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Criminology has a long and distinguished tradition at Kent with its research base in the Crime, Culture and Control Cluster. The MA was founded by the world-famous criminologist, the late Professor Jock Young. Read more
Criminology has a long and distinguished tradition at Kent with its research base in the Crime, Culture and Control Cluster.

The MA was founded by the world-famous criminologist, the late Professor Jock Young. You will be lectured, supervised and tutored by a team of scholars and researchers internationally renowned for their world-class teaching and publications.

Criminology is an important part of the activities of the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research (SSPSSR), which is one of the four top institutions of its kind in the UK as ranked by the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise. In 2012, we were awarded the first National Award for Excellence in Teaching Criminology by the British Criminology Society in recognition of our innovative approach.

The atmosphere of the School is informal and friendly and there is a lively and diverse postgraduate community. Regular staff/graduate seminars introduce you to the work of academic staff and research students as well as academic visitors, and provide opportunities both for sociability and for intellectual stimulation. The large number of academic staff and our favourable staff/student ratios mean that academic staff are readily accessible. Where appropriate, research students are encouraged to teach part-time in the School.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/177/criminology

Research areas

Our research areas are listed below; wider research areas are also available from our European partner institutions.

- Crime, Control and Culture

The School has a long-established tradition of conducting criminological research. The group covers a diverse range of topics, employs both qualitative and quantitative methodologies and draws upon different theoretical traditions. We have particular expertise in the following areas: cultural criminology; crime, punishment and social change; drug use; gender, crime and criminal justice; penology and imprisonment (especially of female offenders); policing; quasi-compulsory treatment for drug-using offenders; race, crime and criminal justice; restorative justice and young offenders; crime and the ‘night-time economy’, terrorism and political crime; violence; youth crime and youth justice.

Present and current research has been funded by the ESRC, the Home Office and the Youth Justice Board.

Staff research interests

Kent’s world-class academics provide research students with excellent supervision. The academic staff in this school and their research interests are shown below. You are strongly encouraged to contact the school to discuss your proposed research and potential supervision prior to making an application. Please note, it is possible for students to be supervised by a member of academic staff from any of Kent’s schools, providing their expertise matches your research interests.

Full details of staff research interests can be found on the School's website (http://www.kent.ac.uk/sspssr/staff/).

- Dr Phil Carney:

Lecturer in Criminology; Erasmus and International Co-ordinator; Kent Co-ordinator, Common Study Programme in Critical Criminology

Photographic theory; spectacle; radical criminology; cultural criminology; critical visual culture; post-structuralist critical theory; desire and power; the micropolitics of fascism.

- Dr Caroline Chatwin:

Senior Lecturer in Criminology; Director of Studies for Undergraduate Criminology

European drug policy; young people and victimisation; drug use and subcultural studies.

- Dr Simon Cottee:

Senior Lecturer in Criminology

Sociology of crime and deviance; sociology of intellectuals; terrorism and apostasy; coercion; political violence.

- Professor Chris Hale:

Professor of Criminology

How political debates around law and order have affected responses to crime; quantitative analysis of crime data, especially the relationships between crime and fear of crime with wider economic and social changes; evaluations of new interventions and crime reduction strategies; policing; youth crime.

- Dr Jonathan Ilan:

Lecturer in Criminology

Cultural criminology; street culture; urban ethnography; media and crime; youth crime; justice and policing.

- Professor Roger Matthews:

Professor of Criminology; Director of Studies for Postgraduate Criminology

Penology, community safety and crime prevention, prostitution, armed robbery, punitiveness, left realism. Recent publications include: Prostitution Politics and Policy (2008); Doing Time: An Introduction to the Sociology of Imprisonment (2009).

- Professor Larry Ray:

Professor of Sociology

Sociological theory; globalisation; race and ethnicity; violence.

- Dr Simon Shaw:

Lecturer in Criminal Justice Studies; Director of Studies

Youth crime; youth justice; politics of crime; criminal justice policy-making.

- Emeritus Professor K. Stenson:

Professor of Criminology

Criminological theory, risk and governance, youth crime.

- Professor Alex Stevens:

Professor of Criminal Justice; Deputy Head of School (Medway)

The politics and practice of criminal justice, with a specific emphasis on national and international drug policy, youth justice, gangs, organised crime, probation practice and the use of evidence in policymaking.

Careers

Building on Kent’s success as the region’s leading institution for student employability we place considerable emphasis on you gaining specialist knowledge in your chosen subject alongside core transferable skills. We ensure that you develop the skills and competences that employers are looking for including: research and analysis; policy development and interpretation; independent thought; writing and presentation as well as time management and leadership skills. You also become fully involved in the professional research culture of the School. A postgraduate degree in the area of Criminology is a particularly valuable qualification that can lead to many exciting opportunities and professions.

Recent graduates have gone on to pursue careers across the criminal justice system, encompassing areas such as counter-terrorism, advocacy, probation, social policy and research. Our graduates have found positions in organisations such as the Civil Service, the Ministry of Justice, various police services and the Probation Service.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The MA in History provides a coherent but flexible course of graduate study, combining research training with intensive modules on specific historical themes and the opportunity to conduct advanced research on a dissertation topic of your choice. Read more
The MA in History provides a coherent but flexible course of graduate study, combining research training with intensive modules on specific historical themes and the opportunity to conduct advanced research on a dissertation topic of your choice.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/history/

Why choose this course?

- You will benefit from being taught by a team of research-active historians – internationally renowned scholars who publish in their areas of expertise.

- The History field at Oxford Brookes is recognised as a centre of academic excellence in both teaching and research.

- We include all aspects of our research interests in the History MA course, teaching modules and supervising dissertations that reflect our specialist subjects.

- The course provides an excellent preparation for students intending to go on to PhD research and will also be of interest to graduates wishing to pursue advanced study in History.

We welcome further enquiries – please contact the MA Subject Co-ordinator, Dr Viviane Quirke, or the History Programme Administrator, Ms Poppy Hoole ().

Teaching and learning

The MA course is taught through small-group seminars, discussion groups, workshops and individual tutorials as well as historiographical and bibliographical presentations.

Classes are held in the evenings (except where indicated), and the sessions run from 6.30pm to 9.00pm.

Part-time students attend the University one evening per week and should be able to devote an additional 12-15 hours per week to private study.

Full-time students attend classes on two evenings per week and spend 30 hours per week in private study. Assessment is entirely by written work. There are no examinations.

Shorter courses in History are also available: the postgraduate diploma and the postgraduate certificate. It is possible to transfer between these and the MA course.

Specialist facilities

Students have access to the world-famous Bodleian Library, a copyright library which houses all books published in the United Kingdom and Ireland.

In addition to the Bodleian and its unparalleled collection of books and rare historical manuscripts, there are affiliated libraries such as Rhodes House, home to the Bodleian Library of Commonwealth and African Studies, and the Vere Harmsworth Library of the Rothermere American Institute, where students will find one of the finest collections of publications on the Political, Economic and Social History of the United States from colonial times to the present.

Oxford is a lively centre for events, exhibitions, seminars and open lectures in various specialist areas of history, which staff and students at Brookes regularly attend.

The city is also an easy bus or train ride to London for convenient access to an even wider resource of historical materials. These include various seminars and lecture series offered by the University of London and the Institute of Historical Research. In addition, The National Archives at Kew, The British Library and other specialised libraries will be of particular interest to students.

Oxford is also within easy reach of other archival collections in Birmingham, Cambridge, Reading and Bristol.

Careers

Students who have completed the MA in History have developed a variety of careers. A significant number have gone on to undertake PhD study and secondary school history teaching. Others have taken up careers in archive management; law; accountancy; local government; the civil service and at GCHQ - all jobs which require excellent research and analysis skills.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research areas and clusters

Our thriving research and postgraduate culture will provide you with the ideal environment in which to undertake a research degree on a broad range of topics from the 16th century to the present day, and to engage in interdisciplinary research.

Research skills are developed in preparation for your dissertation and provide a potential pathway to PhD study. You will have the opportunity to work alongside scholars of international standing as well as receiving comprehensive training in research methods.

Principal research areas in which our teaching staff specialise include:
- History of medicine
- History of fascism
- Social history
- History of crime, deviance and the law
- History of religion from the Reformation onwards.

As well as meeting to discuss and analyse central texts in the field, each group undertakes a number of activities including organising work-in-progress seminars, and offering support and feedback for external grant applications.

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Oxford Brookes University is the home of the Centre for Medical Humanities, which is renowned nationally and internationally for its innovative and cutting-edge scholarship. Read more
Oxford Brookes University is the home of the Centre for Medical Humanities, which is renowned nationally and internationally for its innovative and cutting-edge scholarship.

The MA History (History of Medicine) is a distinctive strand within our MA History. The strands offers you the unique chance to focus specifically on the social, scientific and cultural history of medicine, as well as the relationship between medicine and the humanities (history, philosophy, sociology, literature and art) through a course of research training. It also gives you the flexibility to pursue taught modules in other aspects of history if you wish.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/history-of-medicine/

Why choose this course?

- You will benefit from being taught by a team of nationally and internationally recognised scholars. We are all active researchers and we include all aspects of our own research on the course, teaching specialist modules in our areas of expertise and supervising dissertations in our specialist subjects.

- The knowledge and expertise you gain is grounded in the latest scholarship within the field.

- You will have the opportunity to conduct advanced research on a dissertation subject of your choice.

- The course provides an excellent preparation for students intending to continue with PhD research. It will also be of interest to health care professionals and to graduates in history or the social sciences seeking further personal development.

- All classes are held in the evening. There are no exams - assessment is by written work only.

We welcome further enquiries – please contact the MA Subject Co-ordinator, Dr Viviane Quirke, or the History Programme Administrator, Poppy Hoole, email:

Teaching and learning

The MA course is taught through small-group seminars, workshops and individual tutorials. Assessment is entirely by written work. There are no examinations.

Specialist facilities

Oxford Brookes is home to the Centre for Medical Humanities (CMH). The Centre was established in early 2015. It marks an exciting expansion and diversification of the work previously conducted through the Centre for Health, Medicine and Society which over the past 15 years has been the beneficiary of substantial support from both Oxford Brookes University and the Wellcome Trust. The CMH is building on this track record of outstanding research and grant successes, innovative teaching, career development and public outreach. Engaging with the expanding field of medical humanities, the CMH brings historians of medicine together with scholars from History, History of Art, Philosophy, Social and Life Sciences as well as Anthropology and Religion. It thus aims to foster genuine interdisciplinary collaboration amongst staff and students through a range of new research and teaching initiatives, which reflect the new concerns with the relationship between medicine and the humanities in the twentieth first century.

Students have access to Oxford Brookes University’s special Welfare collection, as well as numerous local medical archive resources. They also have access to the world famous Bodleian Library, a copyright library, which houses all books published in the United Kingdom and Ireland. In addition to the Bodleian and its unparalleled collection of books and rare historical manuscripts, there are affiliated libraries such as Rhodes House, home to the Bodleian Library of Commonwealth and African Studies, and the Vere Harmsworth Library of the Rothermere American Institute, where students will find one of the finest collections of publications on the Political, Economic and Social History of the United States from colonial times to the present.

Oxford is a lively centre for events, exhibitions, seminars and open lectures in various specialist areas of history, which staff and students at Brookes regularly attend.

It is also an easy bus or train ride to London for convenient access to a wider resource of historical materials. These include various seminars and lecture series offered by the University of London and the Institute of Historical Research. In addition, The National Archives at Kew, The British Library and other specialised libraries will be of particular interest to students.

Oxford is also within easy reach of other archival collections in Birmingham, Cambridge, Reading and Bristol.

Careers

Students who have completed an MA have developed a variety of careers. A significant number have gone on to undertake PhD study and secondary school history teaching. Others have taken up careers in archive management; law; accountancy; local government and the civil service as well as GCHQ - all jobs which require excellent research and analysis skills.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

The department boasts a wealth of research expertise and is home to two important research centres:

- Centre for Medical Humanities (CMH)
The centre seeks to promote the study of medical humanities. , It is one of the leading research groups of its kind in the UK and has research links with a wide network of associates, both national and international. The centre also provides associate status opportunities to researchers from outside the University who wish to advance their studies and gain experience in the field.

- Centre for the History of Welfare
The centre provides a base for collaboration between all those with an interest in the history of welfare both within Oxford Brookes and across the wider academic and professional communities. It acts as a focus for research in this field. It aims to support and disseminate research which makes connections between historical research and current welfare policy, and thereby fosters links between historians of welfare and policy makers.

Research areas and clusters

Our thriving research and postgraduate culture will provide you with the ideal environment in which to undertake a research degree on a broad range of topics from 16th century to the present day, and to engage in interdisciplinary research. Research skills are developed in preparation for your dissertation and provide a potential pathway to PhD study.

You will have the opportunity to work alongside scholars of international standing as well as receiving comprehensive training in research methods. Principal research areas in which our teaching staff specialise include:
- History of fascism
- History of race
- Social history
- History of crime, deviance and the law
- History of religion from the Reformation onwards

As well as meeting to discuss and analyse central texts in the field, each group undertakes a number of activities. This includes organising work-in-progress seminars, and offering support and feedback for external grant applications.

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The MSc Investigative & Forensic Psychology is a one year, full-time postgraduate programme. It is accredited by the British Psychological Society and recognised as the first step towards status as a Chartered Forensic Psychologist in the UK for students who have Graduate Basis for Chartership. Read more
The MSc Investigative & Forensic Psychology is a one year, full-time postgraduate programme. It is accredited by the British Psychological Society and recognised as the first step towards status as a Chartered Forensic Psychologist in the UK for students who have Graduate Basis for Chartership. The course is also recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as a Research Methods MSc and students taking this course are eligible for the ESRC 1 + 3 studentships.

The MSc provides students with a high quality, balanced postgraduate programme of research and academic knowledge including, awareness of professional, legal and ethical issues, and practical, communication and dissemination skills in Investigative and Forensic Psychology. The programme takes a three-tiered approach.

Students begin with structured sessions on conceptual and theoretical issues (including aggression, sexual violence and deviance, decision-making, leadership and stress, memory, communication and persuasion, and the psychology of crowd dynamics).

They then appreciate how these and related issues can be applied to forensic practice and its legal context (in terms of crime reduction and intervention studies; investigative procedures, forensic interviewing, court processes and proceedings, assessment, custody and rehabilitation).

Finally, they gain skills in communicating knowledge and conducting relevant research on case assessments of individuals and organisations

Why Choose Investigative and Forensic Psychology?

- This course is unique in that it is the only MSc accredited course of its type in a Russell Group University. It is viewed worldwide by many to be the home of Investigative Psychology
- The number and calibre of external practitioners whom deliver key understanding of real life applications, makes the MSc Investigative and Forensic Psychology distinct from any other.
- The University of Liverpool has the largest representation of psychologists in Europe, who are research active on Law Enforcement projects.
- High quality teaching and a strong focus on employability skills mean that our students have gone on to be some of the most successful individuals in the field.
- The MSc Investigative and Forensic Psychology is renowned worldwide and attracts a large number of International students and visiting speakers each year. In an increasingly global world it is important to raise awareness of the role cultural factors play in psychological functioning and how these may differ from the findings of mainstream Western research.
- This MSc Investigative and Forensic Psychology was the first course of its type to receive five commendations by the British Psychological Society.

Key Facts

Research Assessment Exercise 2008
Targeting our key areas of interest we've systematically enhanced our research base, culture and infrastructure, whilst building internationally influential groups.

Our work is theoretically robust and problem and policy focused, with a research agenda that's socially relevant and postgraduate teaching that's truly research-led.

Why School of Psychology?

Breadth and choice

Reflecting our main research strengths, we offer two one-year, full-time, taught Masters (MSc) programmes in:

Investigative and Forensic Psychology
Research Methods in Psychology.
For details of all MRes/MPhil/PhD and MD opportunities in the Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, see the Research course list at http://www.liv.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/research/

Professionally recognised

The Investigative and Forensic Psychology course is recognised by the Division of Forensic Psychology (DFP, British Psychological Society) and counts towards Chartered Forensic Status.

Innovative research

As home to the Centre for Investigative Psychology, we continue to stretch the boundaries of psychological inquiry with innovative research activity.

We've highly active, internationally renowned research groups and, in the most recent Research Assessment Exercise (2008), 80% of our research activity was rated as of international standard.

Our partners

Our partners include local hospitals and schools, the Regional Neurological and Neurosurgical NHS Trust, Prison Psychology departments, national and international Police Forces and associated Law Enforcement Agencies. There are also close links with other University departments in the Faculty of Science and Engineering, the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, and the Faculty of Health and Life Sciences; in particular, Clinical Psychology, Neuroscience, and Human Anatomy. Numerous collaborations exist between members of staff and their colleagues in other academic institutions both nationally and internationally.

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This course combines the schools’ expertise in criminology and sociology and explores the sociological context of issues in criminology. Read more
This course combines the schools’ expertise in criminology and sociology and explores the sociological context of issues in criminology.

A broad range of criminology and sociology subjects are studied which develop knowledge and understanding of broad spectrum of topics within this field including; crime, organisations and administrations in the field of criminal justice, the social causes and consequences of crime, social change and social structures, culture and identity and related issues.

The broad yet specialised nature of this degree allows students to develop advanced and specialised knowledge and skills in criminological and sociological research.

On completion of the course, students will be able to:

Demonstrate advanced, specialised knowledge and skills across a range of criminology and sociology applications, including an understanding of community cohesion and social identities, of criminal behaviour, its causes and consequences, its prevention and the response by criminal justice agencies.
Conduct empirical research projects. Students will have developed specialist research skills and critical thinking across a range of criminological and sociological areas and an understanding of the complex contexts in which criminologists and sociologists work.
Demonstrate the ability to problem solve and reason scientifically, even in complex contexts using appropriate qualitative and quantitative skills, including identifying, formulating and solving social problems and problems related to crime. Students will have the ability to create, evaluate and assess a range of options, and apply ideas and knowledge to a range of situations.
Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of advanced level theories and empirical evidence concerning crime, its causes and consequences, including the definition of deviant behaviour, public opinion, the media and fear of crime, political reactions to crime, support for victims, offender management and related topics.
Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of advanced level sociological theories and sociological findings, related to topics like the functioning of public sector organisations, social stratification, political and social movements, social values, consensus and conflicts, culture, community and identity, the social function of law.
Careers
The course prepares for a wide range of employment including:

Law-enforcement agencies: the police, customs, the prison service
Public administration: including crime prevention units, offender management, general administration, international institutions
Political associations, work for members of parliaments, for lobby groups related to the criminal justice system and to issues of social justice broadly conceived
Research institutes, researching criminological and sociological issues
Academic institutions such as universities
Course Sturcture
A full MA is valued at 180 credits, a Diploma at 120 credits and Certificate at 60 credits.

The first 120 credits are achieved by following a programme of taught courses. The final 60 credits will be achieved through dissertation, after successful completion of the taught part of the course.

The course employs a wide range of teaching and learning strategies, both formal and informal. These include: lectures, individual study – some of it involving assigned readings - interactive discussion of case studies in class, small group work and essay writing. The MA Criminology and Sociology very much employs the concept of “active learning” by students.

The programme is offered on a full-time and part-time basis.

Full Time Study:

In full-time mode, the course normally lasts for a period of twelve months. Taught courses are undertaken September – May, and the dissertation completed from May to September.

Part Time Study:

In part-time mode, the course normally lasts for a period of two and a half years. Taught courses are undertaken from September to May over a period of two years, and on successful completion of the 120 credits of taught courses, the dissertation may be undertaken. Lectures are concentrated on one day per week for part-time students.

Taught Modules
Compulsory Modules:

The Research Process: This module introduces the main varieties of both quantitative and qualitative research in the social sciences and addresses the principles of research design and issues of data collection.

Key Issues in Crime and Justice: This module focuses on four main themes: comparative criminology, comparative criminal justice, comparative victimology, and criminological perspectives.

International Case Studies in Criminology: This module provides an internationally comparative perspective on key areas of criminological concern. These include questions of crime and deviance, criminological theory and the operation of systems of criminal justice.

Sociology Modules (choose 2):

Researching Community: This module examines the developments in the field of community research and related theoretical and policy debates surrounding the application of ideas of ‘community’ to current economic and social changes.

Case Study: Case Study introduces students to sociological analysis by selecting a topic of joint interest to students and lecturer.

Social Theories of Culture: Social Theories of Culture introduces students to the sociological study of culture by introducing and assessing theories.

MA students take part in the fortnightly lecture series of the School of Social Sciences. Visiting speakers and Bangor staff present topics related to social policy, criminology and sociology.

Dissertation
The dissertation is undertaken on completion of the taught modules. It is valued at 60 credits (one-third of the MA degree) and will be around 20,000 words in length.

Under guidance of a dissertation tutor, students will in their MA dissertation work independently on a topic of their choice. This may be a piece of empirical research including primary or secondary data analysis or a theoretical dissertation. Part-time students in employment may choose a topic related to their profession and an area in which they wish to develop further expertise and specialisation.

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This master's degree draws upon the expertise of staff with established reputations in the field. Tutors have a wide range of research interests and they are actively involved with the Nottingham Crime Research Unit and the Centre for the Study and Reduction of Hate Crimes. Read more
This master's degree draws upon the expertise of staff with established reputations in the field. Tutors have a wide range of research interests and they are actively involved with the Nottingham Crime Research Unit and the Centre for the Study and Reduction of Hate Crimes. These specialist units are located within the division and conduct high quality applied criminological and criminal justice research.

The course offers a distinctive theoretical and policy-orientation of criminology. The emphasis on policy is specifically designed to offer a more vocationally relevant programme of Master's level study that will be more pertinent to students seeking a policy-orientated career in the Home Office, government office of the regions, local government and crime and disorder reduction partnerships.

The Criminology team regularly invites renowned experts and professionals to the University to provide an insight into their specialist knowledge and experiences. Past speakers have included Superintendent Paul Giannasi, Programme Manager of the Cross-Governmental Hate Crime Strategy and Len Jackson, OBE Interim Chair of the Independent Police Complaints Commission.

Why choose the MA Criminology?

-Gain a critical and informed analysis of criminology, criminal justice and crime reduction.
-Graduate with an extensive vocationally relevant, and policy-orientated, knowledge of crime and responses to crime, drawing on examples from across the world.
-Develop a critical awareness of the current philosophical, theoretical and methodological problems, debates, and insights that shape the discipline.
-Enhances lifelong learning skills and personal development in a manner that enables graduates to adopt an independent and reflective approach to their learning and to contribute to crime reduction and community safety.

Modules

Modules may include:

- Contemporary and Classical Theoretical Explanations of Crime and Criminal Behaviour;
- Current Issues in Social Deviance;
- Contemporary Criminal Justice Practice;
- Comprehensive Research Methods Training;
- Crime, Community and Neighbourhood;
- Offender Management and Crime Reduction;
- Dissertation.

For more information about the modules you may study visit http://www.ntu.ac.uk/macriminology

Delivery and Assessment

Assessment includes essays (including reports, reflective reports), policy papers, presentations, case studies and a dissertation. The dissertation will enable you to develop and demonstrate empirical research in your field.

The teaching and learning for the course will involve a mixture of lectures, workshops, enquiry based learning and individual dissertation / project. Your personal tutor will provide both pastoral and academic support throughout your study. This role will switch to their dissertation supervisor during this final module. You will also receive a course handbook.

Your future career

This course is suitable for both those who currently work in the criminal justice field and are looking to enhance their career opportunities and for students seeking employment in criminal justice agencies operating at central, regional and local government levels, such as the Home Office, police forces and local government.

Graduates may go on to pursue a range of professional careers in criminal justice related work in either the statutory, commercial or community voluntary sectors, for example:

- Home Office;
- police forces;
- local government;
- crime and disorder reduction partnerships and their equivalencies throughout the world.

Other graduates may go on to be researchers or academics working in the subject area of criminology in higher education. It will also serve as an effective launching pad for those students wishing to study for a doctorate.

Scholarships

The School of Social Sciences offers a number of competitive scholarships for our full-time and part-time master's courses. For more information please visit http://www.ntu.ac.uk/s3scholarships

Want to find out more? Come along to one of our postgraduate Open Evenings. For further details please visit: http://www.ntu.ac.uk/s3events

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The MA Criminology and Law, which is run by Bangor School of Social Sciences and Bangor Law School, will provide students with postgraduate level knowledge and skills in the interdisciplinary area of criminology and law. Read more
The MA Criminology and Law, which is run by Bangor School of Social Sciences and Bangor Law School, will provide students with postgraduate level knowledge and skills in the interdisciplinary area of criminology and law. It builds on criminological and legal skills and knowledge so as to provide specialist training in criminological, criminal justice and legal research. The programme enables students to develop an international perspective on crime, justice and law through national and cross-national approaches and case studies of other societies, and/or ‘cutting edge’ issues in contemporary criminology and law. Students will also acquire a wide range of transferable skills.

Employment opportunities
Graduates will be sought after by law-enforcement agencies such as the police. Other employment opportunities include public administration: e.g. crime prevention units, offender management, general administration, and international institutions. Political associations and NGOs are also possible employers. Graduates may take up work for members of parliaments, for lobby groups related to the criminal justice system and to issues of social justice and law broadly conceived. Jobs are also available in research at universities and other research institutions. Of course, students may progress into further postgraduate study leading to a PhD.

Structure
Part 1: Taught Courses

Modules in Criminology and Law are taught in two semesters between September and May. Of these modules, half will be law based and taught in the Law School and half will be criminology based and taught in the School of Social Sciences. Modules together give 60 credits for Law and 60 for Criminology.

For this MA, Bangor Law School will offer a ground breaking course Forensic Linguistics in Court, which will examine the use of language in the criminal process. Training in Legal Research will include working with databases such as LexisNexis or Westlaw. Topics in International Criminal Law include international criminal courts and the offences they deal with. In the School of Social Sciences issues such as sentencing policy, theories of deviance, victimisation, international terrorism, the operation of the penal system and theories of policing and law enforcement can be studied both from a UK and international perspective. Teaching is mainly seminar based and allows for in-depth discussions with lecturers.

Part 2: Dissertation

Students will write a 20,000 word dissertation on a topic of their choice from within the broad remit of Criminology. Any topic can be suggested that is of interest for students and dissertation tutors.

Compulsory Modules:

International Case Studies in Criminology and Criminal Justice
Key Issues in Crime and Justice
Legal Research
Forensic Linguistics in Court
International Criminal Law
Dissertation on any topic within Criminology

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The structure of the programme will be as follows. Part I. Taught Courses. The MA Criminology and Law, which is run by Bangor School of Social Sciences and Bangor Law School, will provide students with postgraduate level knowledge and skills in the interdisciplinary area of criminology and law. Read more
The structure of the programme will be as follows:

Part I: Taught Courses
The MA Criminology and Law, which is run by Bangor School of Social Sciences and Bangor Law School, will provide students with postgraduate level knowledge and skills in the interdisciplinary area of criminology and law. It builds on criminological and legal skills and knowledge so as to provide specialist training in criminological, criminal justice and legal research. The programme enables students to develop an international perspective on crime, justice and law through national and cross-national approaches and case studies of other societies, and/or ‘cutting edge’ issues in contemporary criminology and law. Students will also acquire a wide range of transferable skills.

Employment opportunities
Graduates will be sought after by law-enforcement agencies such as the police. Other employment opportunities include public administration: e.g. crime prevention units, offender management, general administration, and international institutions. Political associations and NGOs are also possible employers. Graduates may take up work for members of parliaments, for lobby groups related to the criminal justice system and to issues of social justice and law broadly conceived. Jobs are also available in research at universities and other research institutions. Of course, students may progress into further postgraduate study leading to a PhD.

Structure
Part 1: Taught Courses

Modules in Criminology and Law are taught in two semesters between September and May. Of these modules, half will be law based and taught in the Law School and half will be criminology based and taught in the School of Social Sciences. Modules together give 60 credits for Law and 60 for Criminology.

For this MA, Bangor Law School will offer a ground breaking course Forensic Linguistics in Court, which will examine the use of language in the criminal process. Training in Legal Research will include working with databases such as LexisNexis or Westlaw. Topics in International Criminal Law include international criminal courts and the offences they deal with. In the School of Social Sciences issues such as sentencing policy, theories of deviance, victimisation, international terrorism, the operation of the penal system and theories of policing and law enforcement can be studied both from a UK and international perspective. Teaching is mainly seminar based and allows for in-depth discussions with lecturers.

Part 2: Dissertation

Students will write a 20,000 word dissertation on a topic of their choice from within the broad remit of Criminology. Any topic can be suggested that is of interest for students and dissertation tutors.

Compulsory Modules:

International Case Studies in Criminology and Criminal Justice
Key Issues in Crime and Justice
Legal Research
Forensic Linguistics in Court
International Criminal Law
Dissertation on any topic within Criminology

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The Masters in Clinical and Abnormal Psychology offers a comprehensive grounding in aspects of psychopathology and abnormal behaviour. Read more
The Masters in Clinical and Abnormal Psychology offers a comprehensive grounding in aspects of psychopathology and abnormal behaviour.

As well as modules that will develop knowledge of the aetiology and treatment of a range of psychological disorders and abnormal behaviours, this programme includes a substantial research element.

You will receive extensive training in research methods via a postgraduate statistics module and will complete a postgraduate dissertation in a related topic. Links with a number of agencies and the University of South Wales’ Psychology Clinic means that suitable students should have the opportunity for access to client groups in order to complete an applied dissertation.

We aim to provide students with access to clinical populations to collect psychological data in order to complete an applied dissertation. This is possible through our links with local NHS trusts and local healthcare providers. In addition, the University of South Wales has recently invested in a new psychology clinic which provides clinical and therapeutic services. Suitable students will be able to benefit from in-house research opportunities and supervised voluntary experience.

The MSc Clinical and Abnormal Psychology draws on the research and applied expertise of psychologists in the fields of developmental, clinical, health, sports and forensic psychology. You will learn about a wide range of developmental disorders including autism and conduct disorder, as well as dependence issues such as alcohol addiction and eating disorders. You will also explore interventions such as pharmacological and behavioural treatments, as well as research on depression, anxiety and personality disorders.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/836-msc-clinical-and-abnormal-psychology

What you will study

You will study 180 credits comprising of the following modules:
- Research Methods in Health Psychology: Measurement & Professional Issues (40 credits)
- Psychopathology Through the Lifespan (20 credits)
- Interventions (20 credits)
- Addiction, Dependence and Deviance (20 credits)
- Current and Historical Perspectives on Psychopathology (20 credits)
- Dissertation (60 credits)

Learning and teaching methods

The MSc Clinical and Abnormal Psychology is delivered through a variety of lectures, seminars and workshops. Some of these sessions will be led by members of the teaching team and some by external experts in clinical psychology practice. There will also be student-led sessions and some elements will be delivered online.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

While completion of this programme will not qualify you to practice as a Clinical Psychologist in the UK, nor guarantee acceptance onto a DClinPsy course; the skills that you will develop should enhance your applications for professional training programmes, Assistant Psychologist posts, or Research Assistant posts in clinical settings.

Career options:
Graduates of this masters programme will possess a diversity of skills that will enhance their applications for a range of popular training, employment, and research opportunities. These may include:

Clinical psychology doctorate programmes: These are extremely popular and competitive training courses and successful applicants are likely to have work experience in an appropriate setting as well as suitable qualifications. Applied research experience including the collection of psychological data in a clinical setting should be a useful addition to an application for further training. The extensive research training and applied dissertation completed in this MSc programme should contribute to more robust applications to Clinical doctorate programmes.

Assistant Psychologist posts: These are sought after positions with many applicants for every post; not least because experience as an Assistant Psychologist can help support an application to clinical doctorate training programmes. Successful completion of this MSc programme will suggest a commitment to a career in clinical psychology as well as the development of skills and knowledge that are more advanced than those gained during an undergraduate degree. This may help to help enhance applications for Assistant Psychologist posts.

Research Assistant posts: Excellent psychological research is extremely important in the field of clinical psychology. The extensive research focus and the dissertation completed in this programme will provide graduates with a range of research skills including the ability to critically evaluate literature, research, and applications in the field of clinical psychology, as well as experience in designing, conducting, writing up and disseminating good quality psychological research. These are transferable skills that should be valued in a range of Research Assistant posts.

Assessment methods

A range of assessment methods will be used, including examinations, essays, a systematic literature review, research reports, and case study analysis. You will also complete a dissertation of 15,000- 20,000 words. The range of teaching and assessment methods used will foster a range of skills that are transferable to the workplace and/or further professional training.

Facilities

As a student in the School of Psychology, you’ll have access to the latest learning technologies, facilities and equipment, including excellent designated facilities.

These include observation and interview rooms equipped with two-way mirror, CCTV and audio and allow research and interview practice sessions to be conducted and recorded onto DVD. We also have a custom-built air-conditioned PC laboratory which provides access to specialist software for running psychology experiments and conducting careers guidance interviews. More specialist equipment is also available in our cognitive suite and more details about this are given below.

- Cognitive suite
The cognitive psychology suite houses specialist psychology equipment. This includes eye tracking equipment which is capable of studying the eye movements of individuals whilst they complete cognitive tasks. The suite includes EEG (electroencephalogram) and ECG (electrocardiogram) facilities for recording electrical activity in the heart and scalp. There is also a driving simulator which is currently being used by postgraduate students to complete a study which examines the effects of stressors on driving performance.

- Psychology clinic facility (PAWB Wales)
As well as our excellent dedicated teaching facilities, the School of Psychology offers a wide range of psychological services to the general public. These are offered through our new PAWB Wales clinic facility and include play therapy, behaviour analysis, health and sport psychology interventions. The clinic activities support our wide range of postgraduate opportunities and undergraduate students can also get involved in some of the clinic’s work.

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Comparative Literature at Kent offers an excellent environment for the postgraduate study of literature beyond national and linguistic borders. Read more
Comparative Literature at Kent offers an excellent environment for the postgraduate study of literature beyond national and linguistic borders. The programme involves the study of literature from two or more national and linguistic traditions, allowing you to gain an intercultural and transnational understanding of diverse cultural and literary practices.

The MA programme explores three main areas: themes, genres, movements and major literary figures; the interactions and exchanges between national literary traditions; and the theory and practice of comparative literature. These complementary strands encourage comparative analysis in a variety of contexts, ranging from the study of national literatures to the exploration of different genres, periods, media and literary theory.

The programme is offered by the Department of Comparative Literature and benefits from staff expertise in a range of areas, including European modernism, postmodernism, postcolonial literature, literature and medicine, literature and sexuality, literature and psychoanalysis and literature and the visual arts. Our programme also draws on additional expertise in the School of European Culture and Languages, particularly from colleagues in the departments of French, German, Hispanic Studies and Italian.

You begin by studying a choice of four modules across the Autumn and Spring terms, before writing a 12,000-word dissertation over the summer, supervised by an expert in the department. The programme can also be studied in Canterbury and Paris, where you relocate to Kent’s Paris centre for the spring term.

The MA in Comparative Literature is an ideal programme for those wanting to engage in and pursue detailed literary and cultural analysis that crosses national boundaries.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/318/comparative-literature

Course structure

The programme comprises three main interweaving strands:

- themes and major figures in European literature

- interactions between European national literatures, as reflected in important genres such as autobiography and the fantastic

- comparative literature in theory and practice, with an emphasis on the history of the discipline and ways of reading literature comparatively.

These complementary strands encourage comparative analysis in a variety of contexts: national literatures, genres, media and theory.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

CP805 - European Modernism: Sexual and Textual Deviance (30 credits)
CP808 - Writing the Self: Autobiography in the Modern Period (30 credits)
CP810 - Comparative Literature in Theory and Practice (30 credits)
FR872 - Theories of Art in Modern French Thought (30 credits)
LS810 - History and Memory: Exploring the Independence Period through memoirs Research Methodology (30 credits)
FR804 - Real Fictions: The Documentation of Modernity (30 credits)
FR807 - Postmodern French Detective Fiction (30 credits)
CP813 - Literature and Medicine (30 credits)
CP998 - Comparative Literature Dissertation (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by one 5,000-word essay for each module, and the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide you with the knowledge and skills to prepare you for the academic study of comparative literature at MPhil/PhD level

- attract outstanding students, irrespective of race, background, gender, or physical disability from within the UK

- further the University’s International Strategy by attracting graduate students from abroad as well as from the UK

- enable you to begin to specialise in your areas of interest

- enable you to hone your ability to read literature and literary theory critically and comparatively

- provide you, consistent with point one above, with a transition from undergraduate study to independent research

- provide you with a training that will culminate, if followed through to PhD level, in the ability to submit articles to refereed journals in comparative literature.

Research areas

Areas of particular research strength in Comparative Literature at Kent include the European avant-garde, modernism and postmodernism, postcolonial literature, literary theory, literature and medicine, literature and the visual arts, literature and sexuality, and literature and philosophy. The list below indicates the range of current research interests of members of staff within Comparative Literature and the other disciplines with whom we work closely. Many of these staff are members of the Centre for Modern European Literature. They can supervise postgraduate students for the MA or PhD degrees in any of their respective areas of expertise. If you are considering applying to undertake a research degree, we encourage you to contact us to discuss your plans at an early stage of your application.

- The European avant-garde
- Modernism and postmodernism
- Postcolonial literature
- Literary theory
- Literature and medicine
- Literature and philosophy
- Literature and sexuality
- Literature and the visual arts

- Centre for Modern European Literature
Many of the most significant European writers and literary movements of the modern period have traversed national, linguistic, and disciplinary borders. Co-directed by members of Comparative Literature, French, and German, the Centre for Modern European Literature aims to promote collaborative interdisciplinary research that can do justice to these kinds of border crossing. Ranging across English, French, German, Italian and Spanish literature, the Centre focuses in particular on the European avant-garde, European modernism and postmodernism, literary theory, the international reception of European writers, and the relations between modern European literature and the other arts, including painting, photography, film, music and architecture. The Centre’s activities include a lecture and seminar series and the regular organisation of conferences. It also works with the editors of the postgraduate journal Skepsi, and runs the MA in Modern European Literature.

Careers

Comparative literature graduates develop key skills, including critical thinking, analysis and problem solving. They go on to successful careers in areas such as the media, academia and many different cultural institutions including libraries, museums and galleries.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This programme critically addresses a range of key issues and debates relating to crime and the criminal justice system. Students have the opportunity to develop in-depth understanding of crime, deviance and criminal justice from critical theoretical, policy, legal, political and practical perspectives. Read more
This programme critically addresses a range of key issues and debates relating to crime and the criminal justice system. Students have the opportunity to develop in-depth understanding of crime, deviance and criminal justice from critical theoretical, policy, legal, political and practical perspectives. Addressing issues of historical and contemporary concern such as terrorism, prostitution, legal and illegal drugs, crime in the night time economy, forced migration, gender and crime, domestic violence, crime prevention, punishment, policing, youth crime and justice, law enforcement and the use of new technologies. Students study issues of theoretical and social importance with lecturers who are international experts in their fields.

Course Structure

Students take a range of taught modules primarily in the first two terms of the academic year. Students also undertake a module on research design which enables students to develop a research proposal for their dissertation.

Core Modules:
Theorising Crime and Criminal Justice (30 credits)
-Apply theories of crime and justice to topical issues
-Theory and practice of criminal justice
-Analysis of contemporary politics
-Governance of criminal justice

Perspectives on Social Research (15 credits)
-Introduction to social scientific research
-Establishing cause and interpreting meaning in social sciences
-Essentials of quantitative and qualitative research in social science research

Research Design and Progress (15 credits)
-Formulating research questions
-Ethical review procedures
-Research proposal design, evaluation, and development
-Conversational analysis in practice
-Qualitative interviewing.

Dissertation (60 credits)
-A dissertation of up to 15,000 words.

Optional Modules:
Typical modules outlined below are those that were available to students styuding this programme in previous years. Choose modules to the value of 60 credits, listed below (60 credits)
-Gender, Violence and Abuse (30 credits)
-Drugs, Crime and Society (30 credits)
-Crime, Justice and the Sex Industry (30 credits)
-Cybercrime and cybersecurity: (30 credits)
-Sociology of Forensic Science (30 credits)
-Statistical Exploration and Reasoning (15 credits)
-Qualitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)
-Quantitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)

You will also have the opportunity to take a range of modules from other programmes within the Faculty such as those associated with the MSc in Risk and Security.

Learning and Teaching

The MSc Criminology and Criminal Justice is a 1 year full-time programme which may also be taken part-time. The programme’s core consists of a 60 credit dissertation module, one 30 credit module on Criminological Theory, one 15 credit module on Theories of Social Research and one 15 credit module on Research Design. Students are also required to undertake 60 further credits of modules from within SASS or other related departments which may be taught in a variety of ways.

Core teaching on the programme falls primarily within the two 10 week terms, the second of which commences one week prior to the Undergraduate Term. Depending on module choice students may receive between 6 and 8 hours of tuition per week in either or both of these terms.

The programme is taught according to a variety of approaches. Modules such as ‘Theorising Crime and Criminal Justice’ operate a standard 2 hour session within which lecturing, seminar discussion, workshops or presentations may take place. Modules such as ‘Perspectives on Social Research’, ‘Quantitative Methods’ and ‘Qualitative Methods’ operate a weekly lecture series followed by seminar discussion. Other modules such as ‘Statistical Exploration and Reasoning’ operate computer-based practicals.

Following completion of teaching in terms 1 and 2, the ‘Research Design’ module allows for 4 day long workshops. Reflecting on the process of research design, the module supports the student in formulating the research question for their dissertation.

The MSc programme is research-led at its core. The compulsory module 'Theorising Crime and Criminal Justice' links explicitly with the research activities of the criminology staff; the module ‘Crime Violence and Abuse’ links with the current research activities of the School’s research group of the same name; and ‘Drugs, Crime and Society’ is taught by an internationally renowned expert in the field . Students subsequently undertake a 60 credit dissertation on a topic of their choice supervised by staff who are actively researching in a relevant area. While this module is intended to afford an opportunity for a significant piece of independent and original research, it includes up to four hours of regular supervision which takes place typically from the end of term 2. Students will also participate in two one-hour workshops convened by a supervisor and usually alongside others researching in similar areas.

While teaching is intensive, particularly in terms 1 and 2, it is intended that the programme presents options for part-time study. Consequently, teaching is undertaken where possible in timetable slots which take place late in the afternoon.

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Combines the study of criminology with advanced training in social research methods. Take a sociological look at the nature and causes of crime. Read more
Combines the study of criminology with advanced training in social research methods.

Overview

Take a sociological look at the nature and causes of crime. With this degree, you'll learn how to analyse a wide range of data to examine the motivations behind why people commit crime and how societies attempt to control them.

Course content

In this course, you will analyse crime, deviance and social control and conduct research to examine their impact on society.

In the criminology modules, you'll gain a deeper understanding of why some people are motivated to offend and how this behaviour can shape our communities and our responses to crime.

In the social research methods modules, you will develop practical skills and techniques in qualitative and quantitative research.

Modules
This degree includes three criminology modules and three social research modules:
-Advances in Criminological Theory
-Critical Perspectives on the Criminal Justice System
-Law and Social Control
-Qualitative Methods
-Quantitative Methods and Data Analysis
-Advanced Methods in Social Research

Careers

In addition to preparing you for doctoral study, a criminology and sociology degree like our MA in Criminology and Social Research can lead to a wide variety of careers in the fields of crime and justice. The mix of practical and analytical skills you'll acquire will position you competitively for jobs in this popular field.

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Criminology has a long and distinguished tradition at Kent with its research base in the Crime, Culture and Control Cluster. Aimed at international students, this programme provide an introduction to high-level academic study leading to a recognised postgraduate qualification. Read more
Criminology has a long and distinguished tradition at Kent with its research base in the Crime, Culture and Control Cluster. Aimed at international students, this programme provide an introduction to high-level academic study leading to a recognised postgraduate qualification.

*This course will be taught at the Canterbury campus*

Visit the website: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/331/two-year-masters-in-criminology

Course detail

Criminology is an important part of the activities of the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research (SSPSSR), which is one of the four top institutions of its kind in the UK as ranked by the 2001 and 2008 Research Assessment Exercises. In 2012 we were awarded the first National Award for Excellence in Teaching Criminology by the British Criminology Society in recognition of our innovative approach.

Purpose

You gain a clear, confident and advanced understanding of the subject while receiving coaching in academic study and writing. Language and study support are also given in the first year to help you achieve your full potential.

The skills you develop on this programme include critical thinking, data analysis and presentation of key findings as well as transferable skills such as time management, IT and problem solving.

Format and assessment

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation:

- Academic Skills for Humanities (15 credits)
- Sociology of Crime and Deviance (30 credits)
- Gender, Crime and Criminal Justice (15 credits)
- Terrorism and Modern Society (15 credits)
- Drugs, Culture and Control (15 credits)
- Theories of Crime (20 credits)
- Research Methods in Criminology (20 credits)
- Drugs, Culture and Control (20 credits)
- Cultural Criminology (20 credits)
- Young People, Crime and Place (20 credits)

Careers

Building on Kent’s success as the region’s leading institution for student employability we place considerable emphasis on you gaining specialist knowledge in your chosen subject alongside core transferable skills. We ensure that you develop the skills and competences that employers are looking for including: research and analysis; policy development and interpretation; independent thought; writing and presentation as well as time management and leadership skills. You also become fully involved in the professional research culture of the School. A postgraduate degree in the area of Criminology is a particularly valuable qualification that can lead to many exciting opportunities and professions.

Recent graduates have gone on to pursue careers across the criminal justice system, encompassing areas such as counter-terrorism, advocacy, probation, social policy and research. Our graduates have found positions in organisations such as the Civil Service, the Ministry of Justice, various police services and the Probation Service.

How to apply: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Why study at The University of Kent?

- Shortlisted for University of the Year 2015
- Kent has been ranked fifth out of 120 UK universities in a mock Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) exercise modelled by Times Higher Education (THE).
- In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, Kent was ranked 17th* for research output and research intensity, in the Times Higher Education, outperforming 11 of the 24 Russell Group universities
- Over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2014 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.
Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

Postgraduate scholarships and funding

We have a scholarship fund of over £9 million to support our taught and research students with their tuition fees and living costs. Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/scholarships/postgraduate/

English language learning

If you need to improve your English before and during your postgraduate studies, Kent offers a range of modules and programmes in English for Academic Purposes (EAP). Find out more here: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international/english.html

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The focus of this programme is on contemporary substantive issues in criminology and criminal justice and on criminological research methods. Read more
The focus of this programme is on contemporary substantive issues in criminology and criminal justice and on criminological research methods. It is particularly appropriate for those engaged in criminal justice policy analysis and development or similar work in allied fields.

The programme develops a theoretical, policy and technical understanding of key issues within criminology, criminal justice and research methods. More specifically, it aims to develop an advanced understanding of the complex nature of crime, harm and victimisation together with an appreciation of the role of the state/criminal justice system in the regulation of human behaviour, deviance and crime. The programme will equip you to design and implement social scientific research using a broad range of methodologies, consider research ethics, analyse and present the material such research generates.

Through combining criminology and research methods, the programme enables you to think logically and in an informed manner about criminological issues. The programme fosters a critical awareness of the relationship between theory, policy and practice and enables you to utilize your research knowledge of research skills and translate these into research practice in the field of criminology and broader social science research professions.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/criminology-social-research-methods-msc

Modules

You'll undertake modules from a broad base of subject areas including:

- Criminological theory
This module charts the development of criminological thinking from the onset of modernity through to the present day. It will place discrete theories in their proper sociological, historical, political and cultural contexts. It will seek to establish the implications and relationships of various theories to criminal justice policy. A number of contemporary issues (terrorism, urban disturbances, and gang culture) will be explored with a view to critically evaluating the value of competing theoretical frameworks.

- Crime, harm and victimisation
The module aims to deconstruct the fundamental elements of criminology: the crime, the criminal and the victim. It begins by examining historical and contemporary patterns of crime and criminality, as officially measured, within the UK and beyond. It then engages with more critical academic debates about defining and measuring crime, considering definitions of crime as: a breach of criminal law; a violation of collective conscience; a product of conduct norms; a social construct; ideological censure; a gendered reality; a violation of human rights, and; social or environmental harm. The module engages with critical deconstructions of the 'offender' and the 'victim', considering how these are socially constructed and how our understanding of these, like of 'crime', has changed and continues to change in late-/post-modern society.

- Responding to crime: justice, social control and punishment
This module explores some of the key issues and controversies in the delivery of justice, social control and punishment. It begins with a critical consideration of the concept of justice and emphasises the significance of this in relation to how the state responds to various forms of crime. It encourages you to think critically about the role of the state in the regulation of behaviour and provides an overview of key changes that have occurred in the field of crime control and criminal justice. One of the key features of contemporary crime control discourse is the rise of risk management and the pursuit of security. This module outlines the ways in which such a discourse has transformed criminal justice thinking and practices of both policing and penal policy, and also of crime (and harm) prevention.

- Criminological research in practice
This module uses examples from recent and current research conducted by members of the Crime and Justice Research Group at LSBU and external guest speakers to develop both the research training and subject understanding elements of the MSc, demonstrating how research becomes knowledge – generating theoretical advances, policy initiatives, new research questions and university curricula. Lectures/seminars will take the form of a research commentary, talking you through a research project from idea inception through research design, fieldwork, analysis and dissemination and, where appropriate, on to the influences research has had (or could have) on subsequent academic works and policy developments. Particular emphasis will be placed on challenges peculiar to criminological research.

- Methods for social research and evaluation: philosophy, design and data collection
This module introduces you to core concepts in social research and shows how they can be used to address social scientific questions and practical issues in policy evaluation. You'll be introduced to central topics in the philosophy of social sciences and the effect they have on research choices. You are then introduced to different ways research can be designed and the ways design affects permissible inferences. You are then introduced to the theory of measurement and sampling. The final third of the module focuses on acquiring data ranging from survey methods through qualitative data collection methods to secondary data.

- Data analytic techniques for social scientists
You are introduced to a range of analytic techniques commonly used by social scientists. It begins by introducing you to statistical analysis, it then moves to techniques used to analyse qualitative data. It concludes by looking at relational methods and data reduction techniques. You'll also be introduced to computer software (SPSS, NVivo and Ucinet) that implements the techniques. Students will gain both a conceptual understanding of the techniques and the means to apply them to their own research projects. An emphasis will be placed on how these techniques can be used in social evaluation.

- Dissertation
The dissertation is a major part of your work on the MSc, reflected in its value of 60 credits. The aim of the dissertation is to enable students to expand and deepen their knowledge of a substantive area in criminology, whilst simultaneously developing their methodological skills. You'll choose an area of investigation and apply the research skills of design and process, modes of data generation and data analysis techniques to undertake a 15,000 word dissertation. You'll be allocated a dissertation supervisor from the departmental team and will meet regularly for personal supervision meetings.

Employability

This MSc will enable you to pursue a range of professional careers in criminal justice related work in statutory, commercial or community voluntary sectors and operating at central, regional and local government levels, for example, the Home Office; police forces; local government; crime and disorder reduction partnerships and their equivalencies throughout the world.

The acquisition of specific criminological and research methods knowledge will also enhance the career opportunities if you are currently working in the field. The specialist focus on research methods also offers an excellent foundation for those interested in undertaking subsequent doctoral research in the field.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Professional links

The Crime and Criminal Justice Research Group, (CCJRG), at LSBU has developed a strong national and international reputation for delivering high quality and real life impact research. It has worked closely with a range of government agencies, including the Office for Criminal Justice Reform (Ministry of Justice); Government Office for London; the Scottish Executive, Northern Ireland Office and the Equalities and Human Rights Commission. It has also undertaken extensive research in collaboration with various London local authorities together with a range of voluntary and charity-based agencies.

Placements

Our criminology programme also has a strong voluntary work scheme.You're encouraged to undertake voluntary work in a variety of criminal justice related agencies. Recent positions have been within the police service, the prison service, legal advice, victim support, domestic violence and child abuse agencies and youth offending and youth mentoring schemes.

Teaching and learning

Study hours:
Year 1 class contact time is typically 6 hours per week part time and 12 hours per week full time plus individual tutorial and independent study.

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The Professional Doctorate in Criminology and Criminal Justice (or DCrim) is a 4-8 year part-time course. In the first two years you would be required to attend taught modules. Read more

Overview

The Professional Doctorate in Criminology and Criminal Justice (or DCrim) is a 4-8 year part-time course. In the first two years you would be required to attend taught modules. There are 5 modules in total, each of which is taught in 1-2 day blocks. Around this formal teaching, there are regular opportunities for face to face and e-mail support. In years 3 - 4 (and beyond where necessary) you would work under the guidance and support of a nominated supervisor to produce a 60,000 word thesis.

The DCrim builds on the established and very successful UG and PGT provision in Criminology and Criminal Justice in the School to provide a specialist route for professionals and managers working in the field of criminal justice, or in related fields, who wish to embark on doctoral study located within their own professional discipline and practice. Indeed, this programme focuses on practitioners and professionals in criminal justice (e.g. policing, courts, probation, prison work, alternative sanctions, community sanctions, service providers in the sphere of drugs and addiction, and so on) or related fields of work and practice (e.g. local authority and third sector service providers in the sphere of crime prevention, security, community building and offender rehabilitation; private providers in the above or related spheres; non-governmental action in a variety of spheres such as environmental action, human rights policy and activism, and so on). This list is not exhaustive. Practitioners and professionals working in fields and organisations as diverse as (e.g.) Amnesty International and (e.g.) the Police all share a common sphere of work which is structured around problems and issues of deviance from legal norms.

See the website http://www.keele.ac.uk/sspp/postgraduatetaught/criminology/professionaldocorate/

Course Aims

- Promote an understanding of research evidence and methodologies relevant to professional practitioners.

- Develop a critical awareness of the policy context in which professional practice takes place.

- Enable participants to undertake a research study of relevance to their professional activities.

Course Content

Module 1 (30 credits) Introduction to theories and methods as a reflective practioner-researcher (EDU-40106)
Assignment: Self-Reflection and Personal Development Plan

Module 2 (30 credits) Critical perspectives in criminology and criminal justice
Assignment: Theoretical perspectives essay

Module 3 (30 credits) Research methods and evaluation (EDU-40103)
Assignment: A general research methods critique

Module 4 (30 credits) The pilot study (EDU-40105)
Assignment: a commentary and report on a pilot study that will inform the final research proposal for the thesis

Module 5 (60 credits) Preparing and presenting a thesis proposal (EDU-40107)
This is a summative assignment comprising a written research proposal and an oral presentation

Years 3 and 4+: A Research Thesis
This will be up to 60,000 words and will draw from the previous five assignments. It should form a contribution to the knowledge of the subject area and show evidence of originality, either by the discovery of new evidence, or by the exercise of independent critical power. The thesis is examined by the conventional method of the viva voce.

Tutors will guide the participants through their formative assignments and a supervisor will be allocated for the Thesis Proposal and Thesis

Teaching & Assessment

The programme is assessed by four formative assignments, one summative assignment and a Research Thesis.

Additional Costs

Additional costs for textbooks, inter-library loans, photocopying, printing, and potential overdue library fines.

No other additional costs for this postgraduate programme are anticipated.

Award Pathway Option

Upon successful completion of the taught part of the DCrim programme and a 15-20,000 word mini-thesis, students may be awarded an MRes (Criminology and Criminal Justice).

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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