer Vision) MSc course can be combined with Management Studies enabling you to develop business and management skills so you can work effectively with business managers to develop innovative and imaginative ways to exploit computer vision and embedded systems for business advantage. This is a key skill for employability, particularly as organisations in the public, private and voluntary sectors grapple with austerity.

Assessment

Coursework and/or exams, research project/dissertation.

Work placement scheme

Kingston University has set up a scheme that allows postgraduate students in the Faculty of Science, Engineering and Computing to include a work placement element in their course starting from September 2017. The placement scheme is available for both international and home/EU students.

-The work placement, up to 12 months; is optional.
-The work placement takes place after postgraduate students have successfully completed the taught portion of their degree.
-The responsibility for finding the placement is with the student. We cannot guarantee the placement, just the opportunity to undertake it.
-As the work placement is an assessed part of the course for international students, this is covered by a student's tier 4 visa.

Details on how to apply will be confirmed shortly.

Course structure

The full MSc course consists of an induction programme, four taught modules, and project dissertation. Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Embedded Systems (Computer Vision) MSc modules
-Digital Signal Processing
-Real-time Programming
-Artificial Vision Systems
-Project Dissertation
-One option module

Embedded Systems (Computer Vision) with Management Studies MSc modules
-Digital Signal Processing
-Real-time Programming
-Artificial Vision Systems
-Business in Practice
-Project Dissertation

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This Masters in Sensor and Imaging Systems (SIS) focuses on the technologies and techniques that underpin a vast range of societal, research and industrial needs. Read more
This Masters in Sensor and Imaging Systems (SIS) focuses on the technologies and techniques that underpin a vast range of societal, research and industrial needs. It is delivered and awarded jointly by the Universities of Glasgow and Edinburgh. Sensing and sensor systems are essential for advances in research across all fields of physics, engineering and chemistry and are enhanced when multiple sensing functions are combined into arrays to enable imaging. Industrial applications of sensor systems are ubiquitous: from mass-produced sensors found in modern smart phones and every modern car to the state-of-the-art, specialist high-value sensors routinely used in oil and gas recovery, scientific equipment, machine tools, medical equipment and environmental monitoring. This is an industry-focused programme, designed for people looking to develop skills that will open up opportunities in a host of end applications.

Why this programme

-This is a jointly taught and awarded degree from the University of Glasgow and the University of Edinburgh, developed in with conjunction with CENSIS.
-CENSIS is a centre of excellence for Sensor and Imaging Systems (SIS) technologies, CENSIS enables industry innovators and university researchers to collaborate at the forefront of market-focused SIS innovation, developing products and services for global markets.
-CENSIS, the Innovation Centre for Sensor and Imaging Systems, is one of eight Innovation Centres that are transforming the way universities and business work together to enhance innovation and entrepreneurship across Scotland’s key economic sectors, create jobs and grow the economy. CENSIS is funded by the Scottish Funding Council (£10m) and supported by Scottish Enterprise, Highlands and Islands Enterprise and the Scottish Government.
-CENSIS has now launched its collaborative MSc in Sensor and Imaging Systems, designed to train the next generation of sensor system experts.
-This programme will allow you to benefit from the commercial focus of CENSIS along with the combined resources and complementary expertise of staff from two top ranking Russell Group universities, working together to offer you a curriculum relevant to the needs of industry.
-The Colleges of Science and Engineering at the University of Glasgow and the University of Edinburgh delivered power and impact in the 2014 Research Excellent Framework. Overall, 94% of Edinburgh’s and 90% of Glasgow’s research activity is world leading or internationally excellent, rising in Glasgow’s case to 95% for its impact.

Programme structure

The programme comprises a mix of core and optional courses. The curriculum you undertake is flexible and tailored to your prior experience and expertise, your particular research interests, and the specific nature of the extended research project topic provisionally identified at the beginning of the MSc programme.

Graduates receive a joint degree from the universities of Edinburgh and Glasgow.

Programme timetable
-Semester 1: University of Glasgow
-Semester 2: University of Edinburgh
-Semester 3: MSc project, including the possibility of an industry placement

Core courses
-Circuits and systems
-Detection and analysis of ionising radiation
-Fundamentals of sensing and imaging
-Imaging and detectors
-Technology and innovation management
-Research project preparation

Optional courses
-Biomedical imaging techniques
-Biophysical chemistry
-Biosensors and instrumentation
-Chemical biology
-Digital signal processing
-Electronic product design and manufacture
-Electronic system design
-Entrepreneurship
-Lab-on-chip technologies
-Lasers and electro-optic systems
-Microelectronics in consumer products
-Microfabrication techniques
-Nanofabrication
-Physical techniques in action
-Waves and diffraction

Industry links and employability

-This is an industry-focused programme, developed in conjunction with CENSIS, an Innovation Centre established to maximise the growth potential of Scottish companies operating in the sensor systems market. It will appeal to graduates seeking to develop sensor and imaging systems (SIS) skills that can be used in a range of end markets and applications.
-SIS is key enabling technology to achieve quality, efficiency and performance across all key markets – from transport, security and oil and gas, through to agriculture, the built environment and life sciences. The underlying requirement across of these sectors is the same: to sense, measure, process, communicate and visualise in a way that provides valuable and actionable information based on data.
-Sensing is essential for advances in research across all fields of physics, engineering and chemistry, and is enhanced when multiple sensing functions are combined into arrays to enable imaging. Industrial applications of SIS are ubiquitous: from mass-produced sensors found in smart phones and cars, to the state-of-the-art, specialist high-value sensors routinely used in oil and gas recovery, scientific equipment, machine tools, medical equipment and environmental monitoring.
-Increasingly, sensor systems – along with their underpinning device, signal processing, networking, information dissemination and diagnostics technologies - are being tightly integrated within the products and services of a wide range of Scottish businesses. There are endless opportunities within this emerging global market (worth £500Bn) to develop fundamental changes to benefit society and commercialise sensor lead products over wide market areas.
-Markets that need graduates with SIS skills include include defence and security, renewables, aerospace, subsea, intelligent transport, environmental science, built environment, energy and the smart grid, healthcare and drug discovery, medical diagnostics, and food and drink.

Career prospects

You will gain an understanding of sensor-based systems applicable to a whole host of markets supported by CENSIS.

Career opportunities are extensive. Sensor systems are spearheading the next wave of connectivity and intelligence for internet connected devices, underpinning all of the new ‘smart markets’, e.g., grid, cities, transport and mobility, digital healthcare and big data.

You will graduate with domain-appropriate skills suitable for a range of careers in areas including renewable energy, subsea and marine technologies, defence, automotive engineering, intelligent transport, healthcare, aerospace, manufacturing and process control, consumer electronics, and environmental monitoring.

Globally, the market for sensor systems is valued at £500Bn with an annual growth rate of 10%. The Scottish sensor systems market is worth £2.6Bn pa. There are over 170 sensor systems companies based in Scotland (SMEs and large companies), employing 16,000 people in high-value jobs including product R&D, design, engineering, manufacturing and field services.

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This course provides a thorough, methodical and wide-ranging education in digital signal and image processing. The Degree course offers both core taught modules and a substantial individual research project. Read more
This course provides a thorough, methodical and wide-ranging education in digital signal and image processing. The Degree course offers both core taught modules and a substantial individual research project.

Teaching and learning

The course contains both compulsory core taught modules and a substantial individual research project. Four taught modules are delivered in the first semester from September to January, and four taught modules are delivered in the second semester from February to June. Each taught unit is assessed by coursework or laboratory report, with written examinations in January and June.
You will conduct your dissertation project work during summer and submit your final dissertation in September.

Course unit details

Typical course units include:
-Signals and data capture engineering
-Digital image processing
-Digital Communications engineering
-Sensing and transduction
-Digital image engineering
-Tomography engineering and applications

Career opportunities

Digital signals are part of almost every aspect of 21st technology. If you take this course, you will become expert in this area and expose yourself to a world of opportunity respecting careers. You will, for example, be able to perform biomedical signal processing, audio/visual/multimedia engineering, digital waveform synthesis and medical, industrial and military image processing. You will be able to work in the fields of imaging, medical physics, aerospace, telecommunications systems development, mechatronics, robotics, remote sensing and nondestructive testing. Your skills will be highly sought after in organisations that develop systems for these and many related state-of the art disciplines.

This course will not only make you very employable; it will be a very fulfilling and enriching experience.

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The MFA program in imaging arts emphasizes a broad interpretation of photography as a conceptual art form, with the intention of inspiring and nurturing the individuality of each student as a creative, productive artist. Read more
The MFA program in imaging arts emphasizes a broad interpretation of photography as a conceptual art form, with the intention of inspiring and nurturing the individuality of each student as a creative, productive artist. The program encourages graduate study in photography and related media as a means to personal, aesthetic, intellectual, and career development.

The curriculum provides a flexible focus of study that is continually sensitive to the needs of each student, building upon the strengths each individual brings to the program. Successful completion of the program enables students to seek careers in many fields including education, museum or gallery work, or as self-employed visual artists.

Program goals

The program provides students with the opportunity to use the still and moving image as a means to:

- pursue a professional career and earn a livelihood,
- enrich their personal lives and society as a whole, and
- create a community of creativity, scholarship, and purpose.

Plan of study

Distribution of work within these guidelines is subject to modification based upon the candidate’s background, abilities, and interests. An individualized course of study is prepared with the advice of the graduate faculty and made a matter of record. Modifications in this prescribed program thereafter must be approved and recorded.

Electives

Elective courses are available throughout the College of Imaging Arts and Sciences in areas such as but not limited to: video, printmaking, painting, sculpture, communication design, crafts, bookmaking, graphic design, new media, computer graphics, art history, and archival preservation and conservation. A complete list of graduate electives offered in the college is available through the student's adviser. There are also graduate electives offered throughout the university. Students also have opportunities to enhance their studies through independent studies and internships.

Thesis

Matriculation from the MFA program is obtained when the student has completed and mounted their graduate thesis exhibition, successfully passed their thesis defense, and completed and submitted their thesis publication. The thesis must be an original body of work appropriate to the major commitment of the degree. The thesis publication is a professional, published presentation of the thesis project, which must be submitted, in both print and digital form. It must contain an extended artist statement and a presentation of the majority of thesis artwork. It is prepared for inclusion in the Wallace Library, the School's Archive, and the Graduate Annex Space. The verbal defense requires a public address by the student, discussion of the thesis project, and exhibition in a digital presentation format.

Accreditation

The MFA program in imaging arts and the BFA program in photographic and imaging arts are accredited by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD).

Admission requirements

To be considered for admission to the MFA program in imaging arts, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

- Hold a baccalaureate degree (or equivalent) from an accredited college or university,

- Submit a portfolio containing a focused body of artwork that demonstrates visual sophistication, aesthetic awareness, skill, and craft, as well as a commitment to a purpose and idea.

- Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.

- Submit three letters of recommendation.

- Submit a Letter of Intent, which should include a candidate's interest in obtaing an MFA, the selection of RIT for the MFA degree, and professional goals to be achieved.

- Submit an Artist Statement explaining the intention behind the portfolio submitted.

- Complete a graduate application through the Graduate Admission Website.

- Participate in an interview (optional).

Applicants who are capable of graduate level academic work, as well as artistic visual expression, and who demonstrate an interest in the exploration of new artistic ideas and experiences will be recommended.

- Portfolio

The portfolio, along with written records of achievements and recommendations, serves to inform the faculty of the applicant’s readiness for advanced graduate study. It provides understanding into the applicant’s performance to date, ability to create advanced, self-directed work and his/her aesthetic development and maturity.

Applicants should submit a portfolio of 20 images representing a cohesive body or bodies of recent work. Images must be uploaded to rit.slideroom.com, the college's portfolio website, or via a personal website. Through Slideroom, applicants will submit their Letter of Intent and an Artist’s Statement.

The application deadline is Jan 15. Admission selection for the fall semester is made in the spring from among all portfolios and completed applications received. Acceptance occurs only once a year for a fall admission.

Portfolio instructions to SlideRoom:

- Submit a portfolio of no more than 20 images to the college's portfolio website: rit.slideroom.com. (Size restrictions can be found through SlideRoom.) SlideRoom supplies space for titling and additional information about each image, such as: title of the work, date, size, and medium.
- Number images 1 to 20 in the order the applicant wishes them to be viewed.
- Include a numbered page detailing portfolio image information.
- Include a one-page Artist's Statement discussing submitted work and applicant’s creative process.
- Include a one-page Letter of Intert explaining why the applicant is interested in obtaining an MFA and specifically why RIT would be a successful fit for pursuit of a professional study degree.

Additional information

- Faculty

Thirteen full-time faculty members, all critically regarded for their artistic work in exhibition and publication, contribute to the MFA program. The faculty brings individual expertise and dedication to their work with graduate students, encouraging intellectual inquiry of contemporary art-making practices and aesthetics. The MFA program is supported by a staff of 30 full-time faculty members from the schools of Art and Photographic Arts and Sciences, faculty from the art history department, adjunct faculty members from George Eastman Museum, as well as noted regional, national, and international practitioners, critics, and historians. To learn about the MFA faculty, facilities, equipment cage, MFA events and curriculum, please visit the school's website at https://photography.rit.edu.

- Scholarships and graduate assistantships

All accepted applicants are awarded a university scholarship. Level of scholarship support is based on merit of application materials. Concurrently, the MFA program faculty grants graduate assistantships to all accepted applicants. Assistantships include a variety of positions, including team teaching, faculty assistant in the classroom and with research projects, gallery management, and working in an archive among opportunities. Upon acceptance into the MFA program, applicants are notified by the MFA director as to level of support for both the university scholarship and the graduate assistantship. Both scholarship and assistantship are renewable in the second year of graduate study.

- Transfer credit

Graduate-level course work completed prior to admission should be submitted for approval upon entrance into the program. Up to 8 semester hours of graduate work with a minimum grade of a B (3.0) or higher is transferable toward the degree, with the approval of the Graduate Director.

- Grades and maximum time limit

The average of all grades for graduate credit taken at the university must be at least a B (3.0) to qualify for the degree. University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program.

- Policy regarding student work

The School of Photographic Arts and Sciences reserves the right to retain at least one original piece of work from a student’s MFA thesis show for inclusion in the MFA Collection, to be used for educational, promotional, and exhibition purposes. Graduates must also submit a copy of the thesis publication to the School's MFA archive.

- William Harris Gallery

William Harris Gallery (http://cias.rit.edu/spas-gallery/) supports the exhibition of graduate thesis work, student work, and the works of contemporary image-makers. It maintains a calendar of exhibitions, public lectures, and receptions. Importantly, it also provides real world experience for interested graduate students, where they learn firsthand about gallery operations, installation, and communications as a gallery manager or staff member.

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In a fast-moving society, the professional image-maker has a powerful role in the way science is communicated to the world. The professional imager is vital to modern research, science communication, commerce and industry. Read more
In a fast-moving society, the professional image-maker has a powerful role in the way science is communicated to the world. The professional imager is vital to modern research, science communication, commerce and industry. The MSc Biological Photography and Imaging is ideal for students wishing to pursue a career in professional imaging. The study programme incorporates the areas of biological research, imaging (both industrial and media production) and communication. Developing your imaging skills during the course will allow you to integrate scientific and technical aspects with commercial applications. Graduates of our course have gone on to further study in molecular biology and biophysics, or pursued various careers such as medical imaging or wildlife filmmaking.

You are expected to have a high quality undergraduate degree in the biological or related sciences. Applicants with degrees in other disciplines may be accepted at the discretion of the Course Director. Applicants with professional experience at a level equivalent to that of a first degree will also be considered.

Applicants to this programme are expected to have their own digital SLR camera. Systems normally used on this course are Nikon or Canon; if you wish to operate a different system, you need to discuss this with the Course Director.

Key facts

Throughout the course you will have access to technical advice from a dedicated team of staff, high-spec computer equipment, photography studios and photographic stereo and compound microscopes. We also maintain a museum of biological specimens for you to use in assignments.
Teaching on our biology courses was rated as excellent (23/24) in the most recent Teaching Quality Assessment Exercise.
You will take part in a range of field trips in order to develop every aspect of your photography skills. Experts, such as professional wildlife photographers, are closely involved with these trips.
You will receive tuition in the leading industry-standard web design and animation software and will have the opportunity to set up an online portfolio of your work.
This course includes a business component, enabling you to present your skills to the competitive marketplace.

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The Computer Animation Master’s programme at Kent is oriented towards current industrial needs, technology and practice. It is designed to be a direct route into this high-profile, modern and creative industry, and has been developed jointly by the School and our industrial partner Framestore CFC. Read more
The Computer Animation Master’s programme at Kent is oriented towards current industrial needs, technology and practice. It is designed to be a direct route into this high-profile, modern and creative industry, and has been developed jointly by the School and our industrial partner Framestore CFC.

Develop your knowledge and understanding of the animation process, software tools, techniques and packages, and the technical aspects of working in a professional animation environment. The MSc programme offers invaluable experience of working to professional briefs and under expert supervision of professional animators to prepare you for a career in industry.

Competition is fierce in animation and visual effects and success depends on your concentration levels, constant practise and ability to grasp the essence and modern techniques of animation. Successful former students are now working in animation and animation layout roles for companies such as Sony Games and Framestore CFC on major titles in games, television and film.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/248/computer-animation

About the School of Engineering and Digital Arts

The School of Engineering and Digital Arts successfully combines modern engineering and technology with the exciting field of digital media. The School, which was established over 40 years ago, has developed a top-quality teaching and research base, receiving excellent ratings in both research and teaching assessments.

The School undertakes high-quality research that has had significant national and international impact, and our spread of expertise allows us to respond rapidly to new developments. Our 30 academic staff and over 130 postgraduate students and research staff provide an ideal focus to effectively support a high level of research activity. We have a thriving student population studying for postgraduate degrees in a friendly, supportive teaching and research environment.

We have research funding from the Research Councils UK, European research programmes, a number of industrial and commercial companies and government agencies including the Ministry of Defence. Our Electronic Systems Design Centre and Digital Media Hub provide training and consultancy for a wide range of companies. Many of our research projects are collaborative, and we have well-developed links with institutions worldwide.

Course structure

This intensively taught postgraduate course lasts a full year. It takes place in a dedicated computer laboratory where you have your own seat and computer for the duration of the course. The course lectures and workshops, whether led by visiting professionals or staff, are all held in this room. Demonstrations and showing of films are by means of an HD projector. By the end of the year, the lab will be where you live as much as your accommodation.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

EL831 - Digital Visual Art set-up (15 credits)
EL832 - Animation Principles (15 credits)
EL833 - Visual Training (15 credits)
EL837 - Professional Group Work (15 credits)
EL863 - Advanced 3D Modelling (15 credits)
EL864 - Pre-Visualisation (15 credits)
EL865 - Action in Animation (15 credits)
EL866 - Acting in Animation (15 credits)
EL830 - Computer Animation Project (60 credits)

Assessment

Each module is assessed by practical assignments. The project work is assessed on the outcome of the project itself.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- enable you to develop your knowledge and understanding within the field of 3D computer animation, which will equip you to become a professional in the animation and visual effects industry

- produce professionally-trained animators who are highly skilled in using state-of-the-art 3D animation software for producing animated films

- provide you with proper academic guidance and welfare support

- create an atmosphere of co-operation and partnership between staff and students, and offer you an environment where you can develop your potential

- strengthen and expand opportunities for industrial collaboration with the School of Engineering and Digital Arts.

Research areas

- Intelligent Interactions

The Intelligent Interactions group has interests in all aspects of information engineering and human-machine interactions. It was formed in 2014 by the merger of the Image and Information Research Group and the Digital Media Research Group.

The group has an international reputation for its work in a number of key application areas. These include: image processing and vision, pattern recognition, interaction design, social, ubiquitous and mobile computing with a range of applications in security and biometrics, healthcare, e-learning, computer games, digital film and animation.

- Social and Affective Computing
- Assistive Robotics and Human-Robot Interaction
- Brain-Computer Interfaces
- Mobile, Ubiquitous and Pervasive Computing
- Sensor Networks and Data Analytics
- Biometric and Forensic Technologies
- Behaviour Models for Security
- Distributed Systems Security (Cloud Computing, Internet of Things)
- Advanced Pattern Recognition (medical imaging, document and handwriting recognition, animal biometrics)
- Computer Animation, Game Design and Game Technologies
- Virtual and Augmented Reality
- Digital Arts, Virtual Narratives.

Careers

We have developed the programme with a number of industrial organisations, which means that successful students will be in a strong position to build a long-term career in this important discipline.

The School of Engineering and Digital Arts (http://www.eda.kent.ac.uk/) has an excellent record of student employability (http://www.eda.kent.ac.uk/school/employability.aspx). We are committed to enhancing the employability of all our students, to equip you with the skills and knowledge to succeed in a competitive, fast-moving, knowledge-based economy.

Graduates who can show that they have developed transferable skills and valuable experience are better prepared to start their careers and are more attractive to potential employers.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The M.Sc. in Medical Physics is a full time course which aims to equip you for a career as a scientist in medicine. You will be given the basic knowledge of the subject area and some limited training. Read more
The M.Sc. in Medical Physics is a full time course which aims to equip you for a career as a scientist in medicine. You will be given the basic knowledge of the subject area and some limited training. The course consists of an intense program of lectures and workshops, followed by a short project and dissertation. Extensive use is made of the electronic learning environment "Blackboard" as used by NUI Galway. The course has been accredited by the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (UK).

Syllabus Outline. (with ECTS weighting)
Human Gross Anatomy (5 ECTS)
The cell, basic tissues, nervous system, nerves and muscle, bone and cartilage, blood, cardiovascular system, respiratory system, gastrointestinal tract, nutrition, genital system, urinary system, eye and vision, ear, hearing and balance, upper limb – hand, lower limb – foot, back and vertebral column, embryology, teratology, anthropometrics; static and dynamic anthropometrics data, anthropometric dimensions, clearance and reach and range of movement, method of limits, mathematics modelling.

Human Body Function (5 ECTS)
Biological Molecules and their functions. Body composition. Cell physiology. Cell membranes and membrane transport. Cell electrical potentials. Nerve function – nerve conduction, nerve synapses. Skeletal muscle function – neuromuscular junction, muscle excitation, muscle contraction, energy considerations. Blood and blood cells – blood groups, blood clotting. Immune system. Autonomous nervous system. Cardiovascular system – electrical and mechanical activity of the heart. – the peripheral circulation. Respiratory system- how the lungs work. Renal system – how the kidneys work. Digestive system. Endocrine system – how hormones work. Central nervous system and brain function.

Occupational Hygiene (5 ECTS)
Historical development of Occupational Hygiene, Safety and Health at Work Act. Hazards to Health, Surveys, Noise and Vibrations, Ionizing radiations, Non-Ionizing Radiations, Thermal Environments, Chemical hazards, Airborne Monitoring, Control of Contaminants, Ventilation, Management of Occupational Hygiene.

Medical Informatics (5 ECTS)
Bio statistics, Distributions, Hypothesis testing. Chi-square, Mann-Whitney, T-tests, ANOVA, regression. Critical Appraisal of Literature, screening and audit. Patient and Medical records, Coding, Hospital Information Systems, Decision support systems. Ethical consideration in Research.
Practicals: SPSS. Appraisal exercises.

Clinical Instrumentation (6 ECTS)
Biofluid Mechanics: Theory: Pressures in the Body, Fluid Dynamics, Viscous Flow, Elastic Walls, Instrumentation Examples: Respiratory Function Testing, Pressure Measurements, Blood Flow measurements. Physics of the Senses: Theory: Cutaneous and Chemical sensors, Audition, Vision, Psychophysics; Instrumentation Examples: Evoked responses, Audiology, Ophthalmology instrumentation, Physiological Signals: Theory Electrodes, Bioelectric Amplifiers, Transducers, Electrophysiology Instrumentation.

Medical Imaging (10 ECTS)
Theory of Image Formation including Fourier Transforms and Reconstruction from Projections (radon transform). Modulation transfer Function, Detective Quantum Efficiency.
X-ray imaging: Interaction of x-rays with matter, X-ray generation, Projection images, Scatter, Digital Radiography, CT – Imaging. Fundamentals of Image Processing.
Ultrasound: Physics of Ultrasound, Image formation, Doppler scanning, hazards of Ultrasound.
Nuclear Medicine : Overview of isotopes, generation of Isotopes, Anger Cameras, SPECT Imaging, Positron Emitters and generation, PET Imaging, Clinical aspects of Planar, SPECT and PET Imaging with isotopes.
Magnetic Resonance Imaging : Magnetization, Resonance, Relaxation, Contrast in MR Imaging, Image formation, Image sequences, their appearances and clinical uses, Safety in MR.

Radiation Fundamentals (5 ECTS)
Review of Atomic and Nuclear Physics. Radiation from charged particles. X-ray production and quality. Attenuation of Photon Beams in Matter. Interaction of Photons with Matter. Interaction of Charged Particles with matter. Introduction to Monte Carlo techniques. Concept to Dosimetry. Cavity Theory. Radiation Detectors. Practical aspects of Ionization chambers

The Physics of Radiation Therapy (10 ECTS)
The interaction of single beams of X and gamma rays with a scattering medium. Treatment planning with single photon beams. Treatment planning for combinations of photon beams. Radiotherapy with particle beams: electrons, pions, neutrons, heavy charged particles. Special Techniques in Radiotherapy. Equipment for external Radiotherapy. Relative dosimetry techniques. Dosimetry using sealed sources. Brachytherapy. Dosimetry of radio-isotopes.

Workshops / Practicals
Hospital & Radiation Safety [11 ECTS]
Workshop in Risk and Safety.
Concepts of Risk and Safety. Legal Aspects. Fundamental concepts in Risk Assessment and Human Factor Engineering. Risk and Safety management of complex systems with examples from ICU and Radiotherapy. Accidents in Radiotherapy and how to avoid them. Principles of Electrical Safety, Electrical Safety Testing, Non-ionizing Radiation Safety, including UV and laser safety.
- NUIG Radiation Safety Course.
Course for Radiation Safety Officer.
- Advanced Radiation Safety
Concepts of Radiation Protection in Medical Practice, Regulations. Patient Dosimetry. Shielding design in Diagnostic Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Radiotherapy.
- Medical Imaging Workshop
Operation of imaging systems. Calibration and Quality Assurance of General
radiography, fluoroscopy systems, ultrasound scanners, CT-scanners and MR scanners. Radiopharmacy and Gamma Cameras Quality Control.

Research Project [28 ECTS]
A limited research project will be undertaken in a medical physics area. Duration of this will be 4 months full time

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Our MA Photography course approaches photography as an expanded visual discipline. You'll be encouraged to confidently produce complex and extended photographic projects and engage with experimental and speculative approaches to making. Read more
Our MA Photography course approaches photography as an expanded visual discipline. You'll be encouraged to confidently produce complex and extended photographic projects and engage with experimental and speculative approaches to making.

We offer a dynamic and exciting environment for studying the critical theory of photography, and this course engages with practices of reading and writing about the image. MA Photography also pays close attention to the dissemination, exhibition and publication of photographic work.

We provide specialist digital and analogue facilities for large-format colour and black-and-white exhibition prints.

Our course offers a considered balance of support that develops practical skills and fosters a high standard of diverse critical approaches. You'll take risks, explore and develop your interest, and exchange, debate and discuss ideas. You'll respond to the diverse field of contemporary photography and explore practices of representation that engage with the still and the moving image, as well as performance and installation.

Your studies will be supported by a number of internationally renowned staff in a department that encourages experimentation. This will enable you to establish yourself as a rounded professional who can formulate ideas in a sophisticated framework whilst also being able to communicate to others, both visually and verbally.

We place a strong emphasis on publication, enabling you to find creative ways to disseminate your work beyond the academic context and into the public arena.

Facilities

Our range of equipment and technical support enables specialist and professional-grade work, whilst also encouraging experimental and speculative approaches to making.

Industry Partners

Our MA Photography course enjoys extensive links with a number of photographic, media and fine art professionals, curators, publishers, specialist printers and book designers. These connections enrich your experience through visiting lecturer and seminar programmes.

In the last three years, speakers on the course have included photographers and other creative practitioners such as:
-Ori Gersht
-Esther Teichmann
-Margaret Salmon
-Sarah Jones
-Matthew Stone
-Criodhna Costello
-Chris Coekin
-Carey Young
-Lisa Castagner
-Rod Dickinson
-Jo Longhurst
-Jason Evans
-Joseph Walsh
-Eva Bensasson

Additionally, creative professionals and industry links for our course include:
-Benedict Burbridge, editor of Photoworks
-Stuart Smith, book designer at Smith-Design
-Sarah James, writer at Art Monthly and Frieze
-Lucy Soutter, writer at Source
-Clare Grafik, curator of The Photographer's Gallery
-Jennifer Thatcher, Folkestone Triennial
-Jean Wainwright, writer at Art Newspaper
-Terry King, specialist printer
-Emily Pethick, directs The Showroom
-Robert Shore, editor of Elephant Magazine
-Edward Dorrian, organiser of Five Years
-Joyce Cronin, manages the Cubitt Gallery

Careers

Our postgraduate degree prepares you for your career through professional practice units, talks by visiting artists and portfolio reviews with figures from across the photographic industry. Career opportunities include:
-Freelance photography
-Fine art
-Fashion
-Advertising and editorial
-Post production/digital imaging
-Picture editing and research
-Curating
-Image, arts and community arts management
-Gallery administration

Graduates of MA Photography have gone on to win the Jerwood Photography prize; to exhibit their work in The Photographers' Gallery, Photofusion, ArtSway and the Geffyre Museum as well as publishing their outputs in different venues ranging from The Sunday Times Magazine to monographs with Dewi Lewis Publishing.

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This MA gives practitioners and theorists the opportunity to research and develop the new boundaries of image-making made possible by technological change within the context of post-industrial culture- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-photography-electronic-arts/. Read more
This MA gives practitioners and theorists the opportunity to research and develop the new boundaries of image-making made possible by technological change within the context of post-industrial culture- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-photography-electronic-arts/

This programme joins theory and practice, equipping you to develop and achieve highly effectively in the new image media culture. Practice uses both digital and analogue technology, still and durational as well as the study and production of interactivity.

The programme allows for specialisation in photography and/or electronic arts – which, in addition to still photography, can include interactive, durational and internet work – but encompasses a broader interpretation of practice.

You'll look at the meaning, production and distribution of images, and the relationship between theory and practice in the context of debates about post-modernism and beyond.

You also participate in enabling sessions in photography:

medium/large format cameras
portable and studio lighting technologies and their use
film technology
cinematography
digital imaging
output systems and processes
and/or in electronic arts:

computer and video graphics
post-production
computer-aided design
digital publishing
animation
animatics
2D and 3D computer animation
still and durational image production and manipulation
web construction
interactivity
There is an MRes which follows the MA into a second year, in order to develop your work/voice. This will count as the first year of a PhD. Find out more about the MRes.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact the convenor Nigel Perkins.

Modules & Structure

This programme uniquely joins theory and practice in a way that will equip you with the tools and the vision to develop and achieve highly effectively in the new image media culture. Practice uses both digital and analogue technology, still and durational as well as the study and production of interactivity.

You will study

Photography: Durational & Still; Analogue & Digital
Electronic Imagery: Motion & Still
Visualisation: Stand-alone & Interactive
The programme draws on a broad range of cultural references and technical practices. It offers the opportunity to take stock of evolving practices and developments in image media culture, and is structured to develop the intellectual imagination within each individual student. This is achieved through a combined study of practice and theory, with extensive instruction through ‘enabling sessions’ which engage technical familiarity; core tutorials; secondary tutorials; Issues in Media and Culture and additional theory course options.

Recognising the rapidly changing definitions and context of these practice areas,and the value/positioning of traditional practices, these categories may also be understood through a variety of practices which involve image construction and presentation both still and durational, including: film/video, animation, interactivity, installations, motion graphics, and hyperspace constructs, as well as evolving new exploratory categories.

The programme provides an opportunity to develop and/or research aspects of visual style, and draw on a broad range of cultural references as well as aesthetic and technical approaches engaged through ‘Practice Theory Sessions’, visiting lectures and the Issues in Media and Culture course. Fundamental to the programme is the space that it creates to make it possible for you to explore, question, change and consolidate your work and your ideas.

Assessment

Original portfolio submission; coursework and essays.

Tutorials

This course is interested in the development of the individual voice. To this end, there are two types of tutorial:

Core tutorials - which deal with overall development
Secondary tutorials - these are tutorials for each specific area of photographic media

Skills

You'll develop specific practice skills to a high level, and the articulation/understanding of the pleasures of media consumption.

Careers

Graduates from the programme are extremely successful, with finalists working commercially, developing as artists or continuing to enlarge their academic knowledge. During the course particular attention is given to the development of the individual voice. This, plus students' exposure to a range of technologies, means that our graduates can step into the arena of their choice, or sometimes of their making.

Here are just some examples of the sorts of careers graduates have gone onto:

Art Director
Artist
Animator
Senior Interactive Designer
Head of Creative Department
Head Technical Creative, Experimental Film and Dance
Commercial Photography (fashion, editorial, photobooks, social, advertising)
Director (commercial narrative)
Director Of Photography
Installation Artist
Interactive Artist
Producer
Curator

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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The taught part of the course – from autumn of year one to summer of year two – leads to the Postgraduate Diploma in Landscape Architecture, which is the professionally accredited qualification. Read more

About the course

The taught part of the course – from autumn of year one to summer of year two – leads to the Postgraduate Diploma in Landscape Architecture, which is the professionally accredited qualification. You can then continue over the summer period of your second year to complete a dissertation, leading to the award of MA.

The Special Project helps you develop your professional competence. You may specialise in design, planning or management. With guidance from a member of staff, you’ll work on a landscape architecture solution for a real-world site. You choose the site – it could be in Sheffield or in your home town, even if your home town is in another country. The work is presented in an end-of-year exhibition.

Your career

Our graduates work all over the world,
in private practice and for public organisations. Some work for councils
and national parks or for wildlife trusts. Others go into conservation and forestry.
Our graduates also work in administration and policy making for organisations such
as Natural England and DEFRA.

A world-leading department

The 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) rates us the best landscape department in the UK. World-leading research informs our masters courses. You’ll be taught by leading experts such as Catherine Dee, Anna Jorgensen, Nigel Dunnett, and Olympic meadows co-designer James Hitchmough.

We offer taught courses including design, management, planning, and the ecological, social and cultural aspects of landscape. Our Postgraduate Diploma in Landscape Architecture is accredited by the Landscape Institute and the International Federation of Landscape Architects.

A creative environment

Each year-group has access to a studio. You’ll use the latest technology, just as you would in practice. Our computer suites are equipped with CAD and digital imaging and publishing software, and A4–A0 colour printing facilities.

We’re based in the Arts Tower, an iconic, Grade II* listed building that has just had a £25 million refurbishment. Our studios are equipped with wireless and digital projection facilities, portfolio and locker space and you have your own kitchen and common room.

In the UK’s greenest city

Sheffield is an exciting place to be a landscape student. It’s England’s fourth largest city and also its greenest in terms of public open space and tree cover. The many urban parks and extensive green infrastructure provide inspiration for much of our project work.

First-year modules

Landscape Architecture: Nature, Design, People
Urban Ecological Design and Management
Landscape Planning
Landscape Urbanism and Design Project
Introduction to Landscape Research
Landscape Research Topics and Dissertation

Second-year modules

Special Project Brief
Professional Practice
Law and Contracts
Special Project

Choose one of the following from:

Urban Landscape Planning
Landscape Design and Art Practice
Greenspace Maintenance

Also choose one of the following from:

Rural Landscape Planning
Urban Design Project
Greenspace Management

Postgraduate Diploma: Landscape Research Dissertation

Teaching and assessment

There are lectures, seminars, workshops, tutorials, critical feedback sessions, site visits and practicals. You’re assessed on coursework assignments, dissertation, oral presentation and examination.

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