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This Masters gives artists, practitioners, teachers and educators, in informal and formal learning environments, the opportunity to extend, enrich and consolidate the overlapping practices and theories of contemporary art and learning and teaching through individual and collaborative research- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-artist-teachers-contemporary-practices/. Read more
This Masters gives artists, practitioners, teachers and educators, in informal and formal learning environments, the opportunity to extend, enrich and consolidate the overlapping practices and theories of contemporary art and learning and teaching through individual and collaborative research- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-artist-teachers-contemporary-practices/

Why study MA Artist Teachers & Contemporary Practices (MAAT) at Goldsmiths?

Engaging with practice and theory, you will create new work; develop innovative research approaches and outcomes; critically debate the changing nature of contemporary art, gallery/exhibition practices and art education; and sustain these practices and ideas as artist teacher beyond the MAAT.
You’ll be taught by staff who are nationally and internationally renowned and published artist researcher teachers.
You’ll draw on the international scope of contemporary art practices in London through partnerships with international galleries including Tate Modern, The Whitechapel Gallery and The Showroom Gallery.
You’ll be part of a student body with a rich diversity of backgrounds and experiences, and have the opportunity to develop and maintain collaborative peer networks and support.
You’ll have access to an extensive programme of guest lectures, presentations and projects that has included: Grayson Perry, Yinka Shonibare, Sonia Boyce, Susan Pui San Lok, Danny Devenny, Mark Ervine, Marty Lyons and John Matthews, hosted through our Centre for Arts and Learning (CAL).
The MAAT can be a pathway before or after the completion of a UK QTS (Qualified Teacher Status) programme, such as the PGCE (Secondary): Art & Design.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact John Johnston

Overview

The programme places a strong emphasis on student-centred and directed learning, where teaching sessions and personal tutorials draw on the critical reflection and development of your artist teacher practices: including artistic, theoretical, political and learning and teaching concerns.

The modules of the programme are all underpinned with theories of contemporary art, learning and critical and dialectical pedagogical theories and philosophies.

You'll attend all lectures, seminars, workshops and tutorials where you'll engage in questioning the political, ideas, practices, theory and philosophy related to the specific topics of: contemporary art practice, teaching and learning, identity and place/space construction, dialectical pedagogical theories and practice, social-engagement, and research led practices where you'll be encouraged and expected to critically discuss and debate the issues raised.

But this is just a small proportion of what we expect you to do on the degree. Independent learning/research (practice with theory) is expected throughout the MAAT, this typically involves critical reflection and development of your practices as artist teacher including: additional readings, preparing topics for discussion/presentations, working with fellow students, producing essays, artist teacher statements, research, planning, organising and producing practice-based work and/or projects, curating exhibitions and presentations, both individually and collaboratively.

This emphasis on independent learning is very important at Goldsmiths. We don't just want you to accept what we tell you without question. We want you to be deeply engaged with theory and practice to develop and sustain your own ideas and practices as artist teachers.

Structure

To enable greater flexibility for you and a more equitable experience for full-time and part-time students, the MAAT programme has a modular structure, with the majority of teaching sessions usually conducted in the evenings.

This also enables part time and full-time students to attend the same evening teaching sessions and therefore form a collaborative and supportive learning environment.

For you to obtain the postgraduate degree of MAAT you will need to complete 180 CATS at Masters level.

The MAAT comprises five core modules (150 CATS) and one option module (30 CATS).

You may also take advantage of two exit points:

Postgraduate Certificate in Artist Teacher and Contemporary Practices (60 Credits)
Postgraduate Diploma in Artist Teacher and Contemporary Practices (120 Credits)

Assessment

The MA Artist Teacher and Contemporary Practices utilises a number of complementary assessment strategies. These have been devised to appropriately assess the range of learning outcomes and are underpinned by the ethos of the programme these include, exhibition/presentation/performance, essay, viva voce.

Download the programme specification for this degree to find out more about what you'll learn and how you'll be taught and assessed.

Please note that due to staff research commitments not all of these modules may be available every year.

Skills
Through the programme, you’ll develop independent thinking, understand theoretical underpinning, and the ability to question and have confidence in your ideas and practice - skills that will benefit you throughout your chosen career. You'll also develop:

critical and analytical skills
creative and practical skills
ability to express complex and sophisticated ideas with clarity and confidence
the ability to work independently and collaboratively
IT skills
As a MAAT alumna, you’ll continue to research and engage in the presentation of your practices through practice, exhibitions, socially-engaged projects, international conferences and international journals.

Careers

Our graduates have an outstanding employment record in the fields of education, galleries/museums, social work/charity, health, public administration and welfare with the majority of graduates gaining full-time employment in a variety of careers including:

Teacher, lecturer, tutor
Heads of Faculties/Departments
Community artists
Gallery educators/curators
Practicing artists/photographers

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Programme Philosophy. The Programme recognises that clinical psychology is a caring profession with a number of distinctive features. Read more
Programme Philosophy

The Programme recognises that clinical psychology is a caring profession with a number of distinctive features. Chief among these are the close interdependence between practice and research, and the systematic application of psychological models, theories and evidence to the needs of clients and the development of services. The main aim of the programme is to meet the needs of the NHS for Health and Care Professions Council registered Clinical Psychologists who have:

a wide range of clinical, organisational, leadership and research skills
developed high standards of professional integrity
an internalised model of reflective practice flexible enough to accommodate change

We therefore train clinical psychologists who promote psychological thinking in health care settings, by integrating their clinical, academic and research skills, and through critical, reflective and independent thinking. From a strong value base, they act with integrity to make a positive difference to peoples’ lives.

The programme continually reviews the training programme and is active in making adjustments, where these are indicated, in keeping with the programme’s aims and objectives and to meet the needs of the public and the profession. We are currently focusing on leadership and service user involvement. We have a People Panel, comprising service users and carers, who help us to establish a dialogue between the clients, the trainers and future colleagues in the profession.

The People Panel offer advice on a range of aspects of the training programme. The trainees are invited to consult with the panel on areas of their training, e.g. research ideas. A service user sits on our selection sub-committee and service user representatives are involved in interviewing. Service users are also involved in curriculum development; teaching, and they are invited to provide feedback on trainees as part of clinical placement evaluations.

In terms of therapeutic approaches we focus on Cognitive Behavioural Therapy and Third Wave therapies: Mindfulness based approaches, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Dialectical Behavioural Therapy. With the Centre for Mindfulness and the Dialectical Behaviour Therapy training team, and a range of local clinicians using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, we are optimising learning in these exciting clinical areas. Trainees also receive teaching on psychodynamic models, systemic working and Applied Behavioural Analysis, as one of the leading centres for training and research in behaviour analysis is based within the School of Psychology.

The programme aims to select trainees for their commitment to clinical psychology and their potential to develop a high level of clinical, academic and research competence. It aims to foster this potential by encouraging the development of skills, knowledge and values that underpin these competencies. This development takes place within a supportive structure that facilitates personal and professional growth and uses the close links that exist in North Wales between the clinical and academic services.

The programme has a positive attitude towards diversity and social inclusion, which is reflected in selection, teaching, value based practice ideas and the programme’s overall ethos.

Training Facilities
In addition to the dedicated Programme library based within the Main Arts Library, trainees have access to the wide range of facilities at the University library and the School of Psychology (e.g. psychology and computer laboratories). There is a dedicated trainee resource room that contains computers and an extensive Programme test library. Lease cars are available to trainees on the Programme and many trainees take advantage of this opportunity.

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Decisions in society have important knowledge-related and ethical dimensions. They affect people's obligations, rights and liberties. Read more
Decisions in society have important knowledge-related and ethical dimensions. They affect people's obligations, rights and liberties. At the same time, they are often based on scientific findings. Studying reliable and responsible decision-making requires philosophical reflection from various perspectives: we have to reason about human rationality, morality, political institutions and the science/society interface.

The program adopts an interdisciplinary angle where cutting-edge philosophical research is inspired by findings from psychology, economics and cognitive science. Upon graduating, you will be an expert on ethical and epistemic aspects of social decision-making and you will be able to demonstrate how philosophical analysis contributes to solving societal challenges.

Moreover, the Tilburg University MA specialization in Philosophy, Science and Society offers you:
•Teaching by international and experienced faculty members. The lecturers in the Philosophy, Science and Society MA specialization have a strong international teaching record, including countries such as Belgium, Germany, Italy, the United States, and the United Kingdom. There are also guest lecturers from Australia, Canada and the US.
•At the forefront of international research. Your teachers are also internationally leading researchers. The Tilburg Center for Logic, General Ethics and Philosophy of Science (TiLPS), the philosophy department's research platform, regularly organizes international conferences, workshops and seminars that you are invited to attend free of charge.
•Research-Based Learning. Our MA program is in the forefront of current trends and reflects the commitment to include the most recent state-of-the-art approaches and developments in the field of philosophy. From the first day of your stay in Tilburg, you will be confronted with the latest philosophical research, and you will assist your teachers in developing and testing new research results.
•Innovative Methods. The program combines traditional philosophical methods (conceptual analysis, dialectical reasoning, case studies, thought experiments) with recently developed approaches, such as experimental philosophy, simulations and abstract modeling of philosophical problems.
•A Broad Range of Scholarships. There are several attractive scholarships to which you can apply, awarded at university, school or department level. They are open for European and non-European students alike.

Career Perspective Philosophy, Science and Society

Still think that a philosophy degree is not attractive to employers? That it is not your best career choice? Then have a look at these articles from major newspapers and magazines:
•The Atlantic: “Is Philosophy the Most Practical Major?”
•Huffington Post: “The Unexpected Way Philosophy Majors Are Changing The World Of Business”
•The Guardian: “What can you do with a degree of philosophy?”
•The Guardian: “I think, therefore I earn. The rise in stock of philosophy graduates”

True, a philosophy MA is not a Master of Business Administration. But it is a much better career choice than the cliché pretends. You acquire reasoning, analysis and argumentation skills that can be used in various fields and are highly valued by most employers. You are also trained in clear and persuasive writing, creative thinking and devising original solutions to hard problems. This gives you great flexibility in your job choice.

In addition, the Philosophy, Science and Society specialization makes you a genuine expert on human cognition, social decision-making and the interplay between science and society. This involves hot topics such as the ethics of science, risk assessment and the legitimacy of technocratic decision-making. This expertise is sought for in government agencies, research institutes and the private sector. Companies may be especially interested in your expertise in moral reasoning and the impact of moral factors on decision-making.
After graduating, you can also continue your career as an academic researcher who has already acquired an interdisciplinary background and who can apply for PhD positions in various fields.

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This MA is will enable you to study Philosophy at an advanced level, offering an extensive range of optional modules that give you the flexibility and the freedom to explore your own philosophical interests. Read more
This MA is will enable you to study Philosophy at an advanced level, offering an extensive range of optional modules that give you the flexibility and the freedom to explore your own philosophical interests.

We also provide a core Research Methods module, enabling you to develop the analytic and dialectical skills needed to carry out research in Philosophy. This fosters in-depth reflection on philosophical methods, conducted through fortnightly meetings in term-time.

After completing the MA, you may choose to apply to one of our PhD programmes. The degree also gives you an excellent grounding for further academic work in other areas and a wide range of careers. Recent employment destinations for our postgraduates include Philosophy lectureships, policy research and careers in politics, law, finance, media, teaching and journalism.

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The discipline of Counselling is still forming within the field of the Social Sciences and Humanities; many new exciting research developments have opened up, and the interdisciplinary approach which underpins this programme, offers to contemporary trainee Counselling practitioners a fusion of new and traditional approaches backed by research. Read more
The discipline of Counselling is still forming within the field of the Social Sciences and Humanities; many new exciting research developments have opened up, and the interdisciplinary approach which underpins this programme, offers to contemporary trainee Counselling practitioners a fusion of new and traditional approaches backed by research.

Course Overview

This programme in Psychotherapeutic Practice: Emotion-Focused Therapy offers a part-time Counselling training opportunity at Master’s level in a Humanistic modality.

Lesley Greenberg, one of the co-researchers and founder of the modality states that:

“Emotion-focused treatment was developed as an empirically informed approach to the practice of psychotherapy grounded in contemporary psychological theories of functioning. Emotion-focused therapy (EFT) was developed by my colleagues and I in the 1980s out of empirical studies of the process of change and has developed into one of the recognized evidence-based treatment approaches for depression and marital distress as well as showing promise for trauma, eating disorders, anxiety disorders, and interpersonal problems.” FOCUS 2010;8:32-42.

This model of therapy has now been approved of by the National Institute of Clinical Excellence, the quality gatekeepers of the NHS, as having demonstrated significant positive outcome research in a number of areas.

The foundation of this therapeutic modality draws on the work of Carl Rogers and his work on the ‘therapeutic relationship’; from the ‘focusing’ work of Eugene Gendlin and the dialogic and experiential work of the Gestalt tradition. Significantly, however, EFT opens up a greater access to human emotion, as it engages with close interest in the growing understanding of neuroscience and how emotions function differently from cognition in the functioning of the brain. These insights from the work of Damasio and LeDoux, and others, are enabling practitioners in the field to develop a new language and method of addressing psychological distress and putting emotions back at the centre of the constituted self.

The programme will be taught in small groups so that students have a significant opportunity to engage in the practice and development of their therapeutic competence. In addition students will be taught through lecture format and small seminar group, where there will be the opportunity to discuss with each other and the tutor the rich, diverse and sometimes complex issues addressed in the programme.

Modules

The programme is divided into two parts:

PART 1:
The theory and practice of Emotion-Focused Therapy sets the philosophical, ideological and research base of the programme. The module on ‘The Nature and Experience of Human Functioning’ will address the conceptualization of human wellness and distress as described by the EFT model and establish the research base for the formulation and development of these ideas. The concept of ‘dialectical constructivism’ will be investigated in its formation of human meaning, and its implications to human perception and feeling. The module will engage in the most recent research regarding the emotions and the part they play in our human functioning.

The module ‘The principles of working with EFT’ introduces the practice work of the modality, which is initially founded on the establishing of the therapeutic relationship and qualities of empathy. The modules will develop a wider understanding of the concept of ‘treatment’ in the engagement of therapeutic work.

Running alongside these two practice modules will be modules on ethical practice and professional benchmarks; supervision; personal development; identity: sameness and difference; and the context of psychological distress and mental health.

PART 2:
Part two of the programme consists of a dissertation which is undertaken by the student as a supported research project. A student will receive regular supervision and opportunities to attend research workshops on topics which can help to underpin their knowledge of research.

Key Features

-The interdisciplinary approach which underpins this programme, offers to contemporary trainee Counselling practitioners a fusion of new and traditional approaches backed by research.
-The programme will be taught in small groups so that students have a significant opportunity to engage in the practice and development of their therapeutic competence.

Assessment

The programme will offer a range of different assessment methods to give students the opportunity to extend practical and academic skills and encourage your independent learning, these could include: essays, presentation, reflection, practice.

As a Counselling practice programme written up to BACP accreditation/registration standard there are two additional requirement of the course:
-A student will need to complete a minimum of 100 hours of supervised clinical practice as a trainee Counsellor
-Complete a minimum of 12 hours of personal therapy

Career Opportunities

This programme is ideal for those wishing to develop their career within counselling practice using research-led methods to enhance their professional practice.

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This degree is intended for students with a general interest in sociology who wish to update, extend and deepen their knowledge and understand current developments in the field. Read more
This degree is intended for students with a general interest in sociology who wish to update, extend and deepen their knowledge and understand current developments in the field. The programme aims to provide students with opportunities to expand their knowledge of the discipline by engaging with contemporary research and by undertaking historical and comparative study.

Compulsory modules:

The Research Process: This module introduces the main varieties of both quantitative and qualitative research in the social sciences. Principles of research design and issues of data collection and analysis are studied.

Applied Social Research: This module delivers specialist training in sociological research. It draws upon generic social science research skills and knowledge and applies them to a joint group project. In the group project, students will select the topic in which they will develop their skills as empirical researchers. It is a ‘hands on’ module and students will engage in hypothesis development, research design, data gathering, data analysis and interpretation of the results.

Optional modules:

Researching Community: This module examines the developments in the field of community research and related theoretical and policy debates surrounding the application of ideas of ‘community’ to current economic and social changes. The module focuses on four main themes:

Conceptual issues: the meaning of ‘community’ and its use as a concept in social scientific and popular discourse. This will be considered in relation to different theoretical approaches such as social constructionism, realism, and post-structuralism.
Empirical applications: an examination of classic and contemporary examples of community research and relevant case studies dealing with different forms of ‘community’.
Policy issues: relating to contemporary forms of intervention in relation to community development, regeneration, mobilisation, participation, leadership and power. This will be considered in the context of frameworks such as communitarianism, social capital, and the ‘third way’.
Community methodology: examines how ‘community’ has been researched and the tools and methods available for empirical investigation. These include ethnographic studies, large-scale surveys, ‘community profiling’ and auditing, and action research.
Nationalism and Minorities: This module will examine key issues and debates concerning the growing claims by ethnic and national minorities and indigenous peoples for distinct language, territorial and other minority rights and recognition within nation-states and beyond. The relationships between nationalism, citizenship and minority rights will be considered with reference to empirical examples. Debates and policies concerned with the management of cultural and ethnic diversity by the state will also be considered. The approach is interdisciplinary drawing on sociology, political theory, anthropology, law and education, with case study examples provided from Europe, North America, Asia and Oceania. It aims to provide students with a global and comparative understanding of individual cases, of their historical antecedents, and of the key similarities and differences between them.

Sociology of Everyday Life: The module deals with different theories of everyday life, for example those focusing on face-to face communication. Other theories emphasize how social life is “performed” in everyday contexts and its “dramaturgy”. It is discussed how individuals construct meaning out of their social lives. Some approaches reflect on the constraints of society, especially of powerful institutions, and how they affect the “lifeworld”. Empirical studies of everyday life will also be part of the module. From airports to zoos, human behaviour in different settings has been described and placed in theoretical context. The creation of social stigmas, or of social spaces can be studied. Students will be introduced to the use of different methodologies, like observation and listening to individuals telling their story.

Culture, Race and Civilization: The module explores normative and descriptive concepts of culture, the dichotomy of culture and civilization, and the dialectical tension between all of these. Culture appears in a number of different contexts: for example as promise of Enlightenment, or as social reality of the everyday. The relation between “multiculturalism” and ideas of “nation” and “race” will be part of the discussion. What is the role of the idea of “civilization” for racism and racialization? Another aspect to be covered is the relation between wealth and culture. “Cultural critique” and globalization theories provide different answers. Finally, the role of violence in relation to culture, race and civilization will be discussed.

MA Dissertation

The dissertation is undertaken on completion of the taught modules. It is valued at 60 credits (one-third of the MA degree) and will be around 20,000 words in length.

Part-time students in employment may choose a topic related to their profession and an area in which they wish to develop further expertise and specialisation. Under guidance of a dissertation tutor, students will undertake their MA dissertation work independently on a topic of their choice. This may be a piece of empirical research including primary or secondary data analysis or a theoretical dissertation.

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Studying at ZEI offers you the chance to understand the EU and the critical interplay between governance and regulation. Taught by ZEI professors and a flying faculty of renowned experts from all over the EU, you will be a part of an international group of students with diverse backgrounds and experiences. Read more
Studying at ZEI offers you the chance to understand the EU and the critical interplay between governance and regulation. Taught by ZEI professors and a flying faculty of renowned experts from all over the EU, you will be a part of an international group of students with diverse backgrounds and experiences. You will have the opportunity to have your research published and be a part of the ZEI research team. You will train and develop important skills for your career. You will visit and experience the EU institutions first hand. You will make friends and contacts, which will stay with you throughout your life. You will become a part of the ZEI Alumni Network.

Interdisciplinary Curriculum

Political science modules focus on contemporary political issues and governance in Europe, especially, as they pertain to the wider spectrum of integration theories, and on the institutional and policy development of the European Union since the ratification of the Treaties of Rome.
Economic modules cover the economic, monetary and financial aspects of the EU, and analyse the Union's internal market against the backdrop of economic globalisation and the international trade regime.
Legal modules deal with the constitutional principles of the European Union, the sources and application of EU law, the regulation of industry sectors such as electronic communications, energy and logistics as well as the legal structure of the internal market and the jurisdiction of the Court of Justice of the EU and other EU institutions.
The focus on governance in the EU deals with the interaction between political, economic, and legal factors and the dialectical structure of actors and factors in creating the institutional arrangements and policy fields in today's EU. Regulatory issues cover regulation policy and corresponding legal prerequisites in various fields, such as electronic communications, logistics, water, and energy.

Why choose our programme?

• Learn about current EU trends based on academic competence.
• Benefit from research-based teaching with a practical approach.
• Meet an international faculty of renowned academics and practitioners.
• Gain enormous career opportunities with your post-graduate Master's degree.
• Study in English at one of Germany's most prestigious universities.
• Make friends in a small, international, and diverse student group of fellows at the Center of European Integration Studies (ZEI).
• Open to post-graduates of different profiles from across the EU and around the world
• Excursions to the EU institutions in Brussels and Strasbourg, Luxembourg and Frankfurt as well as to the German government in Berlin
• New: additional certificate in intercultural competences
• Benefit from networking through Europe Dialogues and Business Talks.
• Take part in our diverse and exciting alumni network.
• Enjoy the friendly atmosphere and high quality infrastructure at ZEI.
• Take advantage of the cosmopolitan city of Bonn, the German UN capital (19 different agencies), headquarters of DHL/Deutsche Post and Deutsche Telekom, Deutsche Welle and many national and international organisations, state agencies and companies.


During the two semesters from October to June, students attend six basic modules of 30 hours each and five specialised modules, each consisting of three topics and comprising 36 hours each. Basic modules provide students with a general knowledge and an overview of the subject. Specialised modules provide detailed knowledge on issues of special importance. The programme comprises four field trips to European and German institutions, organisations and companies, a career development programme as well as business talks, in particular, with practitioners from the private sector and alumni.
From June to August, students write their Master's thesis.

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The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is a thriving center of intellectual excellence that encompasses 14 academic departments and 80 degree programs. Read more
The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is a thriving center of intellectual excellence that encompasses 14 academic departments and 80 degree programs. Its more than 2,500 students are engaged in a wide variety of challenging courses and hands-on learning experiences that extend across all areas of the humanities and sciences – from the great philosophers and classic literature to the world economy and environmental sustainability.

At the core of each department are faculty members who have garnered national acclaim for their best-selling books, ground-breaking research and creative endeavors. Together, students and their professors explore globally significant subjects and work towards the goal of improving every aspect of the way in which human beings live. To learn more about a specific area of study, click on the left-hand navigation bar for a full listing of academic departments.

The department

As a student in the Department of Psychology, you will undertake a survey of current knowledge and viewpoints about the science of behavior and cognitive processes. You will learn the research methods by which such knowledge is obtained, and be given the opportunity to study basic psychological processes, their development, the nature of behavioral aberrations, their treatment, and selected applications of this knowledge.

The undergraduate and graduate programs in Psychology encompass child and adult psychology, abnormal behavior, therapy, and psychological testing. The curricula explores the sciences of psychology—learning, perception, behavioral neuroscience, developmental processes, and normal and abnormal processes—and their practical application. In addition to classroom studies, you will gain hands-on experience at community youth centers, hospitals, human resource departments, and agencies that serve developmentally disabled children and adults.

Fully accredited by the American Psychological Association, the Clinical Psychology Doctoral Program (Psy.D.), trains students who want to practice as clinical psychologists with a strong interest in traditionally underserved populations. In addition to mastering a rigorous core curriculum, Psy.D. students gain special competencies in two of four areas: Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT), Assessment and Treatment of Substance Use Disorders, Interventions with High-Risk Families, and Serious Mental Illness.

M.A. in Experimental Psychology

In earning this 36-credit Master of Arts degree in Experimental Psychology you will strengthen your research, writing and critical-thinking skills while broadening and deepening your knowledge of behavior. The core curriculum provides a foundation in the basic topics of statistics, experimental methods, behavior analysis and learning, perception and cognition, and the neuropsychological bases of behavior. You will have unique opportunities to conduct original hands-on research.

In designing a program to fit your own interests and needs, you will have an opportunity to choose from a full menu of electives, including “Social Psychology,” “Personality,” “Applied Behavior Analysis,” “Psychopathology,” “Psychopharmacology “ and “Theory and Practice of Psychotherapy.” In addition to paving the way for further study on the graduate level, the M.A. in Psychology will prepare you for a wide range of positions in research, education, industrial organization, management training and human resources.

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