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Masters Degrees (Development Cooperation)

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The Master in International Cooperation and Development (MIC&D) offers a privileged framework for designing tentative solutions to poverty, inequality, conflict, instability and uncertainty which still affect the everyday life of a majority of the world population. Read more

The Master in International Cooperation and Development (MIC&D) offers a privileged framework for designing tentative solutions to poverty, inequality, conflict, instability and uncertainty which still affect the everyday life of a majority of the world population.

Learning objectives

The Master trains professionals to contribute to development cooperation with creativity, personality and competence by interpreting local and international events, interacting with stakeholders, identifying and managing environmentally and local culture-friendly interventions. This Master provides students with multidisciplinary training and specialized technical and managerial competences.

Career opportunities & professional recognition

Students who have completed the Master in International Cooperation and Development are working in various national and international institutions and organizations: NGOs, public administration, private companies, dealing with poverty eradication, emergency, development, migration, institution and democracy building in many different countries. The Master supports the students professional career in cooperation and development, building on their previous background and expertise.

Curriculum

The Master in International Cooperation and Development is structured as four complementary levels, fostering multidimensional training and integrating scientific methodologies and operative competences.

1st level - Scientific Training. The first level provides students of different academic backgrounds with a multidisciplinary education on various dimensions of development processes aimed at acquiring the relevant economic, political, historical, legal, institutional and managerial competences, with a special focus on fighting against poverty and fostering social inclusion. Areas of study:

● Economic and human development

● Geopolitics

● Trade and finance for development

● Development law and institutions

● Project cycle management

2nd level - Professional Training. The second level intends to develop practical skills required to operate in development and emergency cooperation: actors and strategies for conflict prevention and post-conflict reconstruction, natural disaster management, development programs and projects concerning poverty eradication, food security, environmental sustainability, community-based development initiatives.  Areas of study:

● Development actors and strategies

● Crisis prevention, relief and recovery

● Development aid and governance

● Partnerships for human rights and development

● Enhancing cooperative skills

3rd level and 4th level - Project Work and Internship

Students are required to develop a personal research project on a topic related to development cooperation, under the supervision of a MIC&D professor and/or a professional from a partner institution. The project work will often be connected to the internship experience. The Master is then completed with an internship within one of the ASERI partner institutions or other entities whose mission and activities are consistent with the program.

Faculty & teaching staff

The Master in International Cooperation and Development offers high quality training to a group of 25 students from all continents. The learning platform includes lectures, seminars and a tutored internship. A faculty composed of scholars and professionals from international institutions and non-governmental organizations shares its experience with the class.

Faculty members:

● Prof. Simona Beretta - MIC&D Director, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore

● Dr. Anni Arial - consultant in land governance, former FAO officer

● Dr. Sara Balestri - Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore

● Dr. Frank Cinque - ALTIS, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore

● Prof. Luigi Curini - Università degli Studi di Milano

● Prof. Paul H. Dembinski - University of Fribourg

● Dr. Giuliano Gargioni - Global Tuberculosis Programme, WHO, Geneva

● Dr. Christophe Golay - Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights

● Prof. Xuewu Gu - University of Bonn

● Prof. Marco Lombardi - Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore

● Prof. Mario Agostino Maggioni - Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore

● Dr. Alberto Monguzzi - International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, Budapest

● Prof. Mathias Nebel - Institut Catholique de Paris

● Dr. Valeria Patruno - IAL Puglia s.r.l.

● Dr. Giovanna Prennushi - The World Bank, Washington

● Dr. Manuela Prina - European Training Foundation, Turin

● Prof. Riccardo Redaelli - Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore

● Prof. Javier Revilla Diez - Global South Studies Center, University of Cologne

● Prof. Michele Riccardi - Transcrime, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore

● Dr. Andrea Rossi - UNICEF, Kathmandu

● Dr. Javier Schunk - PCM Trainer

● Dr. Nicola Strazzari - Vision Plus Media Enterprises, Turin

● Dr. Manuela Tortora - UNCTAD, Geneva

● Prof. Teodora Erika Uberti - Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore

● Prof. Roberto Zoboli - Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore

● Professionals from international institutions, non-govern- mental organizations, applied researchers

ASERI - a center of excellence

Since its foundation in 1995, ASERI has formed young professionals in the fields of international relations and international cooperation, in a stimulating, multidisciplinary learning environment. Students from all over the world, faculty, and professionals find a unique space for discovering new opportunities for their professional enhancement and create a valuable network for future collaboration.

Our experts

Both academics and experienced professionals share their knowledge with students during group activities at ASERI, fostering critical and innovative thinking in facing development and emergency challenges.

Job ready

The Master in International Cooperation and Development provides an opportunity for learning critical and systematic analytical tools, and practical competences for international cooperation. Personal skills are developed in class work and enhanced during the curricular internship.

Global perspective

Students from all continents find at ASERI a unique opportunity for meeting an international faculty. They learn how to cooperate for a world of dignity, justice and peace by practicing cooperation with each other, in a rich and challenging multicultural environment.

Scholarships

All scholarships are assigned on a merit basis and will be mostly given to students who apply by the priority deadline. Some scholarships may also target specific geographic regions.

Scholarships cover 25% of the tuition fees.

Language proficiency

Applicants whose first language is not English will need to have either: TOEFL iBT overall score of at least 80; or Academic IELTS overall score of at least 6.0; or successfully completed a degree program taught in the English language.



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Communication for Development is an interdisciplinary field of study and practice, combining studies on culture, communication and development and integrating them with practical fieldwork. Read more

Communication for Development is an interdisciplinary field of study and practice, combining studies on culture, communication and development and integrating them with practical fieldwork. It explores the use of communication – both as a tool and as a way of articulating processes of social change – within the contexts of globalisation.

In this programme, where the form of study strives to be conducive to the course content, progression lies in the group dynamic process as well as in the coursework itself. The multidisciplinary nature of the subject means that the same content should provide in-depth knowledge for students with different backgrounds. One major point of this pedagogical approach is to bring together different experiences. The group diversity should allow students to deepen their knowledge of their own major as well as gain a sufficient overview based on the academic backgrounds and practical experiences of other students. This will allow them to be able to work both interdisciplinary and transcultural in their future professions.

Communication for Development as a Field of Study

Despite the fact that every year vast amounts of money are donated to developing countries, the chasm between the ‘haves’ and the ‘have-nots’ continues to widen as billions of people around the world continue to live without running water, sanitation, adequate nutrition or access to basic education.

While the poor and the marginalised have always been at the centre of development, they have been the subjects rather than the objects of communication as traditional development practices overlooked a fundamental truism: that the poor, themselves, are often the best experts on their needs. Marginalised communities, historically denied access to communication tools and channels, have traditionally been passive bystanders to their so-called development as top-down, one-sided mass communication programmes delivered information without taking into account the very important specificities of context – the cultural norms and beliefs, knowledge and folklore of target populations, and how these impact the uptake of information and the potential for social change. Due to this lack of participation by target communities, most development programmes failed to achieve their goals, and a dramatic shift in paradigm was necessary to improve the efficacy and sustainability of development cooperation methods.

Internet-based distance-learning

Malmö University was the first to pioneer the use of an Internet-based distance-learning platform to make the education available to students globally. With its mix of online collaboration and discussion, paired with webcast seminars the entire programme can be conducted over the internet. This enables students from all corners of the globe to participate, work in their own time and attain the education. The use of the Live Lecture function in seminars makes students, equipped with microphones and webcams, able to participate in lectures and discussions online, resulting in a ‘virtual classroom’. This way, students in New Zealand and South Africa can communicate and work on projects with classmates in Fiji and India, sharing ideas and working together towards the common goal of improving development practices.

Final project and field-work

The final project has always been an important element of the programme. Over the past 10 years, students of ComDev have had the opportunity to apply what they have learned theoretically to a broad range of contexts and scenarios in the process of completing their projects, and field-work has been conducted in India, South Africa, Mozambique, Kenya, Croatia and Sarajevo, to name but a few. During their project work, students have the opportunity to explore a particular research area or topic of concern at a deeper level, and the accompanying written dissertation provides a fantastic opportunity to consolidate and further the knowledge and skills gained during the education. This project work also demonstrates a solid foundation in research, which will aid those students who wish to continue into doctoral level studies. In choosing the topic for their projects, students are free to ‘think outside the box’, and employ innovativeness and creativity to their field-work endeavours, and project works have included documentaries, short films, photo essays, and a wide array of dissertations presented in interesting and original ways. Students are also encouraged to join forces and collaborate on projects, as teamwork is regarded as a vital part of effective development cooperation. For a list of all the Project Works to date, see the ComDev portal: http://wpmu.mah.se/comdev/, under ‘History’.

Courses

For programme with start Autumn 2018: 

Autumn 2018 - Semester 1

Spring 2019 - Semester 2

Autumn 2019 - Semester 3

Spring 2020 - Semester 4

Career opportunities

The global demand for media and communication skills continues to increase as organisations such as UNICEF have made it a policy to hire ComDev practitioners, not only for international development schemes, but for diversity management and other forms of transcultural cooperation. Since skills, knowledge and aptitudes gained through an education in ComDev are relevant to a variety of job functions within the development sector, you may also find alumni working in a range of allied positions, such as conflict resolution positions or as a learning and outcomes coordinator, to name but a few.

Degree

Master's Degree (60 credits).

Degree of Master (one year)



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What is the Master of Cultures and Development Studies all about? . The Master of Cultural Anthropology and Development Studies (CADES) aims to enhance the . Read more

What is the Master of Cultures and Development Studies all about? 

The Master of Cultural Anthropology and Development Studies (CADES) aims to enhance the multidisciplinary and intercultural expertise and skills of students and professionals involved in or interested in advisory, policy or educational assignments in the international and development sectors. Rooted in contemporary social and cultural anthropology, the programme draws on various disciplines and fields of study and deploys a wealth of relevant perspectives. Its approach builds on current insights into the complex dynamics of on-going economic and informational globalisation and the development of multiple modernities, inter alia.

Following multi-sited research conducted at the Institute for Anthropological Research in Africa (IARA) and the Interculturalism, Migration and Minority Research Centre (IMMRC), the programme counters the mainstream Western perspective and stimulates an integrated approach to development issues. Taking this into account, the programme does not offer its students a practical toolkit, but rather tends to question whether available tools are suitable and applicable in any given context.

Having learned to relate domain-specific knowledge within the evolving international debates, our graduates go on to a large variety of jobs in ngo’s, international organisations, development cooperation, education, social and medical services, advisory organisations, international relations, enterprises, and research. 

International

During the programme, students have the opportunity to carry out an internship and acquire international experience. The internship can be included in the curriculum provided that it covers at least 6 weeks and starts after classes have finished (end of June). Students taking up the internship can only complete the CADES programme after 1 and a half years.

Is this the right programme for me?

Ideal prospective students have an interest in advocacy, policy or educational assignments in the international and/or intercultural cooperation context. They are interested in anthropological and cultural-specific views on sustainable development and opt for an interdisciplinary academic preparation towards a better understanding of development paradigms.

Objectives

The aim of the programme is to increase the student's interdisciplinary and intercultural expertise with a view to fulfilling advisory, policy-making and educational functions within international and/or intercultural development and cooperation. This is achieved by providing them with conceptual and practical experience in the processes of information transmission, international cooperation, globalization and cultural assertiveness. The programme places the accent on anthropology, but is relevant to various academic disciplines.

By the end of the programme, the student will have acquired:

  • knowledge and understanding of the scholarly framework in which intercultural problems can be clarified with respect to various academic and social themes;
  • skill in the analysis of practical and theoretical problems from an intercultural perspective; setting up, executing and evaluating research projects; drafting diagnoses, plans and recommendations; use and/or design of instruments for the optimization of situations in practical situations; critical reflection on the content of practical interventions; linking theoretical concepts to practical acts; guiding and developing innovations;
  • the skills necessary for adequate communication and reporting.

Career paths

CADES offers students a broad international and interdisciplinary background with which to confront developmental issues from an anthropological perspective. Graduates find employment in:

  • ngo's
  • international organisations
  • development cooperation
  • education
  • social and medical services
  • advisory organisations
  • international relations
  • private and public enterprises
  • research


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This course will allow students to gain specialism in a chosen topic through a production of an extended piece of academic writing building on their choice of optional units taken in the second year covering the areas of health, education, gender, international relations, criminology and making use of the applied research methods in development skills acquired in the first year. Read more

Why take this course?

This course will allow students to gain specialism in a chosen topic through a production of an extended piece of academic writing building on their choice of optional units taken in the second year covering the areas of health, education, gender, international relations, criminology and making use of the applied research methods in development skills acquired in the first year.

The distance learning and part time mode of the programme provides a flexible learning framework with opportunities for students to undertake a full Master's qualification, a postgraduate Diploma or a postgraduate Certificate.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Critically engage with an international development studies topic of choice, assembling information from a variety of sources to compose clear detailed and logical argument;
Learn to formulate a systematic and methodologically sound research process through undertaking a literature review and empirical research;
Where applicable, justify ethical considerations surrounding research carried out.

What opportunities might it lead to?

You can expect to graduate from this course with enhanced career prospects in the international development sector, greater knowledge of development issues and an increasing professional network that may allow you to identify career opportunities. You will also be prepared for doctoral study.

Module Details

You will study the following core units:

Theory & Practice of Development:
Explore the history, theory and practice of international development studies, through topics from colonialism to globalisation. You will be introduced to the tools, such as social enterprise, that are used in development practice. Assessment includes a social enterprise project alongside a traditional essay.

Applied Research Methods for Development:
Learn the strategies and methods of collecting and analysing quantitative and qualitative data in the social sciences. You will learn to use SPSS for data manipulation, quantitative data analysis and interpretation, using a range of data sets relevant to international development studies.

Dissertation:
Demonstrate your achievement on the course as a whole, through the production of a 15,000-word research project on a topic of your choice, informed by the optional units you have selected, under the advice and guidance of a personal supervisor.

You will also select two optional units:

International and Comparative Criminal Justice:
Compare differing systems of criminal justice, including international courts and criminal tribunals, as well as international norms and standards. You will examine the role of international criminal justice bodies within the UN and the EU, institutional development, and criminal justice capacity building.

Gender for Development Cooperation:
Combine study of theories in gender (including masculinities) with practical knowledge of the tools used by practitioners to approach gender mainstreaming in development. You will also look at the application of a gendered lens to the design and implementation of development programmes.

Contemporary Security in International Relations:
Examine the most pressing international security challenges facing policy makers, reflect on new debates in security studies, and explore the enduring relevance of strategic thought in the face of contemporary challenges.

Education and Development:
Consider key issues in contemporary debates relating to education and international development, through a range of approaches, theories and research in historical and regional contexts. Themes include fair access, inclusivity, diversity and equity in education and skills policy.

Health and Development:
Examine the challenges in defining and measuring population health, and explore a variety of health topics relevant to both the developed and developing countries including obesity, ageing, health and migration, health inequalities and child under-nutrition.

Economics of Development:
Gain insights into the ways in which economics and economists play a critical role in terms of development policy. You will examine resource endowment and exploitation, poverty and inequality, historic trade theory and the role of finance and microfinance in economic development.

Units (30 credits per unit, 60 credits for the dissertation) are offered individually as credit-bearing short courses, or as part of the Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits), Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits), or MSc International Development Studies (180 credits).

Programme Assessment

This course will be offered entirely through distance learning methods. All course materials and readings, lecture notes, as well as additional links to useful organisational sites, social media hubs and further resources, will be posted and regularly updated in our virtual learning environment. Human contact will be an important part of the programme too, with regular ‘webinars’, discussion forums, one-on-one tutorials with lecturers, email correspondence and skype meetings where necessary.

The assessment methods used on this programme are varied and test all the skills developed in the different modules at different stages of the learning process. These include essays, leading and participating in discussion forums and blogs, portfolios, policy briefs and research projects, allowing for a balance between formative and summative assessment.

Student Destinations

The course is designed to support the needs of those who hope to be, or are already, engaged in the international development sector. It offers highly desirable transferable skills such as communication, qualitative data collection, quantitative data manipulation and data analysis and writing skills. Additionally, the applied nature of this course means that students will be working within ‘live’ development contexts from the start. This will ensure that they are able to develop their professional networks and identify career opportunities. Additionally students will benefit from the advice and guidance regarding career progression given by the experts and development practitioners who teach on this course.

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This course builds on the knowledge in theory and practice of development and applied research methods for development gained in the first year to allow for an in-depth understanding of two optional courses depending on students’ interest and background taken in the second year. Read more

Why take this course?

This course builds on the knowledge in theory and practice of development and applied research methods for development gained in the first year to allow for an in-depth understanding of two optional courses depending on students’ interest and background taken in the second year. Optional units will cover the disciplines of health, education, economics, politics and criminology and the topic of gender.

The distance learning and part time mode of the programme provides a flexible learning framework with opportunities for students to undertake a full Master's qualification, a postgraduate Diploma or a postgraduate Certificate.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Study with academic staff that are actively engaged in research in your chosen optional unit and with an area/regional specialism
Critically engage with a range of topics from the field of international development studies, assembling a clear argument from a variety of information sources
Take advantage of flexible provision that aims to meet your specific needs

What opportunities might it lead to?

You can expect to graduate from this course with enhanced career prospects in the international development sector, greater knowledge of development issues and an increasing professional network that may allow you to identify career opportunities.

Module Details

You will study the following core units:

Theory & Practice of Development:
Explore the history, theory and practice of international development studies, through topics from colonialism to globalisation. You will be introduced to the tools, such as social enterprise, that are used in development practice. Assessment includes a social enterprise project alongside a traditional essay.

Applied Research Methods for Development:
Learn the strategies and methods of collecting and analysing quantitative and qualitative data in the social sciences. You will learn to use SPSS for data manipulation, quantitative data analysis and interpretation, using a range of data sets relevant to international development studies.

You will also select two optional units:

International and Comparative Criminal Justice:
Compare differing systems of criminal justice, including international courts and criminal tribunals, as well as international norms and standards. You will examine the role of international criminal justice bodies within the UN and the EU, institutional development, and criminal justice capacity building.

Gender for Development Cooperation:
Combine study of theories in gender (including masculinities) with practical knowledge of the tools used by practitioners to approach gender mainstreaming in development. You will also look at the application of a gendered lens to the design and implementation of development programmes.

Contemporary Security in International Relations:
Examine the most pressing international security challenges facing policy makers, reflect on new debates in security studies, and explore the enduring relevance of strategic thought in the face of contemporary challenges.

Education and Development:
Consider key issues in contemporary debates relating to education and international development, through a range of approaches, theories and research in historical and regional contexts. Themes include fair access, inclusivity, diversity and equity in education and skills policy.

Health and Development:
Examine the challenges in defining and measuring population health, and explore a variety of health topics relevant to both the developed and developing countries including obesity, ageing, health and migration, health inequalities and child under-nutrition.

Economics of Development:
Gain insights into the ways in which economics and economists play a critical role in terms of development policy. You will examine resource endowment and exploitation, poverty and inequality, historic trade theory and the role of finance and microfinance in economic development.

Units (30 credits per unit, 60 credits for the dissertation) are offered individually as credit-bearing short courses, or as part of the Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits), Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits), or MSc International Development Studies (180 credits).

Programme Assessment

This course will be offered entirely through distance learning methods. All course materials and readings, lecture notes, as well as additional links to useful organisational sites, social media hubs and further resources, will be posted and regularly updated in our virtual learning environment. Human contact will be an important part of the programme too, with regular ‘webinars’, discussion forums, one-on-one tutorials with lecturers, email correspondence and skype meetings where necessary.

The assessment methods used on this programme are varied and test all the skills developed in the different modules at different stages of the learning process. These include essays, leading and participating in discussion forums and blogs, portfolios, policy briefs and research projects, allowing for a balance between formative and summative assessment.

Student Destinations

The living contexts of the work undertaken on this course will offer valuable experience and contacts in the international development sector, while the advice and guidance regarding career progression given by lecturing staff will be invaluable. You may use this career to support work in governmental bodies and NGOs, or charities.

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This degree course is held entirely in English, and provides a thorough understanding of specific forms and social, economic, regional and institutional dynamics that characterize the processes of local development in different contexts and at different levels of development, and knowledge aimed at promoting the implementation of a sustainability process (policies, operational practices). Read more

This degree course is held entirely in English, and provides a thorough understanding of specific forms and social, economic, regional and institutional dynamics that characterize the processes of local development in different contexts and at different levels of development, and knowledge aimed at promoting the implementation of a sustainability process (policies, operational practices).

In particular, this degree course objective seeks to provide an in-depth application of the different methodologies used for the formulation, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of programs and projects for local development.

This degree course includes activities dedicated to acquiring advanced knowledge in the fields of political, economic, regional and social organization, statistics for the measurement of local and sustainable development, intercultural learnings, design and development of group dynamics. 

The course includes an on-site traineeship, in Italy or abroad, in conjunction with relevant authorities and NGOs, to conduct the case study that will provide the starting point for the Second Cycle degree course final exam.

Master's degree brochure: https://elearning.unipd.it/scienzeumane/mod/folder/view.php?id=90560

Course structure

Master's degree syllabus: https://elearning.unipd.it/scienzeumane/mod/folder/view.php?id=90560

Career opportunities

This degree course prepares students for professions in local development and more generally in development cooperation in different social and regional contexts, with non-governmental organizations, government at various levels, international organizations and agencies, professional and neighborhood associations. Potential employment opportunities lie in the broad field of development cooperation - especially decentralized - and the promotion of community development in terms of context analysis and feasibility studies, activities under the project cycle, participation in the elaboration and evaluation of policies and programs of this sector.

Scholarships and Fee Waivers

The University of Padova, the Veneto Region and other organisations offer various scholarship schemes to support students. Below is a list of the funding opportunities that are most often used by international students in Padova.

You can find more information below and on our website here: http://www.unipd.it/en/studying-padova/funding-and-fees/scholarships

You can find more information on fee waivers here: http://www.unipd.it/en/fee-waivers



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DEVELOPMENT IN A COMPLEX AND HIGHLY DIFFERENTIATED WORLD. The world is rapidly changing; so is International Development Studies. Read more

DEVELOPMENT IN A COMPLEX AND HIGHLY DIFFERENTIATED WORLD

The world is rapidly changing; so is International Development Studies. After 15 years, the MDG-era (Millennium Development Goals) came to an end in 2015. A larger set of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) were introduced to guide long-term development policies and end global poverty. Development is no longer considered as a problem ‘out there’ in the global south. Our contemporary world faces new global concerns, such as the 'migration crisis', food security, climate change, and energy crises.

We also witness massive changes in the relative power structure in our world system. Africa, Asia and Latin America are experiencing rapid transformations, turning traditional North-South relations upside down. Giants like India and China are strengthening their role in international development cooperation. These ‘new’ donors emphasise that ‘South-South cooperation’ is different from the Western notion of donors helping clients. While development has been traditionally defined by the donor community in the North/West, governments in Africa, Asia and Latin America have come up with their own versions of ‘development’.

Over the past decade, the number of actors active in the development domain has multiplied. In addition to the traditional donors, new ‘players’ have entered the scene, including foundations and diaspora-organisations. Furthermore individual migrants and socially-engaged entrepreneurs are acknowledging their role in societal changes; many are taking responsibility for the social and environmental impacts of production activities and/or consumption.

The multidisciplinary Master's programme in International Development Studies addresses current development challenges and engages with these highly important and urgent issues. In particular, the programme focuses on topics surrounding migration/mobilities, climate change, land governance, urbanisation and corporate social responsibility. You will study in an international environment, with peers and staff from diverse disciplinary and cultural backgrounds. A research-oriented internship abroad is a core component of the programme. International Development Studies takes prides in its large, expanding, and active alumni and friends network.

PROGRAMME OBJECTIVE

The central objective of the Master's in International Development Studies programme is to equip you with conceptual and empirical knowledge as well as research skills necessary to understand and analyse contemporary issues pertaining to international development in broad geographical contexts (local, regional, and international levels).

Upon completion of the programme you will have acquired theoretical, methodological and practical competency. These skills will be useful for your career in further academic research, development policy and practice sector, as well as other work fields. You will gain an understanding of world affairs and international experiences as well as analytical, communication and project implementation skills.



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Cities in Africa, Asia and Latin America struggle with growth, and urban communities in the developing world are increasingly faced with problems relating to poverty, informality and inequality, climate change, insecurity and lack of social cohesion. Read more

Cities in Africa, Asia and Latin America struggle with growth, and urban communities in the developing world are increasingly faced with problems relating to poverty, informality and inequality, climate change, insecurity and lack of social cohesion. Sustainable urban development planning in the global South is thus a complex task with many dimensions.

This interdisciplinary course, offered by the Global Urban Research Group (GURG/Manchester Urban Institute) draws on the advanced expertise of staff from the Global Development Institute (GDI), Planning and Environmental Management (PE&M), Geography and Architecture, from within the School of Environment, Education and Development (SEED) as well as Alliance Manchester Business School. It is suitable for students wishing to improve their understanding of urban development in cities of the global South in general, as well as development professionals seeking to acquire new expertise in dealing with urban issues, and social development specialists working in the voluntary, private or public sector. We particularly encourage applications from Latin American, African and Asian students.

For more information contact the programme director Dr Alfredo Stein ( ) or the programme co-director Nicola Banks ( ).

Aims

  • An understanding of the cutting edge conceptual debates in global urban development theory and practice, by exploring analytical approaches and relating these to operational frameworks for policy, planning and programming to promote more equitable and sustainable urban development in cities and towns of the global South.
  • Analytical and practical skills to deepen your knowledge of global urban development and planning theories, as well as the ability to identify, investigate and justify possible solutions to problems arising out of theory and practice (including competency in developing reasoned arguments, finding commonalities and differences, and defending different approaches).
  • Skills necessary to gather, organise and employ evidence and information from a wide variety of sources, complemented by guidance on how best to manage workloads and obtain research materials, and support to develop your area of expertise through relevant research culminating in a dissertation.

Special features

Students will have an optional core fieldcourse of either the International Planning field trip or the Development Fieldwork module. All students will be automatically enrolled on the International Planning fieldcourse and the cost of this field trip is incorporated into the programme fees. Those students who wish to attend the Development Fieldwork module will have to express their preference by 1 October and pay the difference in cost by Christmas.

Teaching and learning

The programme requires students to pass a total of eight course units totalling 120 credits of postgraduate study and to undertake a dissertation of 12000 -15000 words which provides a further 60 credits. You must normally complete 4 core course units compulsory for all students, and 4 optional course units selected from those available both within PE&M, GDI and in other relevant disciplines within SEED and the Faculty of Humanities.

Part-time Study

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over 27 months.  There are no evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme, therefore if you are considering taking a programme on a part-time basis, you should discuss the requirements with the Programme Director first and seek approval from your employer to have the relevant time off. Timetabling information is normally available from late August from the Programme Administrator and you will have the opportunity to discuss course unit choices during Welcome Week with the Programme Directors.

Coursework and assessment

Most courses are assessed by essays, class presentations and examinations or a combination of these (depending on the course units selected). A dissertation of between 12,000-15,000 words provides an opportunity to obtain an advanced level of expertise in a particular subject area through supervised individual research.

Facilities

The Arthur Lewis Building provides excellent resources including analytical laboratories, studio facilities, workshops, seminar rooms, an on-site cafe and dedicated computer clusters including GIS facilities.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

You will develop an advanced knowledge and skill base that can be applied to professional activities relating to a variety of urban-related fields. Past students have gone on to work as consultants for international development cooperation agencies; planners for national and local governments and private companies; and as practitioners in slum upgrading programmes, or international networks and national NGOs in cities in Africa, Asia and Latin America.

Accrediting organisations

This course is accredited by the Royal Town Planning Institute (RTPI). After completion of relevant work experience, you may be able in due course to proceed to full RTPI membership. Those students wishing to obtain full RTPI accreditation will need to take, in addition to the core courses of the MSc programme, a specific combination of relevant core and optional courses.



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Master's specialisation in Globalisation, Migration and Development. You will study various dimensions and aspects of globalisation, notably as this relates to socio-economic and spatial development for different parts of the world, the Global South in particular. Read more

Master's specialisation in Globalisation, Migration and Development

You will study various dimensions and aspects of globalisation, notably as this relates to socio-economic and spatial development for different parts of the world, the Global South in particular. Core issues on which this master specialisation will focus include: changing relationships of global and local societies through the rise of new social and spatial inequalities brought about by global processes, migration and mobility and the emergence of transnational identities versus local interpretations in so-called multicultural societies. Overall we give particular emphasis to the relationship with urban contexts of these issues, but do also link it up with rural domains, e.g. in studying sustainability of livelihood strategies and development policies in different regions.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/gmd

Career prospects

Our graduates are employed in a wide range of jobs in- and outside the Netherlands. To give some insight in the scope of the work they do we have categorised this as follows, adding that this list is not exhaustive:

1. Working for the Dutch government at local, regional, national and international levels regarding development issues such as poverty, livelihoods, social exclusion and empowerment:

- Policymaker / programme researcher for city municipalities focusing on integration and multi-cultural issues, especially in the low-income neighbourhoods;

- Policy development expert for Provincial Governments in The Netherlands;

- Policy expert or programme/field officer with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs;

- Programme officer with Nuffic (Netherlands Organisation for International Cooperation in Higher education)

2. Working as an NGO practitioner in development cooperation:

- Field officer for Max Havelaar or Fair Trade, visiting developing countries to establish business contracts with local farmer organisations;

- Research officer for the Centre for the Promotion of Imports from developing countries (http://www.cbi.nl/) promoting and facilitating entry of entrepreneurs from developing countries in the European market.

- Researcher/programme officer with development aid related organisations such as: Cordaid, VSO, SNV, Novib/Oxfam, Hivos and COS (Association of Centres for international cooperation at the provincial level), or a migrant (umbrella) organisation.

3. Pursuing an academic career (research and education) with one of many research institutes studying migration, globalisation, integration or development issues in the Netherlands and abroad:

- Conducting highly innovative PhD research on migration and development, health and urbanisation, the rural impact of globalisation, etc. (see http://www.nwo.nl/ for past research proposals)

- Working for a research institute/organisation involved with migration and globalisation: e.g. MPI, IOM, Refugee Studies Centre in Oxford

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/gmd



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What is the Master of Science in Sustainable Development all about?.  The Master of Science in Sustainable Development contains two different tracks. Read more

What is the Master of Science in Sustainable Development all about?

 The Master of Science in Sustainable Development contains two different tracks: the Erasmus Mundus joint Master in Sustainable Territorial Development and the ICP Master of Science in Sustainable Development. 

The Erasmus Mundus Joint Master in Sustainable Territorial Development

STeDe IJM aims to create experts in the area of sustainable territorial development. More concretely it trains professionals to be able to help organizations acting in the territory (enterprises, local communities, civil society organizations) to draft sustainable development policies for economic, social, environmental, international and intercultural management.

The Master concerns the economic competitiveness, social inclusion, environmental protection, international cooperation and intercultural relation challenges of territorial development focusing not only on local communities, but also on enterprises, non-state actors and civil society organizations. It also aims to offer an example of sustainable territory involving all local organizations, which should have human resources available and able to promote sustainable development. 

The ICP Master of Science in Sustainable Development

An active research-driven education model with five main pillars

Pillar 1 : Research based teaching courses taught by academic experts leading research in different sustainability domains and parts of the world.

Pillar 2 : Training in research stimulating critical learners, systemic thinking and creativity in the solution of complex socio-ecological problems and triggering real change.

Pillar 3 : A programme informed by and serving the needs of Global South regions facing economic, social and ecological challenges.

Pillar 4 : The active integration of fieldwork in the South, internship, thesis and portfolio development in the professional preparation of the students.

Pillar 5 : The KU Leuven Sustainability Living Lab as the itinerant platform through which the vision and goals of this Master will be tested and implemented in a real world setting. All contents and activities in the Master are connected to the priorities of the Lab, which will be in tune with international institutions agendas and contemporary sustainability debates.

In simple words, this Master programme embraces sustainable development beyond the walls of universities and classrooms to engage with real world settings and localities in their search for solutions to their most pressing problems.

The Master of Science in Sustainable Development is an initial Master's programme and can be followed on a full-time or part-time basis.

Structure

In this interuniversity programme, both European and non-European students study together. The EMLM STeDe-students study each semester at a different university. First at the Università degli Studi di Padova (30 ECTS), then at KU Leuven (30 ECTS) and then at the Université Paris 1 Panthéon - Sorbonne (30 ECTS). The fourth semester is dedicated to an internship and a Master's thesis (30 ECTS) written at the university of the student's choice from among the three aforementioned universities and the Universidade Catolica Don Bosco in Brazil. 

The students of the ICP Master of Sustainable Development study at the KU Leuven. They can choose between two specialisations: ‘Space and Society’ and ‘Ecology’.

Departments

This programme is offered by the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, collaboration with the Department of Biology. The main mission of the Department Earth and Environmental Sciences is to carry out state-of-the-art scientific research with respect to the functioning of geo- and ecosystems at different spatial and temporal scales, including the interaction between humans and the environment and the sustainable management of natural resources. The department aims at providing attractive academic training at an international level in the fields of Bio-engineering, Geology, Geography and Tourism. The department aims at making an important contribution to the scientific understanding of societal issues such as environmental pollution, food production, climate change, nature and landscape management, soil and water management, exploitation of underground resources, rural and urban development, international development collaboration and tourism.

The Department of Biology is committed to excellence in teaching and research and is comprised of four divisions with diverse research activities ranging from molecular and physiological research at the level of cells and organisms to ecological research on populations, communities, and ecosystems. Although many research groups conduct in-depth analyses on specific model organisms, as a whole the department studies an impressive diversity of lifeforms.

Our research is internationally renowned and embedded in well-established worldwide collaborations with other universities, research institutes, and companies. Our primary goal is to obtain insight into patterns and processes at different levels of biological organisation and to understand the basis and evolution of the mechanisms that allow organisms to adapt to their constantly changing environment. This knowledge often leads to applications with important economic or societal benefits. The department attracts many students and hosts approximately 250 staff members.

Career perspectives

Job opportunities for graduates may be found in all sectors where sustainable development actions should be implemented, in particular at organizations responsible for the creation of sustainable territories (communities, enterprises, non-state actors and civil society organizations, local governments), the central government and international organizations.

Potential posts include: environmental adviser; sustainable development manager in local communities, public administrations, civil society organizations & local governments; representative within local public institutions, national and international institutions, enterprises, trade unions & professional bodies.

The extensive experience, international collaboration and multidisciplinary insights gained from the Erasmus Mundus Master in Sustainable Territorial Development, will open up new perspectives on the sustainability of territorial use and organization while introducing you to various policy tools and management strategies in divergent territorial contexts. 



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The M.A. Development Studies enables students to develop the advanced knowledge, analytical skills, and conceptual frameworks required to understand and navigate the complexities of economic and social development. Read more

About the programme

The M.A. Development Studies enables students to develop the advanced knowledge, analytical skills, and conceptual frameworks required to understand and navigate the complexities of economic and social development.
Students enrolled in the programme gain insights into the economic, social, ethical, and cultural contexts and constraints of development. The programme provides outstanding opportunities to put theory into practice through international field research, with a strong focus on integrating quantitative and qualitative methods.
The programme addresses the worldwide need for experts in the expanding field of development research as well as for project managers in international development cooperation.

Who should study this degree programme?

This programme is particularly suitable for students with a first degree in social science and mid-career professionals in any development-related field. Qualified students from developing and emerging countries are particularly welcome.

Features

– Programme entirely taught in English
– Strong focus on quantitative and qualitative methods
– Field research opportunities
– Unique selection of language courses

Programme syllabus

1st semester (30 ECTS credits):
– Methods and theories of Development Studies
– Interdisciplinary seminar
– Qualitative and quantitative research methods

2nd and 3rd semesters (65 ECTS credits):
– Qualitative and quantitative research methods
– Research seminar
– Elective modules (e.g. sociology, economics, sustain-ability of resources, political science, Southeast Asian studies)
– Languages and additional study skills courses

4th semester (25 ECTS credits):
– Field research
– Master’s thesis
– A research colloquium with internationally renowned guest speakers is offered each semester

Specialisations

If desired, you may choose to specialise in Development Economics or Southeast Asian Studies

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The M.Sc. in Engineering for Natural Risk Management aims to train professionals capable of working in all sectors of safety and civil protection, both public and private, at national and international level. Read more

The M.Sc. in Engineering for Natural Risk Management aims to train professionals capable of working in all sectors of safety and civil protection, both public and private, at national and international level. Thanks to its multidisciplinary nature, the program will provide the skills to coordinate the activities of a complex system such as civil protection.

The student of the M.Sc. in Engineering for Natural Risk Management at the end of his studies will have the following knowledge and understanding capabilities:

a) Knowledge of physical phenomena that generate disasters

b) Capacity of understanding of the mechanisms of interaction between natural events and industrial activities that can generate technological risk

c) Ability to understand and evaluate the legal implications related to the management of emergency situations.

The acquired knowledge may be applied for the:

a) Use the most advanced technologies in order to assess risk exposure and vulnerability, predict the occurrence of catastrophic events and post disasters impact assessment.

b) Assessment of environmental impact of natural disasters

c) Definition of emergency plans for the integrated risk management and decisions support in emergency situations

The courses are fully taught in English. The fourth semester is mainly devoted to internships and thesis work to facilitate international exchanges and contacts with the labour market.

The program has the support of CIMA Foundation, expert center of the national civil protection, which is based in the University Campus of Savona. CIMA has the University of Genoa, the Department of Civil Protection, the Liguria Region and the Province of Savona as founding members. CIMA will provide laboratories, researchers and administrative staff to support the teaching activities.

Students are offered the opportunity to carry out internships/periods of study at Italian and foreign institutions and universities.

Graduates in Engineering for Natural Risk Management may find career opportunities in:

1. public organizations and administrations;

2. international organizations that deal with emergencies and disasters;

3. international development cooperation;

4. humanitarian organizations;

5. private sector, insurances;

6. professional services;

7. research facilities;

8. operational centers for forecasting natural disasters and decision support.

Typical career opportunities for graduates in Engineering for Natural Risk Management are:

a. responsible for managing emergencies in public institutions/government (civil protection);

b. responsible in entities involved in the management of emergency conditions (eg. the fire-fighters, Forestry Police);

c. expert in risk monitoring in public bodies and international organizations;

d. responsible for planning the phases of management of emergencies in public bodies;

e. risk expert in insurance companies;

f. expert in operational management of emergencies in international governmental organizations, non-governmental and development cooperation;

g. expert in mapping of hazardous conditions with reference to security from natural and industrial risks working for professional offices, public/private institutions, public administration.



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This programme empowers actors and practitioners from development, security and other peace and security related institutional backgrounds involved in international peace-building with the knowledge, skills and competencies that will enable them to provide leadership to reduce and ultimately eliminate violent conflict. Read more

Overview

This programme empowers actors and practitioners from development, security and other peace and security related institutional backgrounds involved in international peace-building with the knowledge, skills and competencies that will enable them to provide leadership to reduce and ultimately eliminate violent conflict.

This master’s programme will provide a challenging learning experience for those who wish to develop and integrate mediation and negotiation knowledge and skills with their awareness of wider conflict and development issues while providing students with a critical insight of the entire spectrum of international conflict intervention.

The main theme of the programme will be an integrated and comprehensive approach to the the nexus of peacebuilding, security and development. With increased awareness of the importance of these interlinkages has come increased demands on national and international institutions to respond in a holistic way. In the field, security actors are required to have a better understanding and greater skills in engaging with local communities, institutions and organizations at the local level, while development practitioners recognise a skills deficit with respect to conflict resolution and mediation and are increasingly expected to understand and engage with representatives of multifaceted agencies and communities, particularly when anticipating or responding to the consequences of complex crises.

Students will develop

Conceptual and strategic analytical capacity, including ability to analyse and articulate the violent conflict dimension of complex issues that require an integrated and comprehensive response.
Demonstrated problem-solving skills and judgment in applying technical expertise to resolve a wide range of complex and unusual issues/problems and in developing innovative and creative solutions.
Ability to negotiate and to influence others to reach agreement.
Knowledge of institutional mandates, policies and guidelines pertaining to interventions in violent conflict.
The programme describes the process of negotiating and implementing peace agreements and security actors and international interventions, drawing in senior personnel experienced in peacekeeping/ peace making and security operations. It also explores the notion of partner and aid donors, the contribution of international organisations and cooperation with key strategic partners and the use of broad development instruments in support of conflict prevention and peace building.

Completion of the module, Mediation Knowledge and Practice provides the basis for the opportunity to take a Mediation Competency Assessment and on successfully passing this assessment, the student is in a position to apply for Certified Status with the Mediators Institute of Ireland.

Course Structure

The programme will be a fulltime offering every second year from August 2017 onwards. The programme will be delivered in the following manner;

Semester 1 – Classroom / Online modules (Aug – Dec)

Semester 2 – Classroom / Online-modules (Feb – June)

Semester 3 – Mixture of Online /Classroom/Supervision (May – Oct)

In following a fulltime programme, students must complete- 30 credits per semester and complete a dissertation within the 14 month period of the programme. A flexible approach to delivery will be taken, through blended learning. Classroom based modules will be provided on campus in Maynooth University or in Kimmage Development Studies Centre, as part of existing Maynooth University MA programmes.

For development modules, on-campus delivery of each 5 credit module involves 24 hours of class-contact. adopts a flexible approach to delivery of classroom based modules with some courses offered through 2 hour taught classes over 12 weeks (usually in the evenings) while others are offered through more concentrated blocks of time depending on timetable requirements and arrangements (typically 4.5 day blocks, delivered in a single week or over two weeks). Distance learning modules are structured to allow students to study at their own pace over a semester, with modules running in two cycles annually – October through January and February through May / June.

For the Kennedy Institute, classroom based modules which are normally 10 credits typically involve week long blocks (4.5 days). Each 1 ECTS module will typically involve at least 20 hours of work, including attending lectures, reading, writing coursework, preparing for exams and sitting exams.

For the dissertation module, master classes on research design /methods will be provided by lecturers, and lecturers will provide supervision sessions, which will amount to 36 hours. Students must also undertake approximately 500 hours of independent study when completing the dissertation.

Modules include

KD 615 Conflict, Development and Security (Online)

KD 601 Political Economy of Development (Online & Classroom)

KD 604 Introduction to Development Theory and Practice (Online & Classroom)

KD 602 Gender and Development (Online & Classroom)

KD 605 Adult Learning for Development (Online and Classroom)

KD 610 Facilitation for Transformation (Classroom)

KD 613 Health and Development (Classroom)

KD 614 Sustainable Livelihoods and Climate Change Adaptation (Online)

KD 616 Human Rights and Advocacy (Classroom)

KD 606 Research Methods

KD 607 Dissertation

MC 601 Mediation Theory + Conflict Analysis (Classroom)

MC 615 Mediation Knowledge and Practice (Classroom)

MC629 Resolving Protracted Conflict: Applied Concepts and Peace Process Theories (Classroom)

MC630 Post Conflict: Challenges of Implementing Peace Agreements (Classroom)

MC TBD Negotiation Theory and Skills (Classroom)

MC TBD Conflict Intervention, stabilisation and the comprehensive approach (Classroom)

MC 603 Research

MC 690 Minor Thesis

Career Options

This programme will give graduates knowledge, skills and competencies to work in:

-International Development and Peacebuilding NGOs

-Security Organisations

-International Organisations such as UN, EU and World Bank

-Government Agencies and Departments



Envisaged roles include:

-Monitoring and Evaluation Officer

-Conflict Analysis Advisors

-Military and security analysis

-Peacebuilding Policy Officer and Advocate

-Conflict Mediator

-Political Affairs Specialist

-Advisor on Gender and Security

-Advisor on Peacebuilding, Environment and Security

- Project Manager

among many others.

How To Apply

Online application only http://www.pac.ie/maynoothuniversity

PAC Code

MH54M / MH55M



The following documents should be forwarded to PAC, 1 Courthouse Square, Galway or uploaded to your online application form:

Certified copies of all official transcripts of results for all non-Maynooth University qualifications listed MUST accompany the application. Failure to do so will delay your application being processed. Non-Maynooth University students are asked to provide two academic references and a copy of birth certificate or valid passport.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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What is the 'Master of Architecture' all about?. This Master's programme focusing on "Architecture. Resilient and Sustainable Strategies" explores architecture from a . Read more

What is the 'Master of Architecture' all about?

This Master's programme focusing on "Architecture: Resilient and Sustainable Strategies" explores architecture from a research-by-designand design-by-research perspective. Students are educated and trained in a multicultural and international context. The programme combines an academic approach with creative- experimental approach. It is characterised by a fully-integrated design methodology, providing students with solid skills in the contemporary discipline of architectural design and research.

The Master of Architecture programme is organised at both of the faculty's campuses in Brussels and Ghent, though each campus offers a different orientation:

  • Campus Brussels - Architecture: Urban Projects, Urban Cultures
  • Campus Ghent - Architecture: Resilient and Sustainable Strategies

This is an initial Master's programme and can be followed on a full-time or part-time basis. The programme consists out of a minimum of four semesters.

International

The Faculty of Architecture takes its international dimension as the basis for its own quality assessment. It positions itself squarely within the international field of qualitative academic education. The faculty's international activities are extensive and diversified: student mobility and staff exchange on a European and intercontinental level, internationally oriented programmes for incoming students, international workshops and competitions, international research projects, international internships, development cooperation, etc.

The faculty continues to build on its tradition of academic integration of teaching and research to maintain and enhance its standard of quality and international standing.

The faculty works hard to consolidate and enrich its network of cooperative associations with professionals and universities all over the world and strives to leverage this international network for students' benefit. Its international dimension is a strong catalyst for creativity and an added value to students' future professional career.

Objectives 

"The intended academic quality, is the core of the program (architecture, urban planning), i.e. academically based 'professionalism'.

The broadening of the profile focuses on basic disciplines (architecture and urban planning), however without compromising the appropriate focus on the professional profile of the architect (in multiple forms).

In the profile of master, one should obtain extreme concentration and specificity (however, no specialisation).

On the one hand, the master focuses on the content and area-specific level of the bachelor phase, and on the other hand on the acquirement of access to the professional or doctoral field (advanced masters, PhD,...).

The core competences of the master are:

  • the intellectual development and broadening of the competences acquired in the bachelor;
  • a research attitude (for solutions)
  • the specific, disciplinary knowledge (architecture, urban planning)
  • the interdisciplinary skills (also as to recognize the limits of the own scientific discipline).

The master program should guarantee the acquirement of scientific depth. The offered frontier disciplines focus on the current state of research and development within the competence field. The technical qualification to be acquired, focuses on the high quality problem solving of complex tasks.

Curriculum framework campus Ghent: Architecture: Resilient and Sustainable Strategies

At our campus in Ghent, the International Master of Science in Architecture is concerned with the current theory and practice of architecture and sustainability.

The Brundtland report (United Nations, 1987) defines sustainable development as 'development which meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs'. The United Nations in 2005 referred to the 'interdependent and mutually reinforcing pillars' of sustainable development as economic development, social development and environmental protection.

Translating these three pillars for sustainable architecture, they would entail: providing access to high quality and healthy living and working environments for all, finding ways to create socially sustainable environments at different scales and a wise use of natural resources. Technical considerations, together with more conceptual or strategic issues, are dealt with in this two-year program about architecture and sustainability.

Central in the program of the International Master of Science in Architecture is a critical reflection about architecture and its social, cultural or environmental role for society.

Based on a highly interdisciplinary learning process of integrated research and 'research by design', students are expected to determine a theoretical stance on current issues with particular emphasis on how aspects of sustainability, universal design, urban ecology and energy-efficient technologies may contribute to the development of more sustainable human settlements.

Apart from the theoretical courses, the program includes 3 design studios (during one semester) and 1 final master dissertation studio (during one year). Each semester, there is a focus on a specific attitude, related to the main theme of the programme. All studios are organised through a pool of studio groups (Academic Design Offices and Design Studios) where the teaching staff provides a series of specific themes, methods and intervention areas for the students to develop an architectural project:

Themes sem 1

  • social sustainability and architecture
  • modest heritage and suitability
  • urban emergent processes
  • architectural concept, materiality and detail

Themes sem 2 (specific focus on the city of Ghent)

  • architectural concept, materiality and detail
  • limited resources, re-use and integration
  • urban emergent processes

Themes sem 3

  • architectural materiality and detail

Themes sem 4

  • social sustainability and architecture
  • modest heritage and suitability
  • urban emergent processes
  • architectural concept, materiality and detail
  • limited resources, re-use and integration

Career perspectives

Graduates are trained to lead multidisciplinary teams of engineers, interior architects, landscape architects and artists. In addition to working as independent (self-employed) architects, our graduates also work as professionals in government agencies and international design firms. Some graduates go on to roles as researchers serving local or international governance bodies, NGO's or other institutes.



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'Sustainability and Growth' (formerly. Resources, Development and Growth) is one of the specialized tracks of the Master's program in Economics. Read more
'Sustainability and Growth' (formerly: Resources, Development and Growth) is one of the specialized tracks of the Master's program in Economics.

Tilburg University is ranked #11 worldwide in Business and Economics (Times Higher Education, 2016).

Combine inclusive economic growth with a non-deteriorating environment:

Recently the OECD and Worldbank have launched a Green Growth strategy, which looks for ways to combine inclusive economic growth with a non-deteriorating environment. International development agencies, national governments, regional planners, but also internationally operating firms have to deal with the tension between development and growth on the one hand, and responsible use of resources on the other hand.

This has resulted in a wide variety of responses at the firm level, from foreign investments with the aim of securing resources to corporate social responsibility strategies. At the more aggregate level, analysts have been questioning the growth imperative (cf. Occupy Wall Street, Degrowth) - is growth obsolete?

Evaluate policies and firm strategies towards development and sustainable resource use:
In the 'Sustainability and Growth' track, you will learn how to analyze the sources of economic growth in a country or region, the barriers to growth and development they face, and the possible negative consequences of growth. You will be trained to evaluate policies and firm strategies towards development and sustainable resource use.

The track is closely linked to the Tilburg Sustainability Center, a multidisciplinary research and policy advise institute.

In these courses, you will learn how to evaluate people’s willingness to pay for environmental improvements, and how to measure the effectiveness of structural reform policies. You will write policy proposals regarding inequality and growth, educational policies, and innovation strategies. An example of a case you will be analyzing is investment in sustainable production methods in Vietnamese villages.

Career perspectives

This track is advised if you wish to pursue a career in international organizations (World Bank), national governments (Ministry of Development Cooperation, Ministry of the Environment), non-governmental organizations, or internationally oriented consultancy firms.

Examples of functions of recent graduates of this track:
•Consultant at the Inter-American Development Bank
•Credit Risk Analyst at FMO
•Consultant at The World Bank
•Senior Business Consultant at SimCorp
•Policy Advisor at CNV
•Strategy Consultant at The Boston Consulting Group
•Business Analyst at Argos Energies
•Consultant at Mercados EMI
•Business Consultant at First Consulting
•Analyst at PricewaterhouseCoopers PwC
•Junior Researcher at the University of Amsterdam
•Projectleader SEPA at IBC Business Consulting
•Business Analyst at PostNL
•Business Analyst Finance and Enterprise Performance at Accenture
•Consultant at Steward Redqueen
•Junior Consultant at ECORYS
•Financial-Economic Policy Advisor at the Ministry of Social Affairs and Employment
•Research Consultant at Digitalis Ltd

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