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Masters Degrees (Digital History)

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Would you like to participate in a dynamic and flexible course that can be tailored to meet your own individual interests and career aspirations?. Read more
Would you like to participate in a dynamic and flexible course that can be tailored to meet your own individual interests and career aspirations?

The MA History course consists of broad, thematic taught modules that focus on the middle ages through to present day.

Offering an extremely flexible approach to study, this course incorporates three core modules - historical contexts, digital history and dissertation preparation - which you will study alongside two modules of your own choice, in subjects such as American history, British history, European history and early modern history.

In addition to the taught modules of this course you will also complete a dissertation that will be conducted under the careful guidance of our specialist academics.

Throughout your studies you will have access to our leading learning facilities and new Institute for the Humanities.

Northumbria has just launched its first MOOC (Massive Online Open Course) exploring the fascinating history and culture of the American South from colonial times to the 21st century.

Experience for free Northumbria's excellence in teaching and research with the University's Institute of Humanities, all from your own home.

This course has several available study methods - for more information, please view the relevant web-page:
2 years part time: https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/history-dtphtr6/

1-2 years full time distance learning: https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/history-ma-ft-dl-dtdhtr6/

2 years part time distance learning: https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/history-dtdhty6/

Learn From The Best

Throughout your studies you will benefit from working with our team of specialist academics who were recently ranked in the UK’s top 20 for the quality of their history publications (REF 2014).

Our academics are not only teaching their specialist subjects but also writing textbooks and adding new knowledge and perspectives to our understanding of the past.

When undertaking your dissertation you will be assigned a dedicated supervisor with specialist knowledge of your chosen subject area. They will guide you through your project with the help of our team of support staff.

Boasting doctorates, awards and extensive academic knowledge in their particular specialism, you can rest assured you are learning from the best.

Teaching And Assessment

The MA History course offers a programme of study that will empower you to problematise the past, set your own field of enquiry and test your ability to manage a yearlong project.

This course is primarily delivered via a classroom setting, with regular face-to-face supervision. This course can also be undertaken as a distance-learning course through a Virtual Learning Environment (VLR).

The assessment methods employed on this course include historical and historiographical essays, oral and written presentations, critical reviews and portfolios of work.

Your dissertation will form a large part of the assessment process and will be overseen by a supervisor who specialises in your subject area.

Module Overview
EF0126 - E.S.A.P. in FADSS Level 7 (Optional, 0 Credits)
HI7001 - Historical Contexts (Core, 30 Credits)
HI7004 - War and Peace in Historical Perspective (Core, 30 Credits)
HI7005 - Digital History and Research Methods (Core, 30 Credits)
HI7007 - The British Empire and its Imperial Rivals (Core, 30 Credits)
HI7010 - History Dissertation (Core, 60 Credits)

Learning Environment

Throughout the duration of your course you will have access to state-of-the-art facilities to support your learning experience.

Further facilities are available at the Institute for the Humanities, a special research space in the University’s Lipman Building. These include a resource room, specialist computing equipment and interview rooms. You will also have access to a designated Humanities Student Hub, providing space for self-study, group work or a rest in between teaching sessions.

You will receive support at every step of your learning journey through our on-campus facilities and innovative e-Learning Portal, Blackboard, which will allow you to access electronic versions of your course’s supporting documentation.

We provide a supportive and informal learning environment, offering feedback at all key stages of your course.

Research-Rich Learning

The MA History course is centred around research-rich learning and delivery.

Delivered by our team of renowned academics, you will be learning from research-active experts who boast specialisms in all aspects of history including the British co-operative movement, eighteenth and nineteenth century British political and imperial history, the British empire and modern Irish political history.

Many staff are qualified to professorial level and engaged in collaborative research projects, which are often part of national or international research networks.

More than three quarters of Northumbria University’s History department’s research outputs are rated as being world-leading or internationally excellent, placing us in the upper quartile for history research in the UK. We have also been ranked among the top 20 universities in the UK for research power in History, according to the 2014 Research Excellence Framework.

Give Your Career An Edge

On completion of this course you will possess expert research skills thanks to your ability to collect, sift through and organise historical data. You will also be able to confidently use state-of-the-art digital researching tools.

Employability skills are embedded throughout all aspects of this course and, on completion, you will possess a range of attributes that are highly valued in today’s competitive job market. These skills include effective workload management, IT, problem solving, communication, teamwork and self-motivation.

Your Future

Your previous qualifications and the specialist nature of this course will provide a strong foundation for your future work or study.

The MA History course has been designed to form the basis for those wishing to progress to PhD level and we offer advice in writing PhD and funding applications should you decide to take this route.

The broad range of skills and knowledge acquired on this course can help to enhance promotion prospects in many professions, most notably teaching, professional research, museums or archives, public policy and project management. It should also enhance your prospects of employment should you wish to move into such vocations.

You will also leave prepared for a career as a researcher or employment within a broader business environment.

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History is practised everywhere. by governments, private corporations, universities, museums and galleries, in the tourism and heritage industries, on television programmes and in newspaper columns, and through local history societies, community development projects, and genealogical associations. Read more
History is practised everywhere: by governments, private corporations, universities, museums and galleries, in the tourism and heritage industries, on television programmes and in newspaper columns, and through local history societies, community development projects, and genealogical associations. History and historians play important roles at the level of the both the nation and the neighbourhood, contributing to public debates, policy decisions and popular education and entertainment.

Public history is concerned with the practice of history outside of academia in all its myriad forms and public historians come in all shapes and sizes: they are consultants, museum professionals, archivists, preservationists and curators, cultural resource managers, policy specialists, and community activists, among many other roles. What they share is a commitment to making history relevant, beneficial, informative and instructive within the public sphere. The practice and significance of ‘public history’ has grown significantly in recent years, as historians become more aware of audiences beyond the academy, of the role of history in politics, of the need for their research and analysis to have an impact in the real world, and of the growing public and media interest in popular history and heritage.

This MA will introduce you to key aspects and issues of the practice of public history. It will provide you with the necessary theoretical and practical skills to undertake critical assessments of public history projects and interventions - as well as to create your own. Its focus on public history in practice will provide you with a wide range of examples of different types and methods of public history, from museums and material culture, to public history in the media, to the role of history in policy making. This MA aims to give you a sense of the wide range of public history, the variety of roles played by historians in public, and the importance and impact of public history in politics, culture, and society.

The compulsory modules will introduce you to the systematic study of historiography, the methodologies used in the analysis and interpretation of historical source material, and the contemporary practice of public history. You can explore the enormous breadth of research interests in the Department via the 2 option modules you choose, which are drawn across disciplines including archaeology, classics, the history of art and museology. Finally, the dissertation gives you the chance to pursue your own interests and undertake your own research and critical thinking under the supervision of a member of staff with relevant expertise.

The MA Public Histories provides relevant training for careers in media, education, museums and heritage, publishing, and policy, and it also provides rigorous training in the historical discipline suitable to prepare you for further personal or professional research, or research at MPhil/PhD level.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.
Many Birkbeck historians take very active public roles as policy consultants, columnists in newspapers, editors of digital history websites, and leaders in community history projects. Students on the MA Public Histories will be given the opportunity to benefit from their expertise.
Tutors and potential dissertation supervisors on the course could include Dr. Julia Laite, whose work focuses on aspects of women's history and policy and who is an expert in history online; Professor Matt Cook, who works extensively in community history, oral history and queer history and is a Director of the Samuel Raphael History Centre; Professor David Feldman, who has worked extensively in history and policy related to migration and minorities and is Director of the Pears Institute for the Study of Antisemitism; Professor Orlando Figes, an expert in oral history and the history of nineteenth- and twentieth-century Russia; and Dr. Fiona Candlin, an expert in museum studies, whose work focuses on small museums and public heritage.
MA Public Histories will be taught in Bloomsbury, at the heart of academic London, which contains one of the world's greatest concentrations of first-class library facilities, archives, museums, and heritage and public history organisations.
Our Department of History, Classics and Archaeology is one of the leading research and teaching departments for history in the UK. It is ranked 6th in the UK for the percentage of our research deemed world-leading or internationally excellent.
Our academic staff are international authorities in their fields, delivering stimulating, research-led teaching.
Our Department is home to thriving student societies and a number of affiliated research centres that actively run seminars, conferences and other events where some of the world's best scholars present their latest research. These include the Pears Institute for the Study of Antisemitism, the Raphael Samuel History Centre and the Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities.
We are located 5 minutes' walk from the British Museum and the British Library, while the Museum of London is easily reachable. The Institute of Historical Research is located in Bloomsbury, near the main Birkbeck campus, and has an internationally renowned library collection and seminars that you can attend.
Birkbeck Library has an extensive history collection, including the major specialist journals, and access to online materials.

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Are you keen to learn from widely published academics who are recognised as thought-leaders in their areas of specialism?. Read more
Are you keen to learn from widely published academics who are recognised as thought-leaders in their areas of specialism?

The History MRes course incorporates taught modules that explore key subjects such as historical contexts and digital history, whilst examining the critical and theoretical practices that are fundamental to research. In addition to core modules, you are able to tailor your learning to your own areas of interest and career aspirations.

To demonstrate your understanding and skills you will undertake an in-depth dissertation project under the guidance of our teaching team. You will also have the unique opportunity to organise your own one-day research conference, offering you and an opportunity to share your work with staff and students within a supportive environment.

Northumbria University’s Humanities department boasts strong links with a range of cultural partners and we aim to provide you with direct industry exposure and live project opportunities throughout the duration of your course.

You will learn in state-of-the-art facilities, including our new Institute for the Humanities.

Northumbria has just launched its first MOOC (Massive Online Open Course) exploring the fascinating history and culture of the American South from colonial times to the 21st century.

Experience for free Northumbria's excellence in teaching and research with the University's Institute of Humanities, all from your own home.

This course can also be taken part time - for more information, please view this web-page: https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/history-dtphtr7/

Learn From The Best

Our History department’s teaching team is made up of a large number of experts, each with their own specialist area of interest, and throughout the duration of this course you will have unprecedented access to their knowledge and expertise.

When undertaking your dissertation you will be assigned a dedicated supervisor with specialist knowledge of your chosen subject area. They will guide you through your project with the help of our team of support staff.

Our academics are not only teaching their specialist subjects but also writing textbooks and adding new knowledge and perspectives to our understanding of the past. Boasting doctorates and extensive academic knowledge in their particular specialism, you can rest assured you are learning from the best.

Teaching And Assessment

The History MRes course allows you to embark on a closely supervised research project, whilst participating in taught modules that will further your knowledge and understanding of this subject.

With a key focus on research, you will acquire generic research skills that are applicable not just to history, but a broad range of other subjects.

The taught aspect of this course will be primarily delivered by group seminars, which will be assessed via a mix of oral and written presentations, critical reviews and portfolios of work.

Your dissertation will form a large part of the assessment process and learning will be delivered by one-to-one tutorials with an expert supervisor.

In addition to the mandatory modules of this course, you will have the option to choose a pathway subject and two discipline-specific modules to allow your learning to be focused around your own areas of interest.

Module Overview
EF0126 - E.S.A.P. in FADSS Level 7 (Optional, 0 Credits)
EL7028 - MRes Dissertation (Core, 90 Credits)
HI7001 - Historical Contexts (Core, 30 Credits)
HI7005 - Digital History and Research Methods (Core, 30 Credits)
HI7011 - Research Development (Core, 30 Credits)

Learning Environment

Throughout the duration of your course you will have access to state-of-the-art facilities to support your learning experience.

Further facilities are available at the Institute for the Humanities, a special research space in the University’s Lipman Building. These include a resource room, specialist computing equipment and interview rooms. You will also have access to a designated Humanities Student Hub, providing space for self-study, group work or a rest in between teaching sessions.

You will receive support at every step of your learning journey through our on-campus facilities and innovative e-Learning Portal, Blackboard, which will allow you to access electronic versions of your course’s supporting documentation.

We provide a supportive and informal learning environment, offering feedback at all key stages of your course.

Research-Rich Learning

The History MRes course is centred around research-rich learning and delivery.

Delivered by our team of renowned academics, you will be learning from research-active experts who boast specialisms in all aspects of history.

Our staff are actively involved in research, often through funded projects and awards, and participate in a diverse range of research groups within the department. Several staff members are also engaged in collaborative research projects, many of which are part of national or international research networks.

Northumbria is ranked among the top 20 universities in the UK for research power in history, according to the 2014 Research Excellence Framework. Our academics were also recently ranked in the UK’s top 20 for the quality of their history publications (REF 2014).

Give Your Career An Edge

On completion of this course you will possess a broad understanding of research methods and contemporary digital literacies, in addition to expert professional skills in communication, self-management, and project planning.

In-line with the UK Research Council’s training requirements for research students, you will leave equipped with the necessary skills to progress to the next level of your career.

Throughout the duration of your course you will be encouraged to build relationships and experience with cultural partners such as New Writing North, the co-operative movement, Tyne and Wear Archives and Museums, and Handy Hall to further enhance your career edge.

Your Future

Your previous qualifications and the specialist nature of this course will provide a strong foundation for your future work and study.

The History MRes course has been designed to form the basis for those wishing to progress to PhD level and we offer advice in writing PhD and funding applications should you decide to take this route.

Northumbria is part of the UK’s only Centre for Doctoral Training (CDT) in Heritage, led by Hull and consisting of a consortium of universities in the North of England.

The broad range of skills and knowledge acquired on this course can help to enhance promotion prospects in many professions, most notably teaching, professional research, museums or archives, public policy and project management. It should also enhance your prospects of employment should you wish to move into such vocations.

You will also leave prepared for a career as a researcher or employment within a broader business environment.

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Whether you’re interested in the making of the modern world or witchcraft through the ages, at Essex we give you the freedom to explore the history that excites you. Read more
Whether you’re interested in the making of the modern world or witchcraft through the ages, at Essex we give you the freedom to explore the history that excites you. Our geographic spread, topic diversity and social reach give you an unrivalled opportunity to pursue your historical passions and discover new ones.

Our MA History is rigorous, flexible and wide-ranging, so that you can to choose the modules and thesis topic which best suit your interests.

Alongside four optional modules which enable you to explore the latest in historical research in our specialist areas, you also study a practical module in research techniques, and write a 20,000-word dissertation on a topic of your choice.

Historical research at Essex concentrates on the period from 1500 to the present, and covers a wide geographical area that includes British and European history, as well as Latin America, the USA, China, Russia and Africa.

Our Department of History has developed a strong research and teaching profile, with the majority of our research rated as ‘world leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ (REF 2014). We provide you with opportunities to explore local history, and have strong links with the Essex Record Office, one of the best county record offices in the UK.

Alternatively you can focus your study on a more specific area by following one of the following pathways:

Public History Pathway
Further your understanding of, and expertise in, a variety of public history contexts, ranging from museums and documentary films to conflict resolution and computer games.

This pathway makes the most of our status as an institution at the cutting edge of communicating history to the general public, and will involve classes led by scholars who are currently involved in documentary, heritage, oral history and school curriculum projects.

You will be given the opportunity to create, participate in, and/or critique a current piece of public history as part of your coursework assessment on the Public History Workshop module, and your dissertation will demonstrate an engagement with the methods and/or theories of public history, analyse an example of public history, or be an example of public history.

Cultural and Social History Pathway

Explore the varied ways in which understandings of the relationship between evidence and interpretation, language and the material world, economies and identities, have been challenged and changed by the ‘cultural turn’.

This pathway offers you modules which deal with a range of areas, themes and periods, placing you at the cutting-edge of historical thought on issues such as gender, race, class, consumption, modernity, mentalities and identities.

Local and Regional History Pathway
Local (or micro) history, as well as community and family studies, has played an increasingly important part in the development of historical analysis.

We reflect on these developments, drawing on the rich national and comparative literature in these fields, with a primary focus on the period from 1800 to the 20th century.

You also design and conduct a substantial independent study on a chosen historical topic or in the field of local, community or family history.

Our expert staff

Our staff are among world leaders in their field, and our enthusiasm for our subject is infectious. Our flexible course is combined with a supportive structure which helps you to pursue the modules best-suited to your interests.

We take the time to get to know you as an individual, welcome you into our scholarly community, and value your views.

Specialist facilities

-We have several Special Collections in history, including the Essex Society for Archaeology and History Library, the Harsnett Collection, the Hervey Benham Oral History Sound Archive, the Bensusan Collection, and the Colchester Medical Society Library
-Access the UK Data Archive, a national service provider digital resources for historians, which is particularly strong in 19th and 20th-century economic and social history
-Attend an exciting programme of events
-Access a variety of textbooks and journals in our Albert Sloman Library which houses materials on Latin America, Russia and the US that are of national significance

Your future

We have excellent links with the research community, both in the UK and worldwide, so many of our students have gone on to teach in higher education institutions. Others have found employment in archives, research, managing research funds, other forms of educational provision, the Civil Service, the National Health Service, and management.

Within our Department of History, we offer supervision for PhD, MPhil and MA by Dissertation. Themes of particular research interest include:
-Class, race and gender formation
-Nationalism
-Wars and revolutions
-International relations and oil diplomacy
-The history of medicine
-The history of crime
-Popular culture and consumption
-Slave societies
-The history of ideas and print culture
-The history of the Roma and Sinti in Europe
-Historical censuses and surveys

Our University is one of only 11 AHRC-accredited Doctoral Training Centres in the UK. This means that we offer funded PhD studentships which also provide a range of research and training opportunities.

We also work with our Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-Dissertation
-Research Methods in History
-Race and Class in the United States, South Africa and Britain: Select Topics (optional)
-Illness and Culture in 18th-And 19th-Century Europe (optional)
-The Public History Workshop (optional)
-Gender in Early Modern Europe c.1500- c.1800 (optional)
-Approaches to Cultural and Social History (optional)
-A Global History of Food, c.1400 - c.1750 (optional)
-The Making of Consumer Culture: Britain 1780-1960 (optional)
-Narcotic Culture: A History of Drugs (From the Sixteenth to the Twenty First Century) (optional)
-Decency and Disorder: Institutions in Essex 1700-1900
-The Patterns of Victorian Life: Reconstructing Nineteenth-Century Communities (optional)
-The Uses of Space in Early Modern History (optional)

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What is the Master of Digital Humanities all about?. The Master of Science in Digital Humanities helps graduates from . Read more

What is the Master of Digital Humanities all about?

The Master of Science in Digital Humanities helps graduates from Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences programmes to develop digital competencies that will allow them to add digital dimensions to their own domain expertise. It aims to explicitly link these competencies to research questions, case studies and applications related to the domain expertise of the students.

Graduates of this programme will be able to bring their own domain expertise to a significantly higher level of functionality, using digital tools and techniques. Building both on the expertise they obtained from the programme and their prior expertise in Humanities, Social or Behavioral Sciences, graduates will be well placed to open many new digital applications to a much wider community. Moreover, those who wish to move to a professional profile involving more advanced digital competencies, are well prepared to do so.

Structure

The programme is organized around a number of clusters of course units. The central clusters are the Application Domains cluster and the Tools for the Digital World cluster. Supporting clusters are the Introductory Digitization Components cluster, the Advanced Digitization Components cluster and the Management Component. The heart of the research activities is situated in the Master’s thesis.

International and multidisciplinary

The Master’s Programme is conceived as a one year, international and multidisciplinary advanced master programme (master-after-master). The programme is unique in Flanders and one of only a few in Europe. The programme is firmly framed in an explicit collaboration between the Faculty of Arts, the Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, the Faculty of Social Sciences and the Faculty of Sciences - Department of Computer Science. As such, it is supported by experts in Digital Humanities applications, who supply research expertise for the programme, as well as by experts in digital techniques and tools, who provide a sound technical basis for the students.

Objectives

Digitization affects in many ways how future scientists in Humanities and Behavioural Sciences will conduct their research. Also, graduates from Humanities and Behavioural Sciences programs enter a professional world in which digitization becomes the standard, be it in publishing, arts, libraries, teaching and many others.

The Master of Science in Digital Humanities program aims to prepare graduates from Humanities and Behavioural Sciences programs for these challenges. It aims to help such graduates to develop digital competencies that will allow them to add digital dimensions to their own domain expertise. It aims to explicitly link this knowledge and these competencies to case studies and applications related to the domain expertise of the students. It will train them to master information structures and functionalities of data, programming structures and technique to produce scripts for digital applications, tools for improving access and interactive use of data and the development of new digital applications. It will train them how to manage projects related to digitization and introduce them to emerging new digital technologies and their applications.

As an advanced master program (master-after master), it is assumed that the students entering this program have already achieved the general academic competencies defined for any master's program. Nevertheless, it is also within the aims of the program to further strengthen these competencies, within the specific context that Digital Humanities offers.

More specifically, graduates understand the basics of Digital Humanities, databases and query languages, scripting languages, the role of IT in management and of some of the emerging technologies in Digital Humanities. They are able to formulate research goals, determine trajectories that achieve these goals, collect and select information relevant to achieve the research goals and interpret collected information on the basis of a critical research attitude. They are able to communicate scientifically. They are able to model a database and use SQL, to use a scripting language, to apply tools for Digital Humanities and to study applications in Digital Humanities. They have the attitudes of valuing and fostering creative, critical and independent thinking, of applying an interdisciplinary and participative approach in innovative development and of striving towards opening the digital world to a broader society.

Career perspectives

Academically, researchers in the Humanities, Social or Behavioral Science are confronted with the need to apply digital tools to facilitate and enhance their research. The program enables graduates to enhance their research in the Humanities, Social or Behavioral Sciences through non-trivial uses of digital tools and techniques. This may include modeling and querying databases, accessing data, interconnecting andquerying web resources, extending tools with scripts to provide extra functionality, text-encoding and e-publishing, mining repositories, data visualization, analyzing social networks, adopting, adapting and enhancing e-learning environments, improvingusability of human-computer interaction. As such, graduates are very well placed to take on the challenges that novel research positions require.

Professionally, graduates of the Humanities, Social of Behavioral Sciences enter professional environments where connecting the company’s business with digital tools and techniques has become standard. Here as well, the program enables its graduates to put to use non-trivial digital techniques in their professional occupations, including e-media, publishing, arts, history, culture, music, libraries, e-education or interactions for end-user applications. Thus, graduates who want to pursue a career in the usual sectors for graduates of the Humanities, Social or Behavioral Sciences will be much better prepared to cope with the digital techniques that are currently applied there.

More generally, graduates of this program provide society with professionals and researchers who are able to bring their own domain expertise to a higher level of functionality, using digital tools and techniques. Building both on the expertise they obtained from the program and their prior expertise in Humanities, Social or Behavioral Sciences, are well placed to take part in opening the digital world to a larger community.

Graduates of this program who wish to move to a job profile involving more advanced digital competencies, are prepared to do so and will help to close to gap in an IT-focused labor market. This will require extra training at the company and aims at positions such as project analysts, project managers, service managers.



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Over the past few years, career opportunities in the digital media sector have increased dramatically. The interactive media industry is reaching maturity and needs qualified professionals able to offer a diverse range of expertise. Read more
Over the past few years, career opportunities in the digital media sector have increased dramatically. The interactive media industry is reaching maturity and needs qualified professionals able to offer a diverse range of expertise. This course addresses those needs and is designed to provide you with skills in interactive media content creation, interactive design, digital media production,social media management, digital media project and account management. In the most recent (2014-15) Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 100% of graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

More about this course

This professionally-oriented course will appeal to graduates with an interest in digital media, experienced professionals from the design, media, public relations and marketing sector wishing to retrain for a career change or promotion, and those wishing to progress towards research and PhD studies. The Masters in Digital Media addresses issues in interactive design, interactive media, the internet and its applications, digital solutions for the industry and the public sector, usability design, effective digital media project management, digital audiences and audience research, social media management, digital media strategy, digital interactive television, mobile communications, and new media ownership. The course will provide skills in the relevant multimedia software.

You will learn how to:
-Assess and select the appropriate tools to produce a digital media project
-Produce digital media projects using the appropriate software applications
-Research and analyse the current issues and future developments in digital media, social media, media communications and e-solutions
-Manage digital media projects and production teams
-Produce digital media and social media strategies
-Appreciate the complexity of the international digital media and creative industries and communicate effectively in a media professional environment
-Apply research, design and management skills to the production of new media projects

Assessment methods include interactive projects, design portfolios, presentations, essays, examinations and reports.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Digital Media Project Management (core, 20 credits)
-Principles of Digital Media (core, 20 credits)
-Digital Media Dissertation (alternative core, 60 credits)
-Digital Project (alternative core, 60 credits)
-Accredited Work-Based Learning in the School of MCC (option, 20 credits)
-Advanced English for Masters Studies (option, 20 credits)
-Digital Media Strategy and Consultancy (option, 20 credits)
-Digital Storytelling (option, 20 credits)
-Digital Video Production (option, 20 credits)
-Globalisation (option, 20 credits)
-Interaction Design (option, 20 credits)
-Multimedia Journalism (option, 20 credits)
-Web Design (option, 20 credits)

After the course

The course is particularly suited to students looking to work in: web design; UX design, interactive media production; digital video production; new media project management and account handling; consultancy and policy advice in the area of digital media and communication technology; social media management; digital media strategy, training and research in related fields; electronic publishing; online journalism and broadcasting; administration, management and research in digital media, digital advertising and marketing and digital information industries.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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This course looks at the creation, management, curation and repurposing of digital media and digital assets. Read more

This course looks at the creation, management, curation and repurposing of digital media and digital assets.

As the digital aspects of content industries, the cultural heritage sector and the private sector are reaching maturity, career opportunities have mushroomed worldwide for professionals, who are familiar with digital media and have the skills to manage digital content throughout its lifecycle.

Key benefits

  • We draw on a wide range of expertise, offering insights into curatorial and archival practices of dealing with digital assets as well as into technologies and wider socioeconomic questions such as rights and project management.
  • The course tutors offer unrivalled expertise in technologies and processes that allow the quick and efficient storage, retrieval and reuse of digital assets. They come from a diverse and highly interdisciplinary background, having run digital archives or worked in the digital industries in the past.
  • Through the optional internship module students can have direct access to some of the world’s most important culture and media institutions.
  • Close links and regular speakers from the content sector give students insights and up-to-the-minute knowledge of the subject area.

Description

Our Digital Asset & Media Management MA takes a comparative and interdisciplinary approach, allowing you to explore and critically assess competing theories and practices from across new media digital management, archival, and information science. This will provide you with a well-rounded understanding of the requirements across many domains. In recent years there has been an explosion in the volume, complexity and range of digital content in a variety of media. This has been called the big data revolution and is closely connected to the increasing interest in the digital economy as an engine of growth.

There are very few institutions of any size that do not create and depend on the management, reuse and curation of digital media and information. Government, the public sector, Higher Education, cultural and creative industries and business all make and use these assets every day. This makes the skills we will give you increasingly attractive to employers. As well as developing the practical skills you need to manage digital media assets, you will also develop your critical and reflective capacities and increase your understanding of the interdependence between digital processes, technology, society and curatorial practice. This will enable you to enter into a technologically complex and fast-moving digital world of work.

Reasons you should consider the Digital Asset and Media Management:

  • Broadcast and publishing industries are increasingly using digital media in new ways, on new technological platforms such as tablets and mobile.
  • Archives and libraries are increasingly depending on digital materials and cultural heritage organisations are digitizing and making digital materials relating to our history and culture more available.
  • Businesses rely on digital media and content to develop, run and manage their future prosperity.
  • Research managers and data scientists work with large volumes of digital data, running experiments, simulations and visualisations.
  • Employers are looking for skilled professionals with knowledge and expertise in managing their valuable digital media assets.

Course purpose

The course will prepare students for work or research in an economy and society which increasingly recognises the value of digital media and digital assets in general. Managing these and understanding how to exploit them within a complex digital information environment presents significant challenges for organisations. As a consequence there is an increasing demand for professionals with digital asset and media management expertise. The MA responds to this demand for digitally literate professionals to work in the educational and heritage institutions as well as the publishing, broadcast, and creative content industries. The course aims to equip students with a range of strategic, technical and practical skills to provide direction and leadership in these areas.

Course format and assessment

Teaching Style

If you are a full-time student, we will provide you with 120 to 180 hours of teaching through lectures and seminars, and we will expect you to undertake 1,674 hours of independent study.

If you are a part-time student, we will give you 90 hours of teaching through lectures and seminars in your first year and 50 in your second year. We will expect you to undertake 720 hours of independent study in your first year, and 954 hours in your second.

Assessment

We will assess our modules entirely through coursework, which will consist of a mixture of essays, project work, and workshop reports, depending on the modules you choose.

The study time and assessment methods detailed above are typical and give you a good indication of what to expect. However, they may change if the course modules change.

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The Master of Education in History is designed to provide in-service teachers with additional professional education courses and an opportunity to enlarge their understanding of the historical past. Read more
The Master of Education in History is designed to provide in-service teachers with additional professional education courses and an opportunity to enlarge their understanding of the historical past. This degree program is not designed for initial teacher certification. Students in this program are advised by the Department of History.

Curriculum

Core modules

• HIS 500 Methods & Materials Of Rsrch In History

Major Field

Select three courses under advisement and one of the following:

• HIS 650 Seminar in American History
• HIS 651 Seminar in European History
• HIS 652 Seminar in History of non-Western World

History Electives

• Select 3 semester hours in each of the nonmajor fields

Electives

• Select one course in Professional education or academic .

Please see the website for detailed information about these modules:

http://catalog.wcupa.edu/graduate/arts-humanities/history/#coursestext

Skills

Investigation: One of the most important skills our history students learn is the skill of investigation, from the art of asking good questions that help define the problem at hand, to the research skills in finding sources, to the skills of analysis and interpretation historians apply to our subject. Perhaps most importantly, you will learn the skill of effectively using evidence to draw conclusions.

Collaboration: We all must learn to play nice with others. The skills of collaboration, communication, and compromise are all significant ones that you must gain to join any sort of future work force. We practice them here in the classroom, working on group projects and presentations, leading and following while gaining skills in flexibility and adaptation.

Problem Solving: Our students leave campus as creative problem solvers, who can think imaginatively not only about past events, but about the world today. The ability to think critically and creatively about the past will give you the skills to help solve the problems we face today and in the future.

21st Century Skills: History majors also learn many digital skills necessary for any future job. Our students work on digital history projects, building websites and creating multimedia presentations, editing video and audio. You can claim ownership of the projects you create, listing them on resumes and talking about them in job interviews. Students also become savvy online researchers, capable of discovering, evaluating, and aggregating the vast wealth of available sources.

Careers

A history major need not mean commitment to a life in poverty. Recent studies suggest that history majors fair well in salaries. WCU history graduates have found employment in a broad range of professions and occupations, including:

• high school teachers
• university professors
• lawyers and judges
• ministers
• museum professionals
• archivists
• librarians
• journalists
• screenwriters
• law enforcement officers
• business
• public officials (in the United States Congress as well as the Pennsylvania General Assembly)
• fundraiser/ development officer
• non-profit administrator
• editor

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This course in Digital Humanities brings digital theory and practice to the study of human culture. from history, English and music to museums, digital publishing and beyond. Read more

This course in Digital Humanities brings digital theory and practice to the study of human culture: from history, English and music to museums, digital publishing and beyond.

Digital technology provides many new opportunities and challenges to those working with textual, visual or multimedia content and this course studies the history and current state of the digital humanities, exploring their role in modelling, curating, analysing and interpreting digital representations of human culture in all its forms.

Key benefits

  • This world-leading course is highly multidisciplinary and draws on a wide range of expertise in web technologies, digital publishing, open software and content creation, digital cultural heritage, coding in humanities/cultural contexts and maps, apps and the Geoweb.
  • The course provides opportunities to scope, build and critique practical experiments in digital research with an arts, humanities and cultural sector focus.
  • Through the optional internship module students can have direct access to some of the world’s most important culture and media institutions.
  • The MA can lead to further research or to careers in cultural heritage institutions (such as museums, libraries, and archives), in multimedia and new media companies, in internet companies, in publishing houses, and in web based businesses in London and overseas.

Description

In an age where so much of what we do is mobile, networked and mediated by digital culture and technology, digital humanities play an important role in exploring how we create and share knowledge. On this course, we will develop and enhance your awareness and understanding of a range of subjects that are relevant to the digitally mediated study of human culture, including:

  • How we model human culture using computers and how we can create memory and knowledge environments which facilitate new insights or new ways of working with the human record.
  • How the ethos of openness that the internet encourages – open access, open data – influences the knowledge economy.
  • The role of digital culture in changing concepts of authorship, editing and publication.
  • The potential application and limitations of big data techniques to further the study of human culture in an era of information overload.
  • The place of coding in our digital interactions with culture and cultural heritage.

We will give you a broad understanding of the most important applications of digital methods and technologies to humanities research questions and what they do and don’t allow us to do. You will be able to scope, build and critique practical experiments in digital research with an arts, humanities and cultural sector focus, and you will learn to provide critical commentary on the relationship between creativity, digital technology and the study of human culture.

Course purpose

The MA in Digital Humanities is designed to develop your understanding of digital theory and practice in studying human culture, from the perspectives of academic scholarship, cultural heritage and the commercial world.

Digital technology provides many new opportunities and challenges to those working with textual, visual or multimedia content and this course studies the history and current state of the digital humanities, exploring their role in modelling, curating, analysing and interpreting digital representations of human culture in all its forms.

The MA course is aimed at a diverse range of participants and aims to equip students with a variety of strategic, technical and analytical skills to provide direction and leadership in these areas.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

If you are a full-time student, we will provide 120 to 180 hours of teaching through lectures and seminars, and we will expect you to undertake 1674 hours of independent study.

If you are a part-time student, we will provide 90 hours of teaching through lectures and seminars in your first year, and 50 hours in your second. We will expect you to undertake 720 hours of independent study in your first year and 954 hours in your second.

Assessment

We will assess our modules entirely through coursework, which will mostly take the form of essays, with some project work.

Sign up for more information. Email now

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Digital Media at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Digital Media at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

Digital Media at Swansea has research strengths in media and cultural theory, the history and philosophy of media technology, and contemporary developments in digital media in the UK, the European mainland, the USA and China.

The Digital Media programme is part of the Department of Languages, Translation and Communication which boasts a dynamic research and teaching environment which has already won attention and funding from outside bodies such as the Coleg Cymraeg Cenedlaethol, the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC), Wellcome Trust and the EU. We are home to the Centre on Digital Arts and Humanities (CODAH), which connects researchers in Arts and Humanities, Computer Science, and other fields.

Key Features of Digital Media, MA by Research

An MA by Research in Digital Media gives you the chance to pursue a project based around your own passions and interests in Digital Media, leading to a qualification which can open the door to an academic career or boost employment prospects outside academia (typically in the private sector, the Civil Service, or education).

The Digital Media MA by Research programme will give you the freedom to explore a topic of your choosing and develop a methodology under the close supervision of two experienced academics but without attending regular classes as required in taught programmes.

As a student on the MA by Research Digital Media programme you will be supervised closely by two experienced academics in your field. Typically, you will meet them fortnightly in the first term and at regular intervals thereafter. Meetings are logged and goals agreed each time.

All research students in Digital Media are required to attend skills and training courses at College and Institutional level. They give presentations to other research students and staff at departmental seminars and the annual departmental postgraduate symposium in June and the College of Arts and Humanities conference in October. Advanced research students in Digital Media may have opportunities to teach undergraduate tutorials and seminars. You have a budget (currently £200 per year) to attend conferences outside Swansea.

MA by Research in Digital Media typically lasts from one year (full-time study) to two years (part-time study).

Research proposals on Digital Media are invited on any topic on which staff can provide supervision. It is advisable to email a member of academic staff in the appropriate area before applying. For informal enquiries regarding the MA by Research in Digital Media please contact Professor Julian Preece ().

Staff Expertise on Digital Media

Staff expertise in Digital Media lies in the following areas, among others: media history; media pedagogy; media ethics; war and media; mass media and identity in small nations; Welsh-language digital media; media and health; digital and data journalism; computational media; post-broadcast digital media ecology; gender and media; transnationalism and media; international journalism; European comparative media. In addition, there is expertise in media and digital culture among research staff in Languages and Translation as well as in other COAH departments: History, Political and Cultural Studies and English Language and Literature.



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The research-focused Master's programme in History imparts theory and research methods, enabling you to apply scientific principles to historical topics. Read more

About the programme

The research-focused Master's programme in History imparts theory and research methods, enabling you to apply scientific principles to historical topics.
You will learn to tackle complex issues and reconstruct historical developments and events by cross-referencing source material.
Most history programmes tend to focus on the major historical periods; the M.A. History at the University of Passau additionally includes subjects from closely related disciplines.
The programme is designed to allow you to actively shape your study path by selecting two focus modules to suit your personal interests and career plans.

Features

– A combination of conventional history course content and a choice of major epochs, subjects and regional disciplines, with the possibility to include topics from closely related disciplines
– Core subjects: the Ancient World, the Middle Ages, Modernity and Contemporary History, Eastern European History, Ecclesiastical History and Auxiliary Sciences of History
– You may specialise further by choosing a second focus subject
– Supplementary qualification: Certificate of Digital Humanities

Syllabus

The degree programme comprises eight module groups:

A) Intensive modules
B) Extension modules
C) Research module
D) Auxiliary sciences
E) Theory and methods
F) Subject-specific interdisciplinary modules

A) You will choose two focus areas from the offered historical areas as intensive modules: Ancient History, the Middle Ages, Modernity and Contemporary History, Eastern European History, Ecclesiastical History and Auxiliary Sciences of History.

B) You may choose any of the history courses offered in module group A to extend your knowledge of history.

C) You will present your own scientific aims for debate in a colloquium and critically appraise other research contributions.

D) This module teaches auxiliary sciences and predominantly source-oriented courses.

E) In this module group you consolidate your knowledge of history theory, methods and economic history. The module group also includes courses in history education, including theory and methods.

F) As the degree programme was designed to be interdisciplinary, you may attend courses for related scientific disciplines, such as Catholic Theology; Philosophy; Art History; German, English or Romance Philology; Slavic Literature and Cultural Studies; Political Science; Sociology or Geography.

As part of the degree programme you will write a thesis on a topic selected from module group A. Students who complete the programme will receive a total of 120 ECTS credits.

German language requirements

You will need good German language skills to study this degree programme, as that is the main language of instruction for this programme. Therefore, you will have to provide a recognised German language certificate when enrolling for the programme, unless you can demonstrate that German was the language of instruction for your secondary school education (e.g. Abitur at a German international school) or your first undergraduate degree (i.e. a German-taught bachelor's degree programme).

The University of Passau has set up a German language teaching unit, German Courses Passau, which offers a selection of preparatory language programmes tailored to the needs of international students. These range from summer courses to a full academic year and cater to learners of all levels.

Additional language requirements

You should provide a certificate in both Latin and English at level UNIcert® I/B1 CEFR or equivalent.

If you do not intend to select the Ancient World or Middle Ages focus modules, you may provide a certificate in a Romance language (French, Spanish, Italian) instead of Latin.

If you intend to select the Eastern-European History focus module, you are required to provide a certificate in an Eastern-European language at level UNIcert® I/B1 CEFR but not in Latin.

If you intend to select the Eastern-European History in conjunction with either Ancient or Medieval History focus modules, you are required to provide a certificate in an Eastern-European language at level UNIcert® I/B1 CEFR or equivalent, but not in English.

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This course is for you if you need to improve your English language skills and subject knowledge of history before going on to a Masters course. Read more
This course is for you if you need to improve your English language skills and subject knowledge of history before going on to a Masters course. You improve your language fluency and academic vocabulary, develop your academic skills, and gain experience of western methods of teaching and learning so that you can progress onto a relevant Masters course in our Department of History.

At Essex, you can progress onto our MA History, MA History (Cultural and Social History Pathway), MA History (Local and Regional History Pathway), or MA History (Public History Pathway).

Our International Academy offers some of the best routes for international students to enter higher education in the UK. Our innovative courses and programmes have proved very successful with international students and have also attracted UK students because of the distinctive learning environment we offer.

If you are an international student, you may find that the education system in the UK is slightly different from other countries and, sometimes, that the transition to the British system can be challenging. Our courses help you to settle in and adapt to life in the UK.

Alongside improving your academic English skills, you also gain knowledge of history and an understanding of the methods and techniques of the historical discipline.

Our Department of History has developed a strong research and teaching profile, with the majority of our research rated as ‘world leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ (REF 2014). We provide you with opportunities to explore local history, and have strong links with the Essex Record Office, one of the best county record offices in the UK.

Our expert staff

Our staff are among world leaders in their field, and our enthusiasm for our subject is infectious. Our flexible course is combined with a supportive structure which helps you to pursue the modules best-suited to your interests.

We take the time to get to know you as an individual, welcome you into our scholarly community, and value your views.

Specialist facilities

By studying within our International Academy, you will have access to all of the facilities that the University of Essex has to offer:
-We provide computer labs for internet research; classrooms with access to PowerPoint facilities for student presentations; AV facilities for teaching and access to web-based learning materials
-Our new Student Services Hub will support you and provide information for all your needs as a student
-Our social space is stocked with hot magazines and newspapers, and provides an informal setting to meet with your lecturers, tutors and friends

You can also take advantage of our excellent history facilities:
-We have several Special Collections in history, including the Essex Society for Archaeology and History Library, the Harsnett Collection, the Hervey Benham Oral History Sound Archive, the Bensusan Collection, and the Colchester Medical Society Library
-Access the UK Data Archive, a national service provider digital resources for historians, which is particularly strong in 19th and 20th-century economic and social history
-Attend an exciting programme of events
-Access a variety of textbooks and journals in our Albert Sloman Library which houses materials on Latin America, Russia and the US that are of national significance

Example structure

-English for Academic Purposes
-Making Histories: Concepts, Themes and Sources
-Advanced English for Academic Purposes
-Critical Reading and Seminar Skills
-Extended English for Academic Purposes Project
-Public History Project Module: Bourne Mill, Colchester (From the 16th to the 21st Century) (optional)
-Gender in Early Modern England (optional)
-The Making of Modern Brazil (optional)
-Resistance and Rebellion in the World of Atlantic Slavery (optional)
-Revolutionary Encounters: China and the World, 1780-1930 (optional)
-Mapping History and Heritage in Colchester (optional)
-Supernatural and Natural Worlds in Early Modern Europe (optional)
-Life in the Three Kingdoms: Societies and cultures in early modern Britain and Ireland (optional)
-Consensus Britain? The State and the People, 1945-79 (optional)
-'The Special Relationship'? Anglo-American Relations 1850-2005
-Sex, Class and War at the Movies: Britain, 1930-2000 (optional)
-Witch-Trials in Early Modern Europe and New England (optional)
-Medicine and Society in Britain and France 1700-1860 (optional)
-Reconstructing Family, Residence, Work and Communal Life in Victorian England (optional)
-The African American Experience (optional)
-Human Rights in Historical Perspective (optional)
-South Africa: The Road to Apartheid (optional)
-Literature and the Condition of England (optional)
-Between Protection and Control: Policing Europe in the 19th and 20th Centuries (optional)
-The English Revolution (optional)
-British Social History 1830-1950 (optional)
-Crime and Punishment: England in Comparative Perspective 1650-1900 (optional)
-From Stalin to Putin (optional)
-The Tudors and Stuarts on Film (optional)
-Slavery and Plantation Societies in Latin America (optional)
-The British Empire in the Indian Ocean World, 1780-1930 (optional)
-Women, Gender and Sexuality in US History (optional)
-Metropolis: Urban Germany 1900-1945 (optional)
-The United States and the Vietnam War (optional)

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The MA in Digital Media is unique in its combination of practical and theoretical approaches to contemporary media and technology. Read more

The MA in Digital Media is unique in its combination of practical and theoretical approaches to contemporary media and technology.

The established and exciting degree is designed to help you understand digital transformations in media, culture and society and apply this understanding in practice, in the media and creative industries and in further research. You will be equipped with skills that can be applied to current and future developments in digital media, social media, computing and other aspects of technology.

The MA in Digital Media educates aspiring media practitioners and academics as well as early and mid-career professionals who seek to reflect on their roles in a structured and stimulating learning environment designed to give all students up-to-the-minute knowledge of digital media and the skills to apply that knowledge to future developments.

The MA offers two pathways:

Pathway 1 is a theory programme where you learn about developments in digital media and technology from a wide range of perspectives

Pathway 2 is a theory and practice programme where you can explore transformations in media, culture and society through the practice of contemporary digital communication. You will work with one or more of the following to create installations, apps and single- and multi-screen work that's responsive to the continually changing digital landscape:

  • Animation
  • Photography
  • Video and other forms of moving image
  • Software and web design
  • Hybrid forms of image making

Acclaimed academics and practitioners

Benefit from the experience and expertise of one of the world’s leading media and communications departments. The programme is co-convened by Professor Joanna Zylinska and Daniel Rourke, and you will be taught by theorists and practitioners of international standing.

Work placements and internships

The MA in Digital Media regularly attracts offers of work placements and internships. In the past these have come from GoogleThe Science Museum and N1creative.com. There is also £6,000 bursary available for UK students studying this course. Find out more about the Stationers' Postgraduate Bursary Scheme on our departmental awards page.

Facilities

Our students have access to state-of-the-art facilities including well-equipped lecture and seminar rooms, exhibition spaces, computer facilities and digital media suites.

The department is also currently host to the renowned philosopher of media and technology, Bernard Stiegler and students will have access to his modulein Media Philosophy as well as priority access to the innovative and popular option After New Media. Designed to complement the MA in Digital Media, this course provides a framework for thinking about the current media environment as well as future forms of human and computer interaction.

An established record

The MA in Digital Media has been redefining media theory and practice since 2004. Our students become proficient in:

  • the history, sociology and philosophy of digital media
  • the application of critical conceptual skills to specialist areas and future forms of media
  • multimedia skills in image making (photography, video, animation, graphic art) script writing, journalism and documentary 

MA Digital Media students have access to the pioneering option ‘After New Media’, currently a non-assessed online module which explores the themes of self mediation, ethical mediation and intelligent mediation, and develops a framework for thinking about 'life' after new media. As well as accessing a series of podcasts, students are offered reading groups and a masterclass with Professor Sarah Kember co-author of the book Life After New Media on which the course is based.

Modules & structure

Overview

The programme consists of:

  • Two compulsory core modules
  • Pathway 1 - between two and four option modules (worth 60 credits) OR
  • Pathway 2 - a two-term practice block (worth 30 credits) and either one or two option modules (worth 30 credits)
  • The dissertation or the practice/theory project

Core modules

Assessment

Seen take-home paper; essays; dissertation or practice/theory project and other production work for image-making.

Skills

We provide graduates with skills that are cutting edge: in the critical analysis and/or creative production of digital media; in the disciplinary knowledge and conceptual frameworks necessary for current and future forms of media and technology; in the awareness of how digital media and technologies are re-shaping society from the ways we communicate (through social media and web 2.0) to the increasingly ‘smart’ environments in which we live.

Careers

Our programme provides a theory and practice pathway and prepares students for work in the following areas:

  • media and creative industries; advertising, marketing and PR (graduates of the MA Digital Media have found work with Virgin Media, Google, the BBC and other leading organisations worldwide)
  • research and academia (graduates from this programme have gone on to study for PhD degrees in higher education institutions around the world and also here with us)
  • media production and new media art (graduates have exhibited, published and produced work in photography, journalism, TV, documentary, film and multimedia)


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The Lancaster History MA is designed to foster the study of history at an advanced level and to develop skills which can be transferred into professions outside the university or which may form the basis of further research. Read more

The Lancaster History MA is designed to foster the study of history at an advanced level and to develop skills which can be transferred into professions outside the university or which may form the basis of further research. You have a choice of four fascinating pathways:

  • Medieval and Early Modern
  • Modern
  • Heritage
  • Digital History

Each of the pathways consists of five taught modules and a 20,000 word dissertation.

The programme and the wide range of associated activities within the department combine to create a lively and enjoyable student experience and a real sense of academic community. In addition to your taught modules and supervision from our expert academics, you will be encouraged to attend research seminars, conferences, training events, reading groups and social events run by the department.

One of the key distinguishing factors about the Lancaster History MA is the option to work with heritage organisations on a work placement. Partner organisations include a wide variety of local, regional and national organisations, such as the National Trust, the Duchy of Lancaster, the Wordsworth Trust, and primary and secondary schools.

Click the ‘Visit Department’ tab to find out more about the four pathways, the application process, our placements and life as a History student at Lancaster.

Course Structure

You will study a range of modules as part of your course, some examples of which are listed below.

Core

Optional

Information contained on the website with respect to modules is correct at the time of publication, but changes may be necessary, for example as a result of student feedback, Professional Statutory and Regulatory Bodies' (PSRB) requirements, staff changes, and new research.



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The MA in Public History offers students cutting edge interdisciplinary academic training together with exciting opportunities for hands-on experience in the cultural sphere through a placement in the heritage sector. Read more
The MA in Public History offers students cutting edge interdisciplinary academic training together with exciting opportunities for hands-on experience in the cultural sphere through a placement in the heritage sector. The programme is designed to give students an understanding of the critical issues in public history and to analyse the variety of changing ways that the public engage with the past through not only traditional media, but also new digital and rich media products.

Programme of study

The programme consists of three taught modules (20 credits each), a public history placement (20 credits), a 20,000-word dissertation (90 credits), and a Research Training module (10 credits). These make up the 180 credits that is normal for an MA in the UK higher education system. For students registered for full-time study, the programme is as follows:

Autumn Term (October-December)
-Core Module: Public History I: Meanings and Values in Public History
-Option Module
-Research Training (taught content)
All students take one core module taught by weekly seminar. Public History I: Meaning and Values in Public History introduces students to a broad range of conceptual and methodological frameworks for understanding the relationship between the past and its manifestations in contemporary society. Students also take an option module chosen from a list approved by the MA Convenor. Additionally, all students participate in the research training module which prepares them for independent work on their dissertation later in the year.

Spring Term (January-March)
-Core Module: Public History II: Methodologies and Practices in Public History
-Public History Placement
-Research Training (independent writing of dissertation proposal)
All students take one core module taught by weekly seminar. Public History II: Methodologies and Practices in Public History introduces students to the deployment of the past in the public realm, and particularly the means by which it is put into practical use in a wide variety of contemporary social contexts. Students undertake a Public History Placement, which gives them hands-on experience of working in the field and allows them to reflect on the theory and practice of public history. Students also continue to participate in the research training module.

Summer Term and Summer Vacation (April-September)
-Research Dissertation
During the summer term and over the vacation, all students will write a Research Dissertation of up to 20,000 words on a subject of their own choosing, which may arise from their placement or one of their taught modules, under the supervision of a member of staff that is submitted at the end of the academic year.

Part-time students
Part time students on the MA in Public History will take in Year One the Core (Public History I, Autumn Term; and Public History II, Spring Term), and in Year Two, the Public History Placement and an Option. The Research Dissertation will be spread over two years, with preliminary work undertaken in Year One, and significant work undertaken in Year Two.

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