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Scotland has had a devolution process devoid of civil conflict. Read more
Scotland has had a devolution process devoid of civil conflict. What can we learn from the Scottish experience that can be applied to similar processes in Africa, Eastern Europe and the Middle East? How can the Scottish experiment be sustained and what challenges will politicians, administrators, civil society agents and citizens face in the future? Leading international and Scottish academics and practitioners face these questions in an intensive, practice-orientated, course designed for researchers, professional development and activists.

Why study Devolution & Global Governance at Dundee?

The dissolution of political power and the creation of new forms of governance is a global phenomenon, where the Scottish experience of a peaceful, civil process is not unique, but is remarkable, where there are lessons to be learned from that process that speak to state and inter-state relations, governance and collective action in civil society.

In the MLitt Devolution and Global Governance we explore the lessons of Scotland's experience of devolution and the debate on independence. Scotland has had a devolution process devoid of civil conflict.

What can we learn from the Scottish experience that can be applied to similar processes in Africa, Eastern Europe and the Middle East? How can the Scottish experiment be sustained and what challenges will politicians, administrators, civil society agents and citizens face in the future? Leading international and Scottish academics and practitioners face these questions in an intensive practice-orientated set of qualifications designed for researchers, professional development and activists.

What's so good about Devolution & Global Governance at Dundee?

As a legacy to the 5 Million Questions project, and with the intellectual support of the Centre for Scottish Culture and the Scottish Centre for Global History, this course builds on core strengths of the University of Dundee, and the distinctive role of this university within Scotland, to examine global issues of governance.

An intense, week-long symposium of 'master classes' is offered which features invited researchers and practitioners, split between those whose expertise lies within Scotland and those who work in other parts of the world.

We have organised Devolution & Global Governance so you can study for full-time masters degree (MLitt), taking 12 months, or smaller components of Postgraduate Diploma and Certificate, which can be studied full- or part- time. Some of the optional modules are also available by distance learning.

Who should study this course?

This course is directed towards administrators and practitioners of global governance, and also recent graduates who are looking to advance their career prospects in this area, and undertake advanced professional training including doctoral research preparation.

How you will be taught

This course is co-ordinated by History staff based in the School of Humanities, also teaching on the course are external researchers and practioners. The teaching takes place during two semesters Sept-Dec and Jan-Apr, plus the week-long symposium which takes place in April/May. The group work case study takes from May/June-Aug.

A variety of teaching methods are used, including: small group teaching, supervised study of case studies, plus invited speakers who will hold mastersclasses during the week-long symposium.

studies, plus invited speakers who will hold mastersclasses during the week-long symposium.

What you will study

Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits)

The Postgraduate Certificate is made up of 40-credits from taught modules during the semesters Sept-Dec and Jan-Apr from the list below, plus the week-long symposium which is worth 20 credits.

Scottish National Identities since 1807 (20 credits, distance learning)
Scotland before the Union (20 credits, distance learning)
The Scottish Highlands and Islands - Clearances and Land Settlement (20 credits, distance learning)
Introduction to Historical Theory (20 credits, distance learning)
Government in Early Modern Scotland (40 credits, on campus)
Revolution, Civil War and Nationalism: The Historiography and Politics of Irish State Formation, 1912-2005 (40 credits, on campus)
From Jim Crow to Black Power: The African American Freedom Struggle, 1945-1980 (40 credits, on campus)
Human Rights in International Relations (40 credits, on campus)
Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism in Europe (40 credits, on campus)
International Security of Drugs & Organised Crime (40 credits, on campus)
International Business Strategy (20 credits, on campus)
Global Risk Analysis (20 credits, on campus)
Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits)

The Postgraduate Diploma is made up of three components:

1 - Governance Modules

Two taught modules, one in each semester, which are taught on campus:

Civil Society & Governance (30 credits, on campus)
Governing Scotland (30 credits, on campus)
2 - Week-long symposium

A week-long symposium of masterclasses in April/May.

3 - Other taught modules

Forty credits from other taught modules, as per the Postgraduate Certificate (see above).

Masters (180 credits)

Students wishing to take the Masters complete the Postgraduate Diploma (above) and then spend the summer period (May/June-Aug) working on a group-work case study, worth 60 credits.

In exceptional circumstances, students may be permitted to work on an individual dissertation instead.

All students must attempt the dissertation. Students whose dissertation fails to satisfy the examiners will be awarded the PG Diploma, provided that the taught elements of the course have been successfully completed.

Careers

This programme of study is directed toward those who wish to pursue a career within civil society organizations and within local, devolved, and national administrations. The advanced knowledge and practitioner led skills will help you pursue and advance your employment within international bodies and funding agencies, development agencies, NGOs and multinational companies. Sophisticated conceptual analysis and case study training will benefit those who seek professional development within their current employment.

Learn more about careers related to the Humanities on our Careers Service website.

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The past decade has seen massive structural changes to the constitutional arrangements of the United Kingdom. Read more
The past decade has seen massive structural changes to the constitutional arrangements of the United Kingdom.

The LLM Governance and Devolution programme explores these structural changes, the most obvious being the creation of legislative and executive bodies in Scotland and Wales, together with a resumption of devolved government in Northern Ireland.

The programme explores the opportunities and tensions created by these innovations and will also explore the less public shifts in the relationships between the three branches of government. Issues concerning accountability, democratic engagement and what constitutes ‘good governance’ are explored to give an understanding of the broader relationships between the ‘regions’ and tiers of government/governance at the state and EU levels.

Distinctive features

The LLM Governance and Devolution programme is suitable for graduates from or with a legal practice qualification in any legal tradition or jurisdiction who have a special interest in constitutional legal theory and regional governance.

The LLM Governance and Devolution programme:

provides you with a general appreciation of current issues in specific areas of law, both domestic and international;
stimulates a critical approach to evaluation of current and proposed regulation and cultivate independent and original thought;
enables you to undertake in-depth research and demonstrate advanced knowledge in specific areas of law;
offers close contact with the devolved institutions in Wales: the National Assembly for Wales and the Welsh Assembly Government;
allows you to benefit from the activities of the Wales Governance Centre.
The LLM Governance and Devolution programme is very flexible and offers a wide range of modules providing you with the ability to customise the programme to meet your own professional and/or employment needs.

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Compulsory modules. The Research Process. This module introduces the main varieties of both quantitative and qualitative research in the social sciences. Read more
Compulsory modules:

The Research Process: This module introduces the main varieties of both quantitative and qualitative research in the social sciences. Principles of research design and issues of data collection and analysis are studied. Data collection and analysis will include:

How to construct, use and critique questionnaires and interviews
Interpret measurement error and missing data
Engage in various kinds of observational research
Analyse observational data
Record, transcribe and analyse conversational, textual and visual data
Conduct archival, documentary and historical research
Key Issues in Social Policy: This module extends and deepens knowledge and understanding of key issues in contemporary social policy. Links between theoretical analysis in welfare and empirical enquiry in social policy are made, and key issues, debates and concepts in social policy analysis and evaluation are explored. Contemporary forms of welfare delivery including issues of participation, user involvement and control in the provision of welfare are critically evaluated. Core debates relating to social change, equality and inequalities, discrimination, risk and dependency, citizenship and rights will be examined. The impact of devolution and local government change on social policy in Wales is reviewed together with national and international comparisons of welfare systems.

Health Policies: This module adopts a comparative approach to the study of health policies in Britain and internationally. Students will consider the politics of health and will develop an understanding of the dynamics of power between professionals, administrators and patients. The role of social policy analysis in evaluating the impact of change, factors associated with good and bad practice, and barriers to implementing new health policies are explored through examples and case studies. The case of the British NHS will be considered in detail examining evidence of attempts to improve the quality of care through funding and organisational change. The module will also examine the implications of devolution for the NHS.

Optional Modules:

Researching Community: This module examines the developments in the field of community research and related theoretical and policy debates surrounding the application of ideas of ‘community’ to current economic and social changes. The module focuses on four main themes:

Conceptual issues: the meaning of ‘community’ and its use as a concept in social scientific and popular discourse. This will be considered in relation to different theoretical approaches such as social constructionism, realism, and post-structuralism.
Empirical applications: an examination of classic and contemporary examples of community research and relevant case studies dealing with different forms of ‘community’.
Policy issues: relating to contemporary forms of intervention in relation to community development, regeneration, mobilisation, participation, leadership and power. This will be considered in the context of frameworks such as communitarianism, social capital, and the ‘third way’.
Community methodology: examines how ‘community’ has been researched and the tools and methods available for empirical investigation. These include ethnographic studies, large-scale surveys, ‘community profiling’ and auditing, and action research.
Nationalism and Minorities: This module will examine key issues and debates concerning the growing claims by ethnic and national minorities and indigenous peoples for distinct language, territorial and other minority rights and recognition within nation-states and beyond. The relationships between nationalism, citizenship and minority rights will be considered with reference to empirical examples. Debates and policies concerned with the management of cultural and ethnic diversity by the state will also be considered. The approach is interdisciplinary drawing on sociology, political theory, anthropology, law and education, with case study examples provided from Europe, North America, Asia and Oceania. It aims to provide students with a global and comparative understanding of individual cases, of their historical antecedents, and of the key similarities and differences between them.

Policy Research and Evaluation: Monitoring and evaluation of policy initiatives has become increasingly important. This module aims to develop full complement of skills required to successfully undertake specialist research and robust evaluation that will inform future policy. Evidence-based policy and practice are imperatives of the public, independent and voluntary sector organisations nationally and internationally. Evaluation research is one of the cornerstones of evidence-based practice both locally and nationally and is important right across local government and public and independent sector organisations. The module will provide key skills to enable individuals to understand, conduct or commission evaluative work at a time when it is increasingly important for organisations to consider the effectiveness, efficiency and equity of the services they provide.

Key Issues in International Social Work: The purpose of the International Social Work module is to widen students’ understanding of the differing models, traditions and welfare contexts of social work. On completing the module, students are expected to be able to:

Critically evaluate social work within the international context
Critically evaluate and contrast social work in the UK with European and other countries
Analyse the strengths and weaknesses in the different ways of doing social work within the countries studied
Discuss in depth the philosophical, historical and theoretical differences between the contexts of social work practice within the welfare frameworks of the different countries
Develop a sound and broad understanding of the contrasting differences with social work based in African and Asian countries
Applied Social Research: This module delivers specialist training in social policy research. It draws upon generic social science research skills and k knowledge and applies them to a joint group project. In the group project, students will select the social policy-related topic in which they will develop their skills as empirical researchers. It is a ‘hands on’ module and students will engage in hypothesis development, research design, data gathering, data analysis and interpretation of the results.

MA Dissertation:

The dissertation is normally around 20,000 words in length for MA degrees. Students will receive full support from lecturing staff throughout the process, from the planning stage through to the final stages of writing up the final version. Every student is allocated a supervisor who will oversee and provide advice and guidance on research design, methodology, results, drafting and final dissertation submission. Recent MA dissertation topics have included:

Mental health policy in Japan
Whose welfare benefits?
Violence against women in Pakistan

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After more than a decade of devolution, Scotland’s national status ‘is both dangled before us and tantalisingly withheld’ (Don Paterson). Read more

Introduction

After more than a decade of devolution, Scotland’s national status ‘is both dangled before us and tantalisingly withheld’ (Don Paterson)
The Stirling Master's course views Scottish literature in the light of this ambiguity from a perspective shaped by critical theory as well as traditional literary history. Our focus is the unusually strong role played by literature in sustaining the reality and difference of Scottish culture over the past three centuries – not forgetting the role of novelists and poets in integrating Scottish identity into the project of Britishness. As debate intensifies over Scotland’s political status, the time is ripe to examine the role of writing in shaping the image and reality of the nation.

Key information

- Degree type: MLitt, Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma
- Study methods: Full-time, Part-time
- Duration: Full-time: MLitt-12 months, PG Diploma-9 months, PG Certificate 4 months Part-time: MLitt 27 months, PG Diploma-21 months, PG Certificate-9 months
- Start date: September
- Course Director: Dr Scott Hames and Dr Suzanne Gilbert

Course objectives

This course explores modern Scottish literature in relation to the ambivalent condition of Scottish history and identity.
We focus on writing from Robert Burns, Walter Scott and James Hogg, through Victorian and late 19th-century writers (Galt, Buchan, Stevenson) to the modernist experiments of Hugh MacDiarmid and his followers, and on to provocative 20th-century experiments in language, textuality and historical re-telling (Welsh, Galloway, Kelman, Spark, Gray, Saadi, Robertson).
No previous experience in studying Scottish literature is required. Leading Scottish writers and critics feature prominently in assigned reading, as do theorists of cultural modernity.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Delivery and assessment

Dissertation
The most significant piece of work on the course will be a dissertation of 15,000 words, written during the summer on a subject of your choosing in consultation with a member of teaching staff. You may choose to develop work initiated on one of the modules you have studied. Those who do not embark on the dissertation may be awarded a Diploma. The work of the best students completing the course may be deemed worthy of an MLitt with Distinction.

REF2014

In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

Rating

Over half of our submissions in the latest Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) were found to be ‘Internationally Excellent’ or ‘World-leading’.

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Education & Professional Studies enables you to reflect on your professional practice, extend your knowledge and develop awareness of significant developments in contemporary pedagogical policy and practice. Read more
Education & Professional Studies enables you to reflect on your professional practice, extend your knowledge and develop awareness of significant developments in contemporary pedagogical policy and practice. It is a broad-based programme that suits your specific professional needs and research interests through taught modules plus a research project.

Key benefits

- Professionals can construct a portfolio of courses tailored to their own concerns.

- Students are able to undertake professionally focused research that reflects their interests, expertise and specific sector.

- Flexibility and choice over the duration of the programme enables participants to take account of new interests and changing concerns.

- Located in the heart of London.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/education-and-professional-studies-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

Our department has offered the successful MA Education programmes for over a decade. The current suite of programmes is designed to appeal to different specialist student interests. In the current policy climate, with the increased devolution of managerial responsibility and more shared responsibilities, more educationalists need knowledge and expertise which extends beyond their immediate subject area.

This programme offers the opportunity to construct a broad-based programme that suits your specific professional needs and research interests across the curriculum.

-,Course purpose -

For all those who teach, lecture or organise educational provision at any level. The programme enables professionals concerned with education to reflect on their practice and to inform such reflection by extending their knowledge. Students will be made aware of significant current developments in contemporary pedagogical policy and practice.

- Course format and assessment -

Core modules:

- Recent Developments in Educational Management
- Social Context of Schooling
- Teacher Development
- Dissertation

There are no examinations - all modules are assessed by written work.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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For the non-specialist student, the Law School offers a general LLM which permits the students to pick and mix modules from the specialist schemes. Read more
For the non-specialist student, the Law School offers a general LLM which permits the students to pick and mix modules from the specialist schemes. The general LLM consists of a compulsory module in Legal Research Methods plus taught modules, selected from the list below. The dissertation could be on any legal topic subject to approval of the Law School.

Structure
January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Teaching will mostly be seminar-based which will promote group and individual interaction, which also ensures that every individual student is encouraged to contribute to discussions. Seminar-based teaching enables lecturers and students to discuss issues and investigate topics in greater depth, and develops critical thinking and solution-based learning skills in students; whilst also allowing the course teachers to monitor closely each individual’s progress. Emphasis will be placed on the use of virtual learning through the mechanism of the Blackboard computer-assisted learning system and databases such as Westlaw and LexisNexis. Throughout all modules, comparative elements with other legal systems will be emphasised.

Teaching will be in English; however, according to the University’s Welsh language policy, students who so wish may be examined and present essays, coursework and dissertations through the medium of Welsh.

Compulsory modules:

Legal Research Methods (Exemptions from this module may be granted if a student has achieved the learning outcomes in another way, e.g. already having done and LLM or LLB with a research or dissertation element. Requests for exemption should be made to the Director of Postgraduate Studies.)
Optional modules:

Any five modules offered by the Law School up to the value of 100 credits may be undertaken subject to approval and timetabling. Up to 20 credits may be taken from the list of modules offered by Bangor Business School, Bangor School of Social Sciences and Welsh Institute of Social and Cultural Affairs subject to approval of both schools and timetabling.

Welsh Public Law
The Legal Regulation of Health And Social Care in England and Wales
Law of Devolution in Wales and Europe
World Trade Law
Intellectual Property Law
Industrial Property Law
Competition Law
International Banking Law and Capital Markets
International Corporate Finance and Merger Regulation Law
Comparative Corporate Governance
Employment Law
International Financial Instruments Law
International Environmental La
International Taxation Law
European Union Internal Market Law
International Insurance Law
International Commercial Arbitration Law
Bilingualism in Wales and Other European Countries

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Research in Politics and International Relations explores the theory, practice and ethics of politics and governance. We cover a broad area of expertise, from local policy to global governance, political theory to empirical studies, constructivism to rational choice approaches. Read more

Research profile

Research in Politics and International Relations explores the theory, practice and ethics of politics and governance.

We cover a broad area of expertise, from local policy to global governance, political theory to empirical studies, constructivism to rational choice approaches.

Our Politics & International Relations group has close links with cross-disciplinary and internationally recognised research centres.

Major research focuses include:

sub-state and supranational dimensions of politics and public policy
the impact of devolution in the UK and elsewhere, and the constitution and governance of the European Union
international politics: changing relations, the new security agenda, transatlantic relations, political economy, migration politics and global governance
nationalism, democratic transition, civil society and institution-building
health, welfare, environment, competition, migrations and citizenship, and equal opportunities policies
political theory, especially war ethics, environmental ethics and theories of freedom

Training and support

This programme includes courses in research design and methodology skills. The Graduate School provides a suite of ESRC-recognised research training courses for social science students across the University. We have an exciting package of flexible, web-based training courses in line with the increased emphasis on advanced training throughout the course of doctoral studies.

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Areas of research include, but are not limited to. evaluation of spacial heterogeneity for the design and layout of experimental sites. Read more
Areas of research include, but are not limited to: evaluation of spacial heterogeneity for the design and layout of experimental sites.
The course

This course builds on the Engineering Department’s long history of working closely with industry teaching students how to apply engineering science to industrial product design. Mechatronics is a multi-disciplinary field of engineering that combines with mechanical, electronic, computer, software, control and systems design engineering in the design and manufacture of useful products. It is an increasingly important discipline as most modern vehicles and machinery incorporate multiple mechatronic systems.

Some of the technologies that mechatronics encompasses include: robotics, vision systems, satellite navigation systems, communications technology, and biometric and other new advanced sensors. Introduction of these new technologies means that engineers cannot rely upon prior knowledge when designing machinery. As a consequence it has become normal practice for new highly technical equipment to be developed by specialist manufacturers, either through subcontract subsystem devolution or commercial partnership.

When developing new products, much of the work of the engineer involves the recombination or reapplication of previously un-combined technologies to solve new problems or enable new functionalities. Engineers therefore need to develop the greatest possible body of knowledge as a resource to call upon during the resolution of novel challenges in new or different environments.

This postgraduate programme builds upon students’ existing engineering skills and knowledge developed through prior education and focuses them into a more specific and applied area of study. This approach is designed to allow students to expand their applied knowledge and develop the necessary powers of analysis required to solve complex design problems. Learning largely takes place through a series of individual and group engineering projects intended to enable students to apply their existing academic skills and knowledge to the design, fabrication and testing of new products or systems. Where applicable, projects will be sponsored and supported by engineering companies and will focus on the development of mechatronic systems, machinery and equipment.

How will it benefit me?

This programme is designed for students with a strong academic background but limited industrial experience. It is intended to expedite the experiential development of these engineers through a series of industrially linked projects. Students will complete the course with a view to taking leading positions in manufacturing companies designing innovative machinery and equipment by employing new and emerging technologies to develop mechatronic systems, machinery and solutions.

Careers

This course provides an understanding of the practical application of engineering science and mathematics to the development of mechatronic systems. It is designed to aid students with good engineering qualifications, but limited applied industrial experience, learn the skills to take leading positions in manufacturing companies designing innovative machinery and equipment by employing new and emerging technologies to develop mechatronic systems, machinery and solutions.

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This Master's degree in politics considers how ethnic, national and religious identities intersect and how they cause conflict and violence within and between states. Read more
This Master's degree in politics considers how ethnic, national and religious identities intersect and how they cause conflict and violence within and between states. In Western countries, many majority ethnic groups are bemoaning a loss of national identity and sovereignty, while smaller nations and ethnic-national groups press for devolution or independence at the expense of larger nation-state formations. Religiously inspired conflict, especially, but by no means only, in the Muslim world, is a further major source of global insecurity. This programme draws on research in comparative politics, history, sociology, cultural and genetic anthropology, political theory and international relations to offer comprehensive, balanced analyses of contemporary political controversies. Alongside theoretical approaches, we will examine ethnic and national conflict via a wealth of real-world case studies that cover every corner of the globe. The programme provides the analytical tools you will need to examine problems of national, ethnic and religious conflict in their broader political context.

The first core module will give you a deep understanding of the concepts of ethnic group and nation and the range of approaches and analytical models available to explore case studies from different time periods and places. You will then consider the pressing issue of population change, including its economic, military, political and international implications. You will be equipped with the conceptual ideas, theoretical approaches and analytical research skills needed to study politics at postgraduate level.

You can then choose 2 option modules from a wide variety of topics including international security, American foreign policy, globalisation, political theory and sociology, war and conflict, nationalism and religion, and international political economy. The culmination of the programme is applying the concepts and methods you have learnt to undertake the researching and writing of a dissertation on the subject that interests you most.

Our Department of Politics is a lively and distinguished centre of interdisciplinary research, with a strong reputation for the quality of our teaching. Some of the world’s most famous libraries are on our doorstep in Bloomsbury, central London, and you can walk down to Whitehall, where Parliament and the UK’s most influential and important think-tanks and centres of political research and analysis are located.

Our departmental building was once a key location for members of the Bloomsbury Group, so you could be studying in rooms that have hosted distinguished visitors, including T. S. Eliot, George Bernard Shaw and Maynard Keynes.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

This Master's degree is distinctive, combining theoretical and critical perspectives on nationalism, ethnicity and conflict with empirical approaches and real-world case studies.
The programme allows you to follow your own interests, with a wide choice of option modules, while developing your research skills and undertaking a dissertation in an area that interests you.
Our location in central London puts us at the heart of the UK’s political life and at the centre of academic London. You can walk down to Parliament and Whitehall, while Bloomsbury contains some of the world’s most famous libraries and centres of research.
You can take advantage of the rich research collections nearby, including Senate House Library, which is right next door to Birkbeck, the British Library, which is 5 minutes’ walk away, and the British Library of Political and Economic Science at the London School of Economics, which is walkable from Birkbeck.
Our Department of Politics was ranked 12th in the UK in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) results and is a world-renowned centre of original, influential research.
The department organises a lively programme of seminars and conferences and is home to affiliated research centres, such as the Centre for the Study of British Politics and Public Life, which run seminars, conferences and other events where some of the world's best scholars present their latest research.
Our academic staff are international authorities in their respective fields, publishing and delivering stimulating teaching in a wide range of political topics including civil society and the state, public policy, development, gender, international security and terrorism, and social and political theory, among others.
Birkbeck Library has a large politics collection, including the major specialist journals, and provides you with access to an extensive range of online materials.

Our research

Birkbeck is one of the world’s leading research-intensive institutions. Our cutting-edge scholarship informs public policy, achieves scientific advances, supports the economy, promotes culture and the arts, and makes a positive difference to society.

Birkbeck’s research excellence was confirmed in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, which placed Birkbeck 30th in the UK for research, with 73% of our research rated world-leading or internationally excellent.

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), Politics at Birkbeck was ranked 17th in the UK.

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Politics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Politics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The Department of Political and Cultural Studies (PCS) boasts a dynamic research environment with a committed staff all of whom are research-active in the field of Politics. Academic members of staff within Politics have a very considerable range of research interests on which we offer supervision for research degrees.

Key Features of MA by Research in Politics

An MA by Research in Politics gives you the chance to pursue a major research project based around your own passions and interests in Politics, leading to a qualification which can open the door to an academic career or boost employment prospects outside academia. The MA by Research in Politics will give you the freedom to explore a topic of your choosing in Politics and develop a methodology under the close supervision of two experienced academics in the field of Politics but without attending regular classes as required in taught programmes.

Typically, as a student of the Politics research programme you will work closely with your supervisors, meeting them regularly, in many instances fortnightly, in the first term and at regular intervals thereafter. Meetings are logged and goals agreed each time.

Students enrolled in the MA by Research Politics are required to attend skills and training courses at College and University level. You may also be expected to give presentations to other research students and staff at departmental seminars and attend the postgraduate conference of the College of Arts and Humanities which is held in October.

The MA by Research Politics is ideal for those who want:

- an MA qualification in areas where taught programmes are not offered;
- the experience of a research degree without committing to a PhD at the outset.

Research proposals are invited on any topic in Politics for which staff in PCS can provide supervision. It is a good idea to enter into discussions about your research project in Politics with the Department's Director of Postgraduate Research, Professor Roland Axtmann (), before drawing up an initial proposal and starting the application process.

Departmental Research Expertise

At any one time, the Politics department has over forty research students who work together with their supervisors on their projects.

Staff expertise in the empirical study of Politics lies in the analysis of comparative political institutions; comparative elections; political parties; public sector reform; comparative liberal politics; UK politics; territorial politics; devolution; centre-regional/local relations; public policy; communism and post-communism; democratization; multi-level governance; European integration and European Union politics and policy; genocide; UN and international drugs policy.

In the field of history of political thought, political philosophy and political theory, there is research expertise in European political thought; democratic theory; political and moral philosophy; Ludwig Wittgenstein; neo-Kantian ethics; human rights; just war theory and international ethics; philosophy of religion; philosophical anthropology; postcolonialism and Orientalism.

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The changing political and legal landscape in Wales poses exciting and challenging questions for those with an academic or professional interest in politics and policy. Read more
The changing political and legal landscape in Wales poses exciting and challenging questions for those with an academic or professional interest in politics and policy.

This course of study is designed to develop a comprehensive understanding of the institutions and practices of governance in post-devolution Wales. In addition to focusing on politics and governance in Wales, the course locates developments in Wales in a broader UK and European context, providing also an overview of relationships between the various levels of governance. The course is taught by the leading experts in Welsh politics and government and benefits from the close links that exist between Cardiff University and the institutions of devolved government in Wales.

The MSc Economics in Welsh Government and Politics provides an informed insight into, and understanding of, the emerging Welsh polity, a polity based on distinctive historical and cultural factors, a fast evolving constitutional dispensation, new policy-making processes, and still developing civil society capacity.

The relevance of the scheme is not confined to Wales. Issues relating to shared sovereignty and multi-level governance are central to contemporary political debates and the Welsh case provides a fascinating case study of broader trends in European and global governance.

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This MA in the History of the British Isles will deepen your appreciation of the distinctive political, social and cultural aspects of the British and Irish historical experience, from the Reformation period to the present day, while also fostering your awareness of values and experiences the British and the Irish share with their European and global neighbours. Read more
This MA in the History of the British Isles will deepen your appreciation of the distinctive political, social and cultural aspects of the British and Irish historical experience, from the Reformation period to the present day, while also fostering your awareness of values and experiences the British and the Irish share with their European and global neighbours. This Master's degree considers the constituent countries of the British Isles - England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales - and asks how and why the geographical and political entities that are Great Britain, the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland came into being.

The pressing current day issue of devolution is encouraging discussions about the formation of nation-states and national identities which feed into debates amongst historians about whether the territorial state is the most useful or constructive means of assessing historical developments and how the creation (and re-creation) of national identities relate to religion, race, gender and class.

The core module will introduce you to the systematic study of historiography and the methodologies used in the analysis and interpretation of historical source material. You can explore the enormous breadth of research interests in the department via the 3 option modules you choose, which span from the ancient period to the contemporary moment. This programme will enable you to engage with the most important and up-to-date themes, debates and historiographies in the study of the British Isles.

Finally, the dissertation gives you the chance to pursue your own interests and undertake your own research and critical thinking under the supervision of a member of staff with relevant expertise. By drawing on the expertise of staff directly engaged in English, Irish and Scottish research areas, the programme provides support and encouragement if you want to go on to pursue independent, professional or PhD research, develop new skills in relation to existing careers, or simply deepen your own understanding of the richness, diversity and complexity of the British historical experience in comparative perspective.

Key teaching staff on this programme

Course director: Professor Jerry White.

Other staff who teach on this MA programme include:

Dr Laura Stewart
Dr Sean Brady
Professor Joanna Bourke
Dr Jan Rueger
Professor Frank Trentmann
Professor Vanessa Harding
Professor David Feldman.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.
This exciting, collaborative Master's degree offers you the chance to use the British Isles as a focus for the study of broad historical themes.
You can follow, further develop and enhance your own interests, with a wide choice of option modules, while improving your research skills and undertaking a dissertation in an area that interests you.
Our Department of History, Classics and Archaeology is one of the leading research and teaching departments for history in the UK. It is ranked 6th in the UK for the percentage of our research deemed world-leading or internationally excellent.
Our academic staff are international authorities in their fields, delivering stimulating, research-led teaching.
Our department is home to thriving student societies and a number of affiliated research centres that actively run seminars, conferences and other events where some of the world's best scholars present their latest research. These include the Pears Institute for the Study of Antisemitism, the Raphael Samuel History Centre and the Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities.
We are located 5 minutes' walk from the British Museum and the British Library, while the Museum of London is easily reachable. The Institute of Historical Research is located in Bloomsbury, near the main Birkbeck campus, and has an internationally renowned library collection and seminars that you can attend.
Birkbeck Library has an extensive history collection, including the major specialist journals, and access to online materials.

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