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Masters Degrees (Digital Image)

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See the department website - http://www.cis.rit.edu/graduate-programs/master-science. The master of science program in imaging science prepares students for positions in research in the imaging industry or in the application of various imaging modalities to problems in engineering and science. Read more
See the department website - http://www.cis.rit.edu/graduate-programs/master-science

The master of science program in imaging science prepares students for positions in research in the imaging industry or in the application of various imaging modalities to problems in engineering and science. Formal course work includes consideration of the physical properties of radiation-sensitive materials and processes, the applications of physical and geometrical optics to electro-optical systems, the mathematical evaluation of image forming systems, digital image processing, and the statistical characterization of noise and system performance. Technical electives may be selected from courses offered in imaging science, color science, engineering, computer science, science, and mathematics. Both thesis and project options are available. In general, full-time students are required to pursue the thesis option, with the project option targeted to part-time and online students who can demonstrate that they have sufficient practical experience through their professional activities.

Faculty within the Center for Imaging Science supervise thesis research in areas of the physical properties of radiation-sensitive materials and processes, digital image processing, remote sensing, nanoimaging, electro-optical instrumentation, vision, medical imaging, color imaging systems, and astronomical imaging. Interdisciplinary efforts are possible with other colleges across the university.

The program can be completed on a full- or a part-time basis. Some courses are available online, specifically in the areas of color science, remote sensing, medical imaging, and digital image processing.

Plan of study

All students must earn 30 credit hours as a graduate student. The curriculum is a combination of required core courses in imaging science, elective courses appropriate for the candidate’s background and interests, and either a research thesis or graduate paper/project. Students must enroll in either the research thesis or graduate paper/project option at the beginning of their studies.

Core courses

Students are required to complete the following core courses: Fourier Methods for Imaging (IMGS-616), Image Processing and Computer Vision (IMGS-682), Optics for Imaging (IMGS-633), and either Radiometry (IMGS-619) or The Human Visual System (IMGS-620).

Speciality track courses

Students choose two courses from a variety of tracks such as: digital image processing, medical imaging, electro-optical imaging systems, remote sensing, color imaging, optics, hard copy materials and processes, and nanoimaging. Tracks may be created for students interested in pursuing additional fields of study.

Research thesis option

The research thesis is based on experimental evidence obtained by the student in an appropriate field, as arranged between the student and their adviser. The minimum number of thesis credits required is four and may be fulfilled by experiments in the university’s laboratories. In some cases, the requirement may be fulfilled by work done in other laboratories or the student's place of employment, under the following conditions:

1. The results must be fully publishable.

2. The student’s adviser must be approved by the graduate program coordinator.

3. The thesis must be based on independent, original work, as it would be if the work were done in the university’s laboratories.

A student’s thesis committee is composed of a minimum of three people: the student’s adviser and two additional members who hold at least a master's dgeree in a field relevant to the student’s research. Two committee members must be from the graduate faculty of the center.

Graduate paper/project option

Students with demonstrated practical or research experience, approved by the graduate program coordinator, may choose the graduate project option (3 credit hours). This option takes the form of a systems project course. The graduate paper is normally performed during the final semester of study. Both part- and full-time students may choose this option, with the approval of the graduate program coordinator.

Admission requirements

To be considered for admission to the MS in imaging science, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

- Hold a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution (undergraduate studies should include the following: mathematics, through calculus and including differential equations; and a full year of calculus-based physics, including modern physics. It is assumed that students can write a common computer program),

- Submit a one- to two-page statement of educational objectives,

- Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate or graduate course work,

- Submit letters of recommendation from individuals familiar with the applicant’s academic or research capabilities,

- Submit scores from the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) (requirement may be waived for those not seeking funding from the Center for Imaging Science), and

- Complete a graduate application.

- International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Minimum scores of 600 (paper-based) or 100 (Internet-based) are required. Students may also submit scores from the International English Language Testing System. The minimum IELTS score is 7.0. International students who are interested in applying for a teaching or research assistantship are advised to obtain as high a TOEFL or IELTS score as possible. These applicants also are encouraged to take the Test of Spoken English in order to be considered for financial assistance.

Applicants seeking financial assistance from the center must have all application documents submitted to the Office of Graduate Enrollment Services by January 15 for the next academic year.

Additional information

- Bridge courses

Applicants who lack adequate preparation may be required to complete bridge courses in mathematics or physics before matriculating with graduate status.

- Maximum time limit

University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program. Bridge courses are excluded.

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The MA in Digital Media is unique in its combination of practical and theoretical approaches to contemporary media and technology. Read more

The MA in Digital Media is unique in its combination of practical and theoretical approaches to contemporary media and technology.

The established and exciting degree is designed to help you understand digital transformations in media, culture and society and apply this understanding in practice, in the media and creative industries and in further research. You will be equipped with skills that can be applied to current and future developments in digital media, social media, computing and other aspects of technology.

The MA in Digital Media educates aspiring media practitioners and academics as well as early and mid-career professionals who seek to reflect on their roles in a structured and stimulating learning environment designed to give all students up-to-the-minute knowledge of digital media and the skills to apply that knowledge to future developments.

The MA offers two pathways:

Pathway 1 is a theory programme where you learn about developments in digital media and technology from a wide range of perspectives

Pathway 2 is a theory and practice programme where you can explore transformations in media, culture and society through the practice of contemporary digital communication. You will work with one or more of the following to create installations, apps and single- and multi-screen work that's responsive to the continually changing digital landscape:

  • Animation
  • Photography
  • Video and other forms of moving image
  • Software and web design
  • Hybrid forms of image making

Acclaimed academics and practitioners

Benefit from the experience and expertise of one of the world’s leading media and communications departments. The programme is co-convened by Professor Joanna Zylinska and Daniel Rourke, and you will be taught by theorists and practitioners of international standing.

Work placements and internships

The MA in Digital Media regularly attracts offers of work placements and internships. In the past these have come from GoogleThe Science Museum and N1creative.com. There is also £6,000 bursary available for UK students studying this course. Find out more about the Stationers' Postgraduate Bursary Scheme on our departmental awards page.

Facilities

Our students have access to state-of-the-art facilities including well-equipped lecture and seminar rooms, exhibition spaces, computer facilities and digital media suites.

The department is also currently host to the renowned philosopher of media and technology, Bernard Stiegler and students will have access to his modulein Media Philosophy as well as priority access to the innovative and popular option After New Media. Designed to complement the MA in Digital Media, this course provides a framework for thinking about the current media environment as well as future forms of human and computer interaction.

An established record

The MA in Digital Media has been redefining media theory and practice since 2004. Our students become proficient in:

  • the history, sociology and philosophy of digital media
  • the application of critical conceptual skills to specialist areas and future forms of media
  • multimedia skills in image making (photography, video, animation, graphic art) script writing, journalism and documentary 

MA Digital Media students have access to the pioneering option ‘After New Media’, currently a non-assessed online module which explores the themes of self mediation, ethical mediation and intelligent mediation, and develops a framework for thinking about 'life' after new media. As well as accessing a series of podcasts, students are offered reading groups and a masterclass with Professor Sarah Kember co-author of the book Life After New Media on which the course is based.

Modules & structure

Overview

The programme consists of:

  • Two compulsory core modules
  • Pathway 1 - between two and four option modules (worth 60 credits) OR
  • Pathway 2 - a two-term practice block (worth 30 credits) and either one or two option modules (worth 30 credits)
  • The dissertation or the practice/theory project

Core modules

Assessment

Seen take-home paper; essays; dissertation or practice/theory project and other production work for image-making.

Skills

We provide graduates with skills that are cutting edge: in the critical analysis and/or creative production of digital media; in the disciplinary knowledge and conceptual frameworks necessary for current and future forms of media and technology; in the awareness of how digital media and technologies are re-shaping society from the ways we communicate (through social media and web 2.0) to the increasingly ‘smart’ environments in which we live.

Careers

Our programme provides a theory and practice pathway and prepares students for work in the following areas:

  • media and creative industries; advertising, marketing and PR (graduates of the MA Digital Media have found work with Virgin Media, Google, the BBC and other leading organisations worldwide)
  • research and academia (graduates from this programme have gone on to study for PhD degrees in higher education institutions around the world and also here with us)
  • media production and new media art (graduates have exhibited, published and produced work in photography, journalism, TV, documentary, film and multimedia)


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Digital Humanities is a fast and growing interdisciplinary field at the cutting edge of 21st century research methods. It aligns traditional Humanities-based research with modern data-intensive computational methodologies to produce exciting new research avenues and questions in traditional fields of expertise. Read more

Overview

Digital Humanities is a fast and growing interdisciplinary field at the cutting edge of 21st century research methods. It aligns traditional Humanities-based research with modern data-intensive computational methodologies to produce exciting new research avenues and questions in traditional fields of expertise. The MA degree is transformative in nature and allows graduates from Arts and Humanities, Social Science, as well as Computer Science backgrounds, to enhance and complement their existing research skills with modern digital methods vital for the cultural heritage and information sectors. It is also excellent preparation for those wishing to pursue a computationally-enabled PhD in the arts and humanities, digital preservation, or digital cultural heritage.

Students have opportunities to:

Use State-of-the-art equipment to digitise, analyse and 3D print cultural heritage objects.
Explore alternative methods, theories, and technologies for undertaking a range of digitally-enabled cultural heritage projects and research
Get real-life experience through an internship in a cultural heritage institution or collaborating on a Digital Humanities project.
Be actively involved in our Digital Humanities projects, such as the Letters 1916, the first crowdsourcing project in Ireland, and Contested Memories, a computer graphic simulation of The Battle of Mount Street Bridge.
Create virtual worlds and get an expertise in computer graphics for cultural heritage.
Learn programming and markup languages used widely in the field
Get experience in encoding historical or literary sources and literature in the creation of Digital Scholarly Editions.
The course is delivered in our state-of-the-art facility in An Foras Feasa (Iontas Building, North Campus), which includes the MakersLab for Computational Imaging and 3D Printing projects, the Digital Humanities Lab with high-end desktop computers for computer graphics and image processing, and the Green Screen Studio for audio-visual recording.

A number of funding options are available including two An Foras Feasa Taught Masters Bursaries, the University wide Taught Masters Scholarships and the Maynooth University Taught Masters Alumni Scholarships. Further details may be found at: https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/foras-feasa/ma-and-phd-funding

Course Structure

90 ECTS are needed to complete the Masters. The course is comprised of the following elements:

Required Taught Modules: 20 ECTS*

Elective Taught Modules: 40 ECTS

Project and Dissertation: 30 ECTS

*Required modules include Digital Humanities Theory and Practice and Digital Humanities Practicum (10 ECTS each). Both modules are integral to the building of practical and theoretical knowledge of the discipline, its development and its intersection with public projects. The Digital Humanities Practicum module guarantees students a work placement at a cultural heritage institution or on a Digital Humanities project.

Part-time students are advised to register for ‘Digital Humanities Theory and Practice’ in the first semester, while working for the ‘Digital Humanities Practicum’ in the second year of the course.

Elective modules provide students with a variety of skills, methods, and theories. Students may choose to either specialise in a specific area, delving deeply into a specific set of methods, or to take a wider variety of modules hence gaining a broader understanding of the field.

Applicants with little previous programming experience, are advised to register for ‘Structured Programming’: an intensive 3-week 90-hour pre-semester laboratory-based programming course which runs in late August through to early September and counts as one elective module worth 10 ECTS.

The project and dissertation over the last semester of the course and will be individually supervised or co-supervised by an academic from one or both of the contributing departments. Student who wish not to write the final thesis have the opportunity to exit the course with a postgraduate diploma in Digital Humanities.

Career Options

Graduates of the MA in Digital Humanities at Maynooth University are ideally placed to use computational methods in arts and humanities research and research projects. Graduates also take up exciting positions across the areas of museum curating, archiving and public history and heritage projects, while the technical and transferrable skills they develop can also lead them to the Industry and the IT sector.

How To Apply

Online application only http://www.pac.ie/maynoothuniversity

PAC Code
MH50F/MH51F

The following documents should be forwarded to PAC, 1 Courthouse Square, Galway or uploaded to your online application form:

Certified copies of all official transcripts of results for all non-Maynooth University qualifications listed MUST accompany the application. Failure to do so will delay your application being processed. Non-Maynooth University students are asked to provide two academic references and a copy of birth certificate or valid passport.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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Digital Humanities is a field of study, research, and invention at the intersection of humanities, computing, and information management. Read more

What is Digital Humanities?

Digital Humanities is a field of study, research, and invention at the intersection of humanities, computing, and information management. It is methodological by nature and multidisciplinary in scope involving the investigation, analysis, synthesis, and presentation of information in electronic form.

Digital humanists do not only create digital artefacts, but study how these media affect and are transforming the disciplines in which they are used. The computational tools and methods used in Digital Humanities cut across disciplinary practice to provide shared focal points, such as the preservation and curation of digital data, the aesthetics of the digital (from individual objects to entire worlds), as well as the creation of the born-digital.

Why Take this Course?

This M.Phil. provides a platform for a technically innovative research path within the humanities giving students the opportunity to engage with a new and dynamic area of research. It provides them with the technologies, methodologies, and theories for digitally-mediated humanities providing a framework for new and bold research questions to be asked that would have been all but inconceivable a generation ago.

Course Outcomes

Those who complete this course will have highly specialised IT skills combined with an advanced understanding of how these skills can be applied to a wide variety of digital objects (text, image, audio, and video). It will also provide students with the theories and perspectives central to the field, including the aesthetics implicit in digital creation and migration, best practice in terms of the standards used for a number of data formats, as well as the growing concerns of digital curation and preservation. Through the internship programme students will get real world experience working with cultural heritage partners or digital humanities projects. Moreover, several modules will integrate content from these partners in their learning outcomes, providing opportunities for students to engage with cutting-edge issues and technologies.

What's on the course?

This MPhil consists of three core modules and three optional modules. There is also a dissertation module in which a research topic is chosen in agreement with your supervisor.

Core modules

Theory and Practice of Digital Humanities
Web Technologies
Internship at cultural heritage institution, library, or project
Optional modules (for the 2012-13 academic year):
Cyberculture/Popular Culture
Computational Theories of Grammar and Meaning
Corpus Linguistics
From Metadata to Linked Data
Programming for Digital Media (Full year module)
Contextual Media (Full year module)
Visualising the Past
Heritage Visualisation in Action
NB: Some optional modules require prerequisites

How is it taught and examined?

The taught component of the course begins in September and ends in April. Contact hours depend on the modules you take. Theory-based modules meet for two hours a week (such as 'Theory and Practice of Digital Humanities' and 'Cyberculture/Popular Culture'); practice based modules (such as 'Web Technologies' and 'Digital Scholarly Editing') typically meet for three hours a week to include lab time. Modules are assessed through a combination of essays, in-class presentations, assignments, and projects (either individual or group), depending on the module. There are no examinations. The supervised dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words is submitted by 31 August.

Applicants should have a good honours degree (at least an upper second, GPA of at least 3.3) in any of the disciplines of the humanities. The admissions process will be carried out in two stages. In stage I candidates will apply online and have the opportunity of submitting a sample of their own critical writing (3,000-5,000 words) and a cover letter. Those candidates passing this initial assessment will go onto to stage II that will take the form of interviews (either in person, telephone, video, or skype) which will be arranged by a member of the admissions subcommittee. Taken together, these stages will allow the admissions committee to assess the candidates' general suitability for postgraduate work as well as clarifying my query re on line application]

Applications are also welcome from professionals in the library and cultural heritage sectors. Those already in employment may opt to take the degree over two years: the first year all coursework is taken and the second year the dissertation is written.

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The School conducts high-quality significant national and international research and offers excellent opportunities for graduate studies, successfully combining modern engineering and technology with the exciting field of digital media. Read more
The School conducts high-quality significant national and international research and offers excellent opportunities for graduate studies, successfully combining modern engineering and technology with the exciting field of digital media. The digital media group has interests in many areas of interactive multimedia and digital film and animation.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/264/digital-arts

About the School of Engineering and Digital Arts

Established over 40 years ago, the School has developed a top-quality teaching and research base, receiving excellent ratings in both research and teaching assessments.

The School undertakes high-quality research (http://www.eda.kent.ac.uk/research/default.aspx) that has had significant national and international impact, and our spread of expertise allows us to respond rapidly to new developments. Our 30 academic staff and over 130 postgraduate students and research staff provide an ideal focus to effectively support a high level of research activity. There is a thriving student population studying for postgraduate degrees in a friendly and supportive teaching and research environment.

We have research funding from the Research Councils UK, European research programmes, a number of industrial and commercial companies and government agencies including the Ministry of Defence. Our Electronic Systems Design Centre and Digital Media Hub provide training and consultancy for a wide range of companies. Many of our research projects are collaborative, and we have well-developed links with institutions worldwide.

Course structure

The digital media group has interests in many areas of interactive multimedia and digital film and animation.

There is particular strength in web design and development, including e-commerce, e-learning, e-health; and the group has substantial experience in interaction design (eg, Usability and accessibility), social computing (eg, Social networking, computer mediated communication), mobile technology (eg, iPhone), virtual worlds (eg, Second Life) and video games. In the area of time-based media, the group has substantial interest in digital film capture and editing, and manipulation on to fully animated 3D modelling techniques as used in games and feature films.

Research Themes:
- E-Learning Technology (http://www.eda.kent.ac.uk/research/theme_detail.aspx?gid=1&tid=1)

- Medical Multimedia Applications and Telemedicine (http://www.eda.kent.ac.uk/research/theme_detail.aspx?gid=1&tid=2)

- Human Computer Interaction and Social Computing (http://www.eda.kent.ac.uk/research/theme_detail.aspx?gid=1&tid=3)

- Computer Animation and Digital Visual Effects (http://www.eda.kent.ac.uk/research/theme_detail.aspx?gid=1&tid=4)

- Mobile Application Design and Development (http://www.eda.kent.ac.uk/research/theme_detail.aspx?gid=1&tid=25)

- Digital Arts (http://www.eda.kent.ac.uk/research/theme_detail.aspx?gid=1&tid=26)

Research areas

- Intelligent Interactions

The Intelligent Interactions group has interests in all aspects of information engineering and human-machine interactions. It was formed in 2014 by the merger of the Image and Information Research Group and the Digital Media Research Group.

The group has an international reputation for its work in a number of key application areas. These include: image processing and vision, pattern recognition, interaction design, social, ubiquitous and mobile computing with a range of applications in security and biometrics, healthcare, e-learning, computer games, digital film and animation.

- Social and Affective Computing
- Assistive Robotics and Human-Robot Interaction
- Brain-Computer Interfaces
- Mobile, Ubiquitous and Pervasive Computing
- Sensor Networks and Data Analytics
- Biometric and Forensic Technologies
- Behaviour Models for Security
- Distributed Systems Security (Cloud Computing, Internet of Things)
- Advanced Pattern Recognition (medical imaging, document and handwriting recognition, animal biometrics)
- Computer Animation, Game Design and Game Technologies
- Virtual and Augmented Reality
- Digital Arts, Virtual Narratives.

Careers

We have developed our programmes with a number of industrial organisations, which means that successful students are in a strong position to build a long-term career in this important discipline. You develop the skills and capabilities that employers are looking for, including problem solving, independent thought, report-writing, time management, leadership skills, team-working and good communication.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Building on Kent’s success as the region’s leading institution for student employability, we offer many opportunities for you to gain worthwhile experience and develop the specific skills and aptitudes that employers value.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Digital Humanities is a fast and growing interdisciplinary field at the cutting edge of 21st century research methods. It aligns traditional Humanities-based research with modern data-intensive computational methodologies to produce exciting new research avenues and questions in traditional fields of expertise. Read more

Overview

Digital Humanities is a fast and growing interdisciplinary field at the cutting edge of 21st century research methods. It aligns traditional Humanities-based research with modern data-intensive computational methodologies to produce exciting new research avenues and questions in traditional fields of expertise. The postgraduate diploma is transformative in nature and allows graduates from Arts and Humanities, Social Science, as well as Computer Science backgrounds, to enhance and complement their existing research skills with modern digital methods vital for the cultural heritage and information sectors. It is also excellent preparation for those wishing to pursue a career in digital arts and humanities, digital preservation, or digital cultural heritage.

Students have opportunities to:

Use State-of-the-art equipment to digitise, analyse and 3D print cultural heritage objects.
Explore alternative methods, theories, and technologies for undertaking a range of digitally-enabled cultural heritage projects and research
Get real-life experience through an internship in a cultural heritage institution or collaborating on a Digital Humanities project.
Be actively involved in our Digital Humanities projects, such as the Letters 1916, the first crowdsourcing project in Ireland, and Contested Memories, a computer graphic simulation of The Battle of Mount Street Bridge.
Create virtual worlds and get an expertise in computer graphics for cultural heritage.
Learn programming and markup languages used widely in the field.
Get experience in encoding historical or literary sources and literature in the creation of Digital Scholarly Editions.
The course is delivered in our state-of-the-art facility in An Foras Feasa (Iontas Building, North Campus), which includes the MakersLab for Computational Imaging and 3D Printing projects, the Digital Humanities Lab with high-end desktop computers for computer graphics and image processing, and the Green Screen Studio for audio-visual recording.

Course Structure

60 ECTS are needed to complete the Diploma. The course is comprised of the following elements:

Required Taught Modules: 20 ECTS*

Elective Taught Modules: 40 ECTS

*Required modules include Digital Humanities: Theory and Practice and Digital Humanities Practicum (10 ECTS each). Both modules are integral to the building of practical and theoretical knowledge of the discipline, its development and its intersection with public projects. The Digital Humanities Practicum module guarantees students a work placement at a cultural heritage institution or on a Digital Humanities project.

Elective modules provide students with a variety of skills, methods, and theories. Students may choose to either specialise in a specific area, delving deeply into a specific set of methods, or to take a wider variety of modules hence gaining a broader understanding of the field.

Applicants with little previous programming experience, are advised to register for ‘Structured Programming’: an intensive 3-week 90-hour pre-semester laboratory-based programming course which runs in late August through to early September and counts as one elective module worth 10 ECTS.

Career Options

Graduates of the Postgraduate Diploma in Digital Humanities at Maynooth University are ideally placed to use computational methods in arts and humanities research and projects. Graduates also take up exciting positions across the areas of museum curating, archiving and public history and heritage projects, while the technical and transferrable skills they develop can also lead them to the Industry and the IT sector.

How To Apply

Online application only http://www.pac.ie/maynoothuniversity

PAC Code
MH54F Full-time / MH55F

The following documents should be forwarded to PAC, 1 Courthouse Square, Galway or uploaded to your online application form:

Certified copies of all official transcripts of results for all non-Maynooth University qualifications listed MUST accompany the application. Failure to do so will delay your application being processed. Non-Maynooth University students are asked to provide two academic references and a copy of birth certificate or valid passport.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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This programme offers a comprehensive understanding of current developments in digital media and their wider social significance. Read more
This programme offers a comprehensive understanding of current developments in digital media and their wider social significance. Smartphones; social networking, blogging and tweeting; online shopping; communication by email; and the delivery of news, film, music and e-books over the Internet: these are just some of the most striking ways in which the digital is penetrating and transforming contemporary society.

The programme is delivered by a diverse interdisciplinary team with a strong profile in, for example, digital culture, media, sociology, anthropology and communication studies.

Core study areas include media and cultural industries, digital futures, media and cultural work, textual analysis research techniques, production and reception analysis and a dissertation.

Optional study areas include politics of representation, media and modernity, communication and citizenship, sex industries, global communications, media, nations, and nationalisms, digital cultures, digital economies, cultural memory and the heritage industries, and marketing politics.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/social-sciences/digital-media-society/

Programme modules

Compulsory Modules:
- Digital Cultures
- Digital Futures: explorations in new media
- Production and Reception Analysis
- Digital Economies
- Digital Methodologies
- Dissertation

Optional Modules:
A selection of the following options will be available:
- Media and Modernity
- Media and Cultural Industries
- The Politics of Representation
- Popular Music and Modern Times
- Citizenship and Communications
- Media, Nations and Nationalisms
- Global Communications
- Media and Cultural Work
- Tourism, Culture and Society
- Sex Industries
- Cultural Memory and the Heritage Industries
- Marketing Politics

Assessment

Coursework plus a dissertation of 10,000 words on an agreed topic.

Careers and further study

The degree is designed to develop specialist understanding of contemporary developments in digital media and culture. This will be relevant to anyone pursuing a professional career in this rapidly growing sector and to those with an interest in these significant social changes. Students will also acquire research skills which will be of value in both media-related and academic careers.

Why choose social sciences at Loughborough?

The Department of Social Sciences has long been recognised as an international centre of academic excellence and for its cutting-edge interdisciplinary work.

This recognition of excellence has been a major factor in enabling the Department to recruit a lively community of postgraduate students that currently numbers around 100.

In the Department of Social Sciences we offer a rich variety of taught postgraduate masters. The courses are delivered by an internationally renowned interdisciplinary team, through the use of contemporary case studies and research-informed applied teaching and learning.

The courses provide training in digital culture, media, communications, sociological and anthropological, theory, as well as quantitative and qualitative methods

- Research
All of our academic staff are active researchers, working within and across the following disciplinary boundaries – Communication and Media Studies, Criminology, Social Policy, Social Psychology, and Sociology.

Loughborough is home to the most world-leading, original and internationally excellent research in communication, media studies, sociology, and social psychology. Our research has excellent impact, with staff working with a wide range of public and third sector bodies (e.g., BBC Trust, the Metropolitan Police, the Electoral Commission, the College of Mediators, UK Drug Policy Commission, Department of Health). Our social policy and criminology research also has world-leading impact, particularly in services for children and minimum income standards.

- Career prospects
Our programmes prepare our graduates for the real world of the television industry, marketing, academia, publishing, plus many more industries. They go on to work for companies and organisations such as China Development Research Foundation, Elsevier Ltd, Image Line Communication, Institute of Psychiatry, Metropolitan Police Service, Oxfam and X-Pert Med GmbH.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/social-sciences/digital-media-society/

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The Digital Media, Culture and Education MA explores the theory and practice of media in society, with a particular focus on education and emergent new literacies in the digital age. Read more

The Digital Media, Culture and Education MA explores the theory and practice of media in society, with a particular focus on education and emergent new literacies in the digital age. The programme combines theory with practical opportunities for media production. Students will critically examine new developments within digital media and work with partners including the British Film Institute (BFI).

About this degree

This programme provides the opportunity to explore different media forms, media education, media literacy and related fields. It combines theory with practical opportunities in moving image production, Internet cultures and game design. Students will critically examine developments in the fields of new media, including the impact of new technologies on education, and debates about the place and purpose of media in society.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (60 credits), two optional modules (60 credits), a dissertation (60 credits) or a report (30 credits) and an additional optional module (30 credits).

Core modules

  • Digital Media, Cultural Theory and Education
  • Internet Cultures: Theory & Practice

Recommended optional modules include:

  • Moving Image Production
  • Digital Games, Play and Creativity
  • Bodies and Digital Media

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project, which culminates in a dissertation of 20,000 words or a report of 10,000 words. Either the dissertation or the report can be part-production based, in which case the production element replaces 50% of the wordcount.

Teaching and learning

Teaching is delivered by face-to-face lectures and seminars, practical workshops combined with online-learning. Students are assessed by coursework assignments of up to 5,000 words, plus practical work for some modules, and a 20,000-word dissertation or 10,000-word report.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Digital Media, Culture and Education MA

Careers

Graduates of this programme are currently working across a broad range of areas. Some are working as teachers in primary, secondary schools and further and higher education, while others have jobs as within areas related to digital media. Graduates can also be found working as museum and gallery education officers and in other informal learning spaces.

Employability

The course provides students with skills relevant to media work in a wide variety of employment contexts, including education, museums and galleries, social media, cultural organisations. It provides experience of digital media production relevant to these contexts, but not professional production traiinng for the media industries.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This programme will equip students with skills, knowledge and experience related to the rapidly-changing worlds of digital media, culture and education. It will therefore support career development in a variety of media contexts, including educational settings, broadly-defined.

Students are able to work with the BFI, our partner for part of the course, as well as leading researchers from the DARE Collaborative, a research partnership focussed on the digital arts in education led by UCL Institute of Education (IOE) and the BFI.

The course is based at the UCL Knowledge Lab, which conducts research, design and development across a broad range of media, systems and environments and brings together researchers from the areas of education, sociology, culture and media, semiotics, computational intelligence, information management, personalisation, semantic web and ubiquitous technologies.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Culture, Communication & Media

78% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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This course provides a thorough, methodical and wide-ranging education in digital signal and image processing. The Degree course offers both core taught modules and a substantial individual research project. Read more
This course provides a thorough, methodical and wide-ranging education in digital signal and image processing. The Degree course offers both core taught modules and a substantial individual research project.

Teaching and learning

The course contains both compulsory core taught modules and a substantial individual research project. Four taught modules are delivered in the first semester from September to January, and four taught modules are delivered in the second semester from February to June. Each taught unit is assessed by coursework or laboratory report, with written examinations in January and June.
You will conduct your dissertation project work during summer and submit your final dissertation in September.

Course unit details

Typical course units include:
-Signals and data capture engineering
-Digital image processing
-Digital Communications engineering
-Sensing and transduction
-Digital image engineering
-Tomography engineering and applications

Career opportunities

Digital signals are part of almost every aspect of 21st technology. If you take this course, you will become expert in this area and expose yourself to a world of opportunity respecting careers. You will, for example, be able to perform biomedical signal processing, audio/visual/multimedia engineering, digital waveform synthesis and medical, industrial and military image processing. You will be able to work in the fields of imaging, medical physics, aerospace, telecommunications systems development, mechatronics, robotics, remote sensing and nondestructive testing. Your skills will be highly sought after in organisations that develop systems for these and many related state-of the art disciplines.

This course will not only make you very employable; it will be a very fulfilling and enriching experience.

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The course is a unique opportunity to embark upon a detailed investigation into the intellectual currents and aesthetic concerns surrounding the study and practice of film. Read more
The course is a unique opportunity to embark upon a detailed investigation into the intellectual currents and aesthetic concerns surrounding the study and practice of film. From the outset, questions of history, theory and context are brought to bear on issues of close analysis and interpretation. Elective modules in Screenwriting, Creative Documentary Practice and Editing allow students to balance film theory with practice. At every step of the way your progress will be informed by an emphasis on independent study and critical thinking. In addition, the course aims to develop the key transferable skills required for postgraduate study. These include dissertation preparation, time management and oral and written presentation.


The course consists of six taught modules and a Dissertation module that includes Research Methodologies.

Dissertation and Research Methodologies
This module prepares students for the formal processes of research and writing at M.Phil. level. Classes will cover library use, archival skills, electronic resources, use of Endnote, research skills, note taking, writing and oral presentation and power-point techniques. Students will write a dissertation of approximately 12,000-15,000 words on an approved topic to be supervised by an appropriate member of staff.

In addition, students choose six of the elective modules listed below:

Aesthetics of Digital Cinema
This course traces the history of the development of the digital image with specific reference to its application to filmmaking. We will look at the analogue origins of the digital image and discuss the aesthetic implications of the shift to digital film. Further we will discuss developing models of criticism and their application to the digital cinematic image. We will be drawing examples from Western (Hollywood, Danish, British) cinemas and non-Western (Iranian) cinemas as well as from other outputs, such as YouTube.

Cinema and Ireland

This course will explore the history of Irish cinema from the 1930s to the present. It will also cover such areas as state film production policies, film censorship, and the history of Irish film distribution and exhibition. In addition, it will trace how British and American cinemas have represented Ireland and the Irish, and it will examine representations of political violence, history, gender and the cinema of the Celtic Tiger years, as well as current trends in Irish film production.

Current Trends in European Cinema
This course will look at and examine the changes taking place in cinema in Europe in the latter part of the twentieth century and the beginning of the twenty-first century. This was a period that saw enormous transformation throughout the continent - both East and West - when the post World War II political dispensation collapsed and Cold War divisions crumbled. The fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, the break-up of the Soviet Union in 1991 and the subsequent overthrow of the remaining Stalinist regimes in Eastern and Central Europe, the emergence of the European Union as a transnational political entity in 1992, and the globalisation of the world economy all impacted on the way in which films were made and the type of themes they explored and topics they tackled.

Cult Cinema
This module will examine a number of films that have acquired 'cult status' for a variety of reasons. It will pay particular attention to the ways in which these films have circulated in popular and academic discourses and the various attempts to identify 'cult' qualities and qualifying practices.

Melodrama
This module will consider a wide range of variations on the ‘melodramatic mode’, including examples from early cinema, classical Hollywood cinema, as well as current American and European cinema.Â

Editing
This module will introduce students to the craft of editing, giving students an understanding of the essential technical and creative skills involved: how a scene is assembled and seamlessly put together, cutting dialogue, creating tension and drama using editing, using pacing, editing to rhythm, cutting to music and beats. It will also provide students with a through knowledge of the editing software, Final Cut Pro X, covering all aspects of the software, from capture and system-settings, editing tools and shortcuts, to effects, transitions and colour correction. The overall aim is to give students the knowledge, tools and confidence to complete their own work to a professional standard.

Creative Documentary Practice
The aim of this module is expose students to the possibilities of creative documentary film making with a strong emphasis on learning thorough practical application. The module will take a critical look at current practices in the genre with an emphasis both on the techniques of documentary filmmaking and the practicalities of how films are made.

Screenwriting
This module will introduce students to the techniques and conventions of screenwriting. Class exercises will involve the analysis of screenplays and short films, and the course will cover both the conventional three-act structure and other models of screenwriting.

Please note: all modules are subject to change and/or availability. Students must take three modules in Michaelmas term and three modules in Hilary term, subject to timetabling.

Assessment is by a combination of coursework and dissertation:

Each module will be assessed by a combination of written and/or practice based assignments as appropriate and class participation. Total ECTS: 60
Dissertation of approximately 12,000-15,000 words and Research Methodologies assessment. Total ECTS: 30
Postgraduate Diploma

A Postgraduate Diploma in Film Theory and History may be awarded in certain circumstances on the basis of coursework alone (60 ECTS). Entry is the same as for the M.Phil. programme.

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Given the wider development of Citizen GIS and an increased public awareness and knowledge of the power and value of spatial data, vastly increased amounts of such data from different sources are now available to researchers. Read more

Overview

Given the wider development of Citizen GIS and an increased public awareness and knowledge of the power and value of spatial data, vastly increased amounts of such data from different sources are now available to researchers. However, in order to turn these data into useful information, they must be efficiently managed, processed and analysed before being displayed in a comprehensible format. Geographical Information Systems and the associated field of Remote Sensing greatly aid us in such tasks. The course is equally split between both parts - GIS and Remote Sensing - with four core module introducing the theory and practice of both subject at an introductory and advanced level. Geographical Information Systems or GIS as they are better known, are widely used in a wide variety of subject fields across the physical and social sciences and even in the humanities, with applicability in everything from archaeology and astronomy to geomorphology and globalisation to soil science and social planning. Remote Sensing – the analysis and interpretation of aerial and satellite imagery – has transformed the manner in which we view the Earth. The synoptic view of the Earth that it has given us has greatly improved our understanding of atmospheric and oceanic processes, sustained environmental management and the interaction of humans with the natural world. It is now a standard research tool in many fields such as geology, geography, pollution control, agriculture and climatology. Additional optional modules in Programming, Spatial Databases and Remote Sensing of the Subsurface are also available to students who want to develop the technical side more fully, though the course has a strong applied flavour throughout. In addition, all students complete a work placement in the Summer months which allows them to gain valuable practical experience to test and develop the skills learnt across the course.

Aims of the Course:
- To provide highly qualified, motivated graduates who have been trained in Geographical Information Systems, Remote Sensing and Digital Image Processing and who can apply the information technology skills they obtain.

- To produce marketable graduates who will make significant contributions to GIS and RS application areas including; industry, government, academia, the community and voluntary sector and other public and private bodies.

- To provide an understanding of Geographical Information Systems and Remote Sensing, the technology involved and its applications for specific investigations.

Course Structure

The course consists of 6 modules, 5 of which are compulsory. Two of these cover the theoretical concepts underpinning GIS and Remote Sensing. Two other modules involve gaining the theoretical and technical skills necessary to become proficient in the management and analysis of spatial data. A fifth module involves an assessed work placement during the summer months. Modules include work placement, theoretical remote sensing, digital image processing and advanced remote sensing, introductory GIS systems and science and GIS in practice with optional programming, spatial databases and geophysics modules.

Career Options

The MSc in GIS and Remote Sensing is first and foremost a course to skill students for work in a wide range of employment areas. These include a wide range of government and semi-state agencies, local authorities and the voluntary sector, especially in areas associated with the environment and planning. In addition, graduates have worked in a wide range of private sector organisations and businesses, where the ability to work with and critically managed big spatial data is increasingly valued. Successful students have also proceeded to PhD level research and gained employment in academia.

How To Apply

Online application only http://www.pac.ie/maynoothuniversity

PAC Code
MHN58
The following information should be forwarded to PAC, 1 Courthouse Square, Galway or uploaded to your online application form:

Certified copies of all official transcripts of results for all non-Maynooth University qualifications listed MUST accompany the application. Failure to do so will delay your application being processed. Non-Maynooth University students are asked to provide two academic references and a copy of birth certificate or valid passport.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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This MA gives practitioners and theorists the opportunity to research and develop the new boundaries of image-making made possible by technological change within the context of post-industrial culture. Read more

This MA gives practitioners and theorists the opportunity to research and develop the new boundaries of image-making made possible by technological change within the context of post-industrial culture.

This programme joins theory and practice, equipping you to develop and achieve highly effectively in the new image media culture. Practice uses both digital and analogue technology, still and durational as well as the study and production of interactivity.

The programme allows for specialisation in photography and/or electronic arts – which, in addition to still photography, can include interactive, durational and internet work – but encompasses a broader interpretation of practice.

You'll look at the meaning, production and distribution of images, and the relationship between theory and practice in the context of debates about post-modernism and beyond.

You also participate in enabling sessions in photography:

  • medium/large format cameras
  • portable and studio lighting technologies and their use
  • film technology
  • cinematography
  • digital imaging
  • output systems and processes

and/or in electronic arts:

  • computer and video graphics
  • post-production
  • computer-aided design
  • digital publishing
  • animation
  • animatics
  • 2D and 3D computer animation
  • still and durational image production and manipulation
  • web construction
  • interactivity

There is an MRes which follows the MA into a second year, in order to develop your work/voice. This will count as the first year of a PhD. Find out more about the MRes.

Modules & structure

This programme uniquely joins theory and practice in a way that will equip you with the tools and the vision to develop and achieve highly effectively in the new image media culture. Practice uses both digital and analogue technology, still and durational as well as the study and production of interactivity. 

You will study

  • Photography: Durational & Still; Analogue & Digital
  • Electronic Imagery: Motion & Still
  • Visualisation: Stand-alone & Interactive

The programme draws on a broad range of cultural references and technical practices. It offers the opportunity to take stock of evolving practices and developments in image media culture, and is structured to develop the intellectual imagination within each individual student. This is achieved through a combined study of practice and theory, with extensive instruction through ‘enabling sessions’ which engage technical familiarity; core tutorials; secondary tutorials; Issues in Media and Culture and additional theory course options.

Recognising the rapidly changing definitions and context of these practice areas,and the value/positioning of traditional practices, these categories may also be understood through a variety of practices which involve image construction and presentation both still and durational, including: film/video, animation, interactivity, installations, motion graphics, and hyperspace constructs, as well as evolving new exploratory categories.

The programme provides an opportunity to develop and/or research aspects of visual style, and draw on a broad range of cultural references as well as aesthetic and technical approaches engaged through ‘Practice Theory Sessions’, visiting lectures and the Issues in Media and Culture course. Fundamental to the programme is the space that it creates to make it possible for you to explore, question, change and consolidate your work and your ideas.

Assessment

Original portfolio submission; coursework and essays.

Learning & teaching

Tutorials

This course is interested in the development of the individual voice. To this end, there are two types of tutorial:

  • Core tutorials - which deal with overall development
  • Secondary tutorials - these are tutorials for each specific area of photographic media

Skills

You'll develop specific practice skills to a high level, and the articulation/understanding of the pleasures of media consumption.

Careers

Graduates from the programme are extremely successful, with finalists working commercially, developing as artists or continuing to enlarge their academic knowledge. During the course particular attention is given to the development of the individual voice. This, plus students' exposure to a range of technologies, means that our graduates can step into the arena of their choice, or sometimes of their making.

Here are just some examples of the sorts of careers graduates have gone onto:

  • Art Director
  • Artist
  • Animator
  • Senior Interactive Designer
  • Head of Creative Department
  • Head Technical Creative, Experimental Film and Dance
  • Commercial Photography (fashion, editorial, photobooks, social, advertising)
  • Director (commercial narrative)
  • Director Of Photography
  • Installation Artist
  • Interactive Artist
  • Producer
  • Curator

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths



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This programme draws together teaching from a wide range of disciplines, investigating the application of computational technologies to the arts, humanities and cultural heritage. Read more

This programme draws together teaching from a wide range of disciplines, investigating the application of computational technologies to the arts, humanities and cultural heritage. We study the impact of these techniques on cultural heritage, museums, libraries, archives and digital culture while developing skills that employers and students tell us are needed.

About this degree

Our students develop an advanced understanding of digital resources, techniques and computational methods relevant to research and practice in the humanities and cultural heritage sectors; these include programming, XML, databases, internet technologies, image capture and digitisation. They receive both practical and theoretical training to develop a unique and critical skill set suitable for many types of employment or advanced study.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of five core modules (75 credits), three optional modules (45 credits), a research dissertation (60 credits) and a work placement.

A Postgraduate Diploma, five core modules (75 credits), three optional modules (45 credits), full-time nine months or flexible study up to 5 years, is offered.

A Postgraduate Certificate, four from any of the available modules (60 credits), full-time fifteen weeks or flexible study up to two years, is offered.

Core modules

  • Digital Resources in the Humanities
  • Internet Technologies
  • Introduction to Programming and Scripting
  • Server Programming and Structured Data
  • XML

Optional modules

Students choose three optional modules from a list which may include the following: 

  • Affective Interaction
  • Computer Music
  • Cultural Heritage and Development
  • Early Modern Handwriting and Manuscript Culture for Researchers
  • Electronic Publishing
  • Fundamentals of Information Science
  • Geographical Information Systems
  • Historical Bibliography
  • Interaction Design
  • Systems Management
  • Introduction to Digital Curation
  • Introduction to Digitisation
  • Knowledge Representation and Semantic Technologies
  • Legal and Social Aspects of Electronic Publishing
  • Manuscript Studies
  • Research Software Engineering with Python
  • Research Skills for Spatial Analysis
  • Systems Management
  • The Anthropology of Social Media
  • User-centred Evaluation Methods

Optional modules are offered subject to availability, and students may be required to fulfil specific prerequisites.

Dissertation/report

All MA/MSc students undertake an independent research project in the form of a 12,000-word dissertation.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, demonstrations, seminars and practical sessions, and will include a work placement in a relevant organisation. Assessment is through a mixture of essays, practical projects, programming exercises, written technical examinations, and group work projects, depending on the options chosen.

Placement

Students undertake a 4-6 week work placement as part of their programme of study. Past placement hosts have included the British Museum; British Library; Marx Memorial Library; Islington Museum; the Postal Museum; Ken Saro-Wiwa Foundation; Ubiquity Press; SOAS, University of London; UCL Grant Museum; and The Warburg Institute.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Digital Humanities MA/MSc

Careers

The cultural heritage sector is increasingly aware of the need to provide and manage digital material and projects with institutions and museums investing heavily in online content. Our graduates develop a unique skill set and are well placed for project management, further research, or a career in e-commerce and the fast growing digital field. Our alumni have found employment in the British Museum, Oxford University, UNESCO, International Red Cross, Knowledge 4 All Foundation, and the British Medical Journal, in roles as diverse as web editor, chief operating officer, and senior digital marketing executive. Several have also progressed to fully-funded research degrees; others have further developed their technical skills and have been recruited as programmers and developers for both academic and commercial projects.

Employability

The MA/MSc in Digital Humanities is a unique and groundbreaking programme that gives students the skills that they and employers tell us are needed. In this truly interdisciplinary programme, with optional modules offered across UCL, our students receive an exceptional blend of practical and theoretical skills that are in great demand. The work placement gives our students the opportunity to put theory into practice and gain invaluable experience of the workplace in this fast-moving environment. As well as the practical and technical skills of programming and other digital tools, they are equipped with a critical and analytical mindset and are well positioned to go on to pursue careers that focus on collaborative, innovative and creative thinking.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This MA/MSc is a truly interdisciplinary programme, and students can capitalise on UCL's world-leading strengths in information studies, computer science, the arts and humanities, and social and historical studies.

Students benefit from research teaching delivered by leading scholars and the excellent range of facilities available, including the UCL Library Special Collections, UCL Museums & Collections, and the UCLDH Digitisation Suite. Teaching by academic staff is supplemented by guest lectures given by experienced practitioners and expert industry professionals.

Students take advantage of our collaboration with many internationally important cultural heritage institutions including the British Museum and the British Library. Students undertake a work placement, where they have the opportunity to make professional contacts and gain invaluable experience, putting what they have learnt into practice. Past placement hosts have included the British Museum; British Library; Marx Memorial Library; Islington Museum; the Postal Museum; Ken Saro-Wiwa Foundation; Ubiquity Press; SOAS, University of London; UCL Grant Museum; and The Warburg Institute.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Information Studies

68% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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The MSc in Digital Signal and Image Processing has been developed to deliver qualified engineers of the highest standard into the emerging field of digital signal and image processing who are capable of contributing significantly to this increased demand for both real-time and off-line systems operating over a range of mobile, embedded and workstation platforms. Read more
The MSc in Digital Signal and Image Processing has been developed to deliver qualified engineers of the highest standard into the emerging field of digital signal and image processing who are capable of contributing significantly to this increased demand for both real-time and off-line systems operating over a range of mobile, embedded and workstation platforms. The DSIP option of the MSc in Computational and Software Techniques in Engineering aims to develop your skill-base for the rapidly expanding engineering IT industry sector, not only in the UK but all over the world. Graduates in this option have the opportunity to pursue a wide range of careers embracing telecommunications, the automotive industry, medical imaging, software houses and industrial research where demand for skills is high.

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The Football Digital Marketing & Social Media Online Course is an eight-week online course designed to provide candidates with the skills required to work in the football industry in the areas of digital marketing, social media, CRM, business intelligence, online brand management and communications. Read more

GENERAL OVERVIEW

The Football Digital Marketing & Social Media Online Course is an eight-week online course designed to provide candidates with the skills required to work in the football industry in the areas of digital marketing, social media, CRM, business intelligence, online brand management and communications.

COURSE CONTENT

The Football Digital Marketing & Social Media Online Course consists of the following modules:

Module 1 - The digital revolution in the football industry – how football clubs are embracing new ways of engaging with consumers

Module 2 – The power and influence of social media in emerging football markets – reaching a new fan base beyond your borders

Module 3 – Athletes and social media as a communication tool - best practices to communicate and market personal image of football players through social media properties

Module 4 – New media strategy at governing bodies and major international tournaments – building a strong social media presence at international events and competitions

Module 5 – Fan Engagement and data analytics– business intelligence, CRM, data extraction and contextualization. Includes information on emerging platforms including Periscope, Snapchat.

Module 6 – Creating web content that sells and engages – how football clubs sell through various new media outlets to different markets in the digital era

Module 7 – Sports journalism in the digital era – blogging, website reporting and digital media

Module 8 – Social media and global brands – marketing non-sports products through football and social media

*All modules are taught in English.

METHODOLOGY

We have developed an integral learning system consisting of live weekly web conferences with industry professionals and like-minded peers, complemented with an interactive online platform designed to develop the skills through football-specific case studies, practical course work and a multicultural learning environment. Our approach to learning consists of the following structure:

1. Individual Preparation – reading of cases, articles and technical notes from the interactive online platform

2. Group Discussion – interactive discussions via email, forums and social networks with classmates

3. Weekly Web Conference session led by industry professional – sharing of professional experiences, best practices, lessons learned and conclusions drawn from each session

4. Implementation & evaluation – students are evaluated through hands-on assignments and interactive online tests

CAREER PATHS

• Digital business professionals at football clubs and federations

• Corporate communications roles in the sports industry

• Business Intelligence & CRM Analysts in football clubs, federations, and brands

• Community Managers and Digital media professionals in football

• Corporate marketing and sports blogging

• Sports journalism in all its branches: television, radio, internet and newsprint

- See more at: http://bit.ly/18O0CAy

COURSE INCLUDES:

• Live weekly sessions with industry professionals via web conference
• Access to online campus with football case studies, articles & interactive forums
• Pedagogical support via email with SBI´s faculty
• All students form part of SBI alumni that are notified of any vacancies and internships with our collaborating partners
• Academic certificate of completion

APPLICATION PROCESS

!. Go to http://www.sbibarcelona.com
2. Click on the Football Communication & Social Media Online Program
3. Go to Apply Now. Send us your information
4. Secure your spot via PayPal, credit card or bank transfer. Limited Spaces available!

Email us at [email protected] for a copy of the program prospectus. Also, follow us on Twitter @SBI_Barcelona and Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/SportsBusinessInstituteBarcelona) for our latest news and information.

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