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Masters Degrees (Digital Anthropology)

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Digital technologies are now ubiquitous in nearly every part of our lives, and today's students need to become proficient with digital technologies as research and communication tools. Read more

Digital technologies are now ubiquitous in nearly every part of our lives, and today's students need to become proficient with digital technologies as research and communication tools. The Digital Anthropology MSc at UCL combines technical skill with anthropological research methodologies in order to train students for research and involvement in this emergent world.

About this degree

Students gain skills training in digital technologies, from internet and digital film editing to e-curation and digital ethnography; study the anthropological theories of virtualism, materiality/immateriality and social networks; and develop an understanding of the consequences of digital culture through the ethnographic study of its social and regional impact in a global and comparative context.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (45 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules

  • Digital Anthropology and Digital Anthropology Practical

Optional modules

  • Art in the Public Sphere
  • Mass Consumption and Design
  • The Anthropology of the Built Environment
  • Advanced Topics in Digital Cultural
  • Documentary Film and the Anthropological Eye
  • Practical Ethnographic and Documentary Filmmaking
  • Digital Infrastructure: Materiality, Information and Politics
  • Anthropology and Photography
  • Social Construction of Landscape

Dissertation/report

All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a 15,000-word dissertation.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, practicals and laboratory sessions. It includes a weekly seminar series, with invited international speakers. Assessment is through essays, methodology practicals, written examination and the substantial research dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Digital Anthropology MSc

Careers

In addition to its importance for careers such as in media, design and museums, digital technology is also integral to development, theoretical and applied anthropology. Companies and institutions collaborating with the MSc are: British Telecom, UCL Computer Sciences, UCL Information Studies, Microsoft Research Cambridge, Skype, Intel, the British Museum, NESTA, NOKIA, the Home Office and Inventi V.

The programme is also developing relationships with: Cultural Informatics Research Centre for the Arts and Humanities (CIRCAh), Slade Centre for Electronic Media in Fine Art, Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis, Centre for Museums, Heritage and Cultural Studies, UCL Interaction Centre, UCL Digital Humanities and UCL Urban Laboratory.

Employability

New media and technology companies are showing considerable interest in Digital Anthropology as a degree that qualifies students for positions in all fields of user interaction and research. In the last few years students graduating from the MSc have been recruited by the best international agencies doing research on users' digital practices. In the non-profit sector students have joined organisations involved in policymaking, open access and citizen journalism. The subject is also a good grounding for students who are interested in continuing to a variety of PhD programmes.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Digital Anthropology MSc at UCL is becoming a world leader in the training of researchers in the social and cultural dimensions of information technologies and digital media.

UCL Anthropology is one of the largest anthropology departments in the UK and offers an exceptional breadth of expertise. Our excellent results in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise and 2014 Research Excellence Framework show that we are the leading broad-based anthropology department in the UK. The programme combines ethnographic methods, critical thinking and practical explorations of the digital world and encourages in-depth research to develop the next generation of understanding about the impact, consequences, aesthetics and politics of digital technologies and infrastructures.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Anthropology

68% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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Anthropology prides itself on its inclusive and interdisciplinary focus. It takes a holistic approach to human society, combining biological and social perspectives. Read more
Anthropology prides itself on its inclusive and interdisciplinary focus. It takes a holistic approach to human society, combining biological and social perspectives.

All of our Anthropology Master’s programmes are recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as having research training status, so successful completion of these courses is sufficient preparation for research in the various fields of social anthropology. Many of our students go on to do PhD research. Others use their Master’s qualification in employment ranging from research in government departments to teaching to consultancy work overseas.

We welcome students with the appropriate background for research. If you wish to study for a single year, you can do the MA or MSc by research, a 12-month independent research project.

If you are interested in registering for a research degree, you should contact the member of staff whose research is the most relevant to your interests. You should include a curriculum vitae, a short (1,000-word) research proposal, and a list of potential funding sources.

About the School of Anthropology and Conservation

Kent has pioneered the social anthropological study of Europe, Latin America, Melanesia, and Central and Southeast Asia, the use of computers in anthropological research, and environmental anthropology in its widest sense (including ethnobiology and ethnobotany).

Our regional expertise covers Europe, the Middle East, Central, Southeast and Southern Asia, Central and South America, Amazonia, Papua New Guinea, East Timor and Polynesia. Specialisation in biological anthropology includes forensics and paleopathology, osteology, evolutionary psychology and the evolutionary ecology and behaviour of great apes.

Course structure

The first year may include coursework, especially methods modules for students who need this additional training. You will work closely with one supervisor throughout your research, although you have a committee of three (including your primary supervisor) overseeing your progress. If you want to research in the area of applied computing in social anthropology, you would also have a supervisor based in the School of Computing.

Research areas

- Social Anthropology

The related themes of ethnicity, nationalism, identity, conflict, and the economics crisis form a major focus of our current work in the Middle East, the Balkans, South Asia, Amazonia and Central America, Europe (including the United Kingdom), Oceania and South-East Asia.

Our research extends to inter-communal violence, mental health, diasporas, pilgrimage, intercommunal trade, urban ethnogenesis, indigenous representation and the study of contemporary religions and their global connections.

We research issues in fieldwork and methodology more generally, with a strong and expanding interest in the field of visual anthropology. Our work on identity and locality links with growing strengths in customary law, kinship and parenthood. This is complemented by work on the language of relatedness, child health and on the cognitive bases of kinship terminologies.

A final strand of our research focuses on policy and advocacy issues and examines the connections between morality and law, legitimacy and corruption, public health policy and local healing strategies, legal pluralism and property rights, and the regulation of marine resources.

- Environmental Anthropology and Ethnobiology

Work in these areas is focused on the Centre for Biocultural Diversity. We conduct research on ethnobiological knowledge systems and other systems of environmental knowledge as well as local responses to deforestation, climate change, natural resource management, medical ethnobotany, the impacts of mobility and displacement and the interface between conservation and development. Current projects include trade in materia medica in Ladakh and Bolivia, food systems, ethno-ornithology, the development of buffer zones for protected areas and phytopharmacy among migrant diasporas.

- Digital Anthropology: Cultural Informatics, Social Invention and Computational Methods

Since 1985, we have been exploring and applying new approaches to research problems in anthropology – often, as in the case of hypermedia, electronic and internet publishing, digital media, expert systems and large-scale textual and historical databases, up to a decade before other anthropologists. Today, we are exploring cloud media, semantic networks, multi-agent modelling, dual/blended realities, data mining, smart environments and how these are mediated by people into new possibilities and capabilities.

Our major developments have included advances in kinship theory and analysis supported by new computational methods within field-based studies and as applied to detailed historical records; qualitative analysis of textual and ethnographic materials; and computer-assisted approaches to visual ethnography. We are extending our range to quantitative approaches for assessing qualitative materials, analysing social and cultural invention, the active representation of meaning, and the applications and implications of mobile computing, sensing and communications platforms and the transformation of virtual into concrete objects, institutions and structures.

- Biological Anthropology

Biological Anthropology is the newest of the University of Kent Anthropology research disciplines. We are interested in a diverse range of research topics within biological and evolutionary anthropology. These include bioarchaeology, human reproductive strategies, hominin evolution, primate behaviour and ecology, modern human variation, cultural evolution and Palaeolithic archaeology. This work takes us to many different regions of the world (Asia, Africa, Europe, the United States), and involves collaboration with international colleagues from a number of organisations. We have a dedicated research laboratory and up-to-date computing facilities to allow research in many areas of biological anthropology.

Currently, work is being undertaken in a number of these areas, and research links have been forged with colleagues at Kent in archaeology and biosciences, as well as with those at the Powell- Cotton Museum, the Budongo Forest Project (Uganda) and University College London.

Kent Osteological Research and Analysis (KORA) offers a variety of osteological services for human remains from archaeological contexts.

Careers

Higher degrees in anthropology create opportunities in many employment sectors including academia, the civil service and non-governmental organisations through work in areas such as human rights, journalism, documentary film making, environmental conservation and international finance. An anthropology degree also develops interpersonal and intercultural skills, which make our graduates highly desirable in any profession that involves working with people from diverse backgrounds and cultures.

Many of our students go on to do PhD research. Others use their Master’s qualification in employment ranging from research in government departments to teaching to consultancy work overseas.

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Study at the Granada Centre for Visual Anthropology - widely recognised as the world's leading centre for Visual Anthropology and Sensory Media. Read more
  • Study at the Granada Centre for Visual Anthropology - widely recognised as the world's leading centre for Visual Anthropology and Sensory Media
  • The course combines anthropology with practical training in film-making, editing, visual methods, photography, sensory ethnography and sound
  • Students are provided with professional equipment and supported by an internally renowned staff comprising the largest visual anthropology faculty in Europe

We welcome students from across the social sciences and humanities. The MA in Visual Anthropology is tailored to meet the needs of different levels of anthropological and film-making experience, whether you have little or no background in formal anthropology, film-production, visual methods and photography, or if you have substantial experience in one or more of these areas.

For nearly 30 years, the University's Granada Centre for Visual Anthropology has been widely recognised as the world's leading centre for Visual Anthropology. Our graduates have produced more than 400 ethnographic films seen around the world and it is now at the forefront of the emergent dialogue between art and anthropology, including sensory ethnography and sound, experimental and practice-based methods, photographic and digital media, museum and gallery installations.

Our MA and MPhil courses combine anthropology with training in film-making and editing, visual methods, photography sensory ethnography and sound. Students are provided with professional equipment and supported by an internationally renowned staff comprising the largest visual anthropology faculty in Europe.

The Granada Centre's teaching and research continues to set the standard of excellence in the social sciences as well as arts. This was formally recognised by the ESRC (Economic and Social Research Council), and by the AHRC, awarding the master's programme the status of a Professional Preparation masters, something awarded to no other visual anthropology programme in the UK.

In 2012 the Granada Centre 's MA in Visual Anthropology received a special commendation for teaching excellence by the UK's Higher Education Authority and the Association of Social Anthropologists (ASA), and is the only such course to have been awarded this distinction.

Contact:

Admissions Tutor: Dr Rupert Cox

Email:  

Special features

As a course that teaches anthropology and practice based film and media skills, prospective candidates should be aware that the MA in Visual Anthropology is a highly intensive course and runs over 13-months rather than the standard 12 months. It extends beyond the conventional 12 months because of the additional time required for completing the audio-visual work. Editing the final film and media work is staggered over a 6 week period, from late-August to the beginning of October. Students who need to complete by the end of a 12-month period can apply beforehand in order that arrangements can be put in place. Graduation Exhibition and Film Screenings held in mid October and are organised by the students themselves. These are not a compulsory part of the programme but they have become a traditional rite of passage and opportunity to show work to the public, friends and family.

Why Manchester?

Manchester is a creative, energetic and cosmopolitan city noted for its music scene, media links and industrial past. An advantage of studying in Manchester is the cheap cost of living and accommodation in that rents are approximately half the cost of London.

Teaching and learning

The course combines conventional lectures and seminars with practical 'hands-on' instruction and workshops. Students work in teams and individually. Their final piece is an individual production, however throughout the year they will spend time working in teams so as to develop team-working & presentational skills as well as technical and artistic expertise. Work is presented to the class and receives feedback from fellow students as well as instructors. In this way, students learn to analyse their own and others works and through each other's successes and failures, generating a strong range of intellectual, practical and aesthetic resources as well as a sense of camaraderie and cooperation.



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The MA in Visual Anthropology offers a unique combination of anthropological theory and visual practice. It provides you with a strong foundation for producing visual work informed by anthropology. Read more

The MA in Visual Anthropology offers a unique combination of anthropological theory and visual practice. It provides you with a strong foundation for producing visual work informed by anthropology.

This programme takes an inclusive approach to the definition of visual anthropology – it approaches the sub-field through the study of the politics and aesthetics of representation, documentary and ethnographic film, and anthropological perspectives on art. As a practice-oriented MA, there is a clear emphasis on applying anthropological knowledge to the actual making of visual artefacts, and not just their analysis.

The MA is open to students with a range of backgrounds in anthropology and related fields. As a graduate, you will be well-placed to pursue a career in visual anthropology (be it research- or practice-oriented) as well as to bring an anthropological sensibility to the visual to other disciplines.

You will be taught through lectures, seminars and hands-on training in the use of digital camcorders, sound recording equipment and video editing. Assessment includes written essays for the theory modules, practical assignments, and a final visual project in the form of a 20-minute film.

Modules & structure

You will study:

  • three core modules
  • option modules to the value of 30 credits

Core Modules

Please view the website for a list of optional modules

Careers

The unique combination of theory, research and practice that structures the MA in Visual Anthropology will prepare you for a diverse range of employment opportunities. Past graduates have gone on to work in:

  • Video production, both commercial and independent
  • Film editing and videography
  • Production and programming of film festivals
  • Ethnographic and visual research in both academic and commercial settings
  • Teaching

In addition, you can use this programme as a springboard for further study, either vocational or intellectual (including entry into MPhil/PhD programmes).

In short, the multiple skills – intellectual, critical and creative – developed by the MA in Visual Anthropology will provide you with the flexibility of thought and approach necessary for creative insertion into the global job market. 

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths.



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This programme offers a comprehensive understanding of current developments in digital media and their wider social significance. Read more
This programme offers a comprehensive understanding of current developments in digital media and their wider social significance. Smartphones; social networking, blogging and tweeting; online shopping; communication by email; and the delivery of news, film, music and e-books over the Internet: these are just some of the most striking ways in which the digital is penetrating and transforming contemporary society.

The programme is delivered by a diverse interdisciplinary team with a strong profile in, for example, digital culture, media, sociology, anthropology and communication studies.

Core study areas include media and cultural industries, digital futures, media and cultural work, textual analysis research techniques, production and reception analysis and a dissertation.

Optional study areas include politics of representation, media and modernity, communication and citizenship, sex industries, global communications, media, nations, and nationalisms, digital cultures, digital economies, cultural memory and the heritage industries, and marketing politics.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/social-sciences/digital-media-society/

Programme modules

Compulsory Modules:
- Digital Cultures
- Digital Futures: explorations in new media
- Production and Reception Analysis
- Digital Economies
- Digital Methodologies
- Dissertation

Optional Modules:
A selection of the following options will be available:
- Media and Modernity
- Media and Cultural Industries
- The Politics of Representation
- Popular Music and Modern Times
- Citizenship and Communications
- Media, Nations and Nationalisms
- Global Communications
- Media and Cultural Work
- Tourism, Culture and Society
- Sex Industries
- Cultural Memory and the Heritage Industries
- Marketing Politics

Assessment

Coursework plus a dissertation of 10,000 words on an agreed topic.

Careers and further study

The degree is designed to develop specialist understanding of contemporary developments in digital media and culture. This will be relevant to anyone pursuing a professional career in this rapidly growing sector and to those with an interest in these significant social changes. Students will also acquire research skills which will be of value in both media-related and academic careers.

Why choose social sciences at Loughborough?

The Department of Social Sciences has long been recognised as an international centre of academic excellence and for its cutting-edge interdisciplinary work.

This recognition of excellence has been a major factor in enabling the Department to recruit a lively community of postgraduate students that currently numbers around 100.

In the Department of Social Sciences we offer a rich variety of taught postgraduate masters. The courses are delivered by an internationally renowned interdisciplinary team, through the use of contemporary case studies and research-informed applied teaching and learning.

The courses provide training in digital culture, media, communications, sociological and anthropological, theory, as well as quantitative and qualitative methods

- Research
All of our academic staff are active researchers, working within and across the following disciplinary boundaries – Communication and Media Studies, Criminology, Social Policy, Social Psychology, and Sociology.

Loughborough is home to the most world-leading, original and internationally excellent research in communication, media studies, sociology, and social psychology. Our research has excellent impact, with staff working with a wide range of public and third sector bodies (e.g., BBC Trust, the Metropolitan Police, the Electoral Commission, the College of Mediators, UK Drug Policy Commission, Department of Health). Our social policy and criminology research also has world-leading impact, particularly in services for children and minimum income standards.

- Career prospects
Our programmes prepare our graduates for the real world of the television industry, marketing, academia, publishing, plus many more industries. They go on to work for companies and organisations such as China Development Research Foundation, Elsevier Ltd, Image Line Communication, Institute of Psychiatry, Metropolitan Police Service, Oxfam and X-Pert Med GmbH.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/social-sciences/digital-media-society/

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Taking heritage management into the 21st century. Introduced in 2010 in response to the growth in digital heritage practices, this course provides training for professionals who wish to work in digital archiving, visualisation, and museums and heritage sector interpretation, curation and education. Read more
Taking heritage management into the 21st century

Why choose this course?

Introduced in 2010 in response to the growth in digital heritage practices, this course provides training for professionals who wish to work in digital archiving, visualisation, and museums and heritage sector interpretation, curation and education.

It draws on the Archaeology department’s strengths in both Archaeological Information Sciences and Cultural Heritage Management – offering a unique qualification that combines the theoretical and ground-level study of heritage management with practical training in new technologies, from database systems and virtual-reality modelling to social media platforms.

You will be working with a team of technology pioneers and computing scholars, who lead the field in researching and developing interpretative content and digital applications for the heritage sector worldwide.
• Gain practical experience in new and mobile technologies used to publish, archive, analyse, visualise and interpret archaeological information.
• Understand all aspects of heritage management theory and practice.
• Develop essential IT knowledge and skills required in heritage-sector careers.
• Gain practical work experience in the heritage sector.
• Access a full suite of research computing hardware and software
• Receive tailored careers advice from staff with significant experience of recruiting within the sector.

York is one of the best places to study Archaeology, Heritage or Conservation. The Department has an excellent reputation and is one of the largest Archaeology teaching centres in the UK. The historic City of York is rich in architectural and archaeological treasures and resources which you will have easy access to during your studies.

What does the course cover?

The course draws on the skills and expertise of leading scholars in heritage management, interpretation and digital media, alongside staff from the Archaeology Data Service, which has been the UK digital archive for heritage data since 1997. It also has strong links with museums and other cultural heritage institutions in York, and work placements are a key feature of the programme.

Through a combination of academic studies, practical training, research and work placements, you will:
• Explore how digital technologies are used to present and curate heritage information.
• Gain experience of using the digital and internet technologies in disseminating, publishing and archiving heritage information.
• Develop your practical skills in 3-D modelling, GIS, CAD and other heritage analysis and visualisation technologies.

Who is it for?

The MSc in Digital Heritage course is designed for people seeking professional training in digital archiving, visualisation, museums and heritage sector curation, interpretation, and education. It is ideally suited for graduates of Archaeology, History, Art History, Museum Studies, Education, Anthropology, Cultural Studies and related fields, and for candidates with proven IT experience.

What can it lead to?

The skills developed on this course lead graduates into careers in archaeological computing, archive management, education, marketing and IT services for commercial organisations, museums and the public sector. Equally, the course can be a stepping stone to further research at doctoral level.

Placement

Your work placement is a key feature of the course, offering you the chance to apply your digital skillset in a professional or academic setting.

Aims
-To provide experience of computer applications within a workplace in the heritage sector.
-To consolidate knowledge and understanding of computer applications from one or more of the taught modules.

Learning outcomes
Upon completing your placement you should have:
-Gained detailed knowledge of how information technology is applied in the workplace in the heritage sector, under the guidance of experienced professionals.
-Developed an understanding of the contexts in which IT is applied, and of real world limitations.
-Developed your IT skills in one or more of the core areas covered by the taught programme (i.e. database design, web technologies, digital archiving, electronic publication, CAD, GIS and virtual-reality modelling).

Placement opportunities
Although the organisations offering placements change from year to year, and you have the option of proposing other work providers that match your specific interests, the following list is a good indication of some of the choices available:
-Yorkshire Museums Trust
-Archaeology Data Service
-City of York Council
-Internet Archaeology
-York Archaeological Trust
-Centre for Christianity and Culture
-L-P: Archaeology
-On Site Archaeology
-Council for British Archaeology
-West Yorkshire Archaeology Service
-Historic England
-English Heritage
-National Trust

Careers

Graduates of the MSc in Digital Heritage will be well equipped to work in IT-related roles in heritage management or presentation, in museums and education, and with a range of other heritage organisations.

By the end of the course you will be able to:
-Plan, design and undertake a piece of independent research in the field of digital heritage;
-Critically evaluate claims made for different computer applications and select the correct application for a given problem;
-Locate and use relevant information on the internet and add materials to it;
-Create an electronic text;
-Design and implement a simple relational database;
-Create effective applications in CAD and VR;
-Evaluate the cultural significance of sites, places and artefacts;
-Recognise areas of potential conflict in heritage management and museum practice;
-Evaluate the implications of stakeholder values and interests for heritage management and heritage interpretation/education;
-Appraise the utility of interpretative and educational media both on site and in museums.

The course opens the door to a wide range of careers in heritage-related organisations and in many other sectors, including:
-Archive management
-Museum curation
-Social media management
-Local government and development
-Computing and IT services
-Business and administration
-Marketing and public relations
-Education

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The Digital Cultures and Industries Track within the MA in Global Communications offers an innovative and interdisciplinary focus on the central importance of digital technologies in today’s world. Read more

The Digital Cultures and Industries Track within the MA in Global Communications offers an innovative and interdisciplinary focus on the central importance of digital technologies in today’s world. The Digital Cultures and Industries track helps students to meet the challenge of a world in flux with a suite of up-to-the-minute critical and practical courses that can be tailored to different career pathways.

Students graduate with a stellar profile: theoretical sophistication, skills-based mastery in key domains, and practical experience in global communications.

Skills for a Data Driven World

As a student of the Digital Cultures and Industries Track, you will acquire in-depth knowledge of theories, contexts and practices of digital media as well as their relationship to global cultures and communications industries. Building on a solid base of critical thought around the rise of digital media and current global debates, you can take on specialized topics such as mobile media, the new app economy, data and algorithmic cultures and digital advocacy.

To put ideas into action, choose from hands-on courses teaching skills such as data analysis and visualization, social media strategy, digital writing, multimedia storytelling, visual design and coding. Learning from digital media scholars and industry professionals alike, you are primed with the critical and practical skills and emerging literacies required to thrive and adapt in a transforming digital world.  

Ideal candidates—and career outcomes

Students pursuing this track may come from various backgrounds of work and study – advertising and PR, design and film, sociology, anthropology and psychology, writing and journalism – or be interested in pursuing careers in those fields. Whichever their individual talents, the Digital Cultures and Industries track prepares students for professional careers at the changing face of communications or further graduate study in emerging fields. 

As a student, you will benefit from hands-on fieldwork and research development as you gain professional skills throughout the duration of your studies. This, together with the rigorous academic training, can lead to jobs in companies across the world. You will be well-prepared to pursue a career in a range of sectors and organization types, including corporations, non-governmental organizations, start-ups, nonprofits and family businesses. View career results for graduates of the MA in Global Communications program.

An international approach to learning

The MA in Global Communications encourages students to take their education beyond the classroom. Your learning experience is deepened by the opportunity of immersive practica and study trips where you will come into contact with experts in the field. Whether networking with communications professionals in New York or London, developing sustainable initiatives in India, or experiencing nation branding in Iceland or cultural heritage in Morocco, or we are committed to putting theory into practice.



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This programme draws together teaching from a wide range of disciplines, investigating the application of computational technologies to the arts, humanities and cultural heritage. Read more

This programme draws together teaching from a wide range of disciplines, investigating the application of computational technologies to the arts, humanities and cultural heritage. We study the impact of these techniques on cultural heritage, museums, libraries, archives and digital culture while developing skills that employers and students tell us are needed.

About this degree

Our students develop an advanced understanding of digital resources, techniques and computational methods relevant to research and practice in the humanities and cultural heritage sectors; these include programming, XML, databases, internet technologies, image capture and digitisation. They receive both practical and theoretical training to develop a unique and critical skill set suitable for many types of employment or advanced study.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of five core modules (75 credits), three optional modules (45 credits), a research dissertation (60 credits) and a work placement.

A Postgraduate Diploma, five core modules (75 credits), three optional modules (45 credits), full-time nine months or flexible study up to 5 years, is offered.

A Postgraduate Certificate, four from any of the available modules (60 credits), full-time fifteen weeks or flexible study up to two years, is offered.

Core modules

  • Digital Resources in the Humanities
  • Internet Technologies
  • Introduction to Programming and Scripting
  • Server Programming and Structured Data
  • XML

Optional modules

Students choose three optional modules from a list which may include the following: 

  • Affective Interaction
  • Computer Music
  • Cultural Heritage and Development
  • Early Modern Handwriting and Manuscript Culture for Researchers
  • Electronic Publishing
  • Fundamentals of Information Science
  • Geographical Information Systems
  • Historical Bibliography
  • Interaction Design
  • Systems Management
  • Introduction to Digital Curation
  • Introduction to Digitisation
  • Knowledge Representation and Semantic Technologies
  • Legal and Social Aspects of Electronic Publishing
  • Manuscript Studies
  • Research Software Engineering with Python
  • Research Skills for Spatial Analysis
  • Systems Management
  • The Anthropology of Social Media
  • User-centred Evaluation Methods

Optional modules are offered subject to availability, and students may be required to fulfil specific prerequisites.

Dissertation/report

All MA/MSc students undertake an independent research project in the form of a 12,000-word dissertation.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, demonstrations, seminars and practical sessions, and will include a work placement in a relevant organisation. Assessment is through a mixture of essays, practical projects, programming exercises, written technical examinations, and group work projects, depending on the options chosen.

Placement

Students undertake a 4-6 week work placement as part of their programme of study. Past placement hosts have included the British Museum; British Library; Marx Memorial Library; Islington Museum; the Postal Museum; Ken Saro-Wiwa Foundation; Ubiquity Press; SOAS, University of London; UCL Grant Museum; and The Warburg Institute.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Digital Humanities MA/MSc

Careers

The cultural heritage sector is increasingly aware of the need to provide and manage digital material and projects with institutions and museums investing heavily in online content. Our graduates develop a unique skill set and are well placed for project management, further research, or a career in e-commerce and the fast growing digital field. Our alumni have found employment in the British Museum, Oxford University, UNESCO, International Red Cross, Knowledge 4 All Foundation, and the British Medical Journal, in roles as diverse as web editor, chief operating officer, and senior digital marketing executive. Several have also progressed to fully-funded research degrees; others have further developed their technical skills and have been recruited as programmers and developers for both academic and commercial projects.

Employability

The MA/MSc in Digital Humanities is a unique and groundbreaking programme that gives students the skills that they and employers tell us are needed. In this truly interdisciplinary programme, with optional modules offered across UCL, our students receive an exceptional blend of practical and theoretical skills that are in great demand. The work placement gives our students the opportunity to put theory into practice and gain invaluable experience of the workplace in this fast-moving environment. As well as the practical and technical skills of programming and other digital tools, they are equipped with a critical and analytical mindset and are well positioned to go on to pursue careers that focus on collaborative, innovative and creative thinking.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This MA/MSc is a truly interdisciplinary programme, and students can capitalise on UCL's world-leading strengths in information studies, computer science, the arts and humanities, and social and historical studies.

Students benefit from research teaching delivered by leading scholars and the excellent range of facilities available, including the UCL Library Special Collections, UCL Museums & Collections, and the UCLDH Digitisation Suite. Teaching by academic staff is supplemented by guest lectures given by experienced practitioners and expert industry professionals.

Students take advantage of our collaboration with many internationally important cultural heritage institutions including the British Museum and the British Library. Students undertake a work placement, where they have the opportunity to make professional contacts and gain invaluable experience, putting what they have learnt into practice. Past placement hosts have included the British Museum; British Library; Marx Memorial Library; Islington Museum; the Postal Museum; Ken Saro-Wiwa Foundation; Ubiquity Press; SOAS, University of London; UCL Grant Museum; and The Warburg Institute.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Information Studies

68% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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Research within this area centres on ethnobiological knowledge systems and other systems of environmental knowledge and is supported by members of the Centre for Biocultural Diversity (http://www.kent.ac.uk/sac/research/research-centres/cbcd/index.html). Read more
Research within this area centres on ethnobiological knowledge systems and other systems of environmental knowledge and is supported by members of the Centre for Biocultural Diversity (http://www.kent.ac.uk/sac/research/research-centres/cbcd/index.html).

We research local responses to deforestation, climate change, natural resource management, medical ethnobotany, the impacts of mobility and displacement and the interface between conservation and development. The Centre has an Ethnobiology Lab and Ethnobotanical Garden, and extensive collaborative links, including with the Royal Botanic Gardens (Kew), and Eden Project.

MSc by Research
This course is a one-year full time or two-year part-time programmes. You research and write a thesis under the supervision of one or two academic staff.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/204/ethnobiology

Course structure

The first year may include coursework, especially methods modules for students who need this additional training. In general, you work closely with one supervisor throughout your research, although you have a committee of three (including your primary supervisor) overseeing your progress.

Study support

- Postgraduate resources

The School has a lively postgraduate community drawn together not only by shared resources such as postgraduate rooms, computer facilities (with a dedicated IT officer) and laboratories, but also by student-led events, societies, staff/postgraduate seminars, weekly research student seminars and a number of special lectures.

The School houses well-equipped research laboratories for genetics, ecology, visual anthropology, virtual paleoanthropology, Animal Postcranial Evolution, biological anthropology, anthropological computing, botany, osteology and ethnobiology. The state-of-the-art visual anthropology laboratory is stocked with digital editing programmes and other facilities for digital video and photographic work, and has a photographic darkroom for analogue developing and printing. The biological anthropology laboratory is equipped for osteoarchaeological and forensic work. It curates the Powell-Cotton collection of human remains, together with Anglo-Saxon skeletons from Bishopstone, East Sussex. The ethnobiology laboratory provides equipment and specimens for teaching ethnobiological research skills, and serves as a transit station for receiving, examining and redirecting field material. It also houses the Powell-Cotton collection of plant-based material culture from Southeast Asia, and a small reference and teaching collection of herbarium and spirit specimens (1,000 items) arising from recent research projects.

Kent has outstanding anthropology IT facilities. Over the last decade, the School has been associated with many innovatory projects, particularly in the field of cognitive anthropology. It provides an electronic information service to other anthropology departments, for example by hosting both the Anthropological Index Online and Experience-Rich Anthropology project. We encourage all students to use the Centre’s facilities (no previous experience or training is necessary).

Anthropology at Kent has close links with the nearby Powell-Cotton Museum, which has one of the largest ethnographic collections in the British Isles and is particularly strong in sub-Saharan African and Southeast Asian material. It also houses an extensive comparative collection of primate and other mammalian material. Human skeletal material is housed at the Kent Osteological Research and Analysis Centre within the School.

Anthropology, together with the Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology (DICE) form the School of Anthropology and Conservation.

- Researcher Development Programme

Kent's Graduate School co-ordinates the Researcher Development Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/tstindex.html) for research students, which includes workshops focused on research, specialist and transferable skills. The programme is mapped to the national Researcher Development Framework and covers a diverse range of topics, including subjectspecific research skills, research management, personal effectiveness, communication skills, networking and teamworking, and career management skills.

Research areas

Work in these areas is focused on the Centre for Biocultural Diversity. We conduct research on ethnobiological knowledge systems, ethnoecology, and other systems of environmental knowledge, as well as local responses to deforestation, climate change, natural resource management, medical ethnobotany, the impacts of mobility and displacement and the interface between conservation and development. The Centre has an Ethnobiology Lab and Ethnobotanical Garden, and extensive collaborative links, including with the Royal Botanic Gardens (Kew), and Eden Project.

Careers

As a School recognised for its excellence in research we are one of the partners in the South East Doctoral Training Centre, which is recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). This relationship ensures that successful completion of our courses is sufficient preparation for research in the various fields of social anthropology. Many of our students go on to do PhD research.

The School has a very good record for postgraduate employment and academic continuation. Studying anthropology, you develop an understanding of the complexity of all actions, beliefs and discourse by acquiring strong methodological and analytical skills. Anthropologists are increasingly being hired by companies and organisations that recognise the value of employing people who understand the complexities of societies and organisations.

Many of our alumni teach in academic positions in universities across the world, whilst others work for a wide range of organisations.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Sustainability is one of the key concepts of our times, although a contested one. As the product of concerns about environmental degradation, climate alteration, rising socioeconomic inequalities, increasing mobility, and accelerated change, the term has many different meanings and imperatives. Read more

Sustainability is one of the key concepts of our times, although a contested one. As the product of concerns about environmental degradation, climate alteration, rising socioeconomic inequalities, increasing mobility, and accelerated change, the term has many different meanings and imperatives: our lifeworlds must be environment-friendly, but also economically viable and socially equitable.

This Master’s programme in Cultural Anthropology: Sustainable Citizenship therefore departs from an integrated understanding. It focuses on the triangle of People, Planet, and Profit, pointing out that sustainability has not only an environmental meaning, yet also an economic and sociocultural one. As such, the programme seeks to understand how citizens worldwide are negotiating and restructuring their living environment to be safe and sustainable at the same time. It incorporates both local and global understandings of the concept of sustainability and, in doing so, scrutinizes various expressions of active citizenship in building sustainability around the world.

Innovative methodology

Anthropologists continually focus on cultural diversity and differences based on ethnicity, class, gender, age, and health. This Master’s programme will equip you with the knowledge and skills to evaluate these facets of life and their interrelationships. During your studies, you will learn traditional anthropological methods and techniques (fieldwork, participatory observation, and qualitative interviews).

However, since anthropology is by definition engaged, you will move also toward engaged anthropology and explore collaborative ethnographic methods, such as participatory action research. In addition, you are introduced to related, innovative methodologies in, for example, the area of narrative and virtual ethnography, engaging in cutting-edge combinations of aesthetics, digital media, and ethnography. You will also discuss ethical dilemmas and your own social responsibility as an anthropologist.

International context

The programme offers you a comprehensive learning environment with an international and comparative perspective. You will have the opportunity to go abroad for your field research and research internship, and you can attend seminars of the research group Sovereignty and Social Contestation, to which international researchers and lecturers are regularly invited. This Master’s programme is offered through the Department of Cultural Anthropology. Courses are taught by staff members with strong international reputations and standing like Dr Diederick RavenDr Annalisa Butticci and the Master's Programme Director Dr Yvon van der Pijl.

Intellectually stimulating programme

We offer an intellectually stimulating programme with a variety of work methods, in which you will be challenged to think critically about important and socially relevant themes, to formulate and to share your own arguments. You will formulate a research question that you will develop in a Master’s thesis using the theoretical knowledge acquired in the course modules and the empirical data that you gathered during fieldwork or a research internship. 

We expect an active contribution from students in the form of discussions, book reviews, papers and presentations. When preparing for the research, you will work on the research proposal in a tutorial group.

Research locations will be selected in consultation with the supervisor, with a large number of students conducting research in Latin America and the Caribbean, Africa and Europe (including the Netherlands).

PROGRAMME OBJECTIVE

This Master’s degree programme will train you to work as an academic professional. Along with classic methods and skills, the programme allows you to acquire applied and practice-focused skills, enabling you to flexibly switch between or integrate scientific theory and anthropological professional practice. Take a look at the portraits of our graduates for a better idea of the career prospects.

Do you want to pursue a career as a scientific researcher? If so, the Master’s programme Cultural Anthropology: Sociocultural Transformation might be a better fit for your goals. This programme concentrates on the issue of power and (violent) conflict versus the state, while the Master’s programme in Cultural Anthropology: Sustainable Citizenship focuses on citizenship in relation to a sustainable living environment.



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This MA provides a broad based training in social science approaches to the analysis of material and visual media. Read more

This MA provides a broad based training in social science approaches to the analysis of material and visual media: ranging from art, photography, film and media within visual anthropology, to consumption, museum anthropology and cultural heritage, landscape and genres (such as clothing and the built environment), within material culture.

About this degree

The programme covers a range of contexts such as production, exchange and consumption, and uses anthropological perspectives based on the comparative study of societies, historically and culturally. Skills training is given in social anthropological field research and analysis, and in specific methods for the study of material and visual forms.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (45 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules

  • Critical Issues

Optional modules

The following is a selection of possible option modules:

  • Anthropology and Photography
  • Advanced Topics in Digital Culture: Ethnographies of the Digital
  • Documentary Film and the Anthropological Eye
  • Art in the Public Sphere
  • Social Construction of Landscape
  • Issues in Power and Culture
  • Anthropology of the Built Environment
  • Mass Consumption and Design
  • Risk, Power and Uncertainty

Dissertation/report

All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a 15,000-word dissertation.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, group presentations and discussion, tutorials, independent directed reading, interactive teamwork, laboratory and practical work, video, film and web based courses. There will also be visits to museums, galleries and other relevant sites. Assessment is through coursework, unseen examination and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Material and Visual Culture MA

Careers

The programme can lead to careers in a wide range of areas such as architecture, media, commerce and aspects of development work where an emphasis on the material and visual environment is central.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Project Officer, British Council
  • Senior Administrator, LSE (The London School of Economics and Political Science)
  • Senior Officer in Marketing and Communications, Singapore Economic Development Board
  • Event Co-Ordinator, Tate Britain
  • Social Enterprise Consultant, Sisterhood for Development and Sisterhood Handicrafts

Employability

The programme is designed as an advanced research degree providing exposure to a vanguard and creative field within anthropology and related disciplines. Students learn how to apply ethnographic theory and methodology in material and visual culture to a wide range of case studies highlighting material culture in the wider world - ranging from art, through photography, clothing, consumption, cultural memory, monuments and the built environment.

The degree can lead to further doctoral research or careers in a wide range of areas such as architecture, media, museums, business and aspects of development work where an emphasis on the material and visual environment is central.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Anthropology is the world's leading centre for the study of material and visual culture. We publish the Journal of Material Culture and several relevant book series, and have nine specialist staff in this field.

The department is one of the largest anthropology departments in the UK. Our excellent results in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercises and 2014 Research Excellence Framework show that we are the leading broad-based anthropology department in the UK.

Students are encouraged to take full advantage of the wider anthropological community in London and the department's strong links with European universities and international institutions.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Anthropology

68% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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Students who wish to conduct doctoral-level research in Nepal, or in preparation for professional employment in e.g. a government agency or international NGO. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

Students who wish to conduct doctoral-level research in Nepal, or in preparation for professional employment in e.g. a government agency or international NGO.

This is the only Masters-level programme offered anywhere in the world that provides students who intend to proceed to conduct anthropological research (broadly defined) in Nepal with the necessary skills (disciplinary, linguistic, methodological).

What will this programme give the student an opportunity to achieve?

- The ability to read, write, speak and understand Nepali to a level suitable for field research in Nepal
- A grounding in the scholarly literature on Nepali history, society and culture
- Expertise in anthropological theory and practice that will provide a basis for research in a Nepali context

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-anthropology-research-methods-nepali/

Structure

- Year 1
Students take a 1.0 unit Nepali language course (either Nepali Language 1 or Nepali Language 2); 1.0 unit Culture and Conflict in the Himalaya; 1.0 unit Theoretical Approaches in Social Anthropology (or other anthropology options, chosen in consultation with programme convenor, for students with equivalent anthropology training); 0.5 unit Media Production Skills; and 0.5 units of anthropology options.

- Summer break between years 1 and 2
Two weeks of intensive Nepali language tuition at SOAS after the June exams, followed by two months in Kathmandu, attached to the Nepā School of Social Sciences and Humanities and the Bishwo Bhasa Campus of Tribhuvan University. At the end of the summer students will be required to submit a 5000-word preliminary fieldwork report and research proposal, accompanied by a 500-word abstract written in Nepali.

- Year 2
Students take the following courses: 1.5 unit Nepali for researchers; 1.0 unit Anthropological Research Methods (0.5 units Ethnographic Research Methods in term 1 and 0.5 units in Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Social Research in term 2). They also attend the compulsory weekly MPhil Research Training Seminar in anthropology and write a 15,000 word MA Dissertation.

Language courses will be assessed though a mixture of written papers and oral examinations.

Non-language courses will be assessed on the basis of coursework essays and written papers.

Programme Specification (msword; 668kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-anthropology-research-methods-nepali/file68458.rtf

Teaching & Learning

What methods will be used to achieve the learning outcomes?

Knowledge:
1. How to assess data and evidence critically from manuscripts and digital sources, solve problems of conflicting sources and conflicting interpretations, locate materials, use research sources (particularly research library catalogues) and other relevant traditional sources.

2. The Research Methods course focuses on teaching the various research methods associated with anthropological fieldwork including: participant observation, historical research, qualitative interviewing, quantitative data collection, Rapid Participatory Assessment, how to design questionnaires and, especially, on how to formulate a research question and design a project and consider the ethical issues involved. The Statistics courseworks on how to compile statistics, and how to critically assess statistics.

3. The Research Training course, which is assessed by the Masters dissertation, works on students’ writing skills with an emphasis on thinking of the history of the discipline, writing to schedule, writing to requested word count, how to formulate a research question based on the material gathered, as well as how to do a presentation, how to comment on presentations and how to apply for funding. Term three looks at the strategies for working on the Masters’ dissertation and how to be upgraded at the start of the MPhil year.

4. A good grounding in the sociocultural and political history of and contemporary sociocultural and political issues in Nepal, and familiarity with the scholarly literature on these topics.

5. Proficiency in spoken and written Nepali sufficient for the purposes of anthropological field research: ability to conduct conversations and interviews, and read and synthesise information from Nepali written sources.

Intellectual (thinking) skills

1. Students should become precise and cautious in their assessment of evidence, and to understand through practice what documents can and cannot tell us.

2. Students should question interpretations, however authoritative, and reassess evidence for themselves. They should be able to design a research project, set a timetable, understand the principles of fieldwork, and consider questions of ethics.

3. Students should learn to read each others’ work for both its strengths and weaknesses, develop their skills as public speakers, learn how to compose short abstracts of their project (for funding), be able to think critically and yet be open to being critiqued themselves.

Subject-based practical skills

The programme aims to help students with the following practical skills:

1. Communicate effectively in writing, in both English and (at a less advanced level) Nepali
2. Retrieve, sift and select information from a variety of sources in both English and Nepali.
3. Present seminar papers.
4. Listen to and discuss ideas introduced during seminars.
5. Practice research techniques in a variety of specialized research libraries and institutes.
6. Be prepared to do fieldwork for an anthropology PhD.

Transferable skills

The programme will encourage students to:

1. Write good essays and dissertations.
2. Structure and communicate ideas effectively both orally and in writing.
3. Understand unconventional ideas.
4. Present (non–assessed) material orally.
5. Function as a student and researcher in a radically different environment.
6. Be able to apply for funding to do a PhD.
7. Be prepared to enter an Anthropology PhD programme and to be upgraded from MPhil to PhD in the shortest possible time.

Destinations

Students who study MA Anthropological Research Methods and Nepali develop a wide range of transferable skills such as research, analysis, oral and written communication skills.

The communication skills of anthropologists transfer well to areas such as information and technology, the media and tourism. Other recent SOAS career choices have included commerce and banking, government service, the police and prison service, social services and health service administration. Opportunities for graduates with trained awareness of the socio-cultural norms of minority communities also arise in education, local government, libraries and museums.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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MSc Marketing Online Programme Delivery. The programme is 180 credits with 11 modules. Read more

MSc Marketing Online Programme Delivery

The programme is 180 credits with 11 modules. Classes are 7 weeks long and the full programmes consist of 90 credits core courses, 45 credits focused on marketing electives and/or business electives, and a 30-credit dissertation (with a supporting 15-credit Research Skills module). The programme can be completed in 2 years. Classes are 100% online, and you’ll join a diverse group of professionals from a variety of industries. You’ll participate in class discussions, lectures and assessments at your own pace. Collaborate with fellow students, faculty, and staff to tackle case studies and challenges from the marketing field. At the same time, you’ll enjoy the advantage of building a career network while completing your postgraduate degree.

Class materials are accessible 24/7, and courses are delivered in an innovative online learning environment. We offer six intakes per year so you can start your online postgraduate marketing degree when you’re ready. A Student Support Advisor will work with you throughout the programme to help you succeed.

The online marketing programme’s dissertation is designed to test your cumulative knowledge. You’ll be asked to apply classroom concepts, experience, and theory to a real-world scenario. The dissertation portion of the online programme may be a valuable portfolio piece that shows potential employers the direct application of your marketing degree.

MSc Marketing Online Curriculum

Core Modules - 90 Credits

Marketing Strategy

 The aim of this module is to introduce marketing as a central feature of the strategic planning process. The American Marketing Association defines marketing as the activity, set of institutions, and processes for creating, communicating, delivering, and exchanging offerings that have value for customers, clients, partners, and society at large. A marketing perspective focuses on an in-depth and critical understanding of desires and decision processes of customers and businesses. This module will introduce the stages of an organisation’s marketing strategy as: strategic analysis; strategic choice; strategic implementation; and monitoring and control. Understanding the processes involved in these stages, from both theoretical and practical perspectives will develop participant’s awareness of the changing role of marketing in today’s organisations. The module content is structured around practical examples and case studies that aim to help you develop skills of critical analysis and problem-solving.

Understanding Consumer Behaviour

The aim of the module is to understand the behaviour of people as consumers and the strategic implications of this understanding for marketing managers. This understanding is one of the critical components of marketing analysis in examining and diagnosing problems and reaching effective decisions. Principles from several social sciences including psychology, sociology, and anthropology are integrated to understand and analyse consumer actions, experiences, feelings, and judgment processes.

Integrated Marketing Communications

Consumers find themselves increasingly surrounded by media and marketing-related messages and the impact of technology, and digital communication are transforming the way consumers interact with each other and organisations. Consumers are active and engaged, often generating their own content and co-creating communications with producers and other consumers. This raises both opportunities and challenges for organisations. This module will give students an in-depth understanding of the marketing communication mix both from a theoretical and practical perspective, exploring how different forms of communication work together, acknowledging the development of the new mediums by which organisations may communicate with stakeholder and influencer groups and how such communications affect business and society.

Principles of International Business

Business is increasingly international in scope as managers take advantage of greater access to foreign markets, not only to sell products, but also to access inputs, knowledge and skills. This module addresses several questions. ‘How does becoming an international business change a company that previously operated only in the home market?’ ‘How are its resources and capabilities challenged and transformed by internationalisation?’ ‘What factors determine an international business is successful?’ While many practical examples are provided, focus is given to developing an analytical approach to addressing these questions, drawing on two perspectives. These are the Resource Based View, which focuses on the resources and capabilities of the firm and the Institution Based View which requires studying the differences in the business environment around the globe, to which successful companies need to adapt. The module considers political, economic and cultural difference and the strategies companies adopt when conducting business across national boundaries.

Marketing Analysis & Research

The aim of this module is to provide knowledge on the qualitative and quantitative methodologies used in market research, which provides a foundation to understand markets and consumers. A variety of qualitative and quantitative data collection and data analysis methods for descriptive, causal, and exploratory research designs will be discussed and compared, alongside the utilisation of these techniques in market research. The research design process (problem identification, proposal writing) will also be taught.

Digital Marketing Strategy

This module focuses on the role and consequences of digital technology and social media developments for marketing theory and practice. Digital marketing has fast become an essential area of marketing for many, if not all, organisations. Digital marketing is not only marked by significant cultural changes, but also changes in the ways that marketers operate and relate to consumers. Along with these changes come far-reaching implications related to data security and privacy, social relations, mixed realities, and Big Data, among many others. Looking across a variety of issues within digital marketing, the course interrogates the relationship between digital and ‘traditional’ marketing strategy, with a critical eye to societal implications. As such, this course begins by examining theory around marketing, particularly from a sociological perspective to consider how ‘consumers’ engage with digital marketing and what it means to live in a digital world. Next, the course examines digital marketing practices that are now integral, if not essential, to marketing strategy from a ‘real world’ perspective, including the role and practice of communication, market research, campaign planning and evaluation. Finally, the course considers the implications of digital marketing, not only related to marketing practice but also to the social.



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Course content. This programme is the first taught Masters programme in medical visualisation in the UK. Offered jointly by the Glasgow School of Art and University of Glasgow, it combines actual cadaveric dissection with 3D digital reconstruction, interaction and visualisation. . Read more

Course content

This programme is the first taught Masters programme in medical visualisation in the UK. Offered jointly by the Glasgow School of Art and University of Glasgow, it combines actual cadaveric dissection with 3D digital reconstruction, interaction and visualisation. 

Why this programme

◾You will examine human anatomy and reconstruct it in a real-time 3D environment for use in education, simulation, and training. 

◾You will have access the 3D facilities at the Glasgow School of Art's School of SimVis, including stereo 3D projection, full body motion capture system, haptic devices and ambisonic sound. 

◾You will also have access to the Laboratory of Human Anatomy at the University of Glasgow,, one of the largest in Europe. 

◾The programme has excellent industry connections through research and commercial projects and there are possible internship opportunities. You will benefit from guest lectures by practitioners, researchers and experts from industry. 

◾This programme is accredited by the Institute of Medical Illustrators. 

Programme structure

You will split your time between the Glasgow School of Art (School of SimVis) and the University of Glasgow (Laboratory of Human Anatomy). The programme is structured into three stages. 

Stage one: digital technologies applied to medical visualisation (delivered by the School of SimVis at the Glasgow School of Art) 

Core courses 

◾3D modelling and animation 

◾Applications in medical visualisation 

◾Volumetric and 3D surface visualisation 

◾Core research skills for postgraduates. 

Stage two: human anatomy (delivered by the Laboratory of Human Anatomy at the University of Glasgow). 

Core courses 

◾Introduction to anatomy 

◾Structure and function of the human body 

◾Cadaveric dissection techniques. 

In stage three you will complete a self-directed final project, supported throughout with individual supervision. 

Career prospects

Career opportunities exist within the commercial healthcare device manufacturer, the public and private healthcare sectors, as well as in academic medical visualisation research. Students with medical, biomedical, anatomy, or health professional backgrounds will be able to gain 3D visualisation skills that will enhance their portfolio of abilities; students with computer science or 3D graphics background will be involved in the design and development of healthcare related products through digital technology, eg diagnostic and clinical applications, creating content involving medical visualisation, simulation, cardiac pacemakers, and biomechanically related products for implantation, such as knee, hip and shoulder joint replacements. 

Here are some examples of roles and companies for our graduates: 

◾Interns, Clinical Assistants and Clinical Researchers at Toshiba Medical Visualisation Systems 

◾Research Prosector (GU) 

◾3D printing industry 

◾Demonstrators in Anatomy 

◾PhD studies - medical history, medical visualisation 

◾Medical School 

◾Dental School 

◾Digital Designer at Costello Medical 

◾Lead Designer at Open Bionics 

◾Founder of Axial Medical Printing Ltd 

◾Digital Technician at University of Leeds 

◾Digital Project Intern at RCPSG 

◾Researcher and Factual Specialist at BBC 

◾Graduate Teaching Assistants 

◾Freelance Medical Illustration 

◾Numerous successful placements on PhD programmes (medical visualisation, anatomy, anatomy education, medical humanities) 

◾MBChB, BDS courses 

Please visit the programme page on the Glasgow School of Art website for more details! http://www.gsa.ac.uk/medvis



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This programme is the first taught Masters programme in medical visualisation in the UK. Offered jointly by the University of Glasgow and the Glasgow School of Art, it combines actual cadaveric dissection with 3D digital reconstruction, interaction and visualisation. Read more

This programme is the first taught Masters programme in medical visualisation in the UK. Offered jointly by the University of Glasgow and the Glasgow School of Art, it combines actual cadaveric dissection with 3D digital reconstruction, interaction and visualisation.

Why this programme

◾You will examine human anatomy and reconstruct it in a real-time 3D environment for use in education, simulation, and training.

◾You will have access to state-of-the-art facilities such as laser scanner (for 3D data acquisition), stereo 3D projection, full body motion capture system, haptic devices and ambisonic sound.

◾You will also have access to the Anatomy Facility at the University of Glasgow, one of the busiest in the UK.

◾The programme has excellent industry connections through research and commercial projects and there are possible internship opportunities. You will benefit from guest lectures by practitioners, researchers and experts from industry.

◾This programme is accredited by the Institute of Medical Illustrators.

Programme structure

You will split your time between the Glasgow School of Art (School of Simulation and Visualisation) and the University of Glasgow (Anatomy Facility). The programme is structured into three stages.

Stage one: digital technologies applied to medical visualisation (delivered by the School of Simulation and Visualisation at the Glasgow School of Art)

Core courses

◾3D modelling and animation

◾Applications in medical visualisation

◾Volumetric and 3D surface visualisation

◾Core research skills for postgraduates.

Stage two: human anatomy (delivered by the Anatomy Facility at the University of Glasgow).

Core courses

◾Introduction to anatomy

◾Structure and function of the human body

◾Cadaveric dissection techniques.

In stage three you will complete a self-directed final project, supported throughout with individual supervision.

Career prospects

Career opportunities exist within the commercial healthcare device manufacturer, the public and private healthcare sectors, as well as in academic medical visualisation research. Students with medical, biomedical, anatomy, or health professional backgrounds will be able to gain 3D visualisation skills that will enhance their portfolio of abilities; students with computer science or 3D graphics background will be involved in the design and development of healthcare related products through digital technology, eg diagnostic and clinical applications, creating content involving medical visualisation, simulation, cardiac pacemakers, and biomechanically related products for implantation, such as knee, hip and shoulder joint replacements.

Here are some examples of roles and companies for our graduates:

◾Interns, Clinical Assistants and Clinical Researchers at Toshiba Medical Visualisation Systems

◾Research Prosector (GU)

◾3D printing industry

◾Demonstrators in Anatomy

◾PhD studies - medical history, medical visualisation

◾Medical School

◾Dental School

◾Digital Designer at Costello Medical

◾Lead Designer at Open Bionics

◾Founder of Axial Medical Printing Ltd

◾Digital Technician at University of Leeds

◾Digital Project Intern at RCPSG

◾Researcher and Factual Specialist at BBC

◾Graduate Teaching Assistants

◾Freelance Medical Illustration

◾Numerous successful placements on PhD programmes (medical visualisation, anatomy, anatomy education, medical humanities).



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